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Masters Degrees (Youth Crime)

We have 54 Masters Degrees (Youth Crime)

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications.

This programme provides an ideal route for practitioners working with young people, including youth workers and those who manage them, enabling them to develop an advanced understanding of the issues involved in managing work with young people. It is designed for those who wish to further their understanding of these issues at postgraduate level and who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work.

Course structure

Core Modules

-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work and Youth Policy and Practice plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work, Youth Policy and Practice and Professional and Personal Development plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice is designed for a range of professionals working with young people including youth workers and those who manage them, who wish to undertake related advanced study. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management of this work especially for those who already have or do not require a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. It is offered through both a full time and part time route however, this summary refers to the full time route with the part time options being individually tailored to accommodate work patterns of those students already employed in profession practice. The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional disciplines of youth work and reflect the diverse range of settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

This programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. Read more

Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. The study of this highly relevant and rapidly developing area of criminological research prepares students to make a real contribution to shaping policy around corporate accountability and corporate control.

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of current challenges and perspectives in the area of corporate crime and corporate responsibility, whilst also enhancing your understanding of the main theories and ideas within contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) is aimed at graduates, professionals and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who have an interest in corporate crime or the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners and professionals in companies, business organisations, the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present position.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four-week research placements during spring and summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases, the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

Educational aims of the programme

The MSc pathway in Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility will combine grounding in the discipline of criminology and training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research with specialised understanding of the key issues attached to a criminal offending by corporate agents.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in corporate crime, people who are currently employed and wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present job, or those who wish to move into specialised research or practice in the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour. 

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Read more
The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Tuition draws upon the expertise of research staff in the University’s well established Centre for Criminology.

You will examine a range of crimes and criminal behaviour, the context of crime and responses to it. In addition to core areas of study, you can choose modules and/or pathways to suit your career development. You will explore an area of interest to you, through a 20,000-word dissertation, and gain a thorough grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methods – invaluable skills for any profession that includes planning, analysis and evaluation.

On the Substance Misuse pathway, you will study a range of criminological modules and a module on drug interventions. This specialist module provides an insight into the nature and extent of substance misuse and responses to it, including prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. Your dissertation will be related to substance misuse.

On the Youth Justice and Offender Management pathway, you will study the contexts in which offenders come into contact with the criminal justice system. The work of relevant agencies and systems that engage with those at risk of offending are also considered. Your dissertation must be related to youth justice and offender management.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/230-msc-crime-and-justice

What you will study

- Criminological theory
Explore the philosophical foundations of criminological theory and the way in which it relates to general social theory. You’ll examine the social and political contexts within which the various criminological theories have developed.

- Criminal justice – theory and practice
Learn about the general theories, principles, and models of criminal justice within a national and international context. You’ll examine the key institutions and processes that deliver criminal justice, and evaluate the interplay between them.

- Approaches to criminological research
Gain an understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted. You’ll be given a broad overview of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research in criminology and criminal justice and will learn about the relationship between theories and methods.

- Criminological research in practice
Develop your understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted, putting into practice both qualitative and quantitative approaches considered in ‘Approaches to Criminological Research’.

- Dissertation
A significant piece of research into an appropriate area of study.

Optional modules include:
- Violence and Homicide
- Policing in a Global Age
- Drug Interventions (specified for Substance Misuse pathway)
- Youth Justice and Offender Management (specified for Youth and Offender Management pathway)

Learning and teaching methods

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. Certificate (PgCert) and Diploma (PgDip) stages are taught in group sessions.

Teaching on the MSc Crime and Justice takes place in the evenings and at weekends specifically to enable you to continue to work alongside your studies.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course provides the knowledge and skills to pursue careers in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services. You could also choose a career in government organisations such as the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Welsh Government and local authorities. Graduates also go on to careers within voluntary agencies such as offender rehabilitation, victim support, community safety, and drug treatment services. It is also an excellent basis for further research at MPhil and PhD levels.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. The MSc award requires a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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Our Youth Justice, Community Safety and Applied Criminology Masters fills a two-fold gap in current academic provision. It provides experienced practitioners with the opportunity to apply academic knowledge to, and critically analyse and assess, the context in which they work. Read more
Our Youth Justice, Community Safety and Applied Criminology Masters fills a two-fold gap in current academic provision. It provides experienced practitioners with the opportunity to apply academic knowledge to, and critically analyse and assess, the context in which they work.

