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Masters Degrees (World War Studies)

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The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. Read more

The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. This programme will enable you to study the subject in detail, to update your knowledge, and to become familiar with the use of personal accounts, including interviews and testimonies. You will be taught by experts in the field, and you will carry out your own research in your favourite area.

You will study in depth some of the key issues in the military, political, and social history of the Second World War, such as strategy, diplomacy and politics of Axis and Allied forces, the war in the air, the victory campaign in the West, and the war in the East, including life under German occupation, the fate of societies under the conditions of total war, and last but not least, the Holocaust.

Why Wolverhampton?

Our part-time Master’s programme will enable you to explore the history of the Second World War. Special consideration will be given to military conflicts, societies at war, and the Holocaust.

You will be guided by a team of historians with the highest international reputation, led by Professor John Buckley and Professor Johannes-Dieter Steinert. The team includes Professor Gary Sheffield, Professor Stephen Badsey; and you will in addition be taught by other international scholars such as Professor John Gooch, Professor Martin Alexander, and Dr Peter Gray.

You will benefit from our international scholarly activities, among them the multidisciplinary conference series “Beyond Camps and Forced Labour. Current International Research on Survivors of Nazi Persecution” (Imperial War Museums, London), “Children and War: Past and Present” (in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict), battlefield tour/study trips to Normandy and the Low Countries and the University of Wolverhampton’s oral history programme and archive.

Career path

Successful completion of the course will enhance your career prospects and could lead to a specialised career in museums, education, armed forces, or as a battlefield guide, along with more general arts-related careers.

It will be particularly relevant to researchers, teachers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, charity and campaign workers.

Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical and analytical understanding of key issues and debates in the history of the Second World War and Holocaust.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources.
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources.
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme.


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This new MA programme explores the military, cultural, political and social history of the First World War, introducing you to advanced concepts of historiography and cultural theory. Read more

This new MA programme explores the military, cultural, political and social history of the First World War, introducing you to advanced concepts of historiography and cultural theory.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/765/first-world-war-studies

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI915 - Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)

HI932 - Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)

HI823 - Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)

HI828 - Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)

HI860 - The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)

HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)

HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

HI815 - War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is dependent on module choice, but is typically by coursework and a dissertation of 15-18,000 words.

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history

Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history

Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine

Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War. Read more

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War.

This is an exciting new programme delivered by a truly world-class team of scholars. Led by Professor Gary Sheffield, it includes Professor Stephen Badsey and Dr Spencer Jones, Professor Peter Simkins, Dr John Bourne, Professor John Buckley and Dr Laura Ugolini. This is the strongest cluster of scholars specialising in the military history of the First World War to be found in any conventional UK university, and the team will be supported by a number of prestigious guest speakers. A particular strength of the programme is the quality of the teaching. You can watch lectures on aspects of the First World War given by some of the team here: Aspects of the history of the First World War

University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong.

For further information, please contact Professor Gary Sheffield,  or 

Why Wolverhampton?

University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong. The emphasis of the programme is on the military and political history of Britain and the British Empire in the 1914-18 war.

Members of the team:

Professor Gary Sheffield is one of the UK’s highest profile scholars of the First World War. He has published extensively in the field, including Forgotten Victory: The First World War – Myths and Realities (2001)and The Chief: Douglas Haig and the British Army (2011)Sheffield regularly appears on television and radio, writes in the national press. He is President of the International Guild of Battlefield Guides and a Vice-President of the Western Front Association and is advising the government and the Army on their respective commemorative programmes.

Professor Stephen Badsey is one of the world's leading military historians of the First World War, and is a particular authority on propaganda in 1914-18. His publications include Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry 1880-1918 (2008) and The British Army in Battle and Its Image 1914-18 (2009). He has made over 50 media appearancesand acted as a consultant to numerous TV programmes.

Professor Peter Simkins MBE is an extremely well-respected historian with an international reputation for excellence. Formerly Senior Historian at the Imperial War Museum, he is President of the Western Front Association. His publications include the seminal Kitchener's Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-16 (1988) and The Somme and Beyond: The BEF on the Western Front, 1916-18 (forthcoming in 2014).

