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Masters Degrees (Youth Development)

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more

About the course

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

Working with and for young people in the Global South offers an exciting career full of challenges and rewards. This MA provides a varied programme with a global perspective that equips students for roles at senior levels in international development organisations, government ministries and global agencies.

The programme equips you with:

The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare you for employment, further study and civic engagement.

Course Content

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Compulsory Modules:

International Development, Childhood and Youth
Young Lives in the Global South
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Researching Children, Childhood and Youth
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

Sociology of Youth and Youth Work
Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work
Social Policy
Anthropology of Education and Learning
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Psychological Development
Applied Learning (via placement)

Special Features

High value placements: Students may opt for the ‘Applied Learning’ module which involves a short placement (one or two days a week for 10 weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community work, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Pioneering research: In both core and specialist option modules, students will be exposed to innovative high profile research in the field of children, youth and international development.

Eramus Exchange: An Erasmus agreement exists between the Brunel University’s MA in Children, Youth and International Development, and the MPhil in Childhood Studies at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The exchange programme has two places for students from the MA Children, Youth and International Development. The exchange period is the second term / semester (approximately January to May). Erasmus students do not pay tuition fees at NOSEB, and are entitled to an Erasmus grant (€375/month) to cover any additional costs.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The MA also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this - through tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and all students are assigned to a tutorial group. Regular tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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Summary. This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. Read more

Summary

This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. The programme has three main aims: 1. The development of effective professional practitioners in community youth work. 2. The delivery of a postgraduate programme that will challenge, develop and engage critically in issues that relate to the field of community youth work through informed and innovative methods of teaching and learning. 3. To enhance the professional skills and employability of community youth workers.

About

The programme will initially be studied in part-time mode. This is the second revalidation of this programme offering potential students a unique opportunity to gain a professional qualification, validated by the North South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) and an academic award of the University of Ulster. Students will follow six modules for the postgraduate diploma in community youth work for the professional endorsement by the NSETS leading, if desired, to the award by dissertation of a MSc in Community Youth Work. Students will be required to have the postgraduate diploma before embarking on to the Masters level. The modules are arranged to meet the criteria set out by NSETS and to meet the needs of students training to become professional workers. All students will follow a placement module which is supervised by a University tutor and a practice teacher. The placement is an opportunity for CYW staff to assess at first hand the development of professional practice based on the monitoring student skills through reflective practice. The course maintains both academic and professional coherence through the use of modules that underpin fundamental concepts of community youth work, i.e. the context of youth. The module has been specifically designed to facilitate the needs of a postgraduate programme and will be taught exclusively for this cohort. Past experience suggests that it is important to build a strong collegial group early on in the programme. While it is envisaged that other modules will be taught alongside the undergraduate course the first module is explicitly designed to create a sense of belonging for the new intake.. This is followed by more applied modules, i.e. principles and practice of youth work; communities in focus and the in-situ/exigency placements at the beginning of year. After the placement students will follow the principles and practice of youth work: leadership, management and supervision module preparing them for management roles in youth work and the critical thinking and professional development module to consolidate their learning and to focus on areas that they may wish to research or develop further including inter-professional collaboration. The modules have been designed to facilitate the underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become a professional community youth worker. The modules are: (i) THE CONTEXT OF YOUTH WORK; (ii) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; (iii) COMMUNITIES IN FOCUS; (iv) IN-SITU AND EX-AGENCY REFLECTIVE PLACEMENTS; (v) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; SUPERVISION, LEARDERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT; (vi) CRITICAL THINKING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Award of postgraduate diploma in community youth work with professional endorsement; (i) DISSERTATION Award of MSc in Community Youth Work.

Work placement / study abroad

This assessed practice period placement(s) focuses on youth and community work in the context of an agency. Students will build on learning from the taught modules and their own experience. They will use the placement to reflect and evaluate their practice in four disparate but inter-related areas: 1. The development of self; 2. Understanding individuals; 3. The role and function of the group; 4. The agency context within a given community. The students will therefore be offered opportunities to experience; a. Informal education work with young people and adults, individually and in groups, b. Youth service and community agencies, c. Different types of youth and community work provision. d. A reflective and evaluatory experience with supervisory support by a professionally qualified in-situ practice teacher.

