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Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation. Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with the Traditional Music of the British Isles MA, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. World Music Studies is interpreted quite literally as encompassing, in principle, the study of any and all musical activity in the world: Western as well as ‘exotic’, popular as well as classical, amateur as well as professional.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, world music performance workshops and email tutorials with supporting course texts and guidance notes. Assessments take a variety of forms such as reports and essays, fieldnotes and recordings, and a final dissertation or folio.

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The Music Education MA will introduce students to research and research-informed practice at the forefront of music education. The programme will provide tools for interrogating musical and educational assumptions, values and practices. Read more
The Music Education MA will introduce students to research and research-informed practice at the forefront of music education. The programme will provide tools for interrogating musical and educational assumptions, values and practices. It will help students to expand their understanding of effective music teaching, evaluation and assessment across the lifespan.

Degree information

Undertaking the Music Education MA programme will allow students to develop their critical thinking and ability to interrogate current educational research, literature and practice in the overarching fields of music and music education. They will also have the opportunity to pursue specialist lines of enquiry that are related to their own professional and/or academic interests, working alongside prominent academics in the field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules - the two core modules are founded on three strands in the study of music education: philosophy, psychology and sociology. These include historically-significant and cutting-edge contemporary approaches, theories and philosophies across a wide range of topics.
-Disciplines of Music and Music Education Part I
-Disciplines of Music and Music Education Part II

Optional modules - the Critical Studies in Music Pedagogy and Practice module examines past and present music education research and practice across a range of social and cultural contexts. Music Technology in Education provides students with opportunities to engage with published commentary and also develop practical skills. Choral Conducting, Leadership and Communication develops the skills of effective choral conducting and rehearsing in educational contexts. Students choose from a range including:
-Critical Studies Music and Music Education
-Choral Conducting Leadership and Communication
-Music Technology in Education

Please note: at the programme leader's discretion, a student might be able to import a maximum of 60 credits.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning
The main mode of delivery is through a combination of weekly lectures and seminars. There are ten-week lecture courses for the two core modules, and also for Critical Studies in Music Pedagogy and Practice (optional module), with sessions held in the evenings at the UCL Institute of Education. However, the Choral Conducting Leadership and Communication optional module takes place over five full days at the UCL Institute, as well as through additional student-led sessions. Students are also required to engage actively with UCL's online learning environments across the programme. The Music Technology in Education optional module is delivered online. All students are entitled to face-to-face tutorials with their allocated tutors.

Assessment is predominantly through a written assignment for each taught module.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as:
-Advocates for the arts.
-Arts, health and wellbeing therapists.
-Composers.
-Doctoral and post-doctoral researchers.
-Freelance music teachers.
-Further Education lecturers.
-Music education hub managers.
-Music teachers in primary and secondary schools.
-Performers.
-Primary music co-ordinators.
-Producers.
-University lecturers.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Primary School Class Teacher (Music), Starks Field Primary School.
-Secondary School Teacher (Head of Music Department), Pimlico Academy.
-Secondary School Teacher (Music), Norbury Manor Business and Enterprise College for Girls.
-Secondary School Teacher (Music), Old Palace of John Whitgift School.
-PGCE Secondary Teaching (Music), Middlesex University.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Music Education MA at UCL is the only postgraduate programme of its type in the UK, and one of the largest recruiting in the world, that is dedicated to music education.

The programme is taught by leading academics with current and extensive expertise in externally-funded research. Research and publications from our lecturers has significant impact on educational policy and practice both in the UK and internationally. This informs learning and teaching on the programme whilst fostering the development of a research-based culture. Many of our students pursue further study at doctoral and post-doctoral level.

Our programme meets the needs of a wide range of professionals from across the international communities of music and music education. Our alumni have been and continue to be leading figures in education worldwide.