Dr Spencer Jones is one of the leading scholars of the emerging generation of British military historians. His books include From Boer War to World War: Tactical Reform of the British Army, 1902-14 (2012) and, as editor and contributor, Stemming the Tide: Officers and Leadership in the British Expeditionary Force, 1914 (2013). In 2013 he was appointed to the prestigious position of Historian of the Royal Regiment of Artillery.

Career path

Successful completion of this course will enhance your career prospects. It will be particularly relevant to researchers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, conflict resolution and NGO workers, charity and campaign workers. Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate extensive knowledge and detailed understanding of the history of Britain in the First World War.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme


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Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. Read more

Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. We have designed this course expressly to enhance your employability and support your professional career development

Key benefits

  • A unique opportunity to study war from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
  • Designed to provide a postgraduate-level introduction to War Studies for students who have little or no specialist background in the field.
  • A chance to develop a range of transferable skills that will enhance your employability, aid your professional-career development and help prepare you for postgraduate research.
  • You will be taught by some of the very best academics in the field. Departmental staff are internationally acknowledged experts in their areas of specialization; they are active researchers and routinely use their latest findings in their teaching.
  • An opportunity to study at a global centre of excellence that enjoys close relationships with other academic institutions, with think-tanks, non-governmental organizations and policy-making bodies around the world.
  • Opportunities to network with high-profile visitors, such as government ministers, ambassadors and generals, who frequently give talks in the Department.

Description

War is a key aspect of human experience, and people have long sought to understand it from a diverse range of perspectives. You will study alongside historians, social scientists, philosophers, jurists and artists, benefitting from their perspectives and those of the students around you.

We will provide you with an intellectual ‘toolbox’ composed of skills and techniques drawn from a range of disciplines associated with the humanities and social sciences. We will not train you as a specialist historian, philosopher, strategist, etc., but you will be introduced to elements of various disciplines that are relevant to the study of war. The challenge lies in combining them in order to achieve a sophisticated and rounded understanding of the subject.

The course will appeal if you are a student of politics, history or strategic studies or if you are a professional in defence, diplomacy or foreign affairs who wants to reflect on the broader implications of your experiences.

Course purpose

To introduce the field of war studies to graduate students and professionals who have an interest in deepening their understanding of war. You will gain an understanding of the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. The programme will appeal to students from a wide range of backgrounds including politics, history and strategic studies; and professionals in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs wanting to reflect on the broader implications of their experiences.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback you will typically have 2 hours per week for two terms per 40-credit module. This can be split into 1 lecture + 1 seminar or other combinations thereof. You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have our central departmental workshops (2 hours each) and three to

four sessions with the supervisor during which you will develop your dissertation topic, identify a research question, an approach to answering it, including selection of appropriate methods for gathering and using evidence. The timing of these three to four sessions is up to the student and advisor to arrange. These will complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 and 40 credit modules are assessed through a combination of essay, presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be 100% dissertation up to 15000 words.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study American Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study American Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in American Studies helps to develop an understanding of the forces that have moulded and continue to shape America, and helps us to make sense of our contemporary world. The comparative study of the history and culture of the United States addresses themes such as immigration, democracy, slavery, imperialism, multiculturalism, religion, the economy and, more recently, terrorism. These issues do not just concern the past; they are directly relevant to the world we live in.

MA by Research in American Studies

The MA by Research in American Studies is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in American Studies for which staff in the Department of Political and Cultural Studies can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project in American Studies with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Department of Political and Cultural Studies

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active. Academic members of staff have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees in American Studies.

An MA by Research in American Studies gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in American Studies, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically as a student of the MA by Research in American Studies programme you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled in the MA by Research American Studies are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

Departmental Research Expertise

At any one time, the department has over forty research students who work together with their supervisors on their projects.

In the area of American Studies, staff have expertise in the American Civil War; US foreign policy; the US ‘War on Drugs’; US politics and government; surveillance and urban America; American conservatism; the Spanish Civil War; American military history; the American West; New South; 20th century American literature, film and popular culture.