Students are expected to: develop appropriate programmes of social education within the constraints of the agency. - develop their 'helping' and 'enabling' skills. - gain experience in terms of the management of practice. - gain an understanding of a specialist agency which focuses on a particular target group (ex-agency placement). - link the practice experiences with theoretical concepts. - record and evaluate their work.

Professional recognition

Endorsed by the North/South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) (JNC Recognised) for the purpose of professional qualification.

Career options

Due to the nature of this postgraduate programme being initially about professional endorsement the career opportunities for students is already set, i.e. they are in employment. The development of a new module, ‘Critical thinking and professional development’ is an indication of the staff teams belief in enhancing the understanding of continuing professional development through evidence- based practice and the development of critical thinking. The students on the programme will benefit from reflecting on their profession and indeed looking at how it is viewed in relation to other professions. One can assume, if past history about the course is anything to go on, that those who gain the PGD in CYW will be highly skilled, knowledgeable and highly employable. For others the course itself if part of their professional development as many students have been working the in the field without professional training.



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This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to study the theoretical and practical dimensions of adult, community and youth development. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge to work alongside people in communities to initiate sustainable social change.

Why this programme

◾You will discover ways in which you can help people realise their potential and work together for a fairer, healthier and happier world.
◾Upon successful completion of the PgDip, you will be awarded a professional qualification accredited by the Community Learning and Development Standards Council in Scotland.
◾This qualification will enable you to work in the field of community learning and development, including community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration.
◾You will have the opportunity to participate in a network of community development projects. Project leads contribute to the taught aspects of the programme and also provide you with placement opportunities.
◾Our students come from a wide range of professional, academic and cultural backgrounds and all bring with them a curiosity about how social justice can be developed by people working together for change.

Programme Structure

You will take two core and two optional courses from a specialist pathway. There is a large practical element either in the form of a placement or as part of your current workplace. Throughout the programme there is emphasis on participative and experiential learning. For the MEd you will also undertake an in-depth supervised research project, on a related topic of your choosing.

Core courses
◾Practice and policy inquiry
◾Theoretical frameworks for practice

Optional courses

Adult education
◾Curriculum development in adult education
◾The psychology of adult learning

Community development
◾Educational approaches to community learning & development
◾Empowerment & social change

Youth work
◾Perspectives in youth & young adulthood
◾Working with youth: Education & learning for change

Career prospects

You will have many employment opportunities open to you in the areas of community development work, youth work, health, housing and social and economic regeneration. With an accredited CLD Standards Council for Scotland qualification, you will have the opportunity to work for local authorities, the voluntary sector and further and higher education institutions.

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Take your social policy study to the next level. Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy. What Is It Like?. Read more

Take your social policy study to the next level

Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy.

What Is It Like?

If you are fascinated by how and why power, resources and opportunities are distributed within society, then Massey’s MA Social Policy (MA(SocPol)) is for you.

You will gain an understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that influence the development, implementation and evaluation of social policy in Aotearoa New Zealand.

You will study law, politics, and the roles of central and local government in a democratic society. This will lead to insights into the relationship between the state, political parties, the judiciary, the legal system, and the public in shaping legislation and developing policy.

Careers

Your MA (SocPol) will give you the knowledge and competencies you need in your career as a policy analyst and researcher. You will learn a range of intellectual and practical skills that will stand you in good stead in the job market.

This qualification opens up a world of opportunity to be involved in influencing a broad number of social issue outcomes (e.g healthy housing, youth development, Maori wellbeing, health promotion, gender analysis of policy), not only from a Government-down position, but also from an individual-, community- and society-up perspective.

You will learn to apply your critical social policy analysis skills to a number of decision-making scenarios to result in better social outcomes. This decision-making can take many forms including a policy, a project plan, submission, or even the strategic direction of an organisation.

