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Masters Degrees (World Religion)

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Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies. Read more
Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies.

This new course, which is the first of its kind in the UK, addresses those challenges and complexities and will provide you with a framework to engage with issues relating to the place of religion in public life.

The course is hosted by Westminster Law School and shares modules with the rest of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities as well as Westminster School of Media Art and Design. The course is not affiliated to any particular faith but takes a broad approach to religion including non-religious beliefs. It will allow you to gain a deeper understanding of the place of religion in society and the role of law.

You can choose whether you want to study for the MA or LLM. For the MA you will need to have obtained a minimum of 180 credits at Level 7. You will have to take the three compulsory core modules which are: Law and Religion: Theory and Practice; Law and Religion in Context and Sociology of Law and Religion. In addition, you will have to write a dissertation and take an additional three optional modules of your choice.

Students who wish to obtain the award of LLM will need to write a dissertation with a substantial law element and are expected to take at least one law option in addition to the core modules.

MA
-Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
-Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
-Sociology of Religion (20 credits)
-MA Dissertation (60 credits)

3 options of your choice (from the proposed list)

LLM
-Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
-Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
-Sociology of Religion (20 credits)
-LLM Dissertation in Law (60 credits)

3 options one of which must be from Law

The course will equip you with key skills such as the ability to carry out independent research and to deal with sensitive topics. You will develop an awareness of world challenges posed by religion, a thorough knowledge of equality and non-discrimination legislation, debating and mooting skills, the ability to be non-judgmental, and to work in a multicultural environment.

Students will also benefit significantly from the Law and Religion Research Cluster which launched in February 2017. The research cluster will hold regular events on topical issues and provide an opportunity for students to network with academics and professionals associated with the field of religion, law and society.

Course content

The Religion, Law and Society MA/LLM provides a platform for critical debates around the relevance of religion in modern pluralist societies and the challenges that democratic states face in dealing with religion in the public sphere. Current debates in law and religion include the pursuit of freedom of and from religion; non-discrimination, manifestation of religion and beliefs, church-state relations, religion and democracy as well as the threat of extremism, terrorism and fundamentalism in liberal and pluralist societies.

The programme aims to explore those issues and contribute to a culture of tolerance by encouraging dialogue and critical self-awareness of individuals’ personal trajectories. You will be encouraged to challenge your own perception of religion in order to enter into a constructive dialogue. This will be done through respectful debates, peer review, critical thinking and reflection. The programme draws on interdisciplinary perspectives and offers students a wide range of options from the social sciences such as law, politics, sociology and media. This interdisciplinary perspective will allow you to develop your own theoretical framework for evaluating the interaction between law and religion in modern contemporary societies.

Employability

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

In addition to this, you will receive careers support from academic staff and faculty work placement teams, offering targeted course-specific careers advice and assistance in securing a work placement during your time at Westminster. You can find out more about course-specific career opportunities by visiting the Prospects website.

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Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Read more
Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work.

The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. It offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork.

Following an autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend the spring term studying at Kent's Paris School of Arts and Culture, where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/thrs/postgraduate/taught-religion.html

About the Department of Religious Studies

Collectively, the staff at Kent cover all the current methodologies and theoretical approaches (from empirical research to psychology of religion, and to continental philosophy and history of ideas). As well as offering expertise in all the major world religions, we are widely recognised for leading work at the fringes of the category of religion, as well as for work on the invention of the category of 'religion'. Among the many options of Religion and covered in the department are: religion and media, religion and politics, religion and comparative literatures, and religion and society. See the staff research tab for further details.

The Department supports cross-disciplinary work and students are encouraged to take advantage of the wide range of postgraduate classes and seminars that are available within the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) and across the University as a whole.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus* There is an option to do the MA Religion with a term in Paris: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/350/religion-paris

Course detail

The programme offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork. You also study two modules of your choice, suited to your own specific interests.

Format and assessment

You have the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through your taught modules and dissertation, and you also receive guidance on writing research proposals and seeking funding.