Discover more about the Department of Political and Cultural Studies:

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/politics



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The . city of Exeter.  is the perfect setting for our MA in Medieval Studies. At the University there is a wide variety of resources and you will have access to extensive holdings, audio-visual collections and some medieval manuscripts in our . Read more

The city of Exeter is the perfect setting for our MA in Medieval Studies. At the University there is a wide variety of resources and you will have access to extensive holdings, audio-visual collections and some medieval manuscripts in our Special Collections in the University library. Exeter Cathedral Library Archives and the Devon Heritage Centre, located nearby, contain further significant medieval manuscripts, documents and early printed books.

The MA Medieval Studies draws on the expertise of the Centre for Medieval Studies, which is one of the largest centres in the university. Exeter is unique in that we have a large number of specialists in medieval studies across various disciplines. Our expertise is especially strong in medieval history, archaeology, law, music, French literature, English literature, and Arab and Islamic studies. 

Modules are taken from nine different disciplines meaning the course is varied and you will be offered comprehensive training on skills needed to study the Middle Ages, including medieval languages (Latin, Old English, and medieval French) and palaeography. With such a large number of medieval studies experts and excellent links to the local and national heritage sector we are in an excellent position to help you as you further your historical knowledge whether you are planning on progressing to PhD study, pursuing a profession, or simply exploring a passion for medieval studies.

Learning resources

The University's Streatham Campus is located with excellent access to the heart of historic Exeter which has a rich cultural heritage extending back to the Roman period and boasts particularly fine evidence of its medieval past. You will benefit from access to Exeter Cathedral Library and University libraries which maintain excellent holdings relevant to medieval studies.

Modules

A range of optional modules are available which reflect the varied research interests of academic staff across the Centre for Medieval Studies. These interests range widely across the medieval period and cover Britain, Europe and the Islamic world. They also represent several disciplines, including History, Archaeology, Classics, Literature, Music, Art History, Theology and Islamic Studies.

The core module Interpreting the Middle Ages: Images, Texts and Contexts will give students an overview of these different disciplinary approaches and show how they can be applied to the study of medieval texts and objects. Other core modules are Medieval Research Skills, which introduces students to the skills needed to work with medieval sources such as palaeography and codicology, and Current Research in Medieval Studies which asks students to reflect on how academic research projects are designed and presented, and gives them guidance in developing their own dissertation projects. Students also have the option of taking Latin modules and are strongly encouraged to do so if they are considering going on to an MPhil or PhD.

The programme

- offers an excellent, interdisciplinary education in medieval studies, covering a wide range of topics and approaches across the medieval period;

- gives students the opportunity to work with the medieval sources in and around Exeter, for example at Exeter Cathedral, the Devon Heritage Centre and the University’s Special Collections;

- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;

- encourages participation in research seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms and into how academics go about designing and presenting research projects;

- offers excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Research areas

As an MA Medieval Studies student you will be welcome to join the Centre for Medieval Studies, which brings together academic staff and Postgraduate students from a wide range of disciplines across the University’s Colleges. We are brought together by our shared interests which run from the Early Middle Ages to the early Renaissance and may include archaeology, theology, music, literature and law. We hold regular seminars and research events which, if you decide to join us at Exeter, we hope you will not only attend but become an active part of.

Research is at the heart of History and our students are encouraged to come to Departmental Research Seminars and become an active part of wider research community. Our research centres regularly hold seminars and other research events which MA students are welcome to attend.

Our current research centres include:

As well as our research centres we also have a Postgraduate Reading Group for matters medieval which brings together our Masters and PhD students to share ideas.



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This course involves learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of historical events and processes that shape societies. Read more

This course involves learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of historical events and processes that shape societies.

