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This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. Read more
This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. All our tutors are award winning writers with an insight into what it takes to make it in the industry. We aim to turn out writers who understand the structure and craft of drama, have a finished script they can use as a calling card, know the industry in all its variety, and can pitch and sell their work.

The MA is taught in seventeen weekends of intensive workshops. It is not, however, ‘low residency’. There are as many hours of teaching as on Bath Spa University’s established MA in Creative Writing.

The course is taught at our beautiful Corsham Court campus where we have state of the art performance, capture and editing facilities. Our students also have opportunities to see their work for the stage performed and to shoot excerpts from their screenplays. We work closely with the School of Music and Performing Arts, and their students will have the opportunity to help act in and produce our work.

Although this is an intellectually challenging postgraduate course, there is no ‘academic’ side detached from the working side. Everything theoretical is geared to help the students as writers.

The MA in Scriptwriting also offers each of its students a free copy of Final Draft scriptwriting software, a must for professional Scriptwriters.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is full-time from October to September, or part-time over two years, and is taught in modules. The first trimester runs from October to January and there are two modules, each delivered in three intensive weekends.

One is the module on Dramatic Structure. This aims to give you an understanding of the full range of ways that plays and scripts can work. You are introduced to dialogue, character, genre, and the different media. But the emphasis is on how to tell a story - a well made plot. Students will read and view widely, but the academic side is not separate from the working side. This module is to help you write.

The other module in the first trimester is a workshop in Writing Theatre and Radio. This is delivered in three intensive weekends. All of the time is devoted to the students’ own work, and much of the time we work on our feet. At the end of the trimester each student finishes a 45 to 60 minute play or radio script, and a 3,000 word essay that explains the structure of that script.

The second trimester, from February to June, also has two modules. One is Professional Skills, again over three intensive weekends. All our experience is that the ability to write alone is not enough to make your way in the various industries of theatre, television, film and radio. You also need to be able to pitch, and to talk intelligently and flexibly about your own work and others’. One of our tutors facilitates this module, and various industry professionals come in for a day each to inform, rehearse and challenge you.

The other module this trimester is Workshop in Screenwriting, also over three weekends. Here you write a script for film or television. We pay particular attention to genre, to the visual and time requirements of the screen, and to writing for particular markets. At the end of this trimester each student finishes 50 to 60 minutes of TV, or a short film script, or a treatment for a full-length film plus at least 45 minutes of polished script.

The third trimester runs from June to the end of September. Here there is only one double module, the Final Script Workshop. The workshops meet over five intensive Saturdays.

In this module each student writes a full length play, a full length film script, or the equivalent in television or radio. This script can be a development and reworking of earlier pieces, but will often be completely new work. At the end of September students submit this script.

The final assessment is based on four things. The most important is this script. The second is a 1,500 word essay explaining exactly where in the market it is aimed and how it is shaped to fit that niche. The third is a cold pitch for this script. When we speak of the market, we are thinking quite broadly. Some students will want to write for Hollywood, British independent films, soap operas, or theatre. Others will want to write radio plays, documentaries, puppet shows, theatre in education, training videos or school plays. The emphasis is, however, always on getting your work to a stage where it is ready to be produced. The fourth is a practical realisation of a short excerpt of an original work stage, screen or radio play. Students are expected to co ordinate this realisation themselves with advice and support from their tutor and using the University’s resources.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

All courses will be taught by intensive workshops. Over the years we have found this is far and away the most productive way of teaching writing. It is particularly suited to scriptwriting, which is very much a social and collective art.

Tutors and visiting professionals:
All of our tutors are writers working in the industry. Among those working on the course will be:

• Ursula Rani Sarma (Course Director) writer for theatre, radio and screen
• Steve May who writes radio and novels
• Lucy Catherine who writes theatre, television and film
• Robin Mukherjee who writes theatre, television and film
• Hattie Naylor who writes film, theatre, radio and opera libretti
• Jonathan Neale who writes theatre, radio and novels

In the second semester we have visits from several professionals in the industry. Each conducts a one-day workshop with students, outlining the industry and giving them rigorous practice in pitching their work. Typically, we will have an agent, a TV producer, a radio producer, a theatre director or literary manager, and a film script editor.

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The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. Read more
The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours.

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still committed above all to writing great fiction.

David Young, Crime Thriller MA - "The chance to have a novel-length manuscript read and challenged by leading published crime writers is what attracted me to the MA course. The focus is on writing your own novel and giving you the tools to do that, rather than getting bogged down in literary criticism. I'd thoroughly recommend it."

Objectives

At the end of the Novels MA course, you will be very different; you will have written a novel.