If you have a limited knowledge of criminal justice, the course offers a detailed understanding of the agencies in the criminal justice system, their functions and responsibilities. You can take up to a third of the course as an internship within a criminal justice agency.

The flexibility of the course also allows you to complete up to a third of the course through work based learning.

We expand your awareness of the social and political context of working with offenders.In-depth analysis includes 'what works' and the concept of risk assessment; key criminological theories including cultures of punishment; the legal and organisational context of crime; mediation and reparation schemes; victims and victimology; community safety; mental health issues; the history and development of youth justice; the problem of youth and youth as a problem; and drug misuse and drug-related crime.

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This programme introduces the key issues and decision-making processes that impact on young people’s lives across contexts including education, leisure, training and the labour market, housing and household information. Read more
This programme introduces the key issues and decision-making processes that impact on young people’s lives across contexts including education, leisure, training and the labour market, housing and household information.

Why this programme

-The programme is aimed at early and mid-career professionals who wish to explore how young people's lives are changing in modern societies and the ways they are affected by the processes of social change.
-You will be taught by researchers in the field of youth and young adults and have experience working with organisations such as the UN, the Council of Europe, the European Commission, UK local and national government and the Scottish Government.
-You will study the contexts and factors which impact on young people's decision-making related to for example education, training, work and leisure.
-The programme also provides a strong basis for further study, focusing on international and UK perspectives of youth.
-It is of further value to students who wish to gain an insight into different groups of young people such as those with mental health issues, teenage parents, young carers, homeless young people and those looked after by local authorities.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses, two optional courses and a dissertation. The dissertation gives you the opportunity to investigate an area of young people’s lives in-depth. You are encouraged to follow your own interests in the design of the dissertation, which will be fully supported by a supervisor.

Core courses
-Introduction to education and social research
-Perspectives on youth and young adulthood
-Modern educational thought
-Working with youth: Education and learning for change.

Optional courses
-Advanced educational research
-Curriculum development in adult education
-Developing literacy
-Educational approaches to community learning & development
-Empowerment strategies for community learning & development
-Identities, relationships and behaviours
-Inclusive classrooms, inclusive pedagogies
-International & comparative education
-International issues in adult & continuing education
-Managing change *
-Managing innovation and creativity *
-Marketing management *
-Models of community & development
-Neoliberal globalisation and world Inequality since the 1970s
-Project management *
-Rehabilitation and desistance from crime
-Sexualities and society
-Social theories for community learning & development
-The disabling society
-The evolving concept of inclusion
-The impact of problem drug use on children & families
-The learner & the curriculum
-The psychology of adult learning
-Understanding public policy

*Please note: These courses are offered by the Adam Smith Business School and are 10 credits each (as opposed to 20) and need to be taken in pairs.

Career prospects

If you work directly with young people: teachers, youth workers, police officers, probation officers, health workers, the programme is an excellent step in your professional development. It also provides a foundation for an academic career.

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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. Read more
This course will appeal to practitioners and students interested in careers in a range of professions such as policing, probation, prison service work, social work and many new areas in third sector and private sector security and outsourced support for offenders, vulnerable adults and young people. A broad based masters programme in public protection would enable students to pursue their particular interest be it in domestic violence, terrorism, dangerous offenders or child protection.

More about this course

The course encourages you to look critically at public protection, a key practitioner concept for professionals working in socially responsible professions.

You'll explore applied and theoretical critical understanding of public protection and other aspects of risk, which will transform the professional practice of participants or enhance their future employability.

Modules draw on the research expertise of staff, and aim to create a virtuous circle, where contacts generated through students/staff on the course and via the London Practitioner Forum will enable and assist their further research.

Including critical approaches to the understanding of risk within hard to reach groups and incorporating issues of diversity, the programme draws upon the University's established Criminology MSc degree and utilises the existing module provision.

Two additional modules are offered, Public Protection and Risk Awareness, and Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism.

There is a special emphasis on a sound grasp of the relevant academic literature, including substantial use of key scholarly journals in the field of criminology and criminal justice. There is also a focus on how theory relates to and enhances good practice.

This is assessed through a variety of summative assessments including essays, examinations (seen), practical research methodology assignments, an extended thesis (12-15,000 words), and various formative presentations to class peers.

Modular structure

This course consists of five core modules: Understanding Public Protection and Risk, Crime Control and Community Safety, Criminological Research Methods, Crime and Offender Patterns and the Criminological Dissertation on a topic of students choice.

There are opportunities to specialise in areas of your interest when choosing the two optional designates: topics range from Terrorism/Counter Terrorism, Domestic Violence, Critical Issues in Criminal Justice, Psychology and Crime and other more specialist research modules.

