• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
"writing" AND "for" AND "…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Writing For Performance)

We have 605 Masters Degrees (Writing For Performance)

  • "writing" AND "for" AND "performance" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 605
Order by 
If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment. Read more

If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment.

The emphasis is on different forms of scriptwriting - playwriting, screenwriting, dramatic writing, writing for film and television, and writing for radio – but you can also develop imaginative writing in other forms, especially prose fiction. Specialist pathways in screenwriting or writing for theatre are open to you.

Whether you’re an aspiring writer, a teacher or simply want to learn more about the writer’s craft, you’ll be working in an environment dedicated to developing new and emerging talent. Our students come from all over the world, and we have a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders. Through our partnership with the West Yorkshire Playhouse, the course is linked to the Playhouse’s own new writing schemes.

Our tutors are professional dramatists and leading researchers with a wide range of expertise. The Programme Director for the MA is the award-winning playwright, screenwriter and producer Garry Lyons, who established the degree in 2006.

Find out more about Garry Lyons

You’ll be based in our landmark building [email protected], with two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host works by students and visiting theatre companies. You’ll be encouraged to use these facilities to try your work out in workshops, rehearsed readings or full productions, and gain experience of practical drama-making.

The programme also benefits from our close links with external organisations. As well as our partnership with West Yorkshire Playhouse, we work with the BBC’s new talent unit, Writers’ Room. Other partners include Opera North, ITV, Screen Yorkshire, the National Media Museum, Creative England, Red Ladder Theatre Company, True North Productions, Chapel FM Radio, Valley Press and many more.

Course content

A core module will introduce you to creative writing research, including the potential of practice-led research. This will help to equip you for the rest of the programme, giving you the tools to reflect analytically on your writing and compare it with existing writing of a similar genre or style.

In Semester 1 you’ll spend time in intensive workshops refining your own short pieces of narrative writing, exploring the principles of storytelling and more experimental approaches. You'll work in a range of forms - from theatre and radio to screenplays and prose - preparing you to specialise as you progress through the degree.

Options in Semester 2 allow you to focus on film and television writing or work on an original project of your own – individually, in collaboration with students from across the School, or based on a two-week placement with an external organisation.

All of this work will culminate with your major project, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme – this could be an extended piece of creative writing, a conventional dissertation, or performance-led research.

Working with West Yorkshire Playhouse

The MA is partnered with West Yorkshire Playhouse, one of the UK’s leading theatres outside London. This links us to the the Playhouse’s new writing schemes. Directors and associate artists from the Playhouse regularly run workshops and masterclasses for us, and we collaborate with the theatre on joint projects such as new writing events and festivals. The Playhouse occasionally offers work experience opportunities for our students to apply for.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Story Workshop 30 credits
  • Research Perspectives (Writing for Performance and Publication) 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Creative Work 30 credits
  • Performance and Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Writing for Theatre and Radio 30 credits
  • Writing for Film and Television 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our tutors are professional dramatists and academic specialists in a range of genres, with experience of dealing with theatres, agents, production companies, editors and publishers. We also invite guest speakers from the worlds of theatre, broadcasting, film and publishing to share their insights into the creative industries.

You’ll be taught using a range of methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as practical sessions and workshops. Independent study is also a vital component of this degree, allowing you to conduct your own research and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed mostly on the basis of your creative writing, including theatre, screen and radio scripts and short prose stories you’ll develop in your modules. To encourage you to reflect on your practice, you’ll also write commentaries on your own work. Core modules may also use assessment methods such as essays and presentations to allow you to demonstrate your knowledge.

Career opportunities

Many students will want to pursue a career as a professional writer. Although this is a fiercely competitive field, this degree is designed to try to help you realise your ambitions. Alternatively, you could use your additional experience and qualification to progress in your current career or pursue a related path within the creative arts.

You’ll also be well equipped for a future in education, arts administration, script editing, literary management, broadcasting, journalism, advertising, the media, publishing, literary agencies, marketing, PT and many other areas.

The programme has established a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders, from playwrights and television writers to novelists, directors and lecturers.



Read less
The MA in Writing for Performance focuses on developing the skills of the individual and collaborative writer for diverse forms of contemporary live and broadcast performance. Read more
The MA in Writing for Performance focuses on developing the skills of the individual and collaborative writer for diverse forms of contemporary live and broadcast performance.

Through the combination of writing workshops, critical seminars and discussions, you will develop skills in writing for performance. You will also gain an understanding of the relationship between the writer and the cultural contexts in which they write.
You will develop a number of pieces, including a full length play, as well as outputs for digital mediums, live art projects and broadcast. You will also practice writing from improvisation and adapting existing texts.

These projects are supported by your analysis of dramaturgical principles and narrative structures based in character, story, conflict, dialogue, action and casual logic, as well as more experimental, non-linear writing based on postdramatic concepts.
We use a range of assessment types, including critical essays, project proposals, reflective essays and extended research-informed creative projects. Together these form components of the research process and enable you to develop your creative project to reflect your individual cultural and academic interests.

Our unique Learning Theatre provides a stimulating learning environment, in a professional arena with vital industry contacts. You will be warmly welcomed into a vibrant community of artists and makers across a range of creative fields. You will also benefit from our strong links in the industry, which include QUAD Arts Centre and Cinema, the BFI, the BBC and Creative England. Our experience and knowledge of professional writing in these environments allow us to support you towards a sustainable career in writing.

We also use a mixture of formative and summative assessment. Formative assessments are preliminary works that are not graded (eg a draft of a script), while summative assessments are the formal assessments that form part of your final grade.

Read less
The Master of Writing for Performance focuses on developing the skills and emerging aesthetic of the individual and collaborative writer for diverse forms of contemporary live performance. Read more

The Master of Writing for Performance focuses on developing the skills and emerging aesthetic of the individual and collaborative writer for diverse forms of contemporary live performance. It is unique in Australian theatre culture, focusing on the diversity of voices and cultures present in contemporary writing in Australia and overseas.

