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The Department of Zoology at UBC is internationally renowned for its research in a variety of modern biological sciences, including ecology, evolution, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology and development. Read more
The Department of Zoology at UBC is internationally renowned for its research in a variety of modern biological sciences, including ecology, evolution, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology and development. The department has many strong interdisciplinary connections between different areas of research.

Zoology has a solid computing infrastructure of computer labs, compute servers, loaner equipment, colour and poster printers, and three computing support staff for knowledgable help.

Program Overview

Zoology encompasses over 50 principal investigators. Research interests of faculty members can be divided into several broad categories with substantial overlap of interest and collaboration among these arbitrary groups. The program vigorously promotes integrative research in biology and actively participates in several interdisciplinary programs, including the graduate programs in genetics, neuroscience, applied mathematics, and resource management.

Zoology offers a wide variety of research programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following areas: cell and developmental biology, community and population ecology, comparative physiology and biochemistry, neurobiology, and evolutionary biology.

In addition Zoology is actively involved in several interdisciplinary programs of instruction and research including:
- Fisheries Centre
- Centre for Biodiversity Research
- Centre for Applied Conservation Research (CACR), Faculty of Forestry
- Genetics Program
- ICORD (International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries)
- Institute of Applied Mathematics
- BC Cancer Research Centre
- Life Sciences Institute

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Zoology
- Subject: Life Sciences
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

Research focus

- Cell and Developmental Biology: molecular and genetic bases of development and cellular function
- Comparative Physiology: aspects of animal physiology from a comparative perspective, particularly those mechanisms underlying adaptive responses to environmental constraints
- Ecology: blends field ecology and natural history with ecological theory and conservation biology
- Evolution: encompasses evolutionary ecology, evolutionary genetics, conservation genetics, theory, and systematics

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The Master of Biological Science with a specialisation in Zoology will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, diversity and evolution of animals, as well as the interaction of animals with each other and the environment. Read more
The Master of Biological Science with a specialisation in Zoology will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, diversity and evolution of animals, as well as the interaction of animals with each other and the environment.

You will have the opportunity to study animals and their habitats, including Western Australia's exciting fauna. These habitats are diverse, and range from deserts through to temporary wetlands and rainforests and ultimately the sea. Zoologists discover the solutions to the problems presented by these habitats.

This specialisation integrates theory with practical (both field and laboratory) studies utilising many of the animals and ecosystems from the diverse state of Western Australia as examples.

The Faculty is well equipped for teaching through the School of Animal Biology and is supported by the world class research of the Centre for Evolutionary Biology, the Oceans Institute, and the Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management.

Zoologists are concerned with theoretical topics as diverse as molecular evolution, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, behaviour and community ecology, and with applied aspects that range from fauna conservation and pest management to stream ecology and water quality studies.

Why study Zoology at UWA?

1. Discover the vast diversity of animals in south-west Western Australia and beyond
2. Understand how these animals interact with each other and their surrounding environment.
3. Gain first-hand experience with these animals in both the laboratory and the field
4. Appreciate how climate change will affect this fauna along with the impact of other threats such as habitat destruction and fragmentation.
5. Learn how scientific knowledge can be used to develop and implement management strategies to combat these threats.

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate an advanced level of scientific knowledge from with their chosen major
*Critically analyse scientific theory, models, concepts and techniques from within their chosen major
*Critically read and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings from within their chosen major
*Apply analytic tools and methodologies to define and describe scientific problems from within their chosen major
*Communicate effectively and persuasively, both orally and in writing.

Award title

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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An 11 month (October - August) full-time course of research, culminating in the submission of a thesis and viva voce examination. Read more
An 11 month (October - August) full-time course of research, culminating in the submission of a thesis and viva voce examination. There are no taught components to this course but students do attend appropriate lectures and courses such as those involving transferable skills training.

The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to give students with relevant experience at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and

- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blzompbsc

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical
- understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The Principal Supervisor’s role is to give advice, encouragement and constructive criticism to research students. Principal Supervisors and students should meet every 1-2 weeks, when the student is working in Cambridge.

