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Masters Degrees (World)

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World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. Read more
World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. It draws upon the expertise of faculty members in each of these areas, as well as in Middle Eastern, Oceanic and American history. The MPhil in World History enables students to develop strong expertise in this rich and expanding field of historical scholarship. The MPhil in World History combines courses and a dissertation over a 9-month program. The core course focuses on historiographical debates in world history, leading to two options, usually in the history of a world region. From first term, students also begin directed research for a 15–20,000 word dissertation, working closely with a supervisor from the Cambridge World History Group. Students will also take language classes, a component that is required but not examined. This may be in any language offered in the Cambridge University Language Program, and may be elementary, continuing or advanced. In this way, the Cambridge MPhil in World History offers students thorough preparation for an advanced research degree. Cambridge graduates in World History have taken up posts in universities and academic-related spheres of work around the world. The MPhil in World History provides a point of entry into this rich tradition.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpwhs

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- knowledge of key debates and trends in world history and historiography
- skills in presenting work in both oral and written form
- acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field

Format

The MPhil in World History course has five elements, combining taught classes, a research project, language acquisition and participation in research seminar:

1. The core course, Debates in World History (10%) This course is historiographically based, engaging students with key scholarship, classic texts, and their revisions. Several origins and traditions of world history, global history, transnational history, and regional history will be established and questioned in student-led seminar discussion.

2. Two elective courses, selected from a suite of options (20%). Options will vary from year to year, but will include courses such as “Global Thinkers”, “Global China”, “Inequality: a Global History”.

3. A dissertation (15-20,000 words) (70%).

4. A language (non-examined). This may be preliminary, intermediate or advanced, in any language.

5. Participation in the Cambridge World History Seminar.

Students will receive both formal and informal feedback in all three modules, as well as from their thesis supervisor throughout the period of teaching.

Students will receive feedback via the following routes:

- Supervision: regular oral feedback in addition to termly online feedback reports (CGSRS)
- Core course and Option essays: written feedback
- Graduate Workshop / Seminars: oral feedback
- Language classes (if taken): oral and possible written feedback from teachers
- Dissertation examination: formal written feedback from two examiners after submission and examination of dissertation

Assessment

15,000–20,000 words. The dissertation will be examined by an internal and an external examiner. The dissertation is worth 70% of the final mark. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Core: 3-4,000 word Essay (10% of final mark)
Options: 2 x 3-4,000 word Essay (20% of final mark)

NB: Language Component is compulsory but is not examined.

Students will also prepare a 2,000 word dissertation proposal essay due in the Lent Term. This essay will be unassessed but students will meet with their supervisor to discuss the essay and receive feedback.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation. Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with the Traditional Music of the British Isles MA, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. World Music Studies is interpreted quite literally as encompassing, in principle, the study of any and all musical activity in the world: Western as well as ‘exotic’, popular as well as classical, amateur as well as professional.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

The University offers a range of scholarships and funding for the brightest students and the Department of Music offers a number of studentships for the strongest candidates. Small grants are also available to support postgraduate research project.
For more information about funding opportunities including application deadlines visit: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/funding

Find information about scholarships and funding for international students at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/international/enquiry/money/scholarships

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, world music performance workshops and email tutorials with supporting course texts and guidance notes. Assessments take a variety of forms such as reports and essays, fieldnotes and recordings, and a final dissertation or folio.

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World Heritage, both tangible and intangible, increasingly affects a significant proportion of the world’s population. It is now an essential concept for all engaged in the protection, development and management of heritage. Read more
World Heritage, both tangible and intangible, increasingly affects a significant proportion of the world’s population.

It is now an essential concept for all engaged in the protection, development and management of heritage.

This unique one-year programme is aimed at those who wish to acquire both a deeper understanding of the concepts and processes surrounding World Heritage in its cultural forms (tangible and intangible), its natural forms and as cultural landscapes. This course will provide you with necessary skills that will allow you to critically appraise and effectively manage World Heritage and its impacts in a sustainable manner. It is linked to the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage site, providing you with a unique academic experience and offering you access to unrivalled resources and over 25 years of management expertise.

As well as providing you with an excellent grounding for working in the heritage sector, the course offers ideal preparation for PhD study.