This course is designed to provide a supportive and thought-provoking, yet challenging, environment for novelists to develop their skills, experiment with approaches to writing, learn about the industry and, most importantly, complete a polished novel ready to send to publishers and agents.

This MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. As a focused, high-intensity course, we only have a maximum cohort of 14 students each year for each genre, therefore you must apply and be awarded a place for Literary Novels or Crime Novels at the outset.

At the core of the Novels course is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Their experience underpins all the teaching.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are happy to work around other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel. The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing by each student.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with your toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and polishing your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the entire plotting and structuring of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. That said, there is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors in each term.

Modules

For this course you are required to write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 polished, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises require 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you need to write a novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules requiring an analysis and an outline.

Term 1
-Fundamentals of fiction
-Storytelling (Part 1)
-Reading as a Writer

Term 2
-Experiments in style
-Storytelling (Part 2)

Term 3-6
-Complete your novel

Career prospects

The focus is for you to finish a novel and use City’s unparalleled industry links to help start our literary career as a published novelist.

At the end of this course, you will have the manuscript of your novel and we will do everything we can to assist you to find an agent to represent you who will then work to find a publisher for it.

Our recently published alumni include:
-Rod Reynolds
-Hannah Kohler
-Jem Lester
-David Young

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. Read more
The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. The new 18 month part-time NFTS Diploma in Writing and Producing Comedy will enable students to develop all forms of scripted and unscripted comedy including, sitcoms, sketch shows, and panel shows for radio and tv. The course is run in partnership with Channel 4.

Quick Facts

- 18 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in January
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- The world's first Diploma course in Writing and Producing Comedy.
- Delivered in partnership with Channel 4
- Part-time, evening course
- Regular Industry speakers
- Develop and write an original show and make a taster tape.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/writing-and-producing-comedy

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. Students will be taught by NFTS writing and producing tutors supported by guest sessions from the people responsible for some of the UK’s most iconic UK shows including Peep Show, Father Ted, Have I Got News for You, Spitting Image, Horrible Histories and Green Wing.

The course advisory board includes:

Ash Atalla – The Office, Cuckoo, Trollied
Dawson Bros – The Peter Serafinowicz Show, That Mitchell & Webb Look, Big School
Sam Bain - Peep Show, Fresh Meat, Rev
Richard Boden – Blackadder, 'Allo 'Allo, IT Crowd
Gregor Cameron – Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show, Fighting Talk
Saurabh Kakkar – Head of Development – Comedy – Big Talk
Graham Linehan – Father Ted, IT Crowd, Count Arthur Strong
Arabella McGuigan – Smack the Pony, Brass Eye
Caroline Norris - Horrible Histories, The Armstrong & Miller Show, Dead Ringers
John O’Farrell – Spitting Image, Have I Got News For You, Novelist
Richard Preddy – Green Wing, Campus
Lucy Robinson - Co-Founder Little Comet Film & TV/Head of Comedy Brothers and Sisters
Helen Spencer -Salford Comedy Festival, Salford Sitcom Showcase, Jesting About
Lorna Watson & Ingrid Oliver – Watson & Oliver

The course is part-time (one evening a week and occasional Saturdays) over eighteen months and is delivered in central London. You will be expected to spend at least 8 hours a week working on assignments for the course. You will leave the course with a portfolio of material developed during the course, this could include a ten-minute taster tape of an idea you have developed, or a full script and some sketches and one-liners.

Specifically you will learn about:

- Comedy landscape
- Radio comedy
- Sketches
- Panel shows and formats
- Characterisation
- Story structure
- Narrative TV comedy
- Script editing
- Topical one-liners
- Outlines and treatments
- Pitching
- Commissioning processes
- Working with performers
- Compliance issues
- Working with writers
- Writing briefs

Students graduate able to:

- generate comedy programme ideas
- write or produce a narrative comedy, sketch show or comedy entertainment show
- pitch ideas to commissioning editors
- work with writers and help them develop their ideas

So you think you’re funny? Apply Now!

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £4650 on offer to 2 of the successful candidates. Bursaries will be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective and voice to the course.

CURRICULUM

The course is made up of a number of modules and workshops, you learn by ‘doing’ as well as understanding theory and developing a variety of practical and creative skills.

Module 1: Writing and producing sketch shows
 A sketch needs a premise, a core funny idea that is its reason to exist. As soon as a sketch begins, the audience looks for this premise and it needs to be apparent. You will learn how this works by writing sketches for different shows and getting feedback on them from established sketch performers and producers. You will have your material read by experienced sketch performers, and the chance to have your material performed for an invited audience.

Module 2: Topical one-liners, formats and panel shows. Topical one-liners for Have I Got News for You, The News Quiz and other topical shows is often the entry point for writers. You will learn by a mixture of practice, theory and feedback, the basics of writing topical jokes. You will learn how to develop your own format or panel show idea.