The course also provides a unique opportunity to enhance professional practice and critical understanding.

After the course

The course will help prepare students for employment in the criminal justice sector (including the police, probation, prison, youth offending and community safety departments), as well as academic or government research posts. It is hoped that some students will progress to doctoral studies after successful completion of the MSc.

It is the intention that students already engaged in a related occupation will benefit markedly from the course, in that the latter will provide the academic contextualisation with which to understand and evaluate the complexity of, and reciprocity between, varied agencies, departments and policies related to crime, criminology and criminal justice.

Criminology itself is an increasingly strong and prevalent academic discipline. The analytic and research skills acquired on the MSc are, of course, transferable to other jobs and areas of expertise. Previous students from this course have joined the police service either as police officers or civil investigation officers, some have embarked upon training to equip them to join the probation service or become social workers working with young offenders.

Other students have joined the voluntary sector working in residential or drugs/alcohol units. Still others have entered research jobs within the public or private sector and finally a number have progressed on to PhD studies.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Your own interests will drive the direction of this course as you identify and address the latest theoretical concepts, evidence and research that are relevant to your individual practice. Read more
Your own interests will drive the direction of this course as you identify and address the latest theoretical concepts, evidence and research that are relevant to your individual practice.

You will have a rare opportunity to critically appraise and shape new ideas as they emerge, and enhance your understanding of the links between theory, research, evidence and policy development and its application to the design and delivery of services to children and young people.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Why choose this course?

• Study and evaluate relevant research and practice, synthesise information from a range of sources, and work with a high level of autonomy and self-direction
• Explore the cultural and social constructions of childhood and youth, and the impact they have on the everyday lives of children and young people
• Develop an integrated and critically aware understanding of childhood and youth studies, and cultivate an analytical approach to contemporary methodological theories and developments
• Gain an advanced knowledge and understanding of the complexities surrounding the relationship between children’s rights, the ideologies and responsibilities for welfare, and the application of these elements in the experiences that effect children’s and young peoples’ lives.
• Benefit from enhanced career prospects by applying your new learning and expertise in professional contexts.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/childhood-and-youth-applied-perspectives

Course detail

This MA is designed to allow you to build upon your knowledge and critically consider the theoretical underpinning of societal responses to a range of needs, through policy development and service delivery across children and young people’s sectors in a globalised context.

The majority of units are designed and taught by colleagues within the School of Applied Social Studies or the Institute of Applied Social Research, winners of the 2013 Queen’s Anniversary prize for outstanding achievement and excellence in UK universities and colleges. The departments are recognised for their contribution to policy and practice.

This high quality context is coupled with the opportunities and added value of our extensive professional networks. Partnerships from across private, public and voluntary sectors provide input to courses, as well as research opportunities, practice teachers, placement opportunities and voluntary work experience, making it truly ‘applied’.

Modules

Semester 1 – two core units (2 x 30 credits)
• Dimensions of Childhood and Youth (30 credits)
• Models and methods of social enquiry (30 credits)

Semester 2 – one core unit (30 credits)
• Conceptual Frameworks: Theories Shaping Public Policy for Children and Young People’s Services (30 credits)

Plus two x 15 credit units chosen from:
• The Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People
• The participation of children and young people in research, policy and service delivery
• Critical issues in the design, delivery and evaluation of services to children, young people and their families
• Disability, Children and Young People
• Gypsies, Roma and Traveller Cultures and Communities: Oppression and Inequality
• Early Years
• Young people, group offending and violent crime
• Complexities of Forced Migration: Human Displacement, Trafficking and Refuge

Assessment

Assessments are designed to allow you to demonstrate high level skills of evaluation, synthesis, critical awareness of scholarship and the ability to formulate solutions and communicate findings.

Assessment aims to enhance the learning experience rather than simply provide academic hurdles to be surmounted. Nonetheless it must offer a reliable test of the your level of academic attainment.

The assessment strategy is intended to enable you to:
• Show originality in the application of knowledge and understand how the boundaries are advanced through research
• Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively and show originality in tackling and solving problems
• Have the qualities needed for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, personal responsibility and initiatives in complex and unpredictable professional environments

Careers

The course will allow you to achieve high levels of personal enquiry with the ability to understand the broader context of the discipline of social policy with particular regard to children and young people.