Supervisors will:

- Assist the student in drawing up a research topic and a viable written research timetable, preferably in the initial meetings with the student.
- Ensure that the student is aware of relevant lectures and seminars in the field.
- Ensure that the student is aware of relevant training programmes and opportunities (including the Department's Graduate Training Programme) and discuss transferable and teaching skills the student may benefit from and make provision for appropriate training in these areas.
- Ensure that the student is aware of the range of facilities available for research and learning at the University of Cambridge.
- Introduce the student to other senior and graduate members working in a similar area.
- Assist the student in preparing research trips and archival visits within the UK and/or abroad.
- Encourage the student to keep systematic records of the research, including back-up copies of electronically-stored material.
- Discuss the research in person and offer constructive written comments and criticism.
- Consistently monitor progress and time management.
- Provide the student with adequate indication of his or her progress and challenges still to be met.
- Make termly and annual reports on the student’s progress using the Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System (CGSRS).
- Encourage the student to present his or her work at appropriate internal and external conferences, seminars and workshops.
- Advise on ethical issues, such as plagiarism.
- Advise on the writing up and presentation of the dissertation.
- Assist the student's applications for funding by the writing of letters of reference.
- Give the student guidance on the publication of their work.

Students receive formal feedback from two academic advisors following submission of a Feasibility Report (after 1 month), and a Progress Report (after 5 months). Feedback is also provided by the supervisor via termly supervision reports.

Assessment

You will be expected to submit a thesis (20,000 words excluding tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices) after 11 months, followed by a viva voce examination.

Continuing

Students completing the MPhil cannot automatically continue to PhD - it is a separate course that must be applied for in the normal way.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. Read more
Biodiversity, evolution and conservation are of growing importance due to climate change, extinction, and habitat destruction. This new research-led programme is run in collaboration with the Institute of Zoology and the Natural History Museum, providing a rigorous training and unparalleled opportunities across the full breadth of pure and applied research in evolutionary, ecological, and conservation science.

Degree information

Taught modules will focus on cutting-edge quantitative tools in ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics, systematics, palaeobiology, conservation, biogeography and environmental biology. Seminars, journal clubs and the two research projects will provide students with diverse opportunities for experience at UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are no optional modules for this programme. The programme consists of three core taught modules (60 credits) and two 16-week research projects (120 credits).

Core modules
-Research Skills (15 credits)
-Current Topics in Biodiversity, Evolution & Conservation Research (15 credits)
-Analytical Tools in Biodiversity, Evolutionary and Conservation Research (30 credits)

Dissertation/report
All students undertake two 16-week research projects, which each culminate in a written dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, presentations, assigned papers, as well as data analysis and interpretation. The seminar series includes mandatory seminars at UCL, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology (Zoological Society of London). Assessment is through essays, project reports, presentations and practicals. The two research projects are assessed by dissertation, and poster or oral presentation.

Careers

This programme offers students a strong foundation with which to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Intern, ZSL Institute of Zoology
-PhD in Evolutionary Biology, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL)
-PhD Researcher (Evolutionary Biology), University of Edinburgh a

Employability
This programme provides students with a strong foundation to pursue careers in academic research, environmental policy and management, applied conservation, public health, or scientific journalism.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is an innovative collaboration between three globally renowned organisations: UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment & Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, the Natural History Museum and the Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London.

By consolidating research expertise across these three organisations, students will gain a unique and exceptionally broad understanding of ties among different fields of research relating to the generation and conservation of biodiversity.

The MRes offers diverse research opportunities; these include the possibility of engaging actively in fundamental and applied research and participating in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (based at the Natural History Museum) or the EDGE of Existence programme (based at the Zoological Society of London).

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This qualification gives you the skills to undertake excellent research. You will learn general research skills (project planning, statistics, field & lab techniques) as well as skills specific to your research project. Read more
This qualification gives you the skills to undertake excellent research. You will learn general research skills (project planning, statistics, field & lab techniques) as well as skills specific to your research project. Alongside this training, you will undertake post-graduate level research under the supervision of an expert in the institute.

With over 200 members of staff you will have a lot of flexibility in the area of research you choose to study. The breadth of expertise in the institute means that you can undertake research in any one of several specialisations including, zoology, plant breeding, microbiology, bioinformatics, animal science, equine or marine life & ecology. Visit our Research Groups page to find the area that matches your interests: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/ibers/research/research-groups/

Every step of our research is carried out with the indispensable help of postgraduate students. No matter which area of biology you specialise in, you will be working alongside some of the world’s biggest names in their respective fields.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/biosciences-masters-research/

Course detail

Students on the MRes will be uniquely placed for a bioscience research career in the public or private sector. The course makes an ideal stepping-stone for those considering PhD research and offers opportunity to explore your interest in the biosciences in depth.