Module 3: Radio Comedy 
Many comedy writers and producers have worked in both television and radio with many shows starting out on radio and moving to television. It is the entry point for many established comedy writers and producers. You will develop and test your skills by developing material for Radio 4 and pitch ideas to radio comedy producers.

Module 4: Writing/Producing an existing sitcom 
You will learn about writing for a situation and a bunch of characters that already exist, concentrating on pitching appropriate story ideas to the creators of those shows. You will also learn about script editing and how to give notes.

Module 5: Writing a TV narrative comedy 
You will develop an idea for a television narrative comedy (sitcom), pitch it, and write the first draft of a script.

Module 6: Graduation project 
Working on your own, or in a pair, you will develop a sitcom, comedy drama or sketch show for TV or radio. You will write one episode, and either shoot a taster tape or have some scenes performed by professional actors or produce a radio show.

NFTS BENEFITS

Comedy course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema); and NFTS Masterclasses (major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include Graham King (producer, Hugo, The Departed), Guy Ritchie (Director, Sherlock Holmes), Danny Boyle (Director, Slumdog Millionaire) and Ian Livingstone (former President and CEO, Eidos).

TUTORS

Many of the people on the course advisory board will also teach on the course. In addition the course is supported by Channel 4 commissioners and executives.

APPLY WITH

- Two TV or radio sketches of no more than 400 words each. One of these should be set on a polar landscape.
- An outline for a comedy series, no more than 600 words
- Two short proposed story outlines for an existing sitcom. Each of the 2 episode outlines should be no more than 200 words. The sitcom we want you to write for is Bluestone 42
Each of your 2 stories should have a beginning, middle and an end. Make sure you do your background research and ensure you understand how Bluestone 42 operates as a sitcom

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR WRITING AND PRODUCING COMEDY COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=656

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio. Read more
The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio.

During your time with us you will be following a programme of study that is designed to connect practice with theory, with the eventual aim of providing you with an extensive portfolio of work that could serve as a calling card for the industry. Here you can write short scripts, adaptations and feature length scripts in the medium of your choice.

Our Scriptwriting degree is a valuable opportunity to achieve a high level academic qualification that combines vocational training with analytical skills. We can help you forge working relationships with professional writers and academics, and to explore potential vocational pathways in writing and/or academia.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/136-ma-scriptwriting

What you will study

The MA Scriptwriting course will include the following elements, though you can choose to specialise in writing for film, theatre, TV or radio:

Script Analysis – The module will identify various methods of script analysis from classical structure to more post-structural models equipping you to differentiate between approaches then apply the approach more suited your personal needs.

Short Script – In this module you are required to write a short drama script – either for theatre, radio or for the screen. As part of the module you will visit a specific location as a creative stimulus; this will form the basis for developing the initial idea and writing the final piece.

Adaptation – The module focuses initially on analysis of case studies of adaptations that will include readings of both the original texts and sources as well as the final adapted forms, before offering approaches to allow students to generate their own adaptations.

Major Project Treatment – This module is designed to teach students how to conceive, structure and write a treatment or outline for their final project. It includes analysis of story structure as well as comprehensive guidance on the techniques of writing and presenting an industry-ready package including a pitch, synopsis and treatment.

Major Project – Students will work with their supervisor through the process of evolving their treatment into a final draft, full-length script. Because the story has already been developed, with structure and character arcs already in place, the emphasis at this stage will be more on writing scenes and crafting dialogue

You will be tutored through these modules, which culminate in a full-length script that showcases the skills you have gained during the course and can potentially act as an industry calling card.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Learning and teaching methods

The Full Time course is taught through lectures and seminars held at the Atrium Building coupled and one to one tutorials. We also combine with the Part Time students during a series of intensive residential sessions and master-classes with industry professionals.

Following up from the weekend master-classes the Part Time course employs distance-learning practises, things like Skype tutorials or tutorials via phone or written feedback via e-mail.

The MA Scriptwriting may also be studied through the medium of Welsh.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

USW’s MA Scriptwriting will introduce students to industry professionals and generate a range of networking opportunities. The skills acquired on this scriptwriting course lead either to a career as a writer in film, theatre, TV or radio, or to further academic study at PhD level.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills.

All postgraduate courses at the University of South Wales’ Cardiff Campus offer students the opportunity to undertake a 60 credit Learning Through Employment Research Project as an alternative to a traditional final dissertation, major project or production.

The focus of the project is an individual, organisational problem solving, knowledge-based approach.

As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

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This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice. Read more

Why take this course?

This course encourages a lively environment where as a budding writer you can experiment, be imaginative and ambitious, as well as critically reflect on your practice.