Through a combination of writing workshops, critical seminars and discussions you develop skills in writing for diverse contexts and live performance while gaining an understanding of the relationship between the playwright and the cultural contexts in which they write.

The program focuses on the development of a full length play, as well as four other smaller performance writing projects including: writing from improvisation with acting and directing students; writing for digital mediums; adaptation of existing texts; and writing for live art projects. The projects are supported by an analysis of dramaturgical principles and play structures based in character, dramatic action, conflict, dialogue, action and causal logic, as well as more experimental, non-linear writing based on post-dramatic concepts. At the end of the year, each writer presents a rehearsed presentation of a full-length play to industry and public.

The program welcomes applications from: writers, actors, directors, animateurs, theatre makers, designers and dramaturges, with moderate to extensive experience in performance writing.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Be able to conceptualise, realise and present original writing for performance and/or performance oriented projects in diverse form
  • Evaluate, discriminate and make informed choices as part of writing practice within aesthetic domains
  • Collaborate with other theatre artists and diverse communities
  • Develop the skills of articulating the ideas and processes inherent in your creative work within the context of relevant artistic discourse and research.


Read less
This highly successful programme offers specialist pathways in . Playwriting.  and . Dramaturgy. We concentrate on the process of writing for live performance, together with an ongoing evaluation of the work in process. Read more

This highly successful programme offers specialist pathways in Playwriting and Dramaturgy. We concentrate on the process of writing for live performance, together with an ongoing evaluation of the work in process. Through practice and reflection, we enable you to establish a distinctive, individual approach as both a writer and dramaturge. Projects include site-specific work, writing for a specific audience, verbatim theatre and interdisciplinary collaboration.

We support the development of texts for performance, alongside intellectual understanding of the diverse forms and contexts in which live performance can be made and the writer/dramaturge’s role in this. We examine texts from a wide range of periods and cultures. We engage with work that is innovative, or which challenges established notions of practice.

Opportunities to collaborate

Dramaturgs and playwrights study side by side, and examine creative and dramaturgical issues from various perspectives as writers, spectators and creative collaborators. There are opportunities to collaborate on an Interdisciplinary Project with MA Performance Makers and composers from the Department of Music. Final project texts, performed and directed by industry professionals, are presented at the Soho Theatre in London, attended by key industry representatives. Graduates are highly successful in obtaining commissions, dramaturgy posts and artistic directorships. Recent successes include:

  • Tena Štivičić (Three Winters National Theatre 2015)
  • Finn Kennedy (Artistic Director, Tamasha Theatre Company 2015)
  • Melissa Bubnic (Beached at Soho Theatre 2015)

All students receive Professional Orientation and support towards career development.

Modules & structure

Autumn term 

All students take the Writing Projects module: you will work on three diverse, short playwriting projects. Each addresses particular generic issues that relate to writing for live performance, and you will engage with the specific challenges and demands of differing circumstances of text development and production. These will vary from year to year, but they are likely to be selected from the following:

  • Theatre as Event – site-specific performance
  • Authenticity and Live Performance – verbatim theatre
  • Writing for Specific Audiences – children’s/young person’s theatre project
  • Creative Collaboration – multimedia collaboration with MA Performance Making and Studio Composition students from the Department of Music

You will also take the Dramaturgy module, which has two main elements: analysis of dramatic text (these will include classics and modern classics, as well as new plays); and analysis of live performance seen by the group (including some visual, environmental or non-text-based work). During the module you will assemble a portfolio of critical analyses and creative writing projects for assessment.

You will also take one contextual module alongside students from other Masters programmes, to be selected from a list of options that will vary from session to session.

Spring term 

You will develop your work on Dramaturgy with the term-long practical workshop module Creative Intervention in Text. This will examine: translation; adaptation of work from other media for live performance; and the re-writing and/or adaptation of extant plays; planning and curating seasons of performance work. You will assemble a portfolio of creative projects for assessment.

You also start work on your Final Project the personal Dissertation-equivalent project that will be the core of your work for the next six months). Weekly seminars and workshops will examine themes relevant to the range of projects chosen, and a first draft or outline will be produced. Each project will be the focus of individual tutorials, and then a class workshop led by a guest dramaturg, director or playwright as appropriate. You will then plan the next phase of the research or development of your project.

You also take another option from the list of contextual modules shared with students from other Masters programmes.

Summer term 

You will present the second draft of your project for another phase of tutorials and group workshops.

Playwriting projects will then be prepared for some form of public rehearsed reading or scratch performance, in extract form – with the writers involved in all aspects of the work.

Dramaturgy projects will be given practical support of an appropriate, equivalent kind. You will further develop your work, with tutorials and workshops and public presentation of work as appropriate, before writing and submitting the finished project.

Throughout the year, various seminars and workshops will examine diverse issues that affect writers today, and these will be led by visiting professionals as appropriate.

Assessment

We deploy a range of assessment approaches, each appropriate to the module taken. Students taking Writing Projects will submit three short playtexts for assessment. Dramaturgy is assessed by a portfolio of analytic reviews, and Creative Intervention in Text by a series of short creative writing projects and writing exercises. Each of the contextual option modules is assessed by a 4,000 word essay. Final Project leads to the production of a playtext (Playwriting), or a Dissertation or equivalent practical project (Dramaturgy). 

Careers

Numerous playwrights completing this programme receive high-level professional development opportunities, commissions, awards and full-scale productions of their work at major new writing centres in the UK, USA and in continental Europe. Many also work for at least part of the time in the fields of script development (for theatre and television), and in theatre publication.