This innovative course provides high quality, interdisciplinary research training in the skills you will need during your individual Research Dissertation. The key feature here is that you are able to explore an area of Bio Science that fascinates you with personalised support and supervision. The course is flexible to your interests and focused on your chosen research specialism.

Studying at Aberystwyth University

- What are the facilities like?

We have excellent research facilities including aquariums (marine, freshwater, tropical), a bioinformatics hub, ion-torrent sequencers, and extensive glass house facilities. We operate several farms and own significant tracts of natural woodland. Our coastal location close to several nature reserves & national parks offers unique opportunities for a broad range of bioscience research.

- What are the support networks like?

All postgraduate students in IBERS have a personal tutor, a point of contact within the department to which students can turn to discuss personal or domestic concerns that impact on their studies. The personal tutor is a different person from their dissertation supervisor

- Why should I study an MRes in Bio Science at Aberystwyth University?

The Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) combines world leading research in areas such as zoology, grassland science, biochemistry, animal science, marine biology, microbiology, plant biology and ecology with industry standard training. As a postgraduate research student at Aberystwyth you benefit from world leading research and teaching facilities, and supervision all in a safe, friendly and vibrant coastal town in a beautiful location on the West coast of Wales. These assets make Aberystwyth an excellent choice for students looking to combine lifestyle choice with an internationally recognised degree from a leading institute.

Format

The modules in the programme provide a fundamental basis for understanding and working in biological research. Your knowledge will be developed and you will be intellectually challenged by research within your own area of specialism – dependent on your choice of research project. Key skills, particularly those of communication, research, IT and problem solving, will be developed through formative (e.g. discussion with and feedback from your research supervisor) as well as assessed coursework programmes which will be accompanied by detailed feedback on performance.

Assessment

The programme comprises 180 credits. There are 60 credits of taught modules completed during Semester 1 and Semester 2. A research dissertation (120 credits) is carried out throughout the year.

Employability

This course suits students with an undergraduate degree in any bioscience field who wish to develop their knowledge and research skills through working with experts in IBERS. It is suitable for students who do not want to commit to 3 years of PhD research or for those who would like to develop their research skills and take time to find their ideal research focus first. It is also suitable for students that would like to combine research with a taught element of a postgraduate taught course. On completion of the degree scheme, students will be able to:

· Design, apply and analyse various research/study techniques.
· Plan, conduct, and report on investigations, including the use of secondary data.
· Collect and record information or data in the library, laboratory or field, summarizing it using appropriate qualitative and/or quantitative techniques.
· Conceive, plan and undertake field and/or laboratory investigations in a responsible, ethical and safe manner, paying due attention to risk assessment, legislation concerning experimental animal use, relevant health and safety regulations, other legal requirements and sensitivity to the impact of investigations on the environment and stakeholders.
· Communicate effectively with individuals and organisations in a range of scenarios.
· Write for a range of audiences including academics and the wider public.
· Apply appropriate management and experimental techniques to a range of situations.

An MRes graduate would be able to demonstrate experience and capabilities such as;

· Receiving and responding to a variety of sources of information: textual, numerical, verbal, graphical;
· Communicating about their subject appropriately
· Citing and referencing work in an appropriate manner;
· Sample selection; recording and analysing data in the field and/or the laboratory; validity, accuracy, calibration, precision, repeatability and uncertainty during collection;
· Preparing, processing, interpreting and presenting data, using appropriate qualitative and quantitative techniques, statistical programmes, spreadsheets and programs for presenting data visually;
· Solving problems by a variety of methods including the use of computers;
· Using the internet and other electronic sources critically as a means of communication and a source of information.
· Developing the skills necessary for self-managed and lifelong learning (eg working independently, time management and organisation skills);
· Identifying and working towards targets for personal, academic and career development;
· Developing an adaptable, flexible, and effective approach to study and work.

Find out how to apply https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/
Information on fees is found here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/fees-finance/non-eu/taught/ and https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/fees-finance/uk-eu/taught/

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[General Information]]. Applied Animal Biology offers opportunities for advanced study and research leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in animal physiology, behaviour, welfare, and management of livestock, aquaculture, and wildlife species. Read more
[General Information]]
Applied Animal Biology offers opportunities for advanced study and research leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in animal physiology, behaviour, welfare, and management of livestock, aquaculture, and wildlife species. Graduate training in applied animal biology normally involves a combination of courses in both basic and applied sciences, with research leading to a thesis or dissertation. Students are expected to publish their research results in relevant leading international refereed journals. Coursework selected in consultation with the student's supervisory committee includes graduate courses in areas relevant to each student's research.