You could work in areas such as:

  • Research
  • Communications
  • Project management
  • Governance
  • Charitable trusts
  • Social marketing
  • Journalism (critical analysis of social issues)
  • Advocacy
  • Teaching and lecturing
  • Policy analysis - public, private and third sector (NGOs, PPPs, not-for-profit, voluntary and charity organisations)
  • Youth development
  • Community development
  • Politics
  • Government agencies - local, regional and central
  • NGOs - trusts etc (housing, Maori land trusts, health service providers, disability advocacy and support, youth development).


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The MA in Youth work offers both a professional qualifying route for those looking to gain a professional qualification in Youth Work and an academic route for those seeking CPD opportunities. Read more
The MA in Youth work offers both a professional qualifying route for those looking to gain a professional qualification in Youth Work and an academic route for those seeking CPD opportunities.

The MA is underpinned by a key set of principles and values and also addresses contemporary issues affecting work with Young People in society.

Course Overview

The MA Youth Work offers both a professional qualification in Youth Work and opportunities for CPD. The programme can be undertaken through the medium of Welsh and bilingually.

It is run on a flexible, part-time bases (twilight sessions and Saturdays); as well as the opportunity to study the non-qualifying route on a full or part time bases via flexible and distributed learning.

Youth Work is a profession with a clearly stated purpose, values, and principles. The key purpose of Youth Work in the United Kingdom is to:

‘Enable young people to develop holistically, working with them to facilitate their personal, social and educational development, to enable them to develop their voice, influence and place in society and to reach their full potential’

This statement refers to the holistic development of young people, recognising that personal, social and educational development can also include, for example, physical, political and spiritual development (LSIS, 2012).

Youth Work regards itself as rare among wider services for young people; being driven by a clear set of agreed values, these values are summarised in the National Occupational Standards for Youth Work and include:
-Participation and active involvement
-Equity, diversity and inclusion:
-Partnership with young people and others
-Personal, social and political development

The Programme is committed to a vision of Youth Work clearly based upon these principles, including the voluntary engagement of young people being fundamental to the process of Youth Work.

Additionally a form of Youth Work which empowers young people and adopts a stance where they are partners in the process of learning. The programme team are committed to teaching a form of Youth Work which has at its core the importance of providing safe environments for young people and of supporting the safety as well as their development and well-being. Fundamental to the MA in Youth Work are also the principles of equality and inclusion.

Modules

-Researching and Reflecting upon Youth and Community Practice
-Social Education
-Professional Practice
-Sustainable Communities
-Outreach and Detached Youth Work
-Adolescent Psychology
-Supervision and support skills

Key Features

-The MA Youth Work offers both a professional qualification in Youth Work and opportunities for CDD
-The programme can be undertaken bilingually.
-Fieldwork opportunities offering links to employment.
-Professionally Qualified staff who are research active.
-Opportunities to progress to PhD

Assessment

-Field Work Portfolios
-Essays
-Seminar Presentations
-Online discussions

Career Opportunities

-Youth and Community Worker
-Community Worker
-Learning Support Worker
-Health Based Youth Worker
-Young people’s Participation Worker
-Youth Justice
-Voluntary Sector

Professional Accreditations

The programme is a professionally endorsed programme by the Education and Training Standards for Wales.

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Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Read more
Youth and community work is a unique and value-based practice that seeks to support and foster the development of young people and the wider community to enable all to reach their full potential. Underpinned by strong values of social justice Youth and Community Workers seek to critically analyse the social world and nurture the development of others through collaborative and creative practice leading to social change.

The main aim of the MA in Youth and Community Work with JNC professional qualification is to develop skilled, innovative and reflective practitioners, who are able to engage and develop positive relationships within communities, which lead to education and discovery. Through practice workers will demonstrate a clear commitment to promoting participation and empowerment, equality, partnership working and to the personal, social and political development of those involved.

This new MA Youth and Community Work programme has been designed in partnership with service users and leading professionals employed in the field. This collaboration ensures teaching is current and reflective of today’s youth and community work agenda preparing you effectively for a successful career.