The programme also features an overseas visit. This is likely to be to the World Heritage Centre at UNESCO, Paris, to learn directly of the challenges of linking the protection and conservation of Sites with present and future environmental, social and economic needs.

You will study five core modules:

Critical Approaches to Heritage
Issues in World Heritage Management
Tourism Management at World Heritage Sites
World Heritage Case Study
Research Skills and Methods

You will also choose one optional module from a selection. The list of available modules in any one year can vary, depending on staff specialisms and availability. Modules available typically include:

Heritage Interpretation
Heritage Conservation Management
Heritage Management Practices

You will complete the MA with a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice, relevant to World Heritage.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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About the course. This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. The dissertation will give students the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of their knowledge.

Course structure

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a two year programme. A part time path is also an option. Students must take 240 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester for three semesters (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done the final semester of the second year). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Year 1

Compulsory

  • Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
  • Government and Politics of China
  • China in International Relations
  • Economic Development in Contemporary China

Restricted

Students must take TWO modules (20 credits) from this list below

  • Contemporary Chinese Culture, Ideology and Society
  • Management for China
  • Chinese Business and Society

Alternative

  • Mandarin 1A
  • Mandarin 1B
  • US Foreign Policy
  • Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
  • Politics and History of the Middle East
  • Other languages 1A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
  • Special World History Project
  • The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
  • Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
  • International Organization
  • China and Africa
  • Other languages 1B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

Year two

Compulsory

  • Research Methods I
  • Dissertation

Restricted

Students must choose ONE module (15 credits) from this group, offered by the School of International Studies:

  • Internship*
  • China and the World

Alternative

  • Mandarin 2A
  • Languages 2A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
  • Mandarin 2B
  • Special World History Project
  • The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
  • Humanitarian Intervention and Civil Wars
  • Languages 2B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

*The  Internship can start in the summer of Year 1 and be completed by the end of Autumn semester of Y2. Assessement will be in the Autumn semester of Y2. Long-term part-time internships may be agreed with the School in consultation with the convenor. This programme structure is in line with the requirements of the University of Nottingham Qualifications Framework. At http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/academicservices/qualitymanual/curriculum/unqf.aspx ).

Detailed module information can be found on the Online Module Catalogue. Please key in the relevant module title or module code.

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.



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About the course. This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. The dissertation will give students the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of their knowledge.

Course content

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a two year programme. A part time path is also an option. Students must take 240 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester for three semesters (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done the final semester of the second year). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Year 1

Compulsory modules

  • Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
  • Government and Politics of China 
  • China in International Relations
  • Economic Development in Contemporary China

Students must also take TWO modules from this list below:

  • Contemporary Chinese Culture, Ideology and Society
  • Management for China
  • Chinese Business and Society

Year 2

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methods I
  • Dissertation

Students must also choose ONE module (15 credits) from this group, offered by the School of International Studies:

  • Internship*
  • China and the World

*Internship can start in the summer of Year 1 and be completed by the end of Autumn semester of Y2. Assessement will be in the Autumn semester of Y2. Long-term part-time internships may be agreed with the School in consultation with the convenor. This programme structure is in line with the requirements of the University of Nottingham Qualifications Framework. At http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/academicservices/qualitymanual/curriculum/unqf.aspx ).

Detailed module information can be found on the Online Module Catalogue. Please key in the relevant module title or module code.

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.



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This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern. Read more

This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern.

It is taught in the Department of Classics, by experts in the field of Classical reception. The Department's research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture, giving the programme a breadth unmatched anywhere in the world. 

The programme is interdisciplinary, and is open to students with no prior knowledge of ancient languages. 

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our MA course focuses on the way the classical world has influenced the culture of later periods, and how it continues to do so. With a strong focus on research the course is taught in the Department of Classics by experts in the field of classical reception. Our Department’s research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture. This means we can offer you a breadth of expertise that is unmatched anywhere in the world. Through this advanced course of study, we will develop your literary, historical and archaeological analysis skills, and provide you with the opportunity to learn ancient and modern languages to extend these skills.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to typically 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

The advanced skills that we give you have proved very popular with employers in a wide range of professions, and many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department. Others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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Research profile. If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere. Read more

Research profile

If you join this research area, you will work with the academic specialists who form the Centre for the Study of World Christianity, which focuses on Christianity in and from all parts of the majority world, and also on the growing presence of African and Asian churches in the northern hemisphere.