You will have the opportunity to write literary novels, historical fiction, crime, science fiction, children’s stories, as well as screenwriting or short fiction – we encourage and respect all genres.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by lecturers with professional experience, many of whom are established practising writers
Complete a major project in the form of your own novel, screenplay or poem and learn about the market and current debates within differing genres in the process
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

We continuously encourage you to seize as many opportunities as possible to make your writing visible to publishers and the public. Strengthening your creative writing skills on this course can lead to a variety of different creative career paths from roles in publishing to writing children’s books.

Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
PR

Module Details

The course consists of units focusing on creative practice, academic contexts and critical understanding. For the final stage of the course you will write a creative dissertation which can take the form of a novel (or portion thereof – 30,000 to 40,000 words in length), a collection of prose, poetry or a screenplay.

Here are the units you will study:

Writer's Workshop – Exploration: In this unit, you will be encouraged to experiment in differing genres to build confidence in writing and research.

Writer's Workshop – Resolution: During the course of this unit, you will research your chosen genre or idea and write a proposal and first chapters for the major project (dissertation). Your research and writing practice will be led by reading, discussion, debate and some substantial formative work that will eventually lead to the written proposal and/or opening chapters of a novel or pages of a screenplay or poetry.

Critical Reading for Creative Writers: This is an essay-based unit, in which you will explore critical approaches to the written word with oral presentations and researched essays.

Critical Thinking for Creative Writers: This unit allows you to approach a critical theory by relating it to your own creative writing, with reference to your major creative project. This unit is also essay-based.

The Final Project – The Creative Writing Dissertation: This unit will allow you to complete a major work in any genre (prose, poetry or screenplay) of up to 30,000 words (or equivalent). You will receive guidance and support from tutors throughout this unit of study.

Programme Assessment

Your learning will primarily be via workshop-based sessions where you will explore and develop your own writing as well as constructively contribute to the work of other writers around you. We aim to create a friendly atmosphere in which you will receive feedback to continually help evolve your creative writing style.

Your progress will be assessed by regularly submitted work and a final creative writing project in the form of a literary form or genre of your choice and geared to a specific market.

Student Destinations

You are encouraged to attend and read at ‘open mic’ sessions to develop performance skills. Previous students have found this invaluable not only when reading their own work aloud but also in professional practice. You are also encouraged to build a portfolio of work to show publishers and exhibit your work in other ways through creative blogs, or by submitting your work to online magazines and competitions.

On graduating, many of our students are equipped with the skills and confidence to continue to write and publish after the course has ended. This MA in Creative Writing can lead to a range of employment opportunities in publishing, editing, journalism and education.

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- Have your music performed by a professional 50-piece film orchestra. - Personal 1-to-1 tuition from top professional orchestrators and composers. Read more

Award: MA awarded by University of Chichester

Course Highlights

- Have your music performed by a professional 50-piece film orchestra.
- Personal 1-to-1 tuition from top professional orchestrators and composers.
- Learn how the biggest names in the business go from computer DAW to live score and how you can implement that workflow in your own studio.
- Electives in Pro Tools for Film composers, Advanced Sibelius and Kontakt Programming.
- Unique, real-world approach combines detailed sampled orchestration instruction with live orchestration and score preparation.
- Work on over 20 projects. The workload is challenging but it’s only through hard work that you will truly reach the next level.
- Regular online workshops and tutorial groups, forum discussions and exclusive webinars.
- Telephone and direct email support

Your major project will bring it all together as you write and orchestrate 15 minutes of music, plan, budget, produce the scores and parts and the pro tools sessions and see it right through to the live session.

Fees:

All of our postgraduate courses have a flat fee, regardless of whether you are full or part time.

Course: £8,850 / $12,950 / €11,600

Orchestral Recording Session: $2,500

Fees can be paid as one upfront cost, or as instalments spread monthly across the duration of the course.

Students are required to buy, rent or access additional books, scores, recordings, films and other reference material.

Time Commitment

In the UK, an MA involves 180 academic credits and each credit represents a notional 10 hours of work. That comes to pretty close to a full-time working week for a year.

For Orchestration for Film, Games and Television students there are 24 projects including a longer Major Project at the end of the course.

Practice based creative degrees are notoriously difficult to quantify in terms of how long they take to complete. It depends to a large extent, on how fast you write music. Some students write 5 minutes of music a day while others write 5 minutes a week or less. If you work reasonably productively, i.e. 2-3 minutes a day, which is probably average in the professional working industry, you would complete the work in much less time.

A well organized person, working productively, might be able to complete the course in two or three days a week for a year whereas another working slower, might take 5 days a week. Assume therefore that the full-time lies somewhere between 2 and 5 days a week depending on your work rate. Part time would be pro-rata so a two year schedule would be 1-2 days a week, three years 1 day a week or less.