Our views of past events shape, and give meaning to the present. The research Master’s in Historical Studies brings history researchers together with literary, art and cultural experts to construct critical histories of both the past, and the present. We recognise that historical enquiry has important transformative potential not just for our ideas about the past but also for present day societies. We also recognise that to validate our interpretations, we have to look beyond our own discipline. That is why our programme has a strong international element and a connection to the other humanities. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for historical studies. This will greatly benefit your own research and future contributions to scholarly and social debates.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/historical

Europe and its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of historical research, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. Our research examines the full range of periods from antiquity to the present day. All of our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Historical Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on academic training in historiography methods and theory: you’ll learn how to use current conceptual tools and techniques for organising historical evidence as well as how to sift through and analyse a large number of important primary and secondary sources for your research.

- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s in Literary Studies, and in Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.

- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.

- You’ll receive thorough preparation for eventual PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.

- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Historical Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different ‘worlds’ (in terms of culture and social conditions). Research looks at how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other parts of the world. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups

There is a historian in almost all of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a historical researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Historical Studies students:

- The Making of War. History and Memory of Crisis, War and Recovery

This group focuses on research to critically map, describe, and evaluate the dynamic and comprehensive meaning of World War II to Europe and the world.

- Repertoires of Representation

This group studies the historical variations of political representation, articulation and presentation.

- The Ancient World

This group focuses on Greco-Roman Antiquity and its influence on later Western and Eastern cultures.

- Tourism, Travel and Text

The research of this group looks at the traveller/tourist, the act of travelling itself (the journey), and the travel destination (conservation or even creation of heritage in relation to the destinations of travel).

Master’s thesis topics in Historical Studies:

For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area.

A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:

- The Pope under Pressure: Papal Propaganda during Times of Severe Crisis 1494-1549

- The Dutch Communist Party and the question of Apartheid. Analysing the CPN’s position in relation to South Africa’s Apartheid and the anti-Apartheid movement in the Netherlands

- Christian Suburbs: Conceptions of Constantinople’s Religious Topopgraphy at its Limits, 330-1204

- Dogmatic democracy. Direct elections for the European parliament debated, 1958-1961

- 'Komt voor de deur op straat'. A spatial analysis of eighteenth-century Amsterdam violence

Academia and beyond

This programme is primarily intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:

- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre

- Assistant of a senior researcher

- Teacher at an institution for higher education

- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science

- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship

- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals

- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector

- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/historical



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Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more

Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, you can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

  • The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high-calibre training institution.
  • It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.
  • You are taught by experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies and institutions.
  • Situated close to the seat of government, the City, Imperial War Museum, National Maritime Museum, Royal Courts of Justice and Inns of Court, you have unique opportunities to network with key high-profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.
  • Our MA courses are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Description

Our course challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our course prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master’s degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

Course purpose

Our course offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have two hours per week over two 10-week terms. This can be split into one lecture + one seminar or combinations thereof, You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of training workshop/ supervision, to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3000-6000 words), presentation, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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The MA in War. History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years. Read more

The MA in War: History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years.

Looking at political, cultural and social history, this MA is for those who want to study war in all its multi-faceted complexity, from the everyday and the personal, to the national and the global. We offer expert teaching and supervision on British, European, American and Middle Eastern modern and contemporary history.

The main conflicts you will cover are: the First World War and the Second World War; the Balkan Wars of the 1910s and the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s; the wars of Decolonization and those of New Imperialism; the Cold War and its ‘side-wars’; the War on Terror and the current conflicts in the Middle East. 

Why study with us?

Studying this degree you will acquire expertise on:

  • War and conflict studies
  • Modern international history
  • Interdisciplinary learning and researching

You will be taught in a truly interdisciplinary manner, utilising a number of disciplines: cultural and social history, politics and international relations. You can build the degree structure that suits best your interests and future plans.

You can specialise in particular disciplines, or you can explore a wide range of new methods. You will also have the choice of three different types of elective work (e.g. extended essays or primary-source based seminars). Our students can also use the nearby world-famous Mass Observation archive. They also tend to be involved in the events and research projects run by the University of Brighton’s Understanding Conflict cluster, such as our latest initiative on ‘Contesting Britain at War’.