The research interests of academic staff include Asian and African Christian theologies and history; the history of Christian missions; new missionary movements from the global south; Pentecostalism; current missiological issues such as inculturation, ethnicity, gender, and inter-faith relations.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in World Christianity, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will also be part of the Centre for World Christianity.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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The year-long MLitt in Postcolonial and Word Literatures is an intensive taught programme of study which aims to foster the next generation of scholars in postcolonial and world literary studies. Read more

The year-long MLitt in Postcolonial and Word Literatures is an intensive taught programme of study which aims to foster the next generation of scholars in postcolonial and world literary studies.

Covering both postcolonial and world literatures, this course offers a unique opportunity to expand students’ knowledge and understanding of a global range of theories and literatures focusing on European colonialism and its legacies today, while working with research-active experts in a wide range of relevant topics.

Highlights

  • The UK’s first combined Master’s programme in Postcolonial and World Literatures.
  • Achieve an in-depth knowledge of postcolonial studies in light of renewed scholarly interest in world literatures, and in dialogue with research staff.
  • Explore a global range of writers from the colonial to the contemporary on a programme that offers a comprehensive training in postcolonial and world literary studies.
  • Covering a wide range of periods, topics and contexts, the programme offers the opportunity to study the theoretical, literary, cultural and historical dimensions of contemporary postcolonialism from colonial encounters, to the emergence of the field and its current articulation in a globalised era of world literature.
  • Develop your skills as a researcher within a specific area of study by taking special topic modules.

Teaching format

In each semester students take one module that concentrates on the literature of the field and one module that engages with the field’s theoretical, cultural and historical developments.

All compulsory modules will be taught in small groups (typically of 10 to 15). Students will have weekly classes for each module, which will typically take the form of a mixture of lecture and seminar, allowing for both independent and group study in a supportive framework of teaching and learning.

Modules are assessed through oral presentations, learning journals and coursework essays. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.

Students are encouraged to develop their own, individual interests through their choice of an optional module.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Our MA Air Power in the Modern World aims to provide you with a comprehensive and up-to-the-minute understanding of military theory and operations between 1945 and today, with special reference to the role of air power in integrated (joint) contexts. Read more

Our MA Air Power in the Modern World aims to provide you with a comprehensive and up-to-the-minute understanding of military theory and operations between 1945 and today, with special reference to the role of air power in integrated (joint) contexts. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Academically rigorous course, on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis, and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

MA Air Power in the Modern World is a flexible, modular MA course, rich in media and reading resources, delivered entirely online via King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment. You will interact with an engaging and lively community of fellow graduates, from a wide variety of backgrounds.

The course will give you a comprehensive and up-to-the-minute understanding of modern military theory and operations in the light of the wide-ranging economic, social, technological and political changes in the world between 1945 and today, with special reference to the role of air power in integrated (joint) contexts. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare from an air power perspective, and to understand the contexts in which modern military operations take place.

Course purpose

MA Air Power in the Modern World aims to offer an engaging, well-designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies to qualified graduate students, both civilian and military, who share an interest in air power.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

You will typically have five hours per week of ‘seminars’ (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks per 20-credit module, as well as 160 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will typically have two hours per week online discussion time for four weeks to complement the 592 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500 word short essay (25%), one 3,000 word long essay (70%) and student participation in the seminar discussions (5%).

The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals, and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD, one teaches part-time at King’s.



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The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. Read more
The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research.

Degree information

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key figures, narratives, art forms, concepts, and social, religious and political practices of the classical world that have been most put to use by later cultures. They are equipped with necessary research tools, including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Approaches to the Reception of the Classical World

Optional modules - dedicated reception modules have included:
-Rome on Film
-Ancient Greece on Stage
-Dionysus in Rome
-Athens in Ancient and Modern Political Thought

Students can also choose from the full menu of modules available for the Classics MA which includes:
-Sophocles
-Cicero
-Dionysus in Rome
-Greek or Latin Papyrology
-Greek or Latin Epigraphy
-Medieval Latin Literature