MA structure:
On the MA programme, you study four (30 credit) modules over two terms, as well as writing a dissertation.

PCert structure:
On the Graduate Certificate, you study two (30 credit) modules of your choice from the range of core and optional modules below.

Careers

The University’s aim that students are able to acquire discipline-specific and transferable skills through the curriculum is at the heart of this new MA programme. Its interdisciplinary nature allows you to specialise as well as prepare for the modern university employment market, where versatility and interdisciplinary is increasingly expected.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Religion and faith are major influences on social, cultural and political life around the world. This interdisciplinary MA draws on a range of perspectives to study the public roles of religious communities and individuals. Read more

Religion and faith are major influences on social, cultural and political life around the world. This interdisciplinary MA draws on a range of perspectives to study the public roles of religious communities and individuals.

You’ll think about theological and philosophical responses to issues in the public sphere, the place of religion in public policy on issues such as discrimination and multiculturalism, and the bonds that tie individuals to their communities. Using approaches from sociology, religious studies, theology, history, anthropology and philosophy among others, you’ll also learn about the research process.

Core modules will introduce you to key issues and approaches, and you’ll choose from optional modules to explore topics that suit your interests such as religion and gender, Muslims and multiculturalism, or remembering the Holocaust. Guided by experts in an active research environment, you’ll gain an insight into the significance of religion in the public sphere.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module that develops your understanding of the research process, equipping you with a range of skills from different disciplines. You’ll learn about interviewing and other forms of fieldwork as well as working with legal and historical documents, the use of theory and ethics among others.

A second core module in the following semester will build your knowledge of the role of religion in public life, focusing on issues such as the meaning of secular and post-secular society, tolerance and religious freedom, multiculturalism and globalisation. By the end of the year, you’ll be able to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained with your dissertation – an independently researched project on a topic of your choice – and you can even choose to extend your dissertation to go into greater depth.

You’ll also have the chance to select from a range of optional modules. These will allow you to specialise in topics that suit your interests, from religion and global development to Islam in the modern world. You’ll take two optional modules if you do the standard dissertation, or you can swap one for the extended dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

There are three compulsory modules throughout the year including the Dissertation (60 credits). You’ll then choose two optional modules, or just one if you select the Extended Dissertation (90 credits).

  • Religion and Society: Research Process and Methods 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Modernity and the Jews 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Religions and Global Development 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Muslims, Multiculturalism and the State 30 credits
  • Religion, Politics and the Future: From Apocalypse to Utopia 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits
  • Research Project (Theology and Religious Studies) 30 credits
  • Special Options in Theology and Religious Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Religion and Public Life MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Religion and Public Life MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules use a combination of lectures and seminars, which allow you to discuss the issues arising from your lectures and reading. Independent study is also an important element of this programme, as it allows you to develop your skills and gives you space to form your own ideas.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods. These usually include essays, but some modules may involve project reports and presentations. Modules taught by other Schools within the University may also use different methods.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with diverse and in-depth subject knowledge, as well as strong political and cultural awareness. These are all valuable in a wide range of careers – and you’ll also have advanced skills in areas such as analysis and interpretation, oral and written communication, and different types of research.

Graduates pursue careers in a variety of sectors including the charity sector, NGOs, education, local government, civil service and policy work, business and legal services, the media and social work. Many also continue their studies at PhD level, and even pursue academic careers after this.

We offer plenty of support to boost your employability, including an impressive array of research training offered by the School, the University Library and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute. The School also has a dedicated postgraduate employment advisor who can offer tailored careers advice.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. Read more
Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. The so-called ‘resurgence’ of religion in the public sphere in recent decades is now a significant area of interdisciplinary scholarship eliciting a complex array of responses, ranging from vehement opposition to the very idea that religious concepts and commitments have a right to expression in political debates, to a reassessment of the origins and implications of divisions between the secular and the religious and their relationship to the nation state. The notion that there is no singular secularism, but rather a plurality of secularisms, and of ‘religion’ as an invention of European modernity and colonial interests are two of many emerging efforts to reconceptualise the meanings of religion and the secular and the entangled relationship between them.