Recent playwriting alumni include:

  • Ben Musgrave, whose Pretend You Have Big Buildings won the Bruntwood Prize (2006) and received a main house production at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester
  • Allia V Oswald, whose Dirty Water won the Alfred Fagon Award (2007) and was given a rehearsed reading at the Royal Court Theatre
  • Adam Brace, whose play Stovepipe was a High Tide Festival winner (2008), and was staged recently by the National Theatre and published by Faber

In each of these cases the award-winning play was the writer’s Final Project from this programme.

Dramaturgy alumni work in professional literary management for mainstream and fringe building-based companies, as well as on freelance script development programmes in the UK and internationally. These include:

  • David Lane, who now has an extremely busy career as a freelance dramaturg, teacher and playwright
  • Francesca Malfrin, who is currently developing translation projects of Italian plays with a range of agencies, including the National Theatre Studio


Read less
The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Read more

ABOUT THE MA/MFA WRITING FOR STAGE AND BROADCAST MEDIA

The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Although the primary focus is on writing for television, film, theatre and radio, Central also runs
optional units in writing for new music theatre and, in collaboration with MA Applied Theatre, writing with and for communities. The course provides the opportunity for students to develop the core competencies and skills of the dramatist to explore their own ‘voice’ and develop their confidence as dramatists, and to appreciate the specific media contexts within which professional writers work.

Key features are: practice-based enquiry into techniques and processes for writing for stage and screen; a series of writing projects to engage with different styles and formats of production; associated study of writing techniques and issues of
performance in relation to theatre, cinema, television and other relevant contexts.The MA and MFA are taught in group sessions and through individual tutorials. During these sessions participants will consider the fundamentals of dramatic writing. Indicatively, these will include structure, narrative, dramatic action, genre, character, dialogue and rhetorical effect.

Students will study different approaches to writing including individual authorship, group writing and writing to specific briefs. Students will attend masterclasses, seminars and workshops that focus on particular modes of writing for different production contexts, and will be part of a writers’ group, providing peer support in developing their writing. Their vocational work is complemented by individual research and appropriate theoretical discussion and enquiry. Students will address historical, theoretical and critical contexts within which traditions of dramatic writing have evolved.

Students will engage in a range of projects that test and develop their skills as a writer of drama. Indicatively, these will include forming a team of writers to evolve a television series, writing a short play script for a staged reading, writing a short
film script, writing a radio play and developing and writing a complete dramatic script for production in a particular medium (stage, radio, television, music theatre, or film).

ASSESSMENT

This is through peer assessment, practical assignments, essays, scheme of research, presentations, and the submission of a practitioner portfolio, including personal insights, research, the student’s own scripted material and a plan for professional
development.

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. Develop professional-standard writing skills, and learn to formulate and address advanced research questions. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Develop professional-standard writing skills, and learn to formulate and address advanced research questions.
  • Suited to students that have a clear idea of what they want to work on, and with some experience of writing in their chosen form.
  • The Department is ranked in the top three in London and top 20 in the UK for English and Creative Writing (Guardian University Guide 2016).
  • Roehampton is ranked the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This MA Creative Writing (specialist pathway) provides an intensive opportunity for you to focus on a single writing form: Fiction, Fiction for Young Readers or Poetry.

This programme is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. Taught by published, working writers including acclaimed poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters, this programme provides you with the opportunity to focus on your passion, whether that’s Fiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers.

Every module on this course has a strong focus on the writing industry, which means that it will prepare you for working in this competitive sector or for further academic study. Topics include the specifics of manuscript preparation; editing and redrafting; getting published and performance opportunities. Our strong links with the writing industry give you the chance to attend events and seminars with agents, editors and publishers from across the field of writing. These provide opportunities to network and get your work in front of the people who matter in the literary world. 

The department has thriving partnerships with Wimbledon Bookfest, Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, and local schools, giving you the chance to volunteer or undertake paid work experience during your time at Roehampton. Our in-house publishing imprint, Fincham Press, means you could see your work published or be involved in publishing other people’s work. 

You’ll be part of a department that combines tradition and innovation, excellent teaching and world-class research - 80% of our research publications are ranked as “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. Plus, we are home to the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, which is regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in the UK. We also house the Roehampton Poetry Centre, which places the department at the forefront of the UK poetry scene.

Content

Fiction pathway

This pathway is ideal for people who are committed to producing fiction of the highest professional calibre. You will examine two primary forms: the short story and the novel to produce a portfolio of fiction. The emphasis is on craft, technique and practical guidance, and you will engage with a variety of storytelling tools and models. You will learn how to make your writing practice more effective, how to break bad habits and how to professionally assess your work in progress. 

Fiction for Young Readers pathway

On the Fiction for Young Readers pathway, you will focus on the practice and theory of writing fiction for children. You will read a wide range of theoretical texts exploring definitions and concepts of children’s literature concerning picture-books, fiction for young readers (6-12 years old) and texts for Young Adults (YAs), enabling you to contextualise your own creative practice. 

Poetry pathway

On the Poetry pathway, you will explore the contemporary context of poetry and poetics, with a special focus on writing formally innovative work. You will have the opportunity to engage with topics including poetry as process; the materiality of language; literary affiliations and schools of poetry; intertextuality and found text; the contemporary long poem; non-narrative poetry.

The compulsory module, Creative Contexts, introduces you to theoretical and research-based issues faced by creative writers, investigates “critical” writing as a form in its own right, and provides guidance on study skills.

Your seminars, workshops and tutorials will be complemented by guest lectures from industry specialists and off-site visits. Recent guest lectures have been given by Hellie Ogden at Literary Agency Janklow and Nesbitt, and trips have been organised to Tate Modern, the London Bookfair and Apiary Studios. Each pathway will prepare you for writing your extended portfolio and self-critical analysis, which you will undertake during the final section of the programme year.