The program is enriched through collaboration with colleagues in other UBC graduate programs such as Zoology, and with agencies such as Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

On-campus teaching and research facilities are located in the MacMillan Building. Off-campus research facilities available to students include: the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre in Agassiz; shared research facilities at Fisheries and Oceans Canada at West Vancouver; and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Applied Animal Biology
- Subject: Agriculture and Forestry
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Applied Animal Biology is intended for students who want to study and/or work with animals. It provides students with fundamentals of animal behaviour, animal physiology and related fields as applied to farm, companion and other animals. It also exposes students to the role of animals in human society and the ethical, environmental and other issues that arise. It offers training in research skills needed for graduate work, and (with appropriate selection of courses) prepares students for admission to veterinary and human medicine. Students have various options to gain practical experience on farms and in laboratories, animal shelters and wildlife rehabilitation centres.

Potential career paths include veterinary medicine, human medicine, biomedical research, animal ecology, sustainable aquaculture, animal training, animal nutrition, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife conservation, agricultural extension and animal welfare.

Facilities

On-campus facilities include laboratories in the MacMillan Building. Off-campus research facilities available to students include: the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre in Agassiz; shared research facilities at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans at West Vancouver; Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and the Agassiz Poultry Centre, which includes unique poultry and quail stocks for biomedical and genetic research. Field research facilities for studies in wildlife productivity are also available.

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The Department has strong collaborative ties, both teaching and research, with other departments on campus, including Zoology, Agricultural Sciences Agroecolgy, Forestry, Chemistry, Biodiversity Research Centre, Microbiology, Biotechnology Laboratory, Earth & Ocean Sciences, and Geography. Read more
The Department has strong collaborative ties, both teaching and research, with other departments on campus, including Zoology, Agricultural Sciences Agroecolgy, Forestry, Chemistry, Biodiversity Research Centre, Microbiology, Biotechnology Laboratory, Earth & Ocean Sciences, and Geography.

MSc degree The M.Sc. degree is usually a student’s first serious exercise in research and prepares the student for a research or a teaching career. In this programme the student is expected to carry out a research project, generally chosen and designed by the research supervisor. The project should not be open-ended, should have sharply defined goals, and should be of limited duration (2-3 years) and designed to give research experience towards solving a problem.

Admission:

There are three stages to admission to the Botany Graduate Program:
1. review by the Botany Admissions Committee,
2. acceptance by a supervisor,
3. final approval and offer of admission from the UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies (Graduate Studies).
The Faculty of Graduate Studies sets the minimum requirements for admission to any graduate program at UBC.
Given that a student meets these minimum requirements, then the biggest hurdle to acceptance is finding an appropriate supervisor.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Botany
- Subject: Science
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

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The Neuroscience program is administered by the Neuroscience Advisory Committee which is responsible to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Read more

Program Overview

The Neuroscience program is administered by the Neuroscience Advisory Committee which is responsible to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. The Neuroscience program is flexible and is intended to accommodate the diverse background of students wishing to enter it, and also takes into account the broad nature of neuroscience research. The program accepts applicants with undergraduate majors in a variety of disciplines including but not restricted to biology, biochemistry, computer sciences, engineering, mathematics, neurosciences, pharmacology, physics, physiology, psychology, and zoology. Applicants who are not graduates of a Canadian or American university are required to take the Graduate Records Examination (GRE); students whose first language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Graduates with a professional degree (M.D., D.M.D., D.V.M.) may also be accepted into the program.

M.Sc. Program

A Master's student must spend at least one year, and will normally spend two years, in full-time study at the University. In the first year, the student takes the required course work and begins research under the Supervisor's direction. The student's Supervisory Committee gives ongoing advice and guidance, and may recommend further course work. By the start of the second year, a provisional thesis research proposal should be approved by the Supervisory Committee, while the student continues research for the thesis. Following submission of the written thesis and a successful oral defense, the student is eligible for graduation.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Neuroscience
- Subject: Life Sciences
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Medicine

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Oceanographers investigate both fundamental and applied problems relating to the physics, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and geology of the sea, often working across traditional academic disciplines. Read more