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a subject related to the reception of the classical world, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000–15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and research visits to relevant institutions. Seminars will provide practical tuition in bibliographic searches and the use of a variety of electronic databases. Student performance will be assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme. Many students go on to pursue research at UCL and in other institutions; others have developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Editorial Assistant, McMillan
-Classics, The University of Oxford
-PhD Classics, Princeton University
-Classics, Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL)
-Research Degree: Greek and Latin, University College London (UCL)

Employability
The MA in Reception offers a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced literary, advanced oral communication, the ability to abstract and synthesise information, the ability to construct and manage arguments, independent and critical thinking on difficult issues, competence in planning and executing essays, presentations and projects, self-motivation, information technology skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data), team work, cooperation, and good time management. Students go on to employment in many sectors, including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries (including theatre and the media).

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme makes extensive use of the unique features of UCL: its central location, diverse international expertise and interdisciplinary outlook. Students benefit from research tours of nearby resources, such as the British Museum, the Warburg Institute and Courtauld Institutes, Sir John Soane's Museum, and the British Film Institute.

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world. Students benefit from the large range of modules offered by the department, by other departments at UCL, and by the intercollegiate Classics MA programme.

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This programme is designed to enable you to understand a wide range of Christian belief, culture and practice throughout the world, in historical, theological, and sociological contexts. Read more

This programme is designed to enable you to understand a wide range of Christian belief, culture and practice throughout the world, in historical, theological, and sociological contexts.

With more than 2.2 billion followers, and as one of the oldest religions, Christianity plays an important role in influencing a wide range of social, political and cultural issues. This programme interprets some of the key themes and trends in Christianity in the non-western world, and is designed to provide expert insight, knowledge, skills and understanding, particularly in relation to Africa, Latin America and Asia.

It is taught in a strongly interdisciplinary way, and employs historical, sociological, anthropological and theological perspectives. You will enjoy a unique framework to study, research and understand the complexity of Christian communities in the world and their wider significance for culture and society.

This programme can be taken either as a Master of Theology (MTh) or as a Master of Science (MSc); the difference is only in the name.

Programme structure

This programme is run full-time over one year (or part-time over two years). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will be given training in research methods which offers a practical approach to postgraduate level skills of critical investigation and writing, and receive individual supervision for your 15,000 word dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Compulsory courses comprise Selected Themes in the Study of World Christianity; one further course from the options specific to this programme; and two courses in research methods.

Option courses

You will choose three options. At least two must be World Christianity courses, such as:

  • Christianity in Asia
  • Critical Debates in Christian Mission
  • History of Christianity in Africa
  • Theologies of World Christianity

The options on offer change from year to year, so please consult the Programme Director for advice on what will be available. With your Programme Director’s agreement, you may also choose options from other taught masters programmes, language courses, or advanced undergraduate courses.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in the field or for employment in a range of areas requiring critical analysis and empathetic understanding.



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How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?. The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Read more
How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?

The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Students are introduced to debates about decolonisation and its relationship with modernity, addressing the question of how the end of empire has shaped the modern world.

This MA examines the nature of decolonisation in comparative perspective, looking at the British, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Belgian empires, rather than limiting the study of empire to a few case studies or to a single colonial power. The MA examines the differences in colonial governance and decolonisation processes, and how this has impacted the development of successor colonial states and the processes of decolonisation, nation-building, and the strengthening of the state which these states experienced.

Upon graduating, students will receive a degree awarded by the University of London.

Students will:

Learn about and analyse the political, developmental, institutional and social legacies of the decolonisation process;
Understand the connectivity between domestic politics and society and international diplomacy and policymaking;
Develop skills in understanding and analysing archival sources and undertaking archival and oral research;
Understand the ways in which the decline of the European empires in the extra-European world has shaped the 20th century.
This advanced degree provides an excellent foundation for students who wish to expand their knowledge of international history, politics and society prior to working for international organisations, the media, or in other professional capacities. It also provides the base for those wishing to do further research in African, Asian or European studies.

In addition to the knowledge gained over the course of the MA, the skills students develop - including the ability to analyse material in detail, process quantitative and qualitative data to reach informed conclusions, critique existing knowledge and conduct independent research - will be relevant to a wide variety of careers and will broaden students' appeal to a range of employers.