Career options

Students go on to employment as professional writers or in media-related occupations such as journalists, archivists, librarians, editors, copywriters and arts managers. Additionally, the programme provides essential preparation for advanced academic study of Creative Writing at PhD level or for teaching Creative Writing.

Email Now



Read less
Course content. The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe. Read more

Course content

The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.

Working intensively with international guest choreographers, students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. 

mapdance operates as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

The 2017/18 Repertory includes new commissions and from Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor, Laila Diallo, Helen Parlor and Laura Aris.

The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

The MA Performance Dance operates in the context of a professional performance programme and a series of presentations by visiting artists and researchers.

Guest lecturers on the MA have included practitioners and curators all working at the edges of dance research.

There are also opportunities to engage in cutting-edge research with interactive technologies or to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

At the Bishop Otter campus there is an integrated approach to the provision of learning resources and support. We offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. We use an electronic learning environment with an expanding portfolio of online library resources from anywhere at any time.

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished. On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

  • 130 open access PC workstations
  • 45 Apple iMacs
  • Ample printing facilities
  • Netbooks available on loan
  • Professional editing suites
  • Media loans counter
  • Wi-Fi and plug points throughout

Dance students have the use of four dance studios, a fully equipped 250-seat theatre and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Where this can take you

This course is suitable for you if you are a recent graduate or a dance artist who wishes to extend their technical and performance skills (and have completed a recognised BA degree). 

It will offer you …

  • an opportunity to work with international established and up and coming choreographers reflect on your professional practice and prior training
  • intensive technical training through a variety of contemporary techniques, Pilates, contact improvisation and Ballet
  • an opportunity to tour the repertoire across the UK and internationally
  • an opportunity to develop your teaching skills within the context of a touring company
  • time to deepen your understanding of your professional skills through practice, research and scholarship
  • professional Development
  • deepening your ability to articulate what you do in written and spoken form
  • a stepping-stone toward PhD study

You will develop skills in…

  • performance
  • technique
  • teaching in the context of a touring company
  • choreographic methodology and critical thinking
  • working independently (via dissertation projects)
  • research and the articulation of that research in writing

It will give you…

  • tools and skills to support you in the transition to professional practice
  • extensive experience of working with established choreographers alongside touring and networking that can aid you in gaining work as a performer or in establishing your work as an independent artist
  • a qualification that can aid in obtaining work within educational and HE institutions
  • preparation for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications

Work placements

There are opportunities to engage with cutting edge research into interactive technologies and to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

Indicative modules

The MA in performance includes three core modules: Repertory, Techniques for Performance and Dissertation plus one optional module.

The postgraduate diploma includes two core modules: Repertory and Techniques for Performance and an optional module.

Repertory Module:

The repertory module: mapdance encompasses intensive creation periods with international guest choreographer. Students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. Operating as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals, the creation periods begin in Sept through to February. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

Techniques for Performance Module:

The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, Pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

Teaching and assessment

Assessment on the MA performers route is based on three core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and Dissertation (60 credits) plus one optional module (30 credits). 

Assessment on the postgraduate diploma performers route is based on two core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and one optional module.

Assessment Techniques for Performance is continuous, that is process based.

Similarly the Repertory module is continuously assessed however the assessment is comprised by marks given by guest choreographers during the creation process and marks given by both Artistic Directors in rehearsal and on tour assessing both process and performance.



Read less
Course Outline. Read more
Course Outline
If you...have a passion for children's books, love reading literature for children, have written or would love to have a go at writing children's literature, have a desire to learn what books children like reading, would love the chance to explore your own ideas about childhood and learn how different societies, histories and critics have defined it, want to learn how publishers produce children's books and produce one yourself, want to be involved in a rapidly growing area of academic study, and need to learn about different careers in writing for children...then this exciting new programme is for you.

You will have the chance to study classic and contemporary children's literature and writing and produce your own, with input from some of the most well known authors and publishers of today.


Course Content
7 taught modules plus a Dissertation:

Histories of Children's Literature
An introduction to Children's Literature You will investigate Classic British, American and International Children's literatures before choosing an individual topic on any historical selection of Children's literature to research.

Reading Crossover Fiction
You will explore contexts of crossover fiction such as age-banding, genre, education and new ways of marketing fiction in this relatively new field.

Creative Writing for Children Workshop
A chance to develop your own voice and style by producing creative writing for children in any genre, including the fairy-tale, fantasy, social realism, non-fictional prose, drama or poetry with help from established authors.

Scriptwriting for Children
Run by professionals with experience in commissioning work for children's television and in partnership with the BBC (the BBC Children's Division will shortly be moving to Salford), these workshops will show you how to write for children's television and film and how to present your work to the industry.

Reading the Child
This module will seek to understand what we mean by the "child" and "childhood" by exploring the theoretical approaches to the study and practice of writing for children over the last 100 years.

Children's Writing and Publishing
An opportunity to work in a group to produce/publish a new children's book with the help of experts. You will begin by focusing on the age ranges, educational edicts, series fiction, niche markets, "pester power" and digital and online publishing, ebooks and downloads.

Planning Your Career in Writing for Children
You will be given access to career case studies and trends in publishing, writing, teaching, academia and other areas of graduate recruitment which will enable you to produce your own action plan.

Writing for Children Dissertation
You will be able to choose between a traditional literature dissertation, a creative writing dissertation, one that combines literature and creative writing, or a work-related dissertation.

The programme uses a wide range of teaching and learning strategies. As well as interactive lectures all modules have seminar or workshop elements where you will be encouraged to engage in critical reading and writing exercises. Seminar discussion and, in some modules, formal presentations, will enable you to further develop your subject-specific knowledge and understanding, strengthen your communicative skills, and pursue research projects either independently or in teams. Tutorials enable you to discuss issues and ideas with your tutors either individually or in small groups.

Creative Writing Workshops will offer you the opportunity to give and receive peer critique and support. As an individual you will keep learning journals or logs for some modules. You will spend a substantial amount of time on independent research but you will be supported by one-to-one supervision from tutors.