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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of two letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Submission of an essay or college-level paper.
• A video of the candidate teaching a class or coordinating a rehearsal. Candidates may also submit a live or video audition on the candidate’s primary instrument.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Music in Education at the Crane School of Music is one of the largest music teacher preparation programs in the world. Crane-prepared music teachers are sought after by schools everywhere. For years, our students and faculty have held lead- ership positions in local school districts, as well as in state and national organizations that shape our nation’s musical future. The program strives to assist teachers to become reflective practitioners, lifelong learners, and persons able to integrate their knowledge of subject matter, pedagogy, students, the school and the larger community to maximize the education and welfare of students. Program start dates: Summer, Fall, Spring.

Required Program Courses

Option A: Minimum of 30 credit hours, with Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE 699, Thesis/Graduate Research Project in Music Education
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)

Option B: Minimum of 30 credit hours, without Thesis
MUCE 601, Philosophies and Issues in Music Education
MUCE 608, Curriculum Development in the School Music Program
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCE XXX, Music Education Elective
MUCH 611, Introduction to Graduate Studies
MUCH XXX, Music History/Literature Elective
MUCT XXX, Music Theory Elective
MUC XXX, Music Content Course (not Music Education)
Two free electives: 6 credit hours

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

Making music is at the heart of every Crane degree program. Our philosophy is that all our students are first and foremost musicians. The Crane School of Music was founded in 1886 and was one of the first institutions in the country to have program dedicated to preparing specialists in teaching music in the public schools. Crane is proud to have many of the finest music educators, scholars and performers in the United States as members of the faculty, all working to make Crane a vital, innovative and exciting place.

Testimonials

“The Crane School of Music is a unique community. It provides a focused and serious environment to grow as an artist while remaining extremely supportive. It was an ideal place for me to develop musically while forging lifelong professional relationships.” —Christopher Still ’93

“Crane provides the full package for students by offering degree programs in just about every area of the music world. There are ample opportunities to perform weekly in a great atmosphere. Performing is fully supported by a wonderful staff of teachers. Crane really prepares you to be successful.” —Mark Sophia ’12

“The degree programs at Crane provide a full and rich education in music and the liberal arts. I’m convinced this balanced and thorough curriculum laid the groundwork for the success I’m now enjoying in my life and career.” —Richard Regan ’91

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The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. Read more
The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. This unique programme combines music psychology with neuroscience, focusing on both the biological and cognitive aspects of musical behaviour- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-music-mind-brain/

The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain (MMB) is highly interdisciplinary and draws on expertise from leading figures in the field, in areas ranging from music cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modelling, music education and music therapy.

As a student on the MSc, you will learn about topics in music psychology (from perception to cognition) and the cognitive neuroscience of music, and will acquire all the necessary skills to pursue your own high-quality research.

The programme benefits from good links with institutions such as the Institute of Education, the Royal College of Music, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

Teaching staff

Programme director Dr Daniel Müllensiefen and deputy directors Prof Lauren Stewart and Dr Maria Herrojo-Ruiz are joined by an expert teaching faculty, all of whom have international profiles within the fields of music psychology and/or the neuroscience of music.

Our Eminent Invited Speaker Series brings world-leading researchers to Goldsmiths to present their latest research to our students.

What kind of project can I do?

We offer a range of research projects, drawing on a variety of approaches: behavioural, computational, neuroscientific. Students are also invited to propose a project of their own choice, providing appropriate supervision can be offered.

If a student has a contact with an external supervisor, it may be possible to arrange for project supervision outside Goldsmiths with the involvement of a faculty member as co-supervisor. Examples of previous projects include:

Exploring Absolute Pitch in Children and Young People with Visual Impairment
An fMRI Study Investigating how Music Impacts on the Perception of Emotion
The Influence of Native Language on Rhythmic Grouping
Neural Correlates of Melodic Expectancy

Further information

This journal article from Psychomusicology outlines the focus and contents of the programme.

Keep up to date with our research via our facebook page.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Val West.

Research Skills (15 credits)

This module provides you with the core skills needed to become a successful researcher. This is achieved via two complementary strands; the first strand covers fundamental research skills: seminars on bibliographic searching, essay writing, research report writing, oral presentation skills and career planning and lab sessions in which students conduct, analyse and write up an experiment from the field of music psychology. The second strand exposes students to cutting edge research in the field of music cognition and neuroscience via the Eminent Speaker Series and involves the opportunity to produce a collaborative report from the series for the Music, Mind and brain blog.