About the MA

The MA Religion in Global Politics offers an opportunity to examine these questions and issues at an advanced level by studying the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international) of the regions of the Asia, Africa and the Middle East. A core objective is to challenge the Eurocentrism of current debates around secularism, secularisation, the nature of the public sphere within modernity, by indicating the plurality and contested nature of conceptions of both religion and the secular when considered in a global framework.

The programme is unique: it has a regional focus and disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes in the subject area, draws on a wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives (Law, International Relations and Politics, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and Gender Studies, amongst others) and has a rigorous theoretical basis built in, such that students will be familiarised with the current state-of-the-art debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, postsecularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues of democracy, war, violence, human rights, humanitarianism and development, multiculturalism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism, and free speech amongst others. The range of course options available on the programme is unparalleled, ensuring that students will benefit from a truly interdisciplinary, intellectually rigorous, and regionally focused programme.

Course detail

Designed as a professional development qualification as well as a platform for doctoral research, this programme will give you the opportunity to examine the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international), across the globe.

You will engage in current topical debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, post-secularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues including democracy, war, human rights, humanitarianism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism and free speech.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

The unparalleled range of course options available will allow you to benefit from an intellectually rigorous and globally focused programme which provides a disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes. A wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives are drawn upon including Law, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology and Diaspora Studies.

Expert at where the world is changing

With our highly diversified expertise, our comprehensive resources and our interdisciplinary approach, we offer a unique learning and research environment for a truly inter-cultural approach to systems of belief and thought.

Programme Aims

The programme’s inter-disciplinary focus aims to provide students with advanced training in the area of religion and politics through the study of a wide range of theoretical and regional perspectives. It will serve primarily as a platform for professional development and further (MPhil/PhD) graduate research. The programme offers students:

• Advanced knowledge and understanding of significant approaches, methods, debates, and theories in the field of religion and politics, with particular reference to the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

• Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in and theorisations of religion and politics;

• Advanced skills in the presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religion and politics as they pertain to regional, international, and transnational contexts

Format

Students are required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words. Courses are assessed through a variety of methods including short and long essays, examinations, oral presentations, and response papers. An overall percentage mark is awarded for each course, based on the marks awarded for individual assessment items within the courses.

The MA may be awarded at Distinction, Merit or Pass level in accordance with the common regulations for MA/MSc at SOAS.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme provides a unique interdisciplinary, broad social science perspective on the study of religion. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme provides a unique interdisciplinary, broad social science perspective on the study of religion. It offers you the opportunity to investigate the increasing prevalence of religious and secular dynamics across the globe and how concepts of religion interweave with aspects of today’s society, in theory and practice.

The programme tackles topics of key importance, from policy-relevant connections between religion and public life, and religion and politics, to more theoretical debates about the nature of belief, ritual, and questions of being. It allows you to explore the role of religion in the developing world, and illuminates Western models of religion and secularisation through comparison with those in the global south. Fieldwork is an important element of the programme, with the compulsory course allowing you to work closely on extended case studies based on your lecturers’ own expert primary research.

The programme is intended for graduates of the humanities and social science, but will be of interest to those with a traditional theological background, or with a pastoral or vocational training, as well as those who would like to consider religion from an alternative and complementary perspective.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in the study of religion. Many graduates from the Department go on to complete PhDs. It will also provide a foundation for those wishing to find employment in the civil service, policy and diplomacy, education, social work, journalism and NGOs.

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This master's programme was started in response to the growing salience of the interaction of society, law and religion in our multi-religious and yet highly secularised global world. Read more

This master's programme was started in response to the growing salience of the interaction of society, law and religion in our multi-religious and yet highly secularised global world.

The Master of Society, Law and Religion provides a unique introduction to the strategic area of society, law and religion and brings you in contact with outstanding international experts in the field.

