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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MA English by Research is your opportunity to conduct in-depth research on a topic of your choice from the field of modern literary studies, relative to an area of staff expertise. Read more
The MA English by Research is your opportunity to conduct in-depth research on a topic of your choice from the field of modern literary studies, relative to an area of staff expertise.

This piece of original research will usually be based on close study of the primary texts as well as engagement with critical, contextual and theoretical material as appropriate. You will conduct your research under the close supervision of a member of staff.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/292-ma-english-by-research

What you will study

Your research topic will be decided in consultation with a member of the English team. An individual supervisor will be assigned during the application and interview process and you will then work closely with them.

Dissertation supervision for the MA English by Research is available in the following broad areas:

- 19th Century Literature
- 20th Century and Contemporary Literature
- Women’s Writing
- Feminist Theory
- Welsh Writing in English
- Welsh Women’s Writing
- Gothic Studies
- Religious Poetry
- Postcolonial literatures
- Historical fictions

Learning and teaching methods

Once a research area has been identified and a research programme agreed, you can begin researching and writing your dissertation. You will determine its content, development and structure in regular consultation with your dissertation supervisor. You will produce a dissertation 25,000 words in length.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The MA by research is an excellent qualification for further postgraduate study at MPhil or PhD level. Alternatively graduates will have developed the research skills needed for a range of careers in the arts, media, industry and public or private sectors, including teaching, public administration and publishing.

Assessment methods

The MA English by Research is assessed by a dissertation and a viva voce (oral examination). The dissertation should be 25,000 words in length.

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The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of. Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Read more
The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of: Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Specialism is also possible in translating and interpreting.

The Modern Languages MPhil is offered through the School of Modern Languages. We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

Chinese

-Chinese translating and interpreting
-Chinese numerology, number and gender in nursery rhymes (Dr V Pellatt)
-Cross-cultural studies between China and the West
-Chinese modernity studies
-Modern Chinese literature and culture
-Chinese-English translation
-Global Chinese diaspora studies
-Chinese-American studies
-Cultural theory (Prof J Qian)
-Contemporary society, especially identity, ethnicity and religion
-Minority nationalities (eg Xinjiang or Uyghur studies)
-Chinese state or popular nationalism and national identity
-Islam in China
-Performing arts, music cultures and popular culture in mainland China (Dr J Smith Finley)
-Transnational Chinese cinema
-Stardom
-Independent documentary filmmaking
-Gender and sexuality in Chinese media (Dr S Yu)

French

-Contemporary women's writing (Dr Robson, Dr El-Maïzi)
-19th century literature and culture (Prof Harkness, Prof Cross)
-Dialectology (Dr Hall)
-French and Algerian cinema (Prof Austin, Dr Leahy)
-History, politics and gender (Prof Cross, Prof Harkness)
-Language change (Dr Hall, Dr Waltereit)
-Popular culture (media, sport, music) and public policy (Dr Dauncey)
-Postcolonial cultures (Prof Austin, Dr El-Maïzi)
-Trauma and culture (Prof Austin, Dr Robson)

German

-20th century German and contemporary literature (Dr T Ludden, Dr B Müller)
-GDR literature and censorship (Dr B Müller)
-Representations of the Holocaust and/or World War II (Dr B Müller)
-Literature and philosophy - cultural and critical theory (Dr T Ludden)
-Women's writing (Dr T Ludden)
-Medieval German and comparative literature (Dr E Andersen)
-Morphological theory - morphology, phonology and dialectology of German and Dutch (Dr C Fehringer)

Japanese

-Gender studies (Dr G Hansen)
-Popular culture, film and media studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Political studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Literary studies (Dr G Hansen)

Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies

-Anthropology, anthropological linguistics and sociolinguistics of Latin America, including Quechua language (Prof Howard)
-Semantics, philosophy of language, history and spread of Spanish in Latin America, Latin American dialects and Creole (Prof Mackenzie)
-Political, social and intellectual history of Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially Brazil and Southern Cone (Prof Hentschke)
-History of education in Latin America in 19th and 20th century Latin America (Prof Hentschke, Dr Oliart, Prof Howard)
-Discourses of race and identity in Latin America (Prof Howard, Dr Oliart, Dr Morgan)
-Latin American film, literature and theatre (Dr Page)
-Spanish and Latin American cultural history and popular culture (Dr Catala Carracso, Dr Morgan, Dr Oliart, Dr Fernández)
-Catalan nationalism (Dr Catala-Carrasco)
-Spanish novel (Dr Catala Carrasco)

Translating and Interpreting

We can offer supervision for projects involving English plus Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Quechua, Spanish, Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian.