Research Project (60 credits)

This module provides you with the chance to design and pursue a substantial, independent research project on a topic of their choosing, with expert input from a nominated supervisor. You will be offered a selection of possible projects but are also encouraged to generate their own ideas. External supervision may also possible, in cases where students have links to outside institutions. As well as producing a written dissertation, you will have take produce and present a poster of your work to classmates and teachers from the programme.

Assessment

Written examinations; written coursework (essays); oral presentations; research dissertation.

Careers

The programme will appeal to you if you are interested in pursuing doctoral research in this area or if you are already a music professional wishing to approach music scientifically.

Graduates from the Music, Mind and Brain programme have gone on to work in one of the following areas:

-Academia: Either pursuing a PhD, working in research position or engaged with university-level teaching
-Music and media industry
-Music practitioner or performer
-Music teacher

Other careers that would be informed by this programme include music therapy, neuro-rehabilitation, music consultancy and music and advertising.

Other entry requirements

IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum of 6.5 in the written test and no individual test lower than 6.0).

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK. Read more
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

If you’re an experienced musician and want to put your skills to use supporting children and adults with additional needs, our emphasis on clinical placements will prepare you for a rewarding career.

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, we’ll introduce you to the most recent, effective music therapy approaches. You’ll reflect on your own practice in our clinical supervision group discussions, supported by regular individual tutorials.

In the UK there are two central elements of music therapy: the use of improvised and pre-composed music; and the significance given to the relationship between client and therapist. These principles will underpin your training. Our experiential teaching includes: development of your improvisation skills; focused work on your first instrument; keyboard, single line instrument and voice; music therapy theory and links to practice; block clinical placements in at least two fields, including community settings, schools, hospitals and hospices; and experience in multidisciplinary teams.

Your training will take place in our new state-of-the-art Music Therapy Centre and Clinic, where you’ll often study with MA Dramatherapy students. All our students go on supervised clinical placements, preparing you for employment in many different settings.

Throughout the course you'll be supported by our team of qualified music therapists, who have a strong reputation for research. In 2013 we appointed Jörg Fachner as Professor of Music, Mind and the Brain, to further develop our research activities. One of our course tutors, Professor Amelia Oldfield, was recently awarded the first ever Clinical Impact Award by the World Federation of Music Therapists. And in 2014, our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research was acknowledged as 'world-leading' in the UK Government's Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two days a week plus two days on a clinical placement (Year 1). One day a week on campus plus a placement of least one day a week (Year 2).

Careers

As a qualified music therapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas including the NHS, hospices, social services, the education sector and the voluntary sector. The NHS Agenda for Change has led to improved career paths for music therapists at levels similar to, or higher than, those of other allied health professions.

You may also choose to work privately, or on a freelance basis, with a client base including adults and children with learning difficulties, mental health problems, and other special needs.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council, a legal requirement for music therapists in the UK. Your qualification should also be recognised around the world.

You’ll benefit from our links with the British Association for Music Therapy and other allied health professions; Professor Helen Odell-Miller, for example, advises at government level for the profession. You’ll also be able to forge links with practitioners such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Year one:
• Music Therapy Practical and Clinical Skills
• Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multi-Disciplinary Theoretical Studies
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (1)

Year two
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (2)
• MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as clinical improvisation and composition. You’ll also undertake some self-analysis and reflection with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress and process towards becoming a music therapist will be assessed by an examiner. Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project, which involves clinical evaluation. Meanwhile, in your final oral assessment you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules touches on dramatherapy and covers content from our MA Dramatherapy, as well as the Music Therapy course. Where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you’ll be taught separately but on more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you’ll benefit from working together.

Specialist facilities

You'll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. We have a large range of musical instruments, specifically chosen for clinical work, and high-quality recording and videoing equipment in the therapy rooms.

You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms.

Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our music therapy staff members are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our research is recognised as world-leading. We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

***This course has now reached full capacity for September 2016 but we are now accepting applications for September 2017***

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Humber’s Music Business graduate certificate starts in May and is a condensed summer program with two semesters rolled into one (May - August) followed by a third semester work placement in the fall. Read more
Humber’s Music Business graduate certificate starts in May and is a condensed summer program with two semesters rolled into one (May - August) followed by a third semester work placement in the fall. This program prepares you to work in any number of areas in the music industry. The program offers a unique combination of theoretical and practical knowledge of the music industry as well as entrepreneurial, business and project management skills. You will study the structure of the Canadian music industry, music production, manufacturing, contracts, licensing and copyright, national and international distribution, marketing, promotion, and sales. You will develop foundational music business expertise, including communication and interpersonal skills, in order to respond to industry demands for professionals who can interact with diverse teams and audiences. Opportunities for applied work and industry connections are important components of the program.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Situate music business decisions within key historical and current contexts of the music industry.
• Articulate the unique responsibilities of key personnel in the music industry.
• Analyze the marketplace and trends in the music industry and use the analysis for decision making in the music business environment.
• Develop and implement a viable and realistic business plan for a professional musician or musical company.
• Develop and implement a music marketing plan that includes sonic branding.
• Collaborate with a team to market an artist or new music.
• Adhere to legal principles, government legislation and regulations, copyright and contract requirements, and professional and industry codes of conduct.
• Assess existing and emerging market entry options for music products or services and implement the optimal market entry strategy.
• Apply negotiation, effective interpersonal communication, and human resource management skills to establish and maintain effective working relations.
• Prepare and interpret financial statements to inform music business decisions and/or practices.
• Identify and access public and private sources of capital to support music business plans.

Modules

Semester 1
• MUSB 5000: Music Industry Overview and History
• MUSB 5001: Government Relations and Industry Organizations
• MUSB 5002: Music Business and Finance
• MUSB 5003: Music, Brands, and the Media
• MUSB 5004: Communications, Psychology and Creativity
• MUSB 5005: Contracts, Legal Issues and Ethics
• MUSB 5500: Artist Management and Development
• MUSB 5501: Music Sales and Marketing
• MUSB 5502: Streaming and New Models
• MUSB 5503: Copyright, Licensing & Sync
• MUSB 5504: Touring and Events
• MUSB 5505: Music Enterprise

Semester 2
• MUSB 5549: Music Business Seminar
• MUSB 5550: Music Business Internship

Work Placement

Students are required to complete an industry work placement internship totalling 300 hours.

Your Career

Ontario is home to Canada’s largest and one of the world’s most diversified music sectors. Graduates from our program will be prepared to enter the industry and find employment with radio stations, recording studios, post production facilities, film houses, theatres, video game companies, performance groups, distribution companies, sync agencies, media manufacturers, record labels, as well as various agencies for artist representation, promotion, copyright and legal, royalty collection, presenters, and festivals, as well as industry organizations such as CIMA, CARAS, Music Canada, OMF and others.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. Read more
The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. There are 12 specialist pathways that you can choose from; each includes a range of core and optional taught modules and you will complete the course with a dissertation, recital or composition portfolio.

Pathways

Music MA: British Music Studies pathway
Music MA: Choral Conducting pathway
Music MA: Critical Musicology pathway
Music MA: Early Music pathway
Music MA: Electroacoustic composition/sonic art pathway
Music MA: Global Popular Musics pathway
Music MA: Instrumental/Vocal Composition pathway
Music MA: Mixed Composition pathway
Music MA: Open Pathway with Performance
Music MA: Open Pathway without Performance
Music MA: Performance pathway
Music MA: Performance Practice pathway)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Read more
The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Within the field of musicology, students can slant their studies towards one or several of the following: music in nineteenth-century culture, opera studies, popular music studies or film music. The composition pathway, meanwhile, provides a practice-based contemporary composition curriculum that encourages students to push the boundaries of their practice and develop a voice as an engaged and creative composer.

This course is unusual in combining a rigorous academic education with the opportunity to acquire vocational skills through our innovative Professional Experience module. Students take up work placements with a wide range of external arts organisations or undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. The course therefore offers rich opportunities for career development and can pave the way for further study at PhD level if so required.