Read less
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. Benefit from the department’s strong contacts with agents, editors and publishers across the field of writing. . Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Benefit from the department’s strong contacts with agents, editors and publishers across the field of writing. 
  • Our in-house Fincham Press, provides opportunities for you to see your writing published.
  • One of the very few universities in the UK to offer modules in the areas of formally innovative poetry.
  • You can choose your preferred route through the programme, either practicing different forms of writing or specialising in one.
  • The Department is ranked in the top three in London and top 20 in the UK for English and Creative Writing (Guardian University Guide 2016).

Course summary

This MA in Creative Writing degree is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. You'll be supported throughout your postgraduate studies by academic staff engaged in world-leading research.

Taught by published, working writers including acclaimed poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters, this programme will focus on three main forms of writing: Fiction, Poetry and Fiction for Young Readers.

You will be supported to develop your personal writing style, learn how to make your writing more effective, how to break bad habits and how to professionally assess your work. You will graduate with the skills needed for professional practice in the creative writing industry, and with an understanding of the professional context in which those skills are marketed. 

Every module on our MA Creative Writing degree has a strong focus on the writing industry, which means that it will prepare you for working in this competitive sector or for further academic study. Topics include the specifics of manuscript preparation; editing and redrafting; getting published and performance opportunities.

The department has thriving partnerships with Wimbledon Bookfest, Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, as well as with local schools, providing you with the chance to volunteer or undertake paid work experience during your time at Roehampton. Our in-house publishing imprint, Fincham Press, means you could see your work published or be involved in publishing other people’s work. 

You’ll be part of a department that combines tradition and innovation, excellent teaching and world-class research - 80% of our research publications are ranked as “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. Plus, we are home to the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, which is regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in the UK. We also house the Roehampton Poetry Centre, which places the department at the forefront of the UK poetry scene.

Content

This MA focuses on three main forms of writing: Fiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers. 

In Fiction, you will explore two primary forms: the short story and the novel. Emphasis will be placed on structure and craft, and you will have the opportunity to engage with a variety of storytelling tools and models. 

In Poetry, you will have the opportunity to explore the contemporary context of poetry and poetics, with a special focus on writing formally innovative work. You will question assumptions about language and the function of poetry and engage with diverse topics, including poetry as process; the materiality of language; literary affiliations and schools of poetry; intertextuality and found text; the contemporary long poem and non-narrative poetry. 

In Fiction for Young Readers, you will explore a wide range of theoretical texts exploring definitions and concepts of children’s literature, from picture-books, fiction for young readers (6-12 years old) to texts for Young Adults (YAs), enabling you to contextualise and extend your own creative practice. 

The compulsory module, Creative Contexts, introduces you to theoretical and research-based issues faced by creative writers, investigates “critical” writing as a form in its own right, and provides guidance on study skills.

Your seminars, workshops and tutorials will be complemented by guest lectures from industry specialists and off-site visits. Recent guest lectures have been given by Hellie Ogden at Literary Agency Janklow and Nesbitt, and trips have been organised to Tate Modern, the London Bookfair and Apiary Studios.

Modules:

Compulsory modules

  • Creative Contexts
  • Dissertation

Optional modules (choose two of the following)

  • Fiction
  • Fiction for Young Readers
  • Poetry

Career options

Careers such as journalism, copywriting and arts management are possible on completion of this course.

Email Now



Read less
The MSc in Sports Coaching and Performance has been designed for those working within sport and the coaching industry, or have studied at undergraduate level and gained coaching experience. Read more
The MSc in Sports Coaching and Performance has been designed for those working within sport and the coaching industry, or have studied at undergraduate level and gained coaching experience. This postgraduate degree will provide you with an advanced knowledge base that will give you the best possible opportunity for pursuing your career goals within sport and the coaching industry.

The flexible modular structured course offers an insight into how psychology, physiology, strength and conditioning, and movement analysis impact on performance. This MSc Sports Coaching and Performance degree will give you an interactive approach to performance coaching so you can apply theory to your practice. The integration of theory and practice will enhance and develop your ability to reflect on current coaching practice, plan appropriate training programmes and critically analyse existing approaches to performance coaching. You will also develop comprehensive knowledge of the key issues that support the high performance sports coaching environment.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1805-msc-sports-coaching-and-performance

What you will study

Core Modules:
- Research Project
This project aims to enable students to demonstrate the skills necessary to produce a scholarly, in-depth, empirical research study, resource, or report.

- Research Methods
This module will develop your ability to design and statistically analyse experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental quantitative studies. It will allow you to appreciate the strengths and limitations of the different quantitative and qualitative research designs used in coaching and sport, health and exercise science; and synthesize knowledge and competencies gained during taught modules to produce a scholarly, in-depth critical review and proposal for a research study.

- Effective Coaching
You will develop an advanced understanding of critical self-reflective skills through the use of video analysis, which includes identifying key coaching styles, behaviours and feedback techniques required in advanced coaching situations. In addition, you will develop an in depth understanding of the interdisciplinary approaches that contribute to the coaching process including your ability to recognise and develop current coaching practice and coaching philosophies.

- Professional Work Based Development
This modules provides an opportunity for students to observe and participate in work-based professional environments, including identifying a work problem for you to overcome, which will enhance your professional and vocational learning and inform your own everyday practice. As part of your studies you will critically reflect on your learning throughout the work placement. You will, together with the module team, identify an organisation or organisations that are relevant to your field of study and that will be able to provide 140 hours of work experience.