Program Overview

Oceanographers investigate both fundamental and applied problems relating to the physics, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and geology of the sea, often working across traditional academic disciplines. Research carried out both independently and in collaboration with federal government laboratories occurs in many different oceanographic regimes, including coastal BC fjords, the inland sea of the Strait of Georgia, open ocean regions of the Subarctic Pacific, and many other locations, including the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans. The types of problems that can be studied include fundamental questions about the flow of stratified fluids at scales ranging from tens of meters to thousands of kilometers, applied research in estuaries, coastal, and deep-ocean processes, general ocean circulation and climate change issues, marine chemistry, geochemistry, and biogeochemistry, natural product chemistry, marine viruses, fisheries oceanography, plankton ecology and physiology, and primary production of the sea. The Department is well equipped to carry out research in the field (using either its own boat or larger vessels in the oceanographic fleet), at the laboratory bench, and in the numerical heart of a computer. Most problems involve aspects of all three.

Students in Oceanography may select courses, depending on their interest, from the following areas of specialization:
- biological oceanography
- marine chemistry and geochemistry
- physical oceanography and atmospheric sciences

Students are encouraged to broaden their knowledge by taking courses outside their area of specialization. Courses related to Oceanography are also offered in the Departments of Botany, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Geography, Physics and Astronomy, and Zoology.

Oceanography students normally begin their studies in September but may sometimes arrange to start their thesis/dissertation work in the summer before their first Winter Session. A student wishing to do graduate work in Oceanography should first discuss the proposed program with appropriate faculty in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Oceanography
- Subject: Science
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more
The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

-Anatomy
-Biochemistry
-Bioengineering
-Botany
-Chemistry
-Clothing and Textile Sciences
-Cognitive Science
-Computational Modelling
-Computer Science
-Consumer Food Science
-Design for Technology (No new enrolments)
-Ecology
-Economics
-Electronics
-Energy Studies
-Environmental Management
-Environmental Science
-Food Science
-Genetics
-Geographic Information Systems
-Geography
-Geology
-Geophysics
-Human Nutrition
-Immunology
-Information Science
-Marine Science
-Mathematics
-Microbiology
-Neuroscience
-Pharmacology
-Physics
-Physiology
-Plant Biotechnology
-Psychology
-Statistics
-Surveying
-Toxicology
-Wildlife Management
-Zoology

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned. A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.
A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree. A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study

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The Master of Biotechnology gives you a core competency in advanced molecular biotechnology approaches including molecular biology, protein biochemistry, proteomics and applied microbiology. Read more

Overview

The Master of Biotechnology gives you a core competency in advanced molecular biotechnology approaches including molecular biology, protein biochemistry, proteomics and applied microbiology. In addition it offers you advanced skills in critical thinking, experimental design and writing for peer-reviewed scientific literature.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-biotechnology

Key benefits

- Gives you a strong interdisciplinary and practical focus reflective of the needs of the marketplace
- Draws on expertise from the Departments of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Biological Sciences, Computing and Statistics
Incorporates Macquarie University’s expertise in proteomics

Suitable for

Those already working in or wanting to advance in the biotechnology
area, and those wanting to gain an understanding of a multidisciplinary
approach to biotechnology practice and research.

English language requirements

IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 2 year program
Bachelor degree in any discipline;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and work experience in a relevant area at a senior level and evidence of active engagement in science.

- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and more than 5 years work experience in a relevant area;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and Graduate Certificate in a relevant discipline.

- 1 year program
Honours, Graduate Diploma, Masters (coursework), or Higher Degree Research in a relevant discipline;
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline and relevant work experience.

- Relevant disciplines
Botany, Ecology and Evolution, Marine Science, Zoology, Forestry Studies, Land, Parks and Wildlife Management.

- Relevant areas
Scientific officer, advisor, consultant or researcher in such areas as biological research, environmental management, wildlife management, zoos and botanical gardens, natural history museums, ecological consulting, forestry, fisheries, ecological restoration and conservation policy (government or non-government organisations).

Careers

- Career Opportunities
As an industry, biotechnology is expanding rapidly. This expansion requires a workforce of graduates that have scientific and technical skills, as well as skills in problem solving, teamwork and critical and analytical thinking.

Examples of areas where biotechnology is applied include pharmaceutical discovery and production, exploiting biodiversity for new bioactive compounds, exploring alternative energy sources and developing improved crop varieties for sustainable food production.