Why choose this course?

-The flexible structure of the MA Music allows you to tailor the course to your particular interests. The course is one of very few Music MAs in the UK to offer professional experience as part of the course; you can undertake a work placement with an external organisation such as a radio station, opera house, museum, music publisher, magazine, concert promoter or school. Alternatively, you can undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. Recent students, for example, worked at the Handel-Hendrix House Museum, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Audiograft festival.

The course is taught by experts who are internationally renowned in their fields. Our research informs the content and methodology of our modules, ensuring that teaching is at the cutting edge of the discipline. Following REF 2014 Music has been singled out as an area of particular research strength within the University.Our staff disseminate their research to wider audiences via appearances on BBC Radio 3, articles in the national press and talks for major performing organisations. The activities of our research units in opera (OBERTO), popular music (PMRU), or sonic art (SARU) complement the programme of formal study. MA students can contribute to the research units' activities, for instance by participating in listening groups and helping to organise study days and conferences. Student composers have an opportunity to showcase their work through the annual Audiograft festival. Opera students go on a field trip to hear a live opera, usually in London.

Oxford is a fabulous city in which to study music, with a very lively concert scene and excellent research facilities. You will have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library and the new Brookes library also offers substantial collections centring on the specialist areas of the MA.

The course provides an excellent foundation for doctoral study for those who wish to continue into a career in academia.

This course in detail

Students studying for the MA/PG Dip in Music are required to complete the following compulsory modules* (30 credits):
-Research Skills and Applied Research
-Professional Experience

MA students are also required to complete the following (60 credits):
-Dissertation / Major Project

You will then take two of the following modules depending on your chosen specialism (30 credits each):
Composition Pathway
-Approaches to Experimental Composition and Sound Arts
-Electroacoustic and Live Electronic Composition

Musicology pathway
-Advanced Musicology 1: 19th-Century Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 1: Film Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2: Popular Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2:Opera Studies

*As our courses are reviewed regularly for quality assurance purposes, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Music is taught through a combination of seminars, tutorials and skills-based workshops. Those taking a work placement will also receive mentoring and formative feedback from an individual at the placement organisation.

During your time here you will engage in lively discussions and original research. We aim to give you an in-depth understanding of recent critical debates, scholarship and practice in your chosen field, as well as to broaden your knowledge of musical repertoire.

Our pathways are original, exciting and flexible and one of the most striking features of the Music Department is its breadth of subject expertise. All staff members in Music are actively engaged in research and we have published our work in top journals and with the most highly respected publishers: our research in popular music, opera and sonic art was identified as 'world-leading' in the 2014 REF.

You will have an opportunity to work closely with staff members not only through the course modules but also through our specialist research units in popular music, opera and sonic art. Membership of these units allows you to attend conferences, workshops and talks by visiting speakers that will complement your formal studies.

Careers and professional development

Having an MA will make you stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the course straight after graduating from undergraduate study or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in music or to improve your current position. The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA in Music can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including management, law, journalism, media and the heritage industry.

Career destinations of our recent graduates include:
-Professional composition
-Performance
-Sound engineering
-Arts administration
-HE administration
-Teaching (secondary and FE)
-Retail management
-Youth work

Our programme provides the necessary research training for doctoral work and many MA students continue on into further research and pursue careers in academia. Our students have an excellent success rate in securing funded PhD places.

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Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation. Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with the World Music Studies MA, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. Traditional Music of the British Isles takes advantage of Sheffield’s position as a major hub of both English and ‘Celtic’ musical activity to pursue in-depth studies on British and Irish traditional musics.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, world music performance workshops and email tutorials with supporting course texts and guidance notes. Assessments take a variety of forms such as reports and essays, fieldnotes and recordings, and a final dissertation or folio.

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The future of the music industry lies with computer technology – and what we can do with that technology. It affects how we create, perform and distribute music. Read more
The future of the music industry lies with computer technology – and what we can do with that technology. It affects how we create, perform and distribute music. Whether you’re a practising musician, a sound engineer or a professional looking to combine your background and passion for music, we’ll help you explore key concepts at the heart of music, science and technology. Immersed in a thriving research centre, our future-facing course will give you a wealth of new career opportunities.