What is the 'Master of Society, Law and Religion' all about?

The programme aims at enabling students to gain a solid and critical knowledge on key issues such as the place of religion in the public sphere, the debate on secularism, the role of the State vis-à-vis religion, church and relationships, human rights and religion, European and international law and religion, and domestic and international politics of religious freedom. Taught at the Faculty of Canon Law, the programme is particularly sensitive to the autonomy of religions, religious self-government, and religious laws.

While all students receive a basic training in the law of the Roman Catholic Church, the programme embraces all religions and faith communities, and includes classes in Jewish, Islamic, Orthodox, Anglican and Protestant law. African and Asian religions and customs are also investigated, as far as their relation to law and society is concerned.

The programme can be taken as a self-standing programme or as a gateway to the Master of Canon Law. This initial master's program can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis. In order to facilitate students wishing combine education with employment or social engagement, the programme allows for distance learning and spreading of examinations. The large choice of subjects from different faculties enables students to tailor their educational experience, to their interests, needs and projects.

Is this the right programme for me?

The Master of Society, Law and Religion suits students who are genuinely interested in the interaction of society, law and religion and who are willing to engage critically with the issues at stake. Any background in the area of law, social sciences and religious studies is fit for the purpose, provided that the student is ready to cope with the various methodologies and languages.

Thanks to extensive course offerings in the area of Roman Catholic canon law, the programme also suits those students preparing to enter the Master of Canon Law programme with the aim of achieving the canonical degree 'Iuris Canonici Licentiatus' (JCL).

Objectives

Main goal of the programme is to develop the acquired basic skills in the Bachelor of Law, the Bachelor of Theology or another programme in view of a specialized exploration of the area 'Society, Law and Religion'. The student obtains a basic knowledge on the legal system of the Roman Catholic Church and the other christian churches. He gets acquainted with legal sources and obtains the required skills to interpret the rules incorporated in the Codex Iuris Canonici (CIC). The student is initiated in the complex interaction between social structures and secular law on one side, and the legal structures of the Church at the other side. Research, consultancy and communication skills as well as other social elements are stimulated. The student is able to develop a sound research strategy, and to present an accurate synthesis of existing knowledge and a well-argued personal and critical reflection. He is able to present a well-considered research question, to develop a research plan, and to select relevant sources. Those who selected optional courses in canon law are allowed to start in the programme 'Master of Canon Law'.

Career perspectives

Religion is increasingly acknowledged as a crucial factor in areas such as politics and the economy, social and corporate management, culture, employment, education, health care, international cooperation, and conflict resolution.

Candidates for positions in these areas, in the private or public sector, as well as those already employed, will benefit from gaining a topical knowledge in the field.

Graduates can further develop their education at the Faculty of Canon Law through by moving on to the Master in Canon Law or the doctoral programme in Society, Law and Religion.



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Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline. Read more
Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline.

The programme explores the impact and influence religion and belief has on social structures, community, politics, economics, policy (education), citizenship, culture & identity, sexuality, pluralism, spirituality, and national & international relationships. The MA also introduces critical analysis of ethics, systems of belief, human rights and social justice issues and the application of these concepts within lived environments from diverse religious perspectives.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture & Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The RCS team at UCLan have a wide variety of links with local, national and international faith and intercultural forums, faith schools and academic institutions, all of which provide valuable contacts for students wishing to enter professions related to Teaching, Ministry, inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue and relations. RCS also work with charity organisations both home and abroad and global outreach programmes. Further details and contacts are available from members of the RCS teaching team.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students may study the MA full time over one year or part time over two or three years. In either case students will be required to successfully complete six MA modules and one MA dissertation (the dissertation is equivalent to 3 x modules). Each module requires an estimated 2 hours class contact per week plus extensive reading and dedicated personal study.