The Provisional Schedule

Both full-time and part-time students join the same course. Full time students will compete their taught modules by the end of the 9th month. The rest of the year is spent on their major project. Part time students will do their modules in roughly twice the time.

The live orchestral sessions will happen once a year. Students will attend the session immediately following the completion of their major project.

To encourage a sense of “togetherness”, most of the group activities are not locked into particular modules. Guest lecturers, webinars, workshops and solo live sessions will be scheduled regularly throughout the year and are free for all to attend. The individual module work is normally more focused on individual or small group tuition and so is more flexible in terms of timing.

Application

When you are sure you are ready to apply for the programme, go to the course page and click the “apply now” button. This will take you to our store where you can pay the non-returnable application fee of £50 / €70 / $90.

Once your payment has been processed, you will be able to login and complete the application pack.

We will need your personal details, details of your academic, musical and technical background. If you are offered a place, we will require copies of a number of documents including those confirming your academic history, identity and language ability where English is not your first language.

You will also be required to send us some music.

For full details on the application procedure, please visit our website below.

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With the MSc Air Safety Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Air Safety Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aviation industry (for at least two years), and have a primary interest in its safety. Current students include pilots, air traffic controllers, maintenance staff, engineers and the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Air Safety Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, airports and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, safety officers, pilots, aircraft engineers, air traffic controllers, dispatchers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date safety and risk managers ready to succeed into leadership positions.

The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the Honourable Company of Airline Pilots (HCAP) to increase the career opportunities of aircrew, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aviation safety industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

This course gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to air safety management. The course is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, crisis, human motivation, and management of the air safety industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of accident and incident investigation, human factors, safety risk management.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Modules

We explore air safety management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. This means you learn from the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry's crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

The course is based on completing the Induction Workshop plus eight modules over one to five years, which are taught over three-day periods. Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt. Students also take on a project/dissertation in an air transport related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules.

Core modules
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Airline Marketing (EPM821)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)
-Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airline Revenue Management, Pricing and Distribution (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation (EPM980)

Dissertation - a dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including safety managers, training captains, quality managers, flight safety officers, safety inspectors, safety consultants and accident investigators in civil aviation authorities, airlines and with other aircraft operators and defence forces worldwide.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc.

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With the MSc Air Transport Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Air Transport Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aviation industry (for at least two years). Current students include pilots, air traffic controllers, maintenance staff, engineers and the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Air Transport Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, airports and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, pilots, aircraft engineers, air traffic controllers, dispatchers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date managers ready to succeed into leadership positions. The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the Honourable Company of Airline Pilots (HCAP) to increase the career opportunities of aircrew, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aviation industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by industry professionals and leaders in their field of expertise including the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry’s crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt. Each module, including the Induction Workshop, is taught over a three day period.

This programme gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to air transport management. The programme is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, finance, human motivation, and management of the air transport industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of fleet planning, route management, engineering and air traffic management issues.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Assessment

Each elective is assessed by two pieces of coursework, the core modules are assessed by one piece of coursework and an examination. Each module comprises:
-Part I: Prior reading before the module where appropriate.
-Part II: Attendance at City (or other locations) for the module over three days.
-Part III: Examinations are held on the third day of the core modules.
-Part IV: Coursework is due within six weeks from the last day of the module.

Modules

We explore air transport management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Students also take on a project/dissertation in an air transport related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career. Students who choose note to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme with the five years can receive a Postgraduate Certificate pending Programme Director approval.

We cover the full spectrum of a Master of Science education, adding Management modules for the future career in aviation. The dissertation at the end of the MSc programme gives each student the opportunity to demonstrate the new research and project management qualifications achieved through the programme.

The programme is based on the successful completion of the Induction Workshop which acts as an entry pathway to the MSc. The MSc consists of three core modules and 5 electives plus the project/dissertation. Each module is taught over a three day period across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt.

The dissertation at the end of the MSc programme gives each student the opportunity to demonstrate the new research and project management qualifications achieved through the programme.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules. Core modules for the Air Transport MSc are airline business, airline operations and air transport economics.

Core modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules - you will choose five elective modules. Each elective module is worth 15 credits.
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Marketing (EPM821)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)
-Airline Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airline Revenue Management and Finance (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation Challenges - from Unmanned to Spaceflight Vehicles (EPM980)
-Reviews of Quality, Safety and Aviation Business Functions (EPM976)

Dissertation - A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society. Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including the chief operating officer of Oman Air, the chief executive officer of Jet Time, the Safety Manager of Lufthansa, the Air Safety Director of ICAO and the vice president of Emirates Airbus Fleet.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc. An RAF air traffic controller immediately moved into a senior training position at Eurocontrol in Brussels after completing the programme.