This programme is also available as a Research Masters (ResM). Further details are available on these pages.

Key features

-Work as part of a global research centre – the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR) – with staff, PhD students and post-doctoral researchers from all over the world. The latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 judged 100 per cent of our research to be internationally significant; 25 per cent of that was seen as world- leading, too.
-Projects can range from innovative approaches to composition and performance using computers, and the design of assistive music technology, to studying how music is processed in the brain.
-Take advantage of the ICCMR’s research collaborations with partners in Europe and USA, allowing you to visit renowned institutions such as IRCAM in Paris, NOTAM in Oslo and CalArts in the USA to develop your research project.
-Gain the skills necessary to progress to more advanced research at PhD level.
-Balance your work commitments and further education with the opportunity to study part-time for a masters-level qualification.
-Take part in the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival. Showcase your work in public, stay on top of new developments in the industry and get key insights into where music is headed in the future.
-Benefit from the multi-disciplinary nature of our programme. Whether you’re a practising musician, music graduate, musicologist, music educator, music technologist or just a graduate with proven knowledge of music or music technology, our programme provides many fascinating opportunities for collaboration.
-Focus on where you want to take your career, with the support you need to get there. An individual research project will enable you to explore what interests you most at the intersection of music, science and computing.

Course details

Over the course of our one-year programme, you’ll study three modules. In Advanced Topics in Computer Music Research you’ll be immersed in music programming techniques and software. Studying key contemporary composers working with technology in electronic and computer music, we’ll introduce you to current trends in computer music research, supplemented with course assignments and further reading. The Research in the Arts and Humanities module runs over five intensive days and focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to research into the arts, humanities and technology. You’ll also undertake a module that helps you manage your MRes project with your project supervisor. Your thesis can take the form of a written piece of theoretical work or a critical evaluation report, along with evidence of creative and/or professional practice.

Core modules
-MARE700 Research in the Arts and Humanities
-MARE701 Masters Thesis in the Humanities and/or Performing Arts
-MARE702 Advanced Topics in Computer Music

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Come and study with the pioneer of Music Industry Studies at MA level within the UK. This MA will give you an advanced and discerning knowledge of music industry practices, drawing on our international research and the experience of our tutors. Read more
Come and study with the pioneer of Music Industry Studies at MA level within the UK.

This MA will give you an advanced and discerning knowledge of music industry practices, drawing on our international research and the experience of our tutors. On it you'll investigate current music industry practices in-depth.

The programme is taught alongside the Masters programme in Popular Music Studies, which will broaden your theoretical understanding and opportunities for research. We anticipate class sizes to be between 15 and 20 students.

All postgraduates also have access to the department's programme of research seminars and performances.

Key Facts

REF 2014
In the latest Research Excellence Framework, we increased the proportion of 4* research from 10% (in the RAE 2008)to 32%, with 40% of impact rated 4* (outstanding) and 50% of environment rated 4* (world-leading).

Why School of Music?

Strong research culture

Across the School, our research activity has a strong interdisciplinary nature and is concentrated in three cross-cutting areas:-

Critical and Contextual Approaches
Creative Practice
Media and Industry Studies.

We're at the forefront of research and postgraduate teaching. Our Institute of Popular Music (IPM) was the first academic centre created specifically to study popular music – and where better than in the home of the Beatles? It also boasts an enviable archive of donated recorded material.

Staff and students contribute fully to our research areas, which are informed by the broadly defined fields of:

Critical theory
Musicology
Music Analysis
Music and the moving image (including new media)
Ethnomusicology
Composition
Music industries
Media and cultural studies.

Research students participate fully in our research activity. They present papers at the School’s research seminars, work as Teaching Assistants within the School (with pedagogical training and support provided). There are also weekly research, career, and teaching seminars for all postgrads.

As a postgraduate student you'll be able to attend research seminars involving guest speakers from many disciplines and subdisciplines. You'll also be closely involved in classical, traditional and popular music concerts performed by professional musicians and students.