Our research specialisms are:
-Interpreting (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Psycholinguistics of interpreting and translating (Dr M Jin)
-Translating literature (Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and culture (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and ethics, ideology and power (Prof R. Howard, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation products, processes and strategies (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translator and interpreter training and assessment (Dr Y Chen, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Reflective/autonomous learning and educational psychology (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Wu)
-Audiovisual translation studies (Dr Y Chen)

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The taught MA in French is aimed at graduates with a primary honours degree in French, with a minimum of 2.2 or equivalent, who have spent a year in France, or who have equivalent expertise in French language. Read more

Overview

The taught MA in French is aimed at graduates with a primary honours degree in French, with a minimum of 2.2 or equivalent, who have spent a year in France, or who have equivalent expertise in French language. It is designed for graduates of French who wish to take their study of French language, literature and culture to a deeper level and to enhance their language skills. A significant proportion of the course is delivered and assessed through French. Core teaching involves modules on writing and presentation skills in French, practical translation and research methodology. The course is designed around the theme of writing and exile, a topic that corresponds to departmental research expertise in the modern and early modern periods. There are elective modules (taught through English) in women's writing, translation studies and conflict studies. The minor thesis (15,000-20,000 words) involves independent research and collaboration with a supervisor on an agreed subject.

It is possible to study modules of particular interest without completing a Masters degree or to exit with a Postgraduate Diploma (Level 9) in French after completing 60 credits of taught modules.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/french/our-courses/ma-french

Course Structure

Modules include narratives of exile, intercultural studies, translation skills and contemporary European women's writing.

Career Options

Recent graduates from the taught MA in French have gone on to work in teaching at all levels, translating, administration involving use of Frenchand English, editing, management and tourism.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHM50 Full-time / MHM51 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subjects of English and Creative Writing. Read more
The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subjects of English and Creative Writing.

As a research student, you can benefit from a dedicated doctoral training programme designed for English students, which gives you the opportunity to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Expert and experienced direction will be available from your supervisory team and you can benefit from the School’s research expertise in areas including contemporary literature, 18-19th century literature, early modern literature, women’s writing, Gothic literature, utopianism and American fiction.

Regular research seminars, symposia and conferences provide a lively research environment, in which students are encouraged to participate. An interdisciplinary research culture facilitates collaboration with colleagues across topics and strong links exist with the Schools of Film and Media, History and Heritage, and Fine and Performing Arts.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-21st Century literature and drama
-19th Century literature
-Life writing/testimony/memory studies
-Women’s writing 18-21st Centuries
-American literature 19-21st Centuries
-Renaissance literature
-Utopian studies
-Ecocriticism
-Gothic literature
-Postcolonial literature
-Trauma studies

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at this level of study takes the form of an 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

A doctoral qualification may be regarded as the capstone of academic achievement and may mark the beginning of a career in academia or research.

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more
The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

◾Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
◾We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
◾Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2
◾Creative workshops and guest speakers
◾Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
◾Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:
◾encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
◾provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
◾familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
◾and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.

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This MSc aims to provide medical and science-based students with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the field of reproductive science and women's health. Read more
This MSc aims to provide medical and science-based students with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the field of reproductive science and women's health. There is a strong focus on development of key skills and careers advice in the programme.

Degree information

Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the theoretical (including clinical) and laboratory aspects of reproductive science and women's health, specifically in the areas of basic genetics, gametogenesis and IVF, female reproductive anatomy, physiology and pathology, pregnancy and childbirth, breast and reproductive cancers, prenatal diagnosis and screening, reproductive health, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis and developing technology. They gain transferable skills including information technology, analysis of scientific papers, essay writing, seminar presentation, research techniques, peer review and laboratory skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising eight core modules (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible study two to five years) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Mandatory modules
-Basic Genetics and Technology
-Gametogenesis, Preimplantation Development and IVF
-Female Reproductive Physiology and Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology
-Pregnancy and Childbirth
-Breast and Reproductive Cancers
-Prenatal Diagnosis and Screening
-Reproductive Health
-Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Developing Technology

Dissertation/research project
All MSc Students undertake a clinical, laboratory, audit or library-based research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical demonstrations in laboratories, observation days in fetal medicine, reproductive medicine and IVF units, and student presentations. There are a number of peer-led learning activities. Assessment is through essays, patient case reports, critical reviews of papers, online problem booklet, examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

On completion of the programme, all students will have gained knowledge of both the clinical and laboratory aspects of reproductive science and women's health. This will enable the science-orientated students to go on to pursue research degrees, careers in embryology, or other careers in the field or in general science. Medically-orientated students will be able to develop their careers in the field of reproductive science and women's health.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Fellow, NHS Harris Birthright Research Center for Fetal Medicine
-Trainee Embryologist, Assisted Reproduction and Gynaecological Centre
-University Teaching Assistant, King Saud University
-Medical Laboratory Assistant, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
-Senior House Officer (Obstetrics and Gynaecology), NHS Health Education South London / St Thomas' Hospital (NHS

Employability
Throughout the MSc programme students learn key skills through peer-led activities, such as evaluating and presenting orally on patient cases and media coverage of scientific papers. Basic laboratory techniques are taught as are essay writing, critical evaluation of papers, debates and ethical discussions. We also offer a comprehensive careers programme involving our alumni, covering job applications, CV writing, general careers in science and specific advice on careers in embryology, clinical genetics, medicine and research degrees.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute for Women's Health delivers excellence in research, clinical practice, education and training in order to make a real and sustainable difference to women's and babies' health worldwide.