We strive to give our students key employability and transferable skills which will serve them in the world of work. Our assessment practices illustrate a move away from exams and essays per se and incorporate a move towards a more inclusive assessment which benefits our diverse student body. Assessment strategies include coursework, individual and group presentations, individual and/or group projects, reviews and ICT interaction.

OPPORTUNITIES

Religion, Culture & Society (RCS) also includes field trips to national and international places of interest such as; Rome, Istanbul, Auschwitz, Liverpool Cathedrals, Ladywelle Pilgrimage and Shrine, the Hindu Temple etc. Although these trips are optional to MA students, they aim to draw attention to shared values, beliefs and practices, and supports students in achieving a mutual appreciation of different faiths and traditions. The international trips in particular aim to develop an experienced awareness of cultural heritage, traditions and practices of different faiths, and widen students’ appreciation of how those faiths and belief systems interact within lived environments, communities and in different social settings. Thus enhancing not only MA provision but also the learning experience and the environment where that learning experience takes place.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture and Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector, including local government, race relations officers, ministry, equality/diversity training officers, social services, social welfare, community development, youth work, research, education and communication support workers, lecturing in further or higher education. Practitioners may wish to update their knowledge or gain a higher qualification for personal or professional development. The programme will also appeal to working individuals who are interested in the range of topics offered and do not wish to specialise in a rigidly defined Theology based MA programme. In addition, many students are currently seeking Masters’ programmes as a way of weathering the economic recession.

RCS offers progression routes onto PGCE courses for graduates wishing to develop a career in teaching. There are also opportunities to further study for PhD or professional doctorate.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Religion, Culture & Society brings together disciplines of Theology, Philosophy, Sociology and International Relations – a very innovative, exciting and challenging post-graduate degree award.

The whole philosophy of the Religion, Culture and Society MA is to promote inclusively, encourage reflection on interfaith dialogue and highlight the important contribution religion and belief can make to community cohesion and the combating of religious prejudice and discrimination (QCA & DfES, 2004). The MA evaluates how and why the role of religion and culture has changed within society, and explores the impact and influence of religion and belief within economical, political and social constructs. Religion and faith is critically analysed within the framework of theistic and atheistic approaches to sexuality, spirituality, human rights, territory and space and cultural relationships. The application of classical and contemporary theological and philosophical concepts and theories of faith are examined in relation to lived environments.

The MA in Religion, Culture and Society embodies and supports the objectives outlined in the AHSS 2007-2012 strategy, is aligned to Theology and Religious Studies benchmarks, HEQ (2008) descriptors and is situated specifically within a social science framework. The course supports a pluralistic perspective on and within religion and belief traditions, and engages with a range of methods of study, explores a number of interesting and challenging modules and includes and a diversified range of assessment practices.

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Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Read more
Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Furthermore religion plays an important role in people's lives worldwide, and has become one of the major ways people connect with each other across the globe. However, the persistence and prominence of the role of religion in contemporary societies is still not sufficiently understood in academic research and in the work of policy-makers, NGO's and journalists.

This master's track addresses the pivotal place of religion in the dynamics of globalization and conflict that shape present-day societies. The programme is interdisciplinary, examining political, social, psychological and cultural dimensions. You will learn to:

• investigate the consequences of globalization for religious practices and individual, ethnic and national identities
• understand the relationship between religion, conflict and peace-building
• analyse national and international conflicts, and learn how they are interwoven with religious interests and opinions

You can specialize in either conflict and peacebuilding, migration or gender

Degree: MA in Theology & Religious Studies

Why in Groningen?

• The combination of anthropology, sociology and political science is unique in the world.
• Rated the best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands.
• Top 100 university
• Relates latest research and theories to current developments.
• Vibrant research tradition with international links.
• Internships at embassies, ministry of foreign affairs, international NGO's.
• Taught by leading experts with a world-class reputation.
• You can follow your own research interests.

Job perspectives

With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as, developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education. Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a place on the Research Master after your regular Master's programme. You can complete this two-year programme in one year.