- Employers
Graduates in biotechnology continue on to a diverse range of positions at institutions ranging from small biotechnology companies to large pharmaceutical concerns and universities. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD programs in Australia, the US and Europe, staff positions at local biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical production companies in India and Europe, and research positions in universities in the Asia-Pacific region.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-biotechnology

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St Andrews is Scotland’s leading centre for postgraduate research and training in the heritage sector and the MGS Postgraduate Diploma/MLitt provides Scotland’s pre-eminent museum studies programme. Read more
St Andrews is Scotland’s leading centre for postgraduate research and training in the heritage sector and the MGS Postgraduate Diploma/MLitt provides Scotland’s pre-eminent museum studies programme. The one-year Postgraduate Diploma is available as stand-alone vocational training or there is an option to present a dissertation on an approved topic for an MLitt degree. These programmes have attracted funding for students from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland and various English and Northern Irish Local Education Authorities as well as the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

The Museum and Gallery Studies programmes prepare you for employment in museums, principally as curators. We ensure that the training is broad, covering all types of museums, galleries and other heritage facilities. The main focus of the training is curatorial work, but curators also need a proper understanding of the work of all their colleagues since, especially in small museums, the ‘curator’ may have to tackle a very wide range of duties. Hence, the principles of conservation, museum education, exhibition planning and design, and various management topics are also included. Two taught modules on the theory and practice of museums provide knowledge of museum systems and practices and understanding of issues relevant to today’s museums. These are complemented by project work, including individual museum tasks and the preparation, in a team, of a public exhibition, which enables you to develop relevant practical skills.

The extensive University Museum Collections at St Andrews are particularly suitable for curatorial training and give the programme a unique character. The Collections include over 100,000 museum items in a wide range of subject areas, from art to zoology, and these collections and the staff who look after them are actively involved in the Museum and Gallery Studies teaching programme. Close to the School of Art History is the Museum of the University of St Andrews (MUSA), where most of the Museum and Galleries Studies teaching takes place. MUSA includes four display galleries on the ground floor, and on the first floor is a ‘Learning Loft’ for education and a Viewing Terrace. Students on the Museum and Gallery Studies Art History programme prepare an exhibition in the Gateway Galleries and the St Andrews Museum. Other facilities include extensive library holdings in museum studies, access to computers, and a dedicated work and study area with computers and other appropriate equipment.

St Andrews museum training benefits enormously from the willing participation of the Scottish museum profession. Museums Galleries Scotland and its member museums of all shapes and sizes generously provide visiting lecturers and host class visits and individual student placements. In return, St Andrews has developed several initiatives to extend its training beyond the University and into the museum community.

A part-time version of the Postgraduate Diploma and MLitt, taught through residential schools and work-based projects, is aimed in particular at people already working in museums. Participants are welcomed from Scotland, the rest of the UK and EU. The Museum and Gallery Studies teaching staff are experienced museum curators who continue to be involved directly in museum work.

Teaching methods

Students take three compulsory 40-credit modules during the two semesters of coursework. The taught courses are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, practical sessions and visits to museums and galleries. A programme of project work, based on the University Collections or with local museums and galleries, complements the taught element. This incorporates problem-based learning and enables students to develop relevant practical skills and to experience the dynamics of teamwork. There are short taught sessions related to the exhibition element of the project work and regular formal meetings. There is also a series of research methods classes to help prepare for the dissertation element.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework. Students complete three assignments per module in a variety of formats including an essay, a documentation and database project, an object study, an exhibition or website review, a lesson plan and a management report. The dissertation module during the summer semester provides the opportunity to undertake an independent research project under the supervision of an academic member of staff.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in Art History, History of Photography or Museum and Gallery Studies provides an excellent foundation for a career in the art or museum world.

The Museum and Gallery Studies course provides a theoretical foundation combined with hands-on, practical and transferable experience. Recent graduates have gone on to work for a range of institutions, from the Scottish Light House Museum to the National Museums of Scotland, the Victoria and Albert Museum to the Detroit Institute of Arts, the McManus Galleries in Dundee to Zhejiang University Museum of Art & Archaeology, and auctioneers Lyon and Turnbull, and Bonham’s, among many others. Two year-long traineeships within University Collections are open uniquely to Museum and Gallery Studies graduates, as is the four to five month David Nicholls Curatorial Internship at the South Georgia Museum in Antarctica.

Recent postgraduates in Art History and History of Photography are employed in universities and archives, museums and galleries, auction houses, radio stations, publishing houses and magazines and are also working in journalism, teaching, and retail.

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