The institute houses the UK's largest group of academics working in women's health and the UCL/UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust collaboration at its core provides an academic environment in which students can pursue graduate studies taught by world-class researchers and clincians.

Our diversity of expertise in maternal and fetal medicine, neonatology, reproductive health and women's cancer ensures a vibrant environment in which students develop subject-specific and generic transferable skills, supporting a broad range of future employment opportunities.

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The MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer you the opportunity to develop your creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. Read more
The MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer you the opportunity to develop your creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. You prepare for the processes and challenges involved in publishing creative written work, whether poetry or prose.

COURSES
First Semester
Creative Writing: Poetry
Creative Writing: Fiction

Optional
Tales of Vengeance and Enchantment: the Heroic Age in Irish and Icelandic Saga Literature
Approaching Literature
Crosscurrents in Irish and Scottish Literature
Critical Approaches to Literature, Science and Medicine
Scottish Medicine and Literary Culture
Special Study in Language and Literature
Illness and Disability in Modern Literature and Thought
The Literature of The Gaels in Translation
Novel ideas: Reading Prose Fiction
Migration to Postcolonial Theory in Context
Introduction to Visual Culture

Second Semester
Creative Writing: Prose Fiction
Creative Writing: Narrative, Medicine, Psychology

Optional
Locations and Dislocations: the Role of the Place in Literature
Diaspora and Migration in Contemporary Visual Culture
Contemporary Irish and Scottish Women's Fiction
Irish and Scottish Science Fiction
Special Study in Language and Literature
The Making of Middle Scots
Scott in Context: Walter Scott and His World
Critical Analysis of Visual Culture

Third Semester
Creative Writing Portfolio (dissertation)

Qualification MLitt

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This inter-disciplinary course of study will engage with health professionals working locally and nationally to address the challenges in identifying and delivering a high quality health care for women. Read more
This inter-disciplinary course of study will engage with health professionals working locally and nationally to address the challenges in identifying and delivering a high quality health care for women. The course enables students to engage with current issues in women’s health, contributes to their professional development, enhances knowledge, and study with health professionals from other institutions in a multicultural environment.

The course has been developed in response to a number of reports and industry organisations, such as: Women’s Health and Equality Consortium; High Quality Women’s Health Care: A proposal for change (Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 2011); Royal College of General Practitioners Curriculum (2010), which identified the importance for health professionals to work together to ensure that the experiences and needs of women within a multicultural context are reflected in care provision.

Why study with us?

This course will enable students to choose from a range of modules to ensure a bespoke approach to their learning, enabling practitioners to critically consider their own practice in relation to a changing multi-cultural society in which the health needs of women have arguably become more diverse. In view of this societal shift, the course will be delivered within a multicultural context, by a range of research active academic staff supplemented by a variety of Clinicians working in the area of Women’s Health from the region and beyond.

You will receive training in the skills required in the reading and interpretation of the literature and translating that into evidence based practice. We will develop your research and writing skills so that you will be in a position to contribute to the scientific literature in an effective manner.

The programme culminates in the Research Dissertation, which will be assessed through your production of two publishable scientific articles. Our aim will be to develop these to publication with you if suitable.

If biomedical or clinical research is your interest, successful completion of the MSc will allow you to directly register onto PhD or and join our team of researchers at the Institute of Medicine.

The learning experience

Core Modules:
• Evidence Based Medicine
• Gender Based Violence
• Research Methods and Data Analysis Research
• The Public Health agenda for women: Challenges and Opportunities
• Research Dissertation

Option modules:
• The Provision of Sexual and Reproductive Health
• Work Based Learning/Individual Study
• The Older Woman
• Women’s Oncology
• Leadership for Women: Coaching and Mentoring- OR Leadership and Health Provision
• Rural Women’s Health

You will need to study a total of seven modules to complete the MSc (five core, and two optional).

You will be encouraged to address assignments through your chosen discipline. Most taught lectures will be delivered within the University Centre and supported with access to learning materials. Some modules will also incorporate online learning.

You will be assessed through a variety of assessment methods including via coursework assignments, which may focus on clinical reviews, posters, or data manipulation exercises.

The research dissertation is assessed by the production of a substantial review paper and an academic research article suitable for publication in an appropriate research journal.