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You want to write a novel. We have an Master's degree that will help you write it. And we think what we do is unique. Why? Because the St Mary's Creative Writing MA works with a very small cohort. Read more
You want to write a novel. We have an Master's degree that will help you write it. And we think what we do is unique.

Why? Because the St Mary's Creative Writing MA works with a very small cohort. This means you will receive one-to-one tuition on a far more regular basis compared to other Creative Writing postgraduate courses. Here, you will be personally guided through the journey of your first draft, rather than being another student at the back of a large class. No short stories, no poetry, no screenplay. Just your novel.

Your novel deserves a tutor that understands all, and not just some of its parts. And you deserve a tutor who will coach not just the first draft of your novel, but also the development of your creative process.

Why St Mary's?

St Mary's tutors have published novels and are publishing now. Drawing on our connections with the industry we have, in the first year alone, brought in the winner of The Costa Novel award (2014), the fiction director of Bloomsbury, and The Bookseller's Agent of the Year (2014).

When you have finished the degree, you can choose to continue workshopping and drafting with the dedicated cohorts we establish every year.

We are passionate about our craft, and about your craft too. It is why our first PhD student in Creative Writing struck a two-book deal with Canongate and sales in multiple foreign territories.

Not convinced? Pick up the phone or email Programme Director and author Christie Watson today – she wants to hear about your novel – the one you know you have to write.

Course Content

You will study individually and as part of a group. At the beginning of the course, you will be allocated a personal supervisor who will oversee the development of your draft through tutorials.

Group work seeks to cultivate the collaborative atmosphere and productivity of an artist’s colony, through peer led workshops, meetings with experienced authors and encounter with readers. The supportive and comitted nature of our cohort is important to us, and we seek to put together the best possible people, for the best possible learning experience.

The course takes you from the exploratory phase of writing through to re-drafting, in five modules, across three semesters and a lecture series.

In addition to the modules and workshops, your cohort will be visited by working authors and industry figures, who will talk about their working practice and experiences in publishing.

Assessment

Each module produces a creative element of your draft which will be assessed. In the seminar modules, you will also be assessed by presentation to the group.

One-to-one tutorial feedback and support is essential for the writer aiming to complete a productive draft in just one year.

We are excited about starting this course at St Mary’s, where teaching was ranked first among our 20 competitor institutions and second for overall satisfaction in The National Student Satisfaction Survey (NSS). St Mary’s Creative Writing tutors score very highly in the quality of this provision and outside of our immediate competitors the university is ranked 15th in the country.

Your tutorial time will be scheduled but as with our undergraduate courses, we like to think the door is always open.

In formal assessment, each module will produce a mixture of creative submission to deadline, workshop engagement, critical reflection and seminar presentation. The weight of marking always rests with creative submission and the aim is to complete a draft of a novel through continuous assessment.

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Explore human behaviour in the workplace on this BPS accredited MSc in Organisational Psychology. This course is for students who want to improve the working lives of employees. Read more
Explore human behaviour in the workplace on this BPS accredited MSc in Organisational Psychology.

Who is it for?

This course is for students who want to improve the working lives of employees. It is for those who want to understand how to improve organisational life.

We welcome applicants with a degree in Psychology, from a UK or international institution. We will also consider those with other degrees and a keen interest in improving people’s working lives. You will be expected to conduct some statistical analysis as part of the course so some experience working with data would be beneficial.

Objectives

From understanding how to select the best employee, training them to reach their potential and investigating the politics of power on corporate boards, City’s MSc in Organisational Psychology gives you the opportunity to explore your own area of interest and conduct research within an organisation of your choice.

The programme has been designed to give you the theoretical and practical knowledge you will need to work as an organisational psychologist. Developed to reflect the Department’s unique research strengths, you will have access to specialist topics such as mindfulness within the workplace and the use of innovative selection methods.

At City we interrogate the discipline from a holistic perspective, considering the individual, the organisation and the socio-political framework in which both operate; taking a scientist-practitioner approach ensuring that everything we teach can be applied in practice.

Taught by academic experts who are also involved in consulting, this accredited Masters will give you the tools to understand human behaviour within the workplace.

These are some of the questions that the course poses:
-What are the key contextual issues affecting the workplace now?
-What impact does technology have on the wider work environment?
-How can wellbeing be measured and promoted in the workplace?

Placements

Placements are not a formal requirement of the course. However, this MSc generates interest from employers seeking talented students and graduates for voluntary work placements, evaluations, internships, and short-term work experience. Whilst on the course, previous students have secured excellent internships with London-based consultancies.