Curriculum

This course is delivered through a full-time (1 year) or part time (2 years) route and will provide you with a blend of academic and practice-based learning to develop both your theoretical understanding and experience through two professional practice placements. Students will build a solid foundation in youth and community work through an exploration of the theoretical frameworks of informal education and community development along with advanced studies examining key youth and community work methods and settings, contemporary issues, youth development, welfare and social policy.
- Youth Work Theory and Practice (20 Credits)
- Practice Placement 1: Linked to Youth Work Theory and Practice, Community Empowerment for Social Change (20 Credits)
- Critical Themes and Issues Influencing Contemporary Practice (20 Credits)
- Managing Youth and Community Work (10 Credits)
- Advanced Research Seminars (20 Credits)
- Dissertation Preparation and Research Methods (10 Credits)
- Practice Placement 2 (20 Credits)
- Dissertation (60 Credits)

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This award includes a professional qualification validated by the National Youth Agency and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) of Youth Leaders and Community Work. Read more
This award includes a professional qualification validated by the National Youth Agency and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) of Youth Leaders and Community Work. This is conferred at Postgraduate Diploma level (120 credits at level 7) on successful completion of the relevant taught units and placements (but we encourage students to register for full MA where possible). The PgDip/MA is aimed at graduates with relevant experience, particularly in working with young people/communities, and with a commitment to community/social education, youth development, and the possibilities of social justice and change. The course is designed to prepare the student for management and leadership roles in both voluntary and statutory organisations.

The award teaching, learning and assessment strategies will reflect the values, ethical principles and codes of practice that underpin the profession. They are based on a framework of quality drawn from national guidelines (QAA Youth and Community Work Benchmark Statement) and institutional strategies (The Manchester Metropolitan University’s Mission Statement and Learning and Teaching Strategy), as well as National Standards set by the NYA.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

Features and benefits of the course

-Masters level continuing professional development tailored for students own context, priorities and interests, drawing on multi/interdisciplinary perspectives
-Professional development and recognition
-Contemporary partnership contexts fully explored
-Positive commitment to exploring issues of equality and diversity in an urban context
-Participation in a large, dynamic and forward-thinking taught post graduate community

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This programme provides you with the opportunity to study established and emerging theoretical dimensions of adult education, community development and youth studies. Read more

This programme provides you with the opportunity to study established and emerging theoretical dimensions of adult education, community development and youth studies. You will gain in-depth knowledge in a specialism of your choosing, as well as a solid foundation in educational and social research.

Why this programme

  • The programme provides you with the key attributes for professions in adult education, community development and youth work, developing both in-depth knowledge and breadth.
  • You will develop analytic and research skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base, and a practical understanding of the settings in which adult education, community development and youth work take place.
  • You will be benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the School of Education, who have a breadth of teaching and research experience in a range of areas of study across the three specialist areas.
  • You will have the opportunity to link up with a range of community-based organisations in Central Scotland for your dissertation work.
  • There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars, with leading-edge academics and practitioners and speakers from the UK and abroad.

Programme structure

You will take four core (two of which will be dependent on your chosen specialist pathway) and two optional courses (chosen from the other specialist pathways). You will also undertake a research dissertation in your chosen specialism. Courses employ a range of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, teamwork and participatory teaching methods. There is also the possibility of joining undergraduate students from the BA Community Development on an international study trip.

Core courses

  • Introduction to educational and social research
  • Modern educational thought.

Adult Education

  • International issues in adult and continuing education
  • The psychology of adult learning. 

Community Development

  • Educational approaches to community learning and development
  • Empowerment and social change. 

Youth Studies

  • Perspectives of youth and young adulthood
  • Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Optional courses may include

  • Educational approaches to community learning and development
  • Empowerment and social change
  • International issues in adult and continuing education
  • Perspectives of youth and young adulthood
  • The psychology of adult learning
  • Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with adult education, community development or youth work, as well as policy development. In addition, it is an excellent professional development choice for those currently working in any of the three specialist fields. The programme also provides a solid pathway towards doctoral-level study.