We offer flexible modes of study for those with personal or professional commitments. After finishing the MA you will be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

Areas of study

There are two Core Modules that you will have to take, one on the forms and one on the legacies of war. ‘Forms of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ examines the lead up to war and what is happening in wartime. It looks at: the political, ideological and wider structural causes of war; the human experience at the home-front and at the war-front; the politics and methods of warfare as they have evolved in time; the different modes of practical, political, and intellectual resistance against invasion and occupation. ‘Legacies of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ looks at the impact of war, at what is left after a conflict: the emotional and personal effects of war; how a conflict continues to exist on material and psychological landscapes; the multiple ways through which personal, collective and global memories of killing and sacrifice are constructed; the politics of what we decide to remember and what to forget; the activist, political and theoretical efforts to stop war from happening again.

Beyond the two Core Modules you can also pick a number of option courses that relate to you interests, for example: Public History and Heritage; Cultural Memory; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity; Globalisation and Global Politics; Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Genocide; International Relations theory; Aesthetics and Philosophy; Cultural Theory; Philosophy and Critical Theory. Alternatively you might want instead to research and write a stand-alone extended essay, or you may opt for a more practical-based unit on teaching and learning higher education, offering you the opportunity to learn more about undergraduate teaching. 

You will also take a Research Methods module that will help you develop the academic skills necessary to engage in the 20,000-word Dissertation, for which you are guided by one of our faculty with subject expertise.

Careers and employability

Our graduates are particularly well-equipped to follow career paths in sectors that deal with violent conflicts, their consequences and resolution, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the Ministry of Defence, and international bodies (e.g. United Nations).

Much more broadly our degree opens the path to sectors that value critical research skills and a good knowledge of modern history and politics, such as media and journalism, politics and government, museums and archives, and publishing.

Working in schools and in academia are, of course, standard options. Alternatively, many of our students go on to study for Doctorates with one of the Research Centres in Brighton.



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The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates. Read more
The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates.

Why York?

Our students choose to study with the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit at the University of York for many reasons. Here at the PRDU, we're proud of our location. The University is situated within acres of beautiful parkland, and is only a short walk away from the centre of the historic city of York. Whether it's hustle of the city, or the calmness of campus that you are searching for, it can all be found at the University of York. Here are some of the reasons why our students chose us:
-York is consistently among the top UK universities for the quality of its teaching and research.
-York ranked 1st in the UK and 7th in the world in the Times Higher Education World Rankings of Universities less than 50 years old.
-The PRDU is an internationally recognised teaching and research faculty, with links to other universities and organisations worldwide.
-Eligible students from outside the EU are guaranteed accomodation on or near campus.
-York is easily accessible by air, rail, and road. The city is well connected by major UK railway lines, meaning a travel time of only two hours to London, and two hours fifteen minutes to Edinburgh.
-The cost of living in York is considerably lower than other cities in the UK.

The PRDU offers students the unique chance to study within a research department that is a leader in its field, alongside internationally acclaimed academics and lecturers. The PRDU, like the city of York, is expansive and wide reaching, yet remains personable and friendly despite its cosmopolitan activities.

Teaching

Classes are taught by world renowned academics, policy makers & practitioners. There are five separate class-taught modules, and students are supported throughout the year by the academic staff at the PRDU.

Field Trip

Every year students of the MA in Post-war Recovery Studies undertake a field trip to a post-war region. Led by field-experienced faculty and staff, students gain first hand, ground-level, understandings of recovery and reconstruction in the aftermath of war.

Work Placement

All students undertake a 6-8 week work placement. They are based within an international or national organisation working on an aspect of post-war recovery, humanitarian action or development in a war-affected context.

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Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. Read more

Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Academically rigorous course on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

Our War in the Modern World MA will give you an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of warfare and international security since the end of the Second World War. You will examine contemporary warfare and security issues in the light of the wide-ranging political, technological, economic and social changes since 1945. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare, and to understand the contexts in which modern conflicts take place.

The course is structured so that you will first develop an understanding of warfare, security issues and geo-political changes. You can then choose optional modules and write your dissertation, giving you the opportunity to concentrate on those aspects of contemporary war and international relations that interest you most.