This knowledge and the ability to apply it, together with the collaborative approach adopted in the teaching and learning strategy, will offer you a transformative experience and equip you with the qualities and skills necessary for employment at a high level across the sector.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation is designed for people who already work, or intend to work, within the criminal justice system, whether for the police, probation service, prison service or other organisations, or those with an interest in such matters. It covers criminal law and procedure in the UK, internationally and comparatively. It examines criminal justice systems from a range of perspectives, including the management of organisations, human rights, the psychological and sociological causes of criminal behaviour and social and economic perspectives.

There is close co-operation with the MA in Criminology run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. Students on the LLM and MA can take modules from both programmes. Criminology has specialists in many areas including criminological theory, research methods, youth crime, gender, cultural criminology and terrorism.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/114/criminal-justice

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in Law in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW871 Policing

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

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The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area. Read more
The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area.

You will examine topics such as the London riots, youth crime and alcohol and drug abuse, allowing you to understand the impact of Government policy on the lives of young people. You will study different approaches to community work and the importance of studying international issues and applying them to situations closer to home.

You will gain practical experience as you bid for funding for a real project and choose a wide variety of option modules to tailor your course to your needs.

Expert guest lecturers and staff will offer insights into the evolving nature of youth work in the UK and overseas. You will also study alongside students from a range of backgrounds, giving you a fresh perspective on every day issues.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/communityandyouth_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With an in-depth understanding of youth and community issues, you'll be able to continue your career development in a management role. Graduates from similar subjects have gone on to work with children who have been excluded from school, refugees, the homeless and in hostels. You could consider mentoring, becoming a youth worker or pursuing a role as a case worker for a charity.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit from the expertise of our staff and a range of guest lecturers. Previous speakers have included international academics who provided an insight into the differences between youth and community work here and overseas, and a member of OFSTED who spoke about the changing shape of youth work.

The broad scope of our course means you choose your own option modules from across our University, so you can tailor your course to your interests. Whether you want to find out more about criminology, spirituality, cognitive therapy, working with difference or special education needs, we'll endeavour to meet your requirements.

As an added bonus, you'll be studying alongside students from a range of different backgrounds - from new graduates to those who are already working in the community. With this exposure to different views and methods of problem solving, you'll gain a fresh perspective on the issues you deal with day to day.

Core Modules

Historical Perspectives on Youth and Community Work (Policy, Ideology & Practice)
You will get an overview of recent Government policy and its impact on professional practice, then critically analyse this in relation to the values and ethics of youth and community development.

Understanding Social Research and Evaluation
You will gain a theoretical, methodological and practical foundation for social research, enabling you to act as a social researcher to resolve practice based problems.

Management: Current Issues in Practice
Gain an understanding of the challenges faced by managers and leaders in a complex and changing professional context by understanding the tensions that exist between the values of youth and community work and approaches to management and leadership.

Dissertation
An independent piece of original advanced research that you will be expected to plan, implement and report with guidance from a supervisor.

Community Development and Learning
Explore the various models and approaches to community work, and locate them within a historical, ideological and global context. You will study key theorists and critically analyse their application to a range of practice contexts.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Pursue a career in Criminology. Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. Read more

Pursue a career in Criminology

Criminology is fast becoming a vital discipline! A career in criminology explores the motives behind criminal behaviour and analyses the criminal justice system. A Master of Criminology at Bond prepares graduates for a career in the industry. Graduates are given the skills and training necessary to understand crime, justice, and forensic issues. Graduate sooner with Bond’s accelerated degrees!

About the program

The Master of Criminology program gives students skill development and training as well as scholarly appreciation of crime, justice and forensic issues. The program provides an understanding of a broad range of issues involving criminology theories, contemporary information on crime prevention, the theory and practice of punishment, criminal offenders, the police, courts and correctional institutions, including current crime and deviance issues. Students will be provided with both knowledge and research skills and techniques required for the analysis of criminological issues and an understanding of how to critically evaluate published research. 

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Criminology Program Structure and Sequencing

The Master of Criminology comprises 12 subjects, as follows:

Core subjects (2)

Foundation subjects (6)

Dissertation/Elective option subjects (4)

Students must choose one (1) of the following suites of subjects:

Or

  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio A (HUMR71-705)
  • Minor Dissertation/Portfolio B (HUMR71-706)
  • Plus two (2) elective subjects taken from the Faculty of Society & Design list of available postgraduate subjects. (CRIM71-700 Criminology Internship and Portfolio and further minor dissertation/portfolio subjects are available as elective subject options).

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.