Option Modules (choose three):
- Developing Expertise in Sport
This module aims to enable you to develop a systematic knowledge and critical understanding of how coaches develop and maintain expertise in sport and the ability to critically appraise coaching practice in the context of current approaches to skill development

- High Performance Environment
This module focuses on developing a multi-disciplinary perspective of factors that act upon the elite athlete and how these contribute to the development of elite performance. You will analyse how the coach, psychologist, conditioning coach, medical staff and nutritionist assist and complement each other in producing a high performance environment. The management of the performance environment will be discussed and the many issues that underpin successful implementation of elite sport science support will also be analysed.

- Strength and Conditioning
At the end of this module you will have developed your knowledge and critical understanding of concepts and theories regarding strength and conditioning. You will also have developed the ability to implement effective strength and conditioning programmes into a range of performance environments. The above have been closely linked to the professional standards required for accreditation by both the NSCA and the UKSCA.

- Movement Analysis
This module aims to develop your awareness of the analysis of sports performance, with particular emphasis on technique analysis and notation analysis. The use of systematic observation techniques in the analysis of sports performance will also be considered.

Learning and teaching methods

Teaching methods include lectures, video analysis, seminars and workshops, some of which will be student-led. Lectures will be held predominately held on a Monday between 2pm-8pm and /or a Tuesday depending on your module choice. A draft timetable can be requested from the course leader Melanie Tuckwell

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The UK Vision for Coaching has clearly identified the need to develop Talent Coaches, Performance Coaches and High Performance Coaches. This course will provide opportunities for individuals to develop in these roles within their National Governing Body or sport.

Our MSc Sports Coaching and Performance degree is designed to reflect current developments and ensure that students have the required skills to access a range of employment opportunities within sports coaching and performance. Graduates will possess the key skills, knowledge and competencies that can be used in a wide range of careers, for example:

• Coach Education Personnel
• Sport Coaching Science Personnel
• Elite Sports Coach
• High Performance Coach
• Community Sports Coach
• Physical Education Teacher
• Strength and Conditioning Coach
• National Governing Body Officer
• Self-employed Coaching Consultant
• Researcher
• Performance Analyst
• Sport and Exercise scientist

Assessment methods

Assessment activities include writing essays, producing oral and poster presentations and studying case studies and examinations.

Facilities

As part of your studies you will use our USW Sport Park facilities and state-of-the-art sport science laboratories on our Glyntaff campus.

Work and Study Placements

The MSc Sports Coaching and Performance degree has a bespoke module, Professional Work Based Development, which all students will undertake. Our course team establish opportunities for students across a spectrum of coaching, allowing them to experience vital skills in the potential career they wish to progress.

Current work placements include: Cardiff City Football Club; Cardiff Blues Rugby Football Club; Football Association of Wales; Welsh Rugby Union; Swansea City Football Club; Welsh Netball; Newport Gwent Dragons; Sports Wales; Golf Union of Wales; Welsh Hockey and many local authority Sports Development units and National Governing Bodies of Sport.

Read less
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Read more
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Its historical range is wide and students should be ready to research and trouble-shoot plays from different eras, whether classical Greek and Roman, medieval, early modern or contemporary.

Traditional formats of discussion groups and seminars are coupled with workshops and problem-solving sessions which address all the negotiations involved in transferring words on the page into a fully realised performance. The main emphasis of the MA is on the interpretation of text through the consideration of acting and directing processes, production conditions, historical context, and institutional and cultural politics. The MA incorporates masterclasses by leading theatre professionals which are part of an integrated visitor programme.

The MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance is unique in that it is designed to accommodate both students who may wish to pursue further academic study and students who wish to go into the theatre or media industries. We aim to produce graduates with a sophisticated understanding of how plays in performance work, and to develop high-quality researchers and theatre practitioners who understand the practical dynamics of process and production. Applicants may have a range of academic backgrounds and extensive practical experience is not a prerequisite for the course, but students must be willing to enter into the spirit of practical experiment whatever their particular strengths.

Aims

-To promote cutting-edge interdisciplinary thinking and collaboration
-To provide analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of play and performance texts
-To offer in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the processes of writing, acting and directing
-To provide an understanding of the need to conduct investigation within historical, political, institutional and cultural frames
-To develop high-quality theatre researchers and practitioners

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and workshops
In terms 1 and 2 Directing Early Modern Plays and Case Studies in Writing, Directing and Performance are examined by 2,500 word essays. In Term 1 Writing into Performance is examined by a scriptwriting assignment. In term 2 Directing Modern Plays is examined by a combination of seminar performance and a 3,000 word essay. Storytelling for Theatre, Film and Television is examined by a 3,000 word project in each term. An ambitious programme of masterclasses given by leading practitioners is an important part of the MA.

Screenings
During terms 1 and 2 there will be screenings of relevant film and television material relating to specific performances, plays and productions under discussion.

Dissertation or practical project
In term 3 students prepare for their dissertation or practical project work. Students are assigned dissertation/project supervisors and receive individual supervision through the period of research. Assessment is by 20,000 word dissertation or by a substantial practical project such as a production, performance or piece of creative writing, supported by a 4,000 word essay mapping the project's planning and evolution. All final projects are subject to the approval of the convenors of the MA.

Careers

Because of the innovative emphasis on acquiring a wide range of analytical and practical skills centred around the performance and production of theatre texts, students are highly employable.

An in-depth understanding of narrative structures and their visual, technical, performative and political dimensions is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry and a significant number at the top of these businesses support this programme because it plugs an increasingly serious gap in the skills market. Recent students from the BA and MA Writing and Performance (a forerunner of this MA) have benefited from placements with theatre, film and television companies, and the MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance builds on that ethos. Placements have been informally arranged subject to student interest and industry availability from year to year.

Past graduates have gone on to study PhDs and also to conservatoires to continue their practical training. Many are now working as screenwriters, playwrights, actors, directors, designers, producers, technicians, literary managers, dramaturges, and literary agents. A significant number of graduates have set up their own theatre companies. Others work in theatre-in-education initiatives, arts funding organisations, youth theatre, journalism, publishing, and dramatherapy. Past students are also employed by major animation companies, and have gained work as script editors and production assistants.