Course purpose

Our course is designed to offer you an engaging, well designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

You will typically have five hours per week of ‘seminars’ (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks per 20-credit module, as well as 160 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will typically have two hours per week online discussion time for four weeks to complement the 592 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500 word short essay (25%), one 3,000 word long essay (70%) and student participation in the seminar discussions (5%).

The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD while one teaches part time at King’s.

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Learning and living Europe. Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul. The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies. Read more

Learning and living Europe: Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the present times. Its encompassing teaching method at the crossroads of theory and practice helps the students to gain thorough academic expertise in European affairs as well as a first hand-insight into the work as a Policy Officer at a European institution or international organisation. With its leitmotiv "Learning and living Europe", the programme follows an original approach that distinguishes it from other Master's courses in European Studies and International Relations: the European integration and global studies programme is taught in English and takes place in three different study locations: Berlin, Nice, Rome or Istanbul. After two common terms, the participants have the possibility to chose between two options for the spring term: they can opt to finish their studies either in Rome or in Istanbul.

Programme

Berlin, Germany

The academic year starts in Berlin (from October to December), it encompasses classes on the basics of all the four modules (Conflict and cooperation in the international system, European integration and external action; Federalism and multi-level governance; Globalisation and sustainable development), completed by the seminar « Project cycle management », the core part of the fifth module "Professional Skills Workshops".

Nice, France

In Nice, teaching focuses on the current international order, examining the reasons for conflict and the perspectives for cooperation. Lectures explore Europe's policies in diverse fields (trade, democracy promotion, conflict resolution, climate change, development aid) to explain how important a role the EU plays on the international stage.

At the same time, the programme looks into the current challenges the European integration project is facing (euroscepticism, the challenges of economic governance, Brexit, refugee crisis). During this term, students take their mid-term exams.

A one-week study trip takes the students to European and international institutions in Brussels, Strasbourg and Luxembourg. Visits to the European Council, the European Commission and NATO are highlights of the stay in Brussels, whereas Strasbourg hosts not only the headquarters of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rignts, but also the plenary sessions of the European Parliament.

Rome, Italy or Istanbul, Turkey

According to their choice, students will do their third trimester either in Rome or in Istanbul.

In Rome, special focus is given to the Mediterranean region and Africa with particular emphasis on the issues of migration, poverty and food security. Students will visit relevant UN institutions.

In Istanbul, students study the changing EU-Turkey relations and focus on area studies of the Black Sea region, the Caucasus including ENP, and Central Asia.

During the third term, students have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict and cooperation in the international system

A theoretically grounded approach to revisit the continuities and changes of international relations. Following a theoretical introduction into the grand schools of thought of international relations theory, we will approach the interdisciplinary field of conflict and violence studies. From its very beginning, understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of 'International Relations' as an academic discipline. A special focus will be given to inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts in both the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Ukraine to Syria.

European Integration and external action

This module aims at familiarising the students, who could well become the next generation of European and international decision-makers, with an expert knowledge of the structures, institutions, and problems of the European Union.We focus firstly on the historical development of European integration and then go on to analyse the Union’s institutions and study the basics of EU law. The last part of the program is devoted to the different policies of the EU and especially emphasises the challenges of enlargement.

Federalism, multi-level governance and conflict resolution

For the last fifteen years, federalism has known a revival as an international field of studies. In this framework, three major developments can be considered. The first is the study of the European Union, not analysed any more as a process of integration but in terms of federal institutional comparative approach. The second development is multi-level governance, that can be conceived as an extension of federalism as it deals with any form of multi-tier institutional system. This cooperative/competitive approach has appeared to understand the institutional consequences of the process of globalisation in post-industrialised societies, and of the subsequent changing of nature of sovereignty in the relevant states. Eventually, federalism has become a tool of conflict resolution, in order to resolve violent conflicts all over the world.

Economy, globalisation and sustainable development

The module puts a specific focus on the role of the EU as an economic actor on the global stage, with its opportunities and challenges driven both by European specific evolutions and globalisation trends. Finally, the module proposes an introduction to global sustainable development issues (climate change, access to water, etc.), as they are among the most decisive challenges that will shape the future of the world economy.