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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Are you interested in raising children? In the way their environment shapes their development? Would you like to learn how to support parents and educators, creating a context where children and youth can reach their full potential? Then this Master's programme may be just right for you! . Read more

Are you interested in raising children? In the way their environment shapes their development? Would you like to learn how to support parents and educators, creating a context where children and youth can reach their full potential? Then this Master's programme may be just right for you! 

The Master’s programme Clinical Child, Family and Education Studies (Dutch:Orthopedagogiekchallenges you to make connections between scientific research and practical issues. It addresses what is needed when problems arise in child and adolescent development, or in parenting or education of children at risk.

Objective of the programme

This Master’s programme will enable you to develop yourself as an academic and clinical professional. Armed with scientific insights and clinical skills, you will be able to give advice, support, treatment and guidance concerning clinical issues in raising children and adolescents. You can make an important contribution to research of practical care issues related to children and youth. You will help children, youth, their parents and the systems surrounding them to function to their optimum potential. This programme prepares you to work as a scientist practitioner in youth care in clinical or transnational settings.

Working in a multi-disciplinary way

While studying complex situations you will combine insights from education and child and adolescent studies, psychology, neuropsychology, child and youth psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, juvenile justice, pediatrics and sociology.

An international programme in English

This programme’s working language is English. This means that English will be used during lectures, for scientific exchange between students and staff. You may opt to use Dutch or English for your thesis and individual assignments. Certain parts of the programme, such as a clinical internship in an institution with Dutch speaking clients or patientsare only available to students who speak Dutch.

Clinical issues in raising children and youth: a sound basis

You will take three mandatory courses concerning:

  • Working as a clinical professional in different contexts;
  • Critical Analysis of Youth Development: an Ecological Systems Approach
  • Functioning as an academic professional.

On top of these courses you will follow an elective course, a specialisation (‘track’)and write a Master’s thesis.

Research feeds education

Your lecturers participate in highly qualified research in the field of parenting, adolescence, education, development and learning in the research programmes Child and Adolescent Studies and Education and Learning. This means you will benefit from their most recent scientific insights. Moreover, as a Master’s student your thesis can contribute to the current research within the programme concerning projects such as:

  • STudy of Attention capacities of moderately Preterm born infants (STAP)
  • The YOUth cohort study: social competence and behavioral control
  • Extra support for toddlers: “ToddlerExtra”
  • Evaluation of the Rock and Water support programme
  • Evaluating therapy for depressed adolescents
  • Projects from the Consortium on Individual Development (CID)
  • Research on Adolescent Development And Relationships (RADAR)

Preparing for the labour market

The Master’s programme in Clinical Child, Family and Education Studies prepares you for work from a transnational perspective, or for a career in a clinical setting. You will be able to give advice, support, treatment and guidance when problems in child and adolescent development arise. You will be a trained expert in clinical issues in raising future generations. You could work as a policy adviser or care giver in several fields such as youth care, special needs care in schools, care for people with a disability, paediatric rehabilitation, forensic care and (inter)national knowledge institutions. You can also pursue a career in research, for instance at a university or knowledge institution.



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EXAMINE YOUTH ISSUES FROM AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE. Read more

EXAMINE YOUTH ISSUES FROM AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE

Are you interested in themes such as adolescents' substance use and addiction problems, antisocial and criminal behaviour, marginalisation and exclusion, excessive use of social media, and social inequalities and mental and physical health? Would you like to know why Dutch youngsters are among the happiest in Europe? 

The Master’s programme Youth Studies will enable you to look beyond the limits of individual fields of study. You will learn to observe and examine specific issues by combining different social scientific disciplines (psychology, pedagogy, sociology, anthropology) in an interdisciplinary approach.

By integrating knowledge from different disciplines you will be able to advance fundamental understanding of youth issues and to address youth problems whose solutions are beyond the scope of a single discipline or area of research. Additionally, you will gain knowledge about policies and interventions regarding youth issues and develop academic skills to conduct research in the field of youth.