Structure

In order to pass the MA, students need to have achieved a total of 90 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits. ECTS credits are recognised across the European Union. The degree comprises four compulsory modules (including the dissertation), and three optional modules.

Required (core) modules (Autumn Term):

Historical Research Skills (with the Institute of Historical Research) [10 ECTS]
European Decolonisation in the 20th Century [10 ECTS]
Ethnicity, Nationalism, Liberation and Identity: the view from the Extra-European world [10 ECTS]
Optional modules* (Spring Term):

Diplomacy and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Geopolitics and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Policing, Intelligence and Counter-Insurgency [10 credits]
Decolonisation, Nation-State Building and Development [10 credits]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation [30 ECTS]

Students will complete a 15,000-word research-based dissertation on a chosen topic within human rights which is of special interest to them. This topic will be chosen in consultation with your dissertation supervisor, who will provide support.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through essays, although class participation also contributes towards assessment. Additional formative assessments include class presentations.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months.

Students undertaking the MA on a part-time basis will take two required modules in Autumn Term of their first year, and up to two optional modules in the Spring Term. They will take one required module in the Autumn Term of their second year, and one or two optional modules in the Spring Term.

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The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War. Read more

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War.

Our team of academics

This is an exciting programme delivered by a truly world-class team of scholars. Led by Professor Gary Sheffield, it includes Professor Stephen Badsey and Dr Spencer Jones, Professor Peter Simkins, Dr John Bourne, Professor John Buckley and Dr Laura Ugolini. This is the strongest cluster of scholars specialising in the military history of the First World War to be found in any conventional UK university, and the team will be supported by a number of prestigious guest speakers. A particular strength of the programme is the quality of the teaching.

The University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong. The emphasis of the programme is on the military and political history of Britain and the British Empire in the 1914-18 war.

Modules include:

  • Major Debates in the Historiography of the First World War: Historical Methods
  • The British Empire at War
  • The Western Front: Core Concepts and Controversies
  • The Western Front: The Evolution of the British Expeditionary Force
  • Total War: The British Experience 1914-18


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Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. Read more

Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Academically rigorous course on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

Our War in the Modern World MA will give you an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of warfare and international security since the end of the Second World War. You will examine contemporary warfare and security issues in the light of the wide-ranging political, technological, economic and social changes since 1945. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare, and to understand the contexts in which modern conflicts take place.

The course is structured so that you will first develop an understanding of warfare, security issues and geo-political changes. You can then choose optional modules and write your dissertation, giving you the opportunity to concentrate on those aspects of contemporary war and international relations that interest you most.

Course purpose

Our course is designed to offer you an engaging, well designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

You will typically have five hours per week of ‘seminars’ (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks per 20-credit module, as well as 160 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will typically have two hours per week online discussion time for four weeks to complement the 592 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500 word short essay (25%), one 3,000 word long essay (70%) and student participation in the seminar discussions (5%).

The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD while one teaches part time at King’s.



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From natural and human-made disasters, complex emergencies and conflict to environmental sustainability and community development, this globally-focused course explores real-world problems and how to conceptualise and address them. Read more
From natural and human-made disasters, complex emergencies and conflict to environmental sustainability and community development, this globally-focused course explores real-world problems and how to conceptualise and address them.

You will learn how to prepare for, and respond in a crisis. You will develop the planning skills to help minimise impact and avert problems where possible. You will develop advanced knowledge, project management and analytical skills whilst developing a specialism in an area of your choice.

The course is supported by the Disaster and Development Network (DDN) hosted by Northumbria University , which can lead to placements across the world. Our highly employable graduates have moved into a range of exciting careers, including in the UN, governments, development, humanitarian aid organisations, charities and local authorities.

Learn From The Best

Our MSc was the first of its kind in the world. Over the last 16 years our staff and graduates have informed policy at an international level, regularly advising and researching with the United Nations and national development organisations.

With many modules directly relating to the research expertise of teaching staff, you will learn from lecturers who lead knowledge creation in their specialist fields. Through collaborations with scholars, practitioners and senior policy makers across the world, our academics have connections with organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, national Emergency Management and Environment Agencies, as well as international and national charities and governments in a range of countries around the world.

You will benefit from our outstanding links with research groups and networks including the University-hosted Disaster Development Network (DDN) which is involved with research and enterprise activities on a global scale.