Job examples

- Consulting & Policy
In a globalizing world, national and international conflicts are farreaching.There is a need for experts who can explain and help solve these conflicts. With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. More specifically, this could mean working for the think-tank of a political party, for the Netherlands Institute for Social Research or for the Netherlands Institute of International Relations Clingendael.

- Media & Journalism
Religion is in the news every day, often in a negative way, from terrorism to integration issues. With your expertise in the field of religion and conflict, you can intensify the debate in society and, where necessary, add some nuance to the picture. You can put your knowledge into practice as an editor at a publishing company, a broadcasting company, a newspaper or a current affairs magazine.

- Education
You will have enough knowledge of the subject to teach Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies in secondary education. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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Your programme of study. Religion was recorded in the Palaeolithic period and during the Middle Ages it started to be shaped and formed. Read more

Your programme of study

Religion was recorded in the Palaeolithic period and during the Middle Ages it started to be shaped and formed. The programme draws on a rich history of religion since 1495 to understand religion in its modern context in the West. You are taught by active international researchers and practitioners.

The University of Aberdeen MSc in Religion and Society provides a unique opportunity for postgraduate study in the sociology of religion. Taught by well-known leaders in the field, the programme provides students with study in both the sociological study of religion and training in advanced sociological methods. This programme is ideally suited for anyone considering the pursuit of doctoral studies in sociology of religion, and also provides a broad-base of social-scientific skills that are both marketable and useful for those pursuing careers either in government or in the third-sector.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods

Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Optional Course

The Comparative Study of European Societies

Dimensions of Globalisation

Sex. Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods

Post-Conflict Justice and Peace building

Global Conflict and Peace Processes

Semester 3

Dissertation in Religion and Society

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/276/religion-and-society/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • Religion and Society stem from a rich heritage within Kings College dating back to 1495
  • Strong research defines excellent teaching from other disciplines

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

Find out about fees

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

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Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The MA in Religion & Contemporary Society combines Sociology & Anthropology of Religion to focus on key issues, from religion in public life to globalization, fundamentalism, and modern spirituality. Read more
The MA in Religion & Contemporary Society combines Sociology & Anthropology of Religion to focus on key issues, from religion in public life to globalization, fundamentalism, and modern spirituality. While focusing on Christianity, Islam and Judaism, the course will allow you to specialise in broad issues cutting across these traditions and societies (for example fundamentalism, new religions, or religious pluralism), or to concentrate on a particular society or religion.

Key benefits

- Unrivalled location gives you access to cosmopolitan and vibrant religious traditions.

- Close links and regular fieldwork trips to religious centres and communities in London offering many opportunities to examine the religious experience of living communities.

- Unique opportunity to engage in study of a variety of religious groups and movements within and outside the major traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) in the contemporary world.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/religion-in-contemporary-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This unique interdisciplinary course is designed to develop your knowledge and skills in social sciences and humanities and to encourage your constructive, critical and independent thought in this field. While focusing on Christianity, Islam and Judaism, the course will allow you to specialise in broad issues cutting across these traditions and societies (for example fundamentalism, new religions, or religious pluralism), or to concentrate on a particular society or religion. Moreover, you will master a number of transferable skills that are necessary for professional expertise in a range of areas, from the academic study of religion to public policy and pastoral care.

- Course purpose -
To provide training in analysis and understanding of religion in contemporary societies.

- Course format and assessment -
Taught compulsory and optional modules assessed by coursework plus a dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Graduates apply their skills in a range of professions, such as academic careers in departments of Theology, Social & Political Sciences, journalism, business, international relations, teaching, government, mass media, and religious institutions.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work. Read more

This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work.

This is one of the world’s very few science and religion programmes.

Much of the recent debate surrounding ‘new atheism’ has taken place within a poorly informed view of the history and philosophy of science and its relationship with religion. This programme aims to inform and engage with the debate in depth, looking at it from scientific, philosophical, historical, ethical and theological perspectives.