Read less
MA Creative Writing at Brunel University London is designed for writers who want to express their creativity in a number of forms – novels, film scripts, poems, journalism – rather than specialise in only one. Read more

About the course

MA Creative Writing at Brunel University London is designed for writers who want to express their creativity in a number of forms – novels, film scripts, poems, journalism – rather than specialise in only one.

The Creative Writing master's course will appeal to writers who wish to try out a number of areas before deciding which they are best at or those who already know their strongest form, but feel the need to gain expertise in other fields to fund their speciality.

In addition, the course provides instruction on writing in the community, creative writing teaching and the organisation and funding of arts events.

We seek to create a supportive but constructively critical environment for circulating and evaluating students’ creative and journalistic work and to foster a broad span of creative and critical writing skills, including the ability to work independently on a long creative/critical project.

All applications should include a sample of writing.

Aims

This degree will give you instruction and practice in a broad range not only of writing forms, but also of strategies and techniques within those forms.

You will be introduced to the latest theories of creativity and up-to-date thinking on literary and journalistic genres.

We seek to create a supportive but constructively critical environment for circulating and evaluating students’ creative and journalistic work and to foster a broad span of creative and critical writing skills, including the ability to work independently on a long creative/critical project.

The Creative Writing master's programme will prepare you for:

A career as a creative or feature writer
Progression to doctorate-level creative writing or journalistic research
Employment in the creative industries or other areas of work where writing skills are a central requirement

Course Content

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time route

Term 1

Elements of Writing: Fiction
Creativity

Term 2

Feature and Screenwriting
Writers at Work

Term 3/Summer Vacation (until the end of September)

Independent Writing Project

Part-time route

Term 1: Elements of Writing: Fiction
Term 2: Feature and Screenwriting
Term 4: Creativity
Term 5: Writers at Work
Term 6/Summer Holiday (until the end of September): Independent Writing Project

Modules

Creativity
Elements of Writing: Fiction
Feature and Screenwriting
Writers at Work

Special Features

MA Creating Writing students are taught by some of the most talented, original, exciting and experienced writers publishing in the industry today. Brunel’s creative writing staff have between them published over 80 books and have written for television, film and radio. The team includes writer and broadcaster Will Self and renowned performance poet, writer and broadcaster Benjamin Zephaniah.

The broad range of forms, techniques and strategies taught on the MA Creative Writing gives you the opportunity to experiment and discover which suits you best. If you are already specialising in a particular area of writing, it will underpin your expertise by equipping you with a varied knowledge of other methods.

Teaching

The course offers various forms of teaching and learning methods such as:

3-hour lectures, combining presentation and practice
workshops
seminars
presentations
project supervision
tutorials
independent learning and practice.

Assessment

Students of the master's course will need to gain 180 credits to complete the Creative Writing MA degree; you will therefore take all the four modules of Strand A (120 credits) and the project of Strand B (60 credits). Full-time Creative Writing students will take two taught modules in Term 1 and two in Term 2. Part-time students will generally take the morning module in Terms 1 and 2 of the first year, and the afternoon module in Terms 1 and 2 of Year 2, although, if circumstances require, this pattern can be reversed.

Read less
Course content. The MA Choreography and Professional Practices draws on expertise from a number of professionals within the dance industry and is delivered in close relationship with a national dance agency, South East Dance based close by, in Brighton. Read more

Course content

The MA Choreography and Professional Practices draws on expertise from a number of professionals within the dance industry and is delivered in close relationship with a national dance agency, South East Dance based close by, in Brighton.

The degree incorporates opportunities for engaging in Continuing Professional Development opportunities such as workshops, career planning, master classes and residencies alongside the development of your own choreographic skills.

The MA offers an introduction to research methods in the arts and to strategies for documenting live performance practice and promoting your work to wider audiences.

It provides opportunities to pursue live performance practices as a choreographer and to consider how your work is situated in relation to the wider field of professional contemporary dance practice.

It allows for you to develop your own artistic voice and to explore single discipline or interdisciplinary practice-based arts research projects involving choreography, performance, fine art, music, installation, and so forth – led by you and your interest in performance making.

The MA is designed to cater both for students who wish to develop their dance-making skills in order to further their careers as reflective practitioners, and as a foundation programme for those hoping to pursue practical and/or theoretical research at M.Phil or Ph.D level.

The flexibility of the programme means that you can exit after successful completion of modules to the value 120 credits with a postgraduate diploma at Level 7.

For the award of the MA you need to attain 180 credits at Level 7 including the Dissertation module.

The MA Dissertation project can involve practical performance and or written work determined by your needs as a performance researcher and maker.

Our facilities

At Chichester, we teach in small groups and pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we have created for our students. The Dance courses are delivered on our Bishop Otter Campus where the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) is the hub of your learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources with dedicated areas for silent work or group study, while on the ground floor you will find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources. There are over 130 open access PC workstations, 45 Apple IMacs and ample printing and media facilities. A state-of-the-art wireless network offers fast internet as well as access to all our online resources. You will also have a dedicated subject librarian who will be available to help you access all the library resources you need for your course, both on the shelves and online. 

Our Dance facilities include four superb dance studios, a fully equipped 250-seat theatre and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Where this can take tou

The MA in Choreography and Professional Practices will equip you for a range of careers in choreography, performing arts, dance development, arts administration, performance, teaching or dance research.

It will also prepare you for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications.

Work placements

The programme has an industry-facing identity facilitated through the relationship with South East Dance, the region’s dance development agency, and you will be able to draw on the skills and expertise arising from this partnership.

The programme includes opportunities for presenting your work at choreographic platform sharings, participating in artist networking opportunities, developing your marketing, fundraising and ‘pitching’ / presentation skills.