Teaching And Assessment

In this rapidly expanding field, you will learn through real scenarios and case studies, live research projects, developing your personal and professional responses to disaster and development challenges.

Guided through lectures, seminars and workshops by staff with vast experience in applying their expertise to current world issues, you will develop the knowledge and practical skills needed to prepare for, take action within, and recover from a crisis. You will develop research and methodology skills. You will also develop a specialism in an area such as health and wellbeing in disaster management, integrated emergency management, or exploring a specific thematic subject of your own choice. The course culminates in a Masters dissertation which can take the form of a traditional research dissertation or a work related project.

Assessment is designed to provide an authentic learning experience, using techniques and approaches common in professional practice and subject-based academic research and consultancy. We provide constructive ongoing and forward feedback to develop your understanding within and between modules.

Learning Environment

If you’re looking for specialist software packages or group study areas, our facilities have been developed to help you through your studies.

We also make use of technology in module delivery. Modules take a ‘virtual field study’ approach where real-world examples are brought into the classroom via video clips, podcasts and online discussions with external experts and practitioners.

Lecture materials, learning resources and assessment details are accessible on the eLearning portal (Blackboard), a university-wide system that also provides access to discussion boards where you can communicate with your fellow students and lecturers.

Module Overview
KE7001 - Approaches to Project Management (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7003 - Subject Exploration in Disaster and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)
KE7004 - Themes in Sustainable Development (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7005 - Disaster Risk Reduction and Response (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7006 - Health and Well-being in Disaster and Development (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7007 - Integrated Emergency Management (Optional, 20 Credits)
KE7015 - Research or Work Related Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KE7022 - Postgraduate Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

Research-Rich Learning

Research-led teaching and learning is used to guide you from the start to the end of the course. We embed research into lectures, seminars and workshops, drawing on staff and visiting lecturers’ research findings and consultancy.

You will be encouraged to debate key readings and actively engage in critical discussion of research strategies in interactive seminars and workshops. This is reinforced by assessments where you critically evaluate case studies, concepts, applications and research outputs.

Our research into Disaster and Development was ranked by judges representing UK Government Departments and Research Councils among the top 20 impact case studies within the Research Excellence Framework for contribution towards global development. DDN has been researching and facilitating the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies to improve community resilience in some of the world’s poorest communities since 1994, working with communities in Bangladesh, Mozambique, Nepal, Pakistan and Zimbabwe.

Northumbria is one of three Europe wide groups to represent Europe and Africa in the new Global Alliance of Disaster Research Institutes, and a leading member of a new UK national research network for implementing the UK research strategy for the Sendai Framework.

Our contribution is supported through the global MSc, doctoral alumni and the annual Dealing with Disasters conference.

Give Your Career An Edge

This postgraduate course is designed to support the development of those seeking to enter a career in the disaster and development fields, as well as to broaden and deepen the career options of those already working in the field. Our connections with professionals working in the sector ensure that the course content is aligned with current practice and relevant to the world, while staff research helps to inform new innovations, reflected in modules on the MSc also.

The course is supported by the Northumbria-based Disaster and Development Network (DDN) and there are also links to the Gender and Disaster Network. Connections that could lead to placements in countries such as Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Philippines, India, Nepal, Australia and a number of African countries as well as with EU and UK-based organisations.

Your Future

Our graduates are highly employable, equipped with the skills to address hazards, disasters, risks, vulnerabilities and complex emergencies, working with/in relief and development organisations, national authorities and emergency services at a local or global level.

Graduates go on to careers in a diverse range of related areas.

Our graduates work in roles, for example, as a: Emergency Planner or Emergency Planning Manager; Disaster and Development Academic and/or Researcher; Business Contingency Manager; Humanitarian and United Nations Consultant; Deputy Head of Field Officer of the Office of the United Nations for Humanitarian Assistance (OCHA); and are often working for the Environmental Agency, Local Authorities and International, National, Regional and Local Non-Governmental Offices - often at managerial level.

A number of students who already worked in the sector have subsequently progressed to senior roles in United Nations bodies, World Vision and UK Emergency Planning. Others have successfully gone on to PhD research before pursuing a career in academia in a range of countries around the world, both so-called developed and developing.

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