The history of science is studied from ancient times through the modern scientific revolution, together with philosophical trends in our understanding of reality. The main areas of dialogue between science and religion are explored in depth, including cosmology, evolution, divine action and miracles, consciousness and the human person.

Programme structure

This programme is run over one year full-time (or two years part-time). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will be given training in research methods which offers a practical approach to postgraduate level skills of critical investigation and writing, and receive individual supervision for your 15,000 word dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Compulsory courses comprise History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition; Cosmos, Cell and Creator: Current Debates in Science and Religion; and two courses in research methods.

Option courses

You will choose three options, which can be taken from courses in science and religion, such as:

  • Economy, Ecology, and Ethics
  • Key Thinkers in Science and Religion
  • Philosophy of Time
  • Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Debates
  • Science and Religion in Literature
  • Science and Scripture

The options on offer change from year to year, so please consult the Programme Director for advice on what will be available. With the agreement of your Programme Director, you may also choose options from other taught masters programmes, language courses, and advanced undergraduate courses.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in the field or for employment in a range of areas requiring critical analysis and empathetic understanding.



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Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together in an authentically interdisciplinary way leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

The programme follows an integrated approach with leading researchers in philosophy, the sciences and theology proving teaching on, respectively, the philosophical, scientific and theological dimensions of the programme.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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This course is about searching for traces of meaning in everyday practices, and looking beyond traditional shapes of religiosity. Read more

Master's specialisation in Practical Theology

This course is about searching for traces of meaning in everyday practices, and looking beyond traditional shapes of religiosity.
Have God and religion disappeared from modern society? According to some scholars of religion there is a global resurgence of religion, yet there is vast secularisation in most European societies continues. How can theology explain the transformation of the Christian religion in society? We need fresh expressions of theological concepts and new methods of research to understand religion beyond traditional studies of religiosity.
In the Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology, students are introduced in theological theory-building to understand the dynamics and meaning of lived religion at four different levels: the personal, inter-group relations, organisational and societal. Students learn to use empirical research methods to build new theological theory based on lived religion. Graduates of this Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology can become researchers, policy makers, educators or spiritual caregivers.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/practicaltheology

Why study Practical Theology at Radboud University?

- The new theoretical approach of Practical Theology at Radboud University manifests itself in the search for theological concepts that match the changing shape of the Christian religion in the life of individuals as well as fresh expressions of religious institutions.
- Our department has constructed new, unique methodologies that focus on a qualitative study of narratives, communication, and ritual (liturgy). We have expertise in spiritual biographical research, practice-oriented research and discourse analysis.
- We have a long-standing expertise in survey research, with a specialisation in cross-religious surveys where Christian believers are compared with believers of other religions (Islam, Hinduism).
- This programme is not just geared towards Europe, but also places developments in a global perspective.
- With electives, students have plenty of room to choose a direction that meets their professional and academic interests. Taking a few seminars from the other theology disciplines of choice (Church History, Literary Theology or Practical Theology) is mandatory to broaden students general knowledge on Theology.
- The third year is aimed at training students for a specific profession. Students can choose research (English), education (Dutch), religion and policy (Dutch) or spiritual care (Dutch).
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups, allowing for ample opportunity for questions and discussion.
- Radboud University and its Theology department are Roman Catholic in origin, but its Master’s programme in Theology is open to all students. Our students have very diverse religious and cultural backgrounds.

Change perspective

Graduates of Practical Theology will be able to pinpoint how certain groups of people view spirituality today, how they give meaning to lives and how this, sometimes, is at odds with traditional religious conventions. You will get insight in the different forms that religion takes in contemporary society and will be able to take that on board when participating in debates in the public arena.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Theology or related area

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- An TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- A IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

In a globalising world, more and more institutions require skills in theological communication and hermeneutics. Practical theologians search for traces of meaning in everyday practices and look beyond traditional forms of religiosity. Our graduates have an analytical attitude and the skills to make sound judgments which will help them participate in debates in the public arena. Using arguments based on Christian faith, they can convey their faith in society. In addition, the programme teaches you how to think independently and critically about the way that Christian doctrine can give meaning to contemporary issues.