You have the opportunity to conduct your final dissertation within an organisation and there are also opportunities to get involved in the research being conducted by members of staff while you study.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a substantial amount of group work and discussions around the core content from the first term onwards. One of the benefits of this programme is the blend of diverse perspectives you will experience collaborating with peers from a broad skillset and age range.

When it comes to assessment, you will find a substantial amount of the assignments are practitioner focused rather than being purely essay and exam based. For example, you might be asked to write a pitch for a company, where we would expect you to write about the theoretical underpinning of what you are proposing and then present it to the client as a practitioner.

One of the benefits of this varied assessment style is that you learn to write from an academic and practitioner perspective and understand different client needs.

Modules

The MSc Organisational Psychology consists of eight taught modules, plus an applied research dissertation, which normally takes five months to complete and forms the final part of the programme.

There is a substantial amount of theoretical work in all of the modules, but you will have the opportunity to apply your learning through practical exercises, group role plays and case studies.

Full-time students complete all eight modules and the dissertation in one calendar year (from September to September). Part-time students complete the course over two years.

Modules
-Research Design and Statistics (15 credits)
-Workplace Wellbeing (15 credits)
-Design of Work and Work Environments (15 credits)
-Learning, Training and Development (15 credits)
-Leadership and Organisational Behaviours (15 credits)
-Professional skills (15 credits)
-Psychological assessment (15 credits)
-Research in organisations (15 credits)

Dissertation
You will need to submit a dissertation as part of the programme. In the second term you will start with a research methods seminar where you will be given support to develop the necessary skills for undertaking independent research. You will choose a topic under the guidance of a project supervisor and conduct empirical research in your chosen area, which will involve gaining access, collecting and analysing data and submitting an 8-10,000-word dissertation. In the summer term, you will work full-time completing your final dissertation. Many students choose to conduct research within an organisation for their final dissertation so they can address a real-world problem. One of our current students is working with a large public health organisation to explore how employee engagement has changed since a major internal change programme; whilst another is investigating what impact shared parental leave has on men’s careers with a professional severance firm.

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to apply their learning in a range of professional settings across the public and private sector, including organisations such as Aviva, Accenture, the Ministry of Defence and the BBC.

Lucy Gallagher MSc Organisational Psychology, 2014
Whilst completing her Masters at City, Lucy worked for Assessment and Development Consultants as a Centre Administrator supporting the manager in running assessment and development centres. Soon after completing her Masters, Lucy completed a Graduate Scheme at Saville Consulting, gaining experience in the three core business areas.

Now working as a consultant at Saville Consulting, Lucy works on a number of projects including partner recruitment, assessment centre design, selection and assessment, employee development and competency framework design. She is passionate about making sure the right people are in the right roles and that individuals get the help and development they need to reach their full potential.

Tara Tapper MSc Organisational Psychology, 2008
Since graduating from City in 2008, Tara has worked in India as the Head of HR for RBS Technology Services and managed change programmes at Mischon de Reya, a law practice based in London and New York. Tara is currently working as Group HR Director at Wonga.com.

In 2008 Tara was awarded the MSc Occupational Psychology Research Prize for her research into the employee engagement challenges, barriers and biases faced by maternity returners on the 'Partner track' at a city law firm. The prize recognises academic excellence and is awarded by the British Psychological Society.

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This course is taught jointly by the Departments of Philosophy and Politics. It’s designed to help you develop advanced knowledge and understanding of political philosophy. Read more

About the course

This course is taught jointly by the Departments of Philosophy and Politics. It’s designed to help you develop advanced knowledge and understanding of political philosophy. The MA teaches you the research skills you need for a PhD in political theory or a related subject.

Where your masters can take you

A masters from Sheffield will set you apart and is excellent preparation for a PhD at any leading university or for a wide range of careers, including teaching, law, publishing, civil service, charities, and NGOs, among others. Our postgraduate students have gone on to academic posts at Aberdeen, UC Berkeley, Birkbeck, Cambridge, Essex, Keele, Kent, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Manitoba, Newcastle, Nottingham, the Open University, Oxford, Sheffield, Stirling and Zurich.

Our style of teaching encourages originality and independence of mind. You will learn how to express complex ideas clearly, and how to argue persuasively for those ideas. You’ll also learn to understand other points of view. Our graduates have the confidence and the focus to tackle big projects, and they know how to carry out their own research.

We also offer more specific training. For example, many of the modules on the MA Political Theory are relevant to careers in politics, public service and NGOs.

A lively study environment

You’ll be part of a large group of students from all over the world. You’ll socialise together, share ideas and inspire each other.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us 2nd in the UK for the quality of our published work. We have expertise in almost every area of the subject, particularly philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophical logic, philosophy of psychology, history of philosophy, political philosophy, metaethics and feminist philosophy. The department is also home to The Hang Seng Centre for Cognitive Studies and a number of major research projects.