Guest lecturers will introduce you to issues affecting dance employment, and your learning is supported by individual tutorials and group meetings to discuss your progress.

Indicative modules

  • Choreographic Practices
  • Artist as Producer
  • Dissertation (practical and written components)
  • Optional Modules
  • Choose one from
  • New Media and Performance Practices
  • The Body in Site distance learning module over the summer period
  • Technique for Performance
  • Writing and Performance
  • Performing Politics

Teaching and assessment

The Dance department is a leading provider of excellence in dance education and draws on the expertise of the teaching team. The team is made up of international professional dancers, choreographers, researchers, writers and directors. Each member of the team is renowned for his or her theoretical and practical expertise. You’ll work with, and learn from, a wealth of professional specialist tutors whose backgrounds stem from highly respected performance companies.

As an MA student you will have access to the lively arts research culture at the University including: regular full programmes of research presentations given by staff, web-based learning, research students and visiting artists/researchers, performances by visiting artists/companies, theatre trips to performance events, arts research training events and national arts conferences.

 Some of the optional modules enable you to work alongside students from other Masters programmes. Some of the course content will be delivered by staff from South East Dance both on campus and off campus at their base in Brighton and in off-site performance venues in Brighton, London and other regional venues.

Learning is assessed using various methods chosen as the most appropriate for demonstrating achievement of the learning outcomes for each module. All modules are assessed by means of programme work in the form of practical choreography presentations, essays, reports, presentations, learning journals, portfolios, online tasks and group working.

Students are expected to carry out an independent research project on a topic relevant to the field of choreography. For this module students are supported through seminar sessions and tutorials during the two semesters so that they can develop research skills which are essential for lifelong learning, career flexibility; and for professional practice as well as for personal and professional development. In addition, students have the option to become involved in a number of collaborative projects through which they can, as part of the degree, develop project management, time management and interpersonal team work skills.



Read less
Designed by performance makers for performance makers, this innovative course will give you the opportunity to make new theatre, dance, digital and live performance work under the guidance of our team of research active, internationally-acclaimed staff who are committed to making performance matter. Read more
Designed by performance makers for performance makers, this innovative course will give you the opportunity to make new theatre, dance, digital and live performance work under the guidance of our team of research active, internationally-acclaimed staff who are committed to making performance matter.

Whether you are a recent theatre or performance graduate, a professional arts worker, an emerging artist, or are working in the education sector, your course will see you work with a diverse range of performance communities.

You will be immersed in an artist-centred learning environment and you will connect with other like-minded people interested in creating performance work. We will give you the skills to expand and reframe your current practices within a supportive community that values practice as research, while giving you the platform to perform your work at national and international festivals.

Take a look at Landing Party 2012 a festival of music, film and performance produced by students from our school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including in music, drama, dance and performing arts.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/performance_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your course can be designed to suit your interests and specific needs. Bespoke learning contracts form an important cornerstone of the course, enabling you to develop as a fully rounded, multi-skilled, creative and reflective artist. Your course will enhance your ability to work successfully in a range of artistic and professional contexts and it will also prepare you for further study should you wish to pursue a career in academia.

- Stage Performer
- Screen Performer
- Stage Manager
- Drama Teacher

Careers advice: the dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

The main benefit to studying this course is access to the expert teaching staff and their network of contacts which stretch beyond Europe.

In recent years our students have performed at festivals around the world - these include Sibiu International Theatre Festival (Romania), Dyonisus Theatre Festival (Croatia), Edinburgh Festival, Latitude Festival (Suffolk), Gift Festival (Gateshead) and also locally at Leeds Festival.

Our students have undertaken professional placements with among others: Guillermo Gomez Pena, Robert Pacitti, Red Ladder Theatre, Third Angel, Leeds and Latitude Music Festivals, Bilbao Bai Theatre School, Kate Craddock (Mouth to Mouth), and The Kantor Archive (Noel Witts).

Core Modules

Performance Matters 1
At a weekly evening seminar, address the issues of what we know, what we should know and how we can learn more about performance. You'll look at performance research, developing different writing registers, epistemic and expert practices, and consider what really matters in performance.

Performance Matters 2
Examine specific research areas proposed by yourself and your course mates,leading to the creation and presentation of a conference paper or presentation in a professional context.

Artist Project Major
Undertake a project in a specific area of performance, such as dance, theatre, live art, or stand up comedy. You will work under the supervision of one or more members of our performing arts staff who will arrange regular observation of your work throughout the rehearsal/making/conceptual process.

Artist Project Minor
Immerse yourself in a project which will result in the creation of one or a series of new performance works. You will have the option to work independently or collaboratively.

Option Modules

The Festival Project
Visit a national or international performance festival with and take the opportunity to collaborate in talk-back sessions with artists, directors, critics and academics. You will submit a written report on your experience.

Embodied Knowledges
We will lead you through a series of classes in voice and body-based training including Feldenkrais, Yoga, Tai Chi, Clean Language, Kalaripyatthu, Hart and Polyphonic singing.

The Artist Mentor
Develop your artistic practice under the mentorship and guidance of an established professional artist who operates in your area of interest. You will be encouraged to critically reflect on your work and identify areas where you can enhance your skills.

Choreographing in Wider Contexts
Explore contemporary global choreographic practices. We will provide you with the space to reconsider and develop your own making practices as a process of choreographing performance.

The Placement Project
Gain hands-on experience with a placement opportunity linked to your career aspirations. Placements might include working in administration in an arts organisation, engaging in undergraduate teaching or contributing to in-house artist projects, either in a supportive role or in a performance context.This is an opportunity to undertake an undergraduate teaching placement through shadowing and collaborating with staff; residencies with established artists and companies; event, project and festival management opportunities with university partners; international platform opportunities.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Dance Studios
If live performance is your calling, our black box and dance studios are the perfect creative spaces.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X