This one-year Master's programme relates to topics and challenges relevant and, often, unique to youth such as:

  • substance use, addiction, and risky behaviour
  • psychosocial problems
  • social inequalities and wellbeing
  • radicalisation, discrimination, intolerance
  • accessibility of health care
  • social media and the digital environment of youngsters
  • antisocial and prosocial behaviour
  • youth culture, pop music and cultural lifestyle
  • friendship, social networks and the social environment of adolescents
  • sexual development and behaviour
  • changes in youth welfare and youth policy

EDUCATION ON THE BASIS OF LEADING RESEARCH 

We have a strong (and growing) research team, conducting research on a broad range of youth issues, changes in youth welfare and youth policy. The programme’s instructional staff consists of researchers with excellent national and international reputation, including Prof Tom ter Bogt, Dr Regina van den Eijnden, Prof Catrin Finkenauer, Dr Zeena Harakeh, Dr Ina Koning, Dr Margreet de Looze, Dr Margot Peeters, Dr Gonneke Stevens, Prof Maykel Verkuyten, Prof Wilma Vollebergh and Prof John de Wit.

DEVELOP YOURSELF

Through an innovative approach in interdisciplinary science, the Master’s programme will prepare you for the challenges associated with today’s increasingly global and diverse workforce in academic institutes, policy organisations, and NGOs. It offers you an exciting choice of themes, perspectives and methodological approaches and provides you with the opportunity to personally design an important part of your Master's research. You will also participate in an internship in an organization in the professional field of youth studies. This freedom of choice stimulates your personal development and optimally prepares you for a career in research or advisory positions.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

This Master’s programme will prepare you for a career in the field of youth research, youth welfare and youth policy. By acquiring in-depth knowledge on youth issues, academic skills and competencies you will develop into a highly-qualified science practitioner. You will receive a structured and systematic training in theoretically and methodologically advanced research that will equip you to help solve social problems in the field of youth either within or outside of academia.



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This postgraduate diploma can be studied on a full- (one year) or part-time (two years) basis. It provides the perfect learning platform for experienced youth workers to concentrate on their professional development, exploring and analysing social education strategies and community development with critical reflection. Read more
This postgraduate diploma can be studied on a full- (one year) or part-time (two years) basis. It provides the perfect learning platform for experienced youth workers to concentrate on their professional development, exploring and analysing social education strategies and community development with critical reflection. Students also work to understand the policies and practices which aim to counter discrimination and encourage equality in the community.

This dynamic course offers an in-depth look at the profession in its current state, encouraging students to identify new strategies which can bring about positive change in the future. The course leads to a nationally recognised qualification from the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC), as part of the University’s continued commitment to boosting students’ employability and professional confidence.

This intensive course helps students to understand how communities function and how they change according to political, social and economical changes. Students are encouraged to explore historical and contemporary evidence and theory to develop a well-rounded, expert approach to youth and community work.

Modules

Students are required to completed their PG Dip with professional qualification before undertaking a practitioner research project to inform the Masters Dissertation.
-Theory and Practice of Youth and Community Work
-Professional Development (1) Anti-Oppressive, Interpersonal Communication and Group Work in Youth and Community Work
-Professional Development (2) Enhancing Youth and Community Work Practice through Research and Enquiry
-Professional Development (3) Managing and Leading Youth and Community Work
-Youth and Community Work Practice 1
-Youth and Community Work Practice 2

Students who successfully complete their Postgraduate Diploma (Year 1) can exit with that award, or they can return the following year or interrupt and return in any subsequent year to submit a dissertation for the MA. The Masters dissertation of 15,000 words is based on a separate practitioner research project.

Career Opportunities

Youth and community workers are in demand across a wide range of agencies and settings both locally and nationally. From main stream youth work running centres, projects in the Third Sector to work in schools and with youth work partners such as Public Health. The MA Youth and Community is not only responsive to the continuing professional development needs of students in the UK but is also transferable to other Youth and Community Work settings internationally. The Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) accreditation is one of the few nationally recognised professional qualifications which places successful students in an excellent position to gain employment in a variety of youth related fields. The University has well established and on-going contact with local and national agencies and a developing rapport with international providers, so the career prospects for graduates of the programme are excellent.

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