Professional Skills Workshops

This module equips the participants with the professional skills and competences that will enable them to work in the context of the European and international organisations. They will take actively part in several simulation games and follow workshops on project cycle management, intercultural management, as well as on mediation and negotiation.

Application deadline is 30 June of the current year.



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The International Master’s Degree Program in Israel studies offers students the opportunity to partake in an in-depth study of the State of Israel covering periods of the beginning of the Zionist movement to the present day. Read more

The International Master’s Degree Program in Israel studies offers students the opportunity to partake in an in-depth study of the State of Israel covering periods of the beginning of the Zionist movement to the present day. The course aims to elucidate the theoretical underpinnings of the Zionist project, communities of the Jewish diaspora and their relationship to the modern state of Israel, and the deep complexities of Israeli society in light of its multicultural character.

Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented growth of scholarly interest in Israeli history, politics, society and culture. Numerous programs, research centers and chair endowments in Israel Studies have been established in North America and Europe, adding a new, fresh and innovative dimension to existing programs in Judaic Studies. The Israel Studies program is designed for students who wish to deepen their understanding of the experiences of the Israeli population from a range of perspectives, against the wider backdrop of twentieth-century Jewish history, Middle Eastern politics and society.

What you will study

The program will examine Israeli society from a variety of perspectives, including Aliyah and migration; economics and politics; culture, religion, history and the ties between Israel and Jewish communities abroad. The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters from October through August. Students wishing to pursue the thesis track will be required to submit a research thesis within one year of completing their coursework.

The field campus is one of the highlights of the program. Students, together with academic staff, spend three days in one of the country's historically rich regions. Locations include the Lower and Upper Galilee, the Negev, Jordan Valley, Beit She’an Valley, Jerusalem and its surroundings. Students engage in an exploration the areas' complexities, of both the past and present. Students meet public figures and Israeli citizens with the aim of developing dialogue and familiarity with Israeli society. The cost of the field campus is included in the tuition fee.

Hebrew and Arabic language courses are also available to students who are interested. Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded an MA in Israel Studies from the Faculty of Humanities and Department of Israel Studies.

Careers

Graduates of the program will be well placed to continue academic careers in their home countries both in Middle Eastern studies and the growing field of Israel studies specifically. They will also find the use for their studies in the fields of diplomacy and journalism; working for a variety of Israel-related NGOs, and points of cultural exchange between Israel and the world.

Courses

  • Religion, Science and Politics in the Cartography of Israel from the Middle Ages to Our Time
  • The Holocaust and the Israeli Society
  • The Zionist Ideology
  • A Social History of Palestinian Society, 1900-1948
  • 1948 War - Field Course
  • Modern Israeli Society
  • Israel Stories: Page, Stage, and Screen
  • Modern Polish-Jewish History and Culture
  • The Arab-Israeli Conflict: History and Diplomacy
  • Crusader Castles and Battle Site (Field trips)
  • Jewish Artists and the Stories of America

For the most recent list of courses, course description and schedule, please visit the program website

Faculty

The director of the Israel Studies department, Professor Gur Alroey, is also the director of the Israel Studies and 20th– century Jewish Histories (ISJH) International MA Program and the chair of the School of History at the University of Haifa. During the years 2009-2011 Alroey was a visiting professor at the Taub Center for Israel Studies at NYU and Schusterman fellow at Rutgers University. He has also authored a number of books related to Israel studies in both Hebrew and English, such as Seeking a Homeland: the Jewish Territorial Organization and its Struggle with the Zionist Movement, 1905-1925; Immigrants: Jewish Immigration to Palestine in the Early Twentieth Century and Bread to Eat & Clothes to Wear: Letters from Jewish Migrants in the Early Twentieth Century.

To explore the rest of the faculty members and their specializations please click here.  

Scholarships

This program is eligible for Masa scholarship. For more scholarship information please visit the Program's Scholarships page.

Faculty scholarships are available up to $4,500US for eligible applicants. Please inquire when applying.  



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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more

An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

  • This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
  • The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
  • All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include

  • Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
  • The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
  • Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
  • Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include

  • Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
  • The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
  • Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
  • Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.



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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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