Composer Kenneth Hesketh and conductor Vasily Petrenko from the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic - neighbours with whom we have launched a partnership - have recently been made honorary professors of Music at Liverpool.

Career prospects

Students from the taught postgraduate programmes in the School of Music have gone on to a wide range of careers, including various positions in the music industries, museums, arts administration, journalism, publishing, and teaching. PhDs from the School of Music are in full-time lectureships around the world (e.g. Canada, Sweden). The MMus and MA in Popular Music and Music Industry Studies have been recognised by the AHRC as appropriate training for advanced research and all three pathways prepare students for a level of further training equivalent to doctoral study.

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This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and understanding of both current and prospective music educators. Read more
This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and understanding of both current and prospective music educators. It provides a unique opportunity for students from all over the world to investigate the UK system of music education, consider major issues in international music education research and undertake a comparative study of music education practices across different cultures.

Key features
-You can tailor the course to your own interests by selecting one option module from a wide range of music topics.
-The core modules will develop your research, project planning and development skills in preparation for your major project, and you will receive guidance from a specialist tutor.
-The curriculum is enriched by our eclectic view of musical styles and genres, exploiting the diversity of a repertoire that encompasses Western classical music, popular and world musics.

What will you study?

You will develop and implement a musical project within an educational environment and undertake a substantial research project on a topic of your choice. Alongside this core study, which encompasses key research issues in music as well as in music education, you can choose from a variety of option modules and develop new skills to exploit in your own teaching.

You will have the opportunity to develop and enhance your skills as a practitioner by devising, delivering and evaluating a music education project. As part of the broader musical community, you will be able to further enhance your performance skills by participating in some of the many University ensembles.

Assessment

Assessment includes essays, critiques, position papers, practical projects, presentations, research papers and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Performance Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

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The Music PGCE covers the nature and principles of music teaching and learning and the place of music in the school curriculum. We aim to develop expertise in a variety of teaching situations and to equip students to plan meaningful musical experiences for their pupils. Read more
The Music PGCE covers the nature and principles of music teaching and learning and the place of music in the school curriculum. We aim to develop expertise in a variety of teaching situations and to equip students to plan meaningful musical experiences for their pupils.

Degree information

Our aim is to develop students as reflective and highly skilled music teachers. As well as developing subject expertise, students will understand why music is taught in schools, how pupils learn and how to teach music in a way that develops, challenges and inspires young people. In our partner schools students learn to teach pupils within the 11-16 range. There is also an opportunity to observe or to teach at post-16 level.

Students undertake two level 7 (Master’s-level) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Subject Studies (30 Master's-level credits)
-Wider Educational Studies (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
You will spend most of your time (120 days) in schools, working with music mentors who support you through your two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools with whom we work, with many outstanding mentors and strong music departments. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placements. Assessment is by practical teaching, assignments and portfolio tasks.

Students will also record their progress in a Career Entry and Development Profile statement. This will form part of an ongoing portfolio charting the student's continuing professional development.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas, including: classroom music and instrumental teachers, music educators, workshop leaders and consultants in National Music Hubs and local authorities, learning and participation programme leaders for professional orchestras, and resident composers in schools.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Music Teacher, Unspecified Girls' School
-Music Teacher, Unspecified Grammar School
-Music and Mathematics Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-Music Teacher, Unspecified Academy
-Music Teacher, Unspecified Boys' School

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools which, alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) offers one of the larger music PGCE programmes in the country, allowing students to benefit from a team of lecturers with a wide range of expertise and interests.

Our central London location means that we are able to draw on the world-leading expertise of professional musicians and music educators. For example, a number of subject sessions are arranged in collaboration with the London Sinfonietta, LSO St Luke's (Gamelan) and the Kingdom Choir (Gospel).

While undertaking placements in our network of partner schools, students also benefit from the wealth of expertise on offer in London and the opportunity to teach music in a vibrant and dynamic setting.

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Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree. Read more

Overview

Combine your knowledge and skills in music with managerial training with this distinctive and diverse degree.