Job positions

The Master’s programme in Theology has a strong emphasis on career prospects by allowing students to focus on one professional path in their third year: research, education, spiritual care or religion and policy.

Our approach to this field

Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Practical Theology is all about studying lived religion and lived spirituality. How do people today connect with Christian stories? The role of practical theologians is to research new religious motives. Where and in what way do people find inspiration? How do they give meaning to their lives?

Searching for new forms of religiosity
In other words, at Radboud University, we train our practical theologians to search for new forms of religiosity in order to gain an understanding of the transformation of religion. The church is not the only place for contemplation; sometimes people turn to the beach, the woods or even a health club. Symbols are given new meanings. Metaphors get a different connotation. The challenge is to deal with the tension between religious traditions and the many contemporary forms of spirituality.

We look at the role that religion and spirituality play, not only for individual people, but also for inter-group relationships and on organisational and societal levels. We try to get a grasp on differences between religious practices, how faith schools profile their religious character in their education policy, and how municipalities give religion a place in the services they offer, among other topics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/practicaltheology

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Research profile. If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere. Read more

Research profile

If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere.

The research interests of academic staff include Asian and African Christian theologies and history; the history of Christian missions; new missionary movements from the global south; Pentecostalism; current missiological issues such as inculturation, ethnicity, gender, and inter-faith relations.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in World Christianity, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will also be part of the Centre for World Christianity.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online. Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. Read more

This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online.

Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. You’ll have the opportunity to consider themes such as: concepts of God; the nature of justice; religious experience; ethics of the environment; the religious and spiritual significance of the arts and our relationship to the natural world.

This programme is designed to be accessible to students from a variety of backgrounds. It will be of interest to students with a personal interest in philosophical and religious questions, and also to teachers who wish to deepen their knowledge of philosophy and religious studies for professional development purposes.

You can also study this programme for a PGDip or PGCert qualification. You’ll study the same content as the MA programme, but take fewer modules overall.

Course content

There are two modules in the philosophy of religion strand of the course: a module examining concepts of God, and a module examining religious and spiritual practice, and its significance for our understanding of the nature of a good human life. You choose one of these modules if studying the PGCert, and can take both modules if studying the Diploma or MA.

You also take a core module in ethical theory, and choose from optional modules on a range of ethical themes, such as life and death, the environment, and the nature of justice.

The dissertation enables you to investigate a topic of your choice at length with the support of a supervisor, and to apply the knowledge and skills in independent research that you have developed in the course. As an MA student, you have the option of taking fewer optional modules and writing an extended dissertation instead.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

For the MA, PGDip and PGCert, you take Introduction to Ethics and at least one philosophy of religion module, plus at least one optional module. MA students take a standard or an extended dissertation. PGDip students have the option of taking a standard dissertation.

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Philosophy and Spiritual Practice 30 credits
  • Concepts of God 30 credits
  • Justice: Fairness, Equality and Diversity 15 credits
  • Global Environmental Ethics 15 credits
  • Business Ethics 15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics 30 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life 15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy of Religion and Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This course is taught entirely online, so you can fit your studies around your social and professional life. You’ll be able to access a wide range of teaching and learning resources through our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and use the University Library’s online resources for your own independent research. You’ll also be able to discuss issues arising from your studies with other students through our forums.

Assessment

For most modules, you keep a weekly log, in which you reflect on the study exercises for the week. In addition, you make regular contributions to discussion forums, and write one or more essays. The discussion forum contributions and essays determine the final module mark.

Career opportunities

The MA Philosophy of Religion and Ethics will be of interest to teachers of Philosophy and Religious Studies for professional development purposes. The course can also provide a route into a research degree in the fields of philosophy of religion and ethics. Equally, the important skills of argumentation and clear expression that are developed in the programme will be valuable in a wide range of work settings.



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