Studentships

If you qualify, you may be able to get financial support through the University’s studentships and fee waivers, and the AHRC Block Grant Partnership.

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/philosophy/prospectivepostgraduates/funding

Core modules

Political Philosophy Research Seminar; Dissertation.

Other modules include

Research seminars in: History of Philosophy; Morals and Other Values; Mind and Language; Metaphysics and Epistemology; Cognitive Studies. Modules including Human Rights, Politics and Global Migration; The Politics of International Law.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. You’ll write a long essay for each module and a dissertation. If you’re going on to a PhD you may choose to write a PhD proposal.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars and tutorials. A long essay for each module and a dissertation. If you’re going on to a PhD you may choose to write a PhD proposal.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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With the MSc Aircraft Maintenance Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Aircraft Maintenance Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aircraft maintenance industry (for at least two years). Current students include engineers, maintenance staff, the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Aircraft Maintenance Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, MRO and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, aircraft engineers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date managers ready to succeed into leadership positions.

The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the AJ Walters (AJW) to increase the career opportunities of aircraft engineers, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aircraft maintenance industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

This course gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to aircraft maintenance management. The course is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, crisis, human motivation, and management of the aircraft maintenance industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of accident and incident investigation, human factors, safety risk management.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Assessment

Each elective is assessed by two pieces of coursework, the core modules are assessed by one piece of coursework and an examination. Each module comprises:

Part I: Prior reading before the onsite module where appropriate.
Part II: Attendance at the institution (or other locations) for the module over three days.
Part III: Examinations are held at the end of the core modules.
Part IV: Coursework for assessment. Coursework is required within six weeks of the onsite module.

Modules

We explore aircraft maintenance management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. This means you learn from the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry’s crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

The course is based on completing the Induction Workshop plus eight modules over one to five years, which are taught over three-day periods. Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt.

Students also take on a project/dissertation in an aircraft maintenance related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules.

Core modules
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Airline Marketing (EPM821)
-Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airline Revenue Management, Pricing and Distribution (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation (EPM980)

Dissertation - a dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including safety managers, training captains, quality managers, flight safety officers, safety inspectors, safety consultants and accident investigators in civil aviation authorities, airlines and with other aircraft operators and defence forces worldwide.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc.

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In a globally connected and rapidly changing world the skills needed in the future are very different to those needed today. It is argued that education offers each individual and nation the best chance of navigating an unknown future. Read more
In a globally connected and rapidly changing world the skills needed in the future are very different to those needed today. It is argued that education offers each individual and nation the best chance of navigating an unknown future. This course explores the unique challenges facing educational leaders in the 21st century as they learn to cope with uncertainty and adapt to evolving conditions.

The MA Education: Leadership and Management is designed for those who are interested in becoming, or presently working as, middle and senior managers and leaders in schools and other educational organisations in the UK and internationally. Drawing on internationally based research this course offers a critical and culturally based understanding of leadership as a social and ethical practice.

This course promotes the development of leadership competencies through practice based inquiry in which theories may be applied, or developed, within the workplace. The course will develop individual leadership skills and competencies as well as the capacity to lead and manage change

The course is structured over three trimesters (thirds) and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
Leadership in Practice: part 1. (30 credits) explores how leadership is exercised in your own educational setting through analysing a specific example of improvement and change. Taught sessions will provide an understanding of the ways in which leadership impacts on the climate and culture of a school or educational setting you will explore theories of organizational change. You will then undertake a work-based action research project in order to critically evaluate a chnage initiative and your impact as a leader.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Leadership in Practice: part 2. (option 15 credits). An important aspect of leadership development is concerned with the way that our life experiences influence our values, beliefs and practice as a leader. This module explores the narratives that we tell as leaders and how our educational vision is shaped by our past experiences. Drawing on research into ‘learning lives’ you will be supported to write a reflective case study of self that articulates the influences that have shaped your professional identity and will inform your future development.
Leadership principles: context and challenges. (option 15 credits). This module will develop your critical thinking and practical understanding of the principles of leadership. Time will be spent in sessions exploring current international research and thinking in order to challenge and develop an understanding of what consittutes effective leadership within particular contexts.
Leadership and coaching. (shared option 15 credits). Coaching is recognised as a significant, and distinctive, leadership style. This module will help you to gain an understanding of the differences between coaching, mentoring and leadership. You will have an opportunity to develop your coaching skills in your school or setting. These experiences will enable you to reflect critically on what constitutes effective coaching and its value as a leadership style.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15 credit module or 5,000 words for a 30 credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor, who will offer guidance on structure and academic writing

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