Available research topics for dissertation / portfolio

The Faculty of Society & Design has highly skilled academic staff who can provide supervision to students in the following research areas:

  • A Critical Examination of the Criminal Justice System and Why Mistakes Happen
  • Analysis of an Effective Response to the Illicit Drug Problem
  • Analysis of Regulations Pertaining to Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Case Analysis of Miscarriage of Justice
  • Comparing Efficiency of Different Methods of Criminal Profiling
  • Consequences of Wrongful Convictions
  • Copycat Crime and New Media
  • Corruption and Bribery in the Justice System
  • Criminal Justice and Youth Crime
  • Cyber Bullying – Where Does the Responsibility Lie?
  • How Stalking Victims Prolong the Intensity or Duration of Stalking
  • Indigenous Crime and Justice
  • Looking at Criminal Investigations and Understanding the Social and Criminological Context Within Which These Operate
  • Measures to Prevent Violence in the Workplace
  • Media Coverage of a Topical Crime Genre
  • Preventing Assaults on Drivers of Public Transport
  • The CSI Influence on Juries
  • The Link Between Self Esteem and Crime
  • Understanding the Role Victims Play in the Criminal Justice System


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Criminal offending and the state’s response to it are constantly evolving, and this course explores the latest ideas, thinking and research into the subject. Read more
Criminal offending and the state’s response to it are constantly evolving, and this course explores the latest ideas, thinking and research into the subject. Benefiting from the practice and practical knowledge of highly experienced tutors and lecturers, you will reflect critically on the latest theories and the many explanations used to explain why crime occurs.

The department’s expertise is deep and wide ranging, and covers youth crime and justice, substance abuse, gang related crime, corporate crime and forensic mental health.

You will be taught by leading researchers from the Institute of Applied Social Research, whose studies on sexual exploitation, trafficking, and disability is internationally renowned and at the interface between research, knowledge, policy and practice.

Why study this course?

• Study the social, political and cultural contexts that inform criminology, and develop a critical in-depth knowledge and understanding of the subject
• Explore and research a particular topic of interest, and as you do this sharpen your independent study skills and become highly specialised in a particular area
• Develop the ability to apply originality in the application of knowledge that addresses problems relating to criminal justice, crime and offending
• Gain a wide range of new skills and qualities that are relevant to the workplace and will give you the opportunity to seek employment at a senior level
• Benefit from the ability to take part in critical discussions, systematic reviews and the analysis of complex, unfamiliar or unpredictable criminological problems, and work to produce an understanding that is informed by current scholarship.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/macriaaf

Course detail

Criminology at the University of Bedfordshire is taught by subject experts who are all members of the Vauxhall Centre for the Study of Crime under the direction of Professor John Pitts - a key member of the Home Office gang strategy’s expert advisory group. This dynamic programme considers developments in the academic study and research evidence of criminology in the context of an increasingly globalised world.

You will have the opportunity to critically reflect on theory while drawing on a depth of practical knowledge, theory and professional expertise from the teaching team. In addition, the team have an interest in the personal development of Masters students through a system of seminars and personal tutorials. This allows both staff and students to get to know each other well and fosters a shared commitment to the subject.

Modules

The units you will study are a mix of core and option units critically examining issues relating to offending and the responses to a range of offending behaviours by the state and other institutions.

Semester 1
• Theories and Perspectives in Crime and Criminal Justice
• Models and Methods of Social Research

Semester 2
• Young People Group Offending and Violent Crime
• Offenders and Offending: The experience of end to end offender management
• Corporate Crime and Corporate Criminals
• Forensic Mental Health: Dealing with the mentally disordered offender
• Complexities in Forced Migration: Human displacement, trafficking and refuge

Semester 3
• The Dissertation in Criminology

Assessment

You will undertake written assignments – essays and reports – as well as participating in group conferences, poster presentations, reflective journals and presentations.

These presentations are designed to allow you to become accustomed to presenting yourself in a variety of settings. Being able to practice these skills in a supportive environment will develop this essential employability skill.

You will also have in-class tests and an examination. These assessments will allow you to demonstrate and record your ability to work under pressure. However, the weight of assessments are written assignments and these allow you to explore the subject in depth and through detailed research demonstrate your ability to apply knowledge to understand the variety of behaviours and potentially offer solutions.

Careers

The MA in Criminology will allow you to achieve a range of skills and levels of personal enquiry deemed essential in the world of work.

The depth of knowledge you will acquire at Masters level together with the ability to apply knowledge in a range of offending settings will offer you a transformative experience and equip you with the qualities and skills necessary for employment at a high level across the sector.

In addition, the MA offers the potential to progress to further study at PhD or Professional Doctorate level.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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