Taught by the School of Music and Leeds University Business School, this programme will allow you to specialise in an aspect of music that suits your interests and talents while gaining an insight into the principles and strategies of management across the creative industries. You’ll also study modules designed specifically for this programme which bring music and management together, giving you the chance to connect with professionals in the music industry.

You could specialise in music management and promotion, performance, composition, music psychology, electronic and computer music or source studies while exploring strategic management, marketing and entrepreneurship. Whether you’re looking to launch a management career in the music industry or you want to enhance your skills and promotion prospects, you’ll learn from experts in both subjects to gain the diversity of skills to succeed.

Leeds University Business School is internationally recognised for the quality of its teaching and research. It’s among just 1% of institutions offering business degrees to be triple-accredited by the world’s best-known accreditation bodies.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course Content

The focus of the degree will be a major project: working with a tutor, most of our students devise a music and management project to combine and reflect upon music management theory and practice. This could include, for example, organising an event, acting as a consultant during a work placement you organise, or managing a musical group. Alternatively, you can complete a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

A core module throughout the year will introduce you to research methods in music, equipping you with the skills to support the rest of your studies. You’ll also choose from optional modules to specialise in one of computer music, aesthetics, musicology, editing, psychology of music, performance, composition, artistic management or live music promotion.

In both semesters you’ll study core modules run by Leeds University Business School. These will introduce you to strategic management, marketing for managers and how businesses in the creative industries are actually run and managed, applying concepts and theories to understand the business models of media companies, as well as the impact of digital technologies and the rise of exciting new markets.

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At the nexus of creativity, technology and business, this postgraduate degree is designed for graduates who want to further develop their music engineering and production skills, to establish a career as a professional producer in the music industry or related fields. Read more
At the nexus of creativity, technology and business, this postgraduate degree is designed for graduates who want to further develop their music engineering and production skills, to establish a career as a professional producer in the music industry or related fields.

As the music industry is constantly evolving, students on this course are equipped to deal with an ever-changing commercial landscape, while developing their personal potential. Key areas of the industry are studied from a wide variety of angles, but without losing sight of the primary goal to develop a sustainable career within music production.

An important element of the course is the practical application of your knowledge to generate highly creative work. Allied areas are also examined, which allows graduates to apply their skills in many other media-related fields, including film and animation. Such a strategic approach to your higher-level study engenders responsibility, critical thinking, problem-solving, and the highly creative generation of musical and visual tangibles.

In addition, our graduates will be trained in the use of Apple Logic Pro and Avid Pro Tools.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/131-msc-music-engineering-and-production

What you will study

The MSc Music Engineering and Production includes:
- Recording or Professional Music Production
- Music Post-Production
- Sequencing/Synthesis/Sampling
- History, Analysis, Repertoire and Theory
- Remixing Production
- Major Individual Research Project (or Learning Through Employment Research Project)

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

NOTE: Modules are subject to change.

Learning and teaching methods

The MSc Music Engineering and Production degree is taught through lectures, seminars and workshops, with emphasis on the practical application of your knowledge.

All assessments are coursework-based, allowing a detailed application of your knowledge and experience. Assessment is through continuous assignments, seminars and a dissertation based on real-life scenarios. The final major project is presented through written submission alongside an oral examination.

The Masters project may be in any area derived from, or related to, the course or the general discipline of music engineering and production, e.g, sound design in animation, music video, album recording and release, and sound synthesis. There are also opportunities to work on academic staff research projects, or with one of several PhD researchers in the Faculty’s Division of Music and Sound.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Engineering and production professionals work as music producers, sound engineers, writers and arrangers, sound designers and mixers/remixers in surround. Career opportunities will vary according to an individual’s capabilities and passion, but it is expected that graduates of USW’s MSc Music Engineering and Production should play a full role in shaping the future of music and sound in the UK and further afield.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills. As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that final projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

The MSc project may be in any area derived from, or related to, the course or general discipline of Music Engineering and Production. For example, sound design in animation, music video, album recording and release, and sound synthesis. There are also opportunities to work on academic staff research projects, or with one of several PhD researchers in the Division of Music and Sound.

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