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Introduction to key issues in the contemporary discussion of gender. Detailed exploration of theoretical, critical and creative writing through a range of historical periods. Read more

MLitt in Women, Writing and Gender

• Introduction to key issues in the contemporary discussion of gender.
• Detailed exploration of theoretical, critical and creative writing through a range of historical periods.
• Examine the diversity of women’s literary practices across a range of centuries and genres.
• Consider broader historical and contemporary debates in feminism and gender studies.

Teaching methods: Seminar.
Assessment: Coursework essays, oral presentation, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Fortnightly or weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90-120 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School of English currently has 32 permanent members of staff, as well as several Teaching Fellows, Honorary Lecturers/Senior Lecturers, and Honorary Professors.

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these. Read more

Overview

Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these.

Women and children, both in the UK and around the world, face inequality on a daily basis. These inequalities come from lack of access to healthcare, education, employment opportunities, technological advances, legal support, and social, cultural and political opposition (Marmot, 2010). The World Health Organisation has recognised this and explicitly targeted women and children in three of its Millennium Development Goals; to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health, alongside wider goals to improve universal access to education and to eradicate poverty that also disproportionately affect women (WHO, 2015).

This course focuses on the health of women and children. During their ‘core’ modules, students will be encourage to explore individual health issues, as well as exploring the global legislation that impacts on women’s and children’s health, and understanding how they can implement and influence policy change. The option modules will allow the student to tailor their learning to their individual practice; whether caring for the critically unwell women, doing a physical assessment of a new-born infant (NIPE), understanding the global impact of responsive parenting or as an effective leader or manager of a service.

References

Marmot, M., 2010. Fair society, healthy lives. The Marmot Review. London: University College London.

World Health Organisation, 2015. Millennium Development Goals http://www.who.int/topics/millennium_development_goals/about/en/

Careers

This course will utilise a global public health perspective and is aimed at all practitioners who work with women and children, so will appeal to students both in the UK and internationally. It will offer an inter-professional learning opportunity to a range of professionals including Midwives, Children’s Nurses, Health Visitors, Hospital and Community nurses, Family Support Workers, but is also suitable for those who work with women and children in the voluntary sector or education. The course will be taught by a range of experienced lecturers from a variety of clinical backgrounds. Please be aware that this course is aimed at practitioners working in some capacity with women’s and children’s health and does not lead to a registerable qualification with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK.

Modules & assessment

Core modules -

- Global Challenges to Women and Children's Health:
This module is designed for an inter-professional audience, and has a global public health focus, considering issues affecting women and children around the world. It is designed to provide insight and exploration of the major public health issues affecting the health of women and children. Each of the main areas explored will include an overview of the illness/problem as well as consideration of the social, cultural and political context and influence upon it and evaluation of how this leads to inequality and may reduce life chances.

- Research Proposal - Women's and Children's Health:
This module provides a critical overview of research philosophy and the major methodological and design approaches to research in order to equip you to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of published research, whether in your specialist area or in the health, welfare and social care field.

- Political Power and Policy Drivers affecting Women and Children's Health:
As part of everyday inter-professional practice, practitioners working with women and children are affected by policy drivers in a number of ways, however, differences may be apparent in how these are translated to healthcare and how they are embedded into practice. Implementing new policy requires practitioners to use their, power, influence and interpersonal skills. The module will enable the student to critically evaluate their own knowledge and skills which underpin their current practice.

- Postgraduate Major Project:
The Major Project, which is central to the Masters award, enables students to demonstrate their ability to synthesise learning from previous modules and use this learning as the basis for planning, conducting and writing up a research or work-based project. This project provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate: the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism; depth of knowledge which may involve working at current limits of theoretical and/or research understanding; critical understanding of research methods and its relationship to knowledge; awareness of and ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice; the ability to draw meaningful and justifiable conclusions from information which may be complex or contradictory; the capability to expand or redefine existing knowledge to develop new approaches to changing situations and contribute to the development to best practice; the ability to communicate these processes in a clear and sophisticated fashion; the capability to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. In the course of your studies with us you may generate intellectual property which is defined as an idea, invention or creation which can be protected by law from being copied by someone else. By registering with us on your course you automatically assign any such intellectual property to us unless we agree with the organisation covering the cost of your course that this is retained by them. In consideration of you making this assignment you will be entitled to benefit from a share in any income generated in accordance with our Revenue Sharing Policy in operation at that time. Details of our Intellectual Property Policy and Guidelines can be found on My.Anglia under Research, Development and Commercial Services or by contacting this Office for a hard copy.

Optional modules -

- Applied Leadership & Management:
This module provides an innovative exploration of leadership and management in healthcare, and examines their impact on organisations including wider considerations in the external environment. This module will enable students to assess and analyse the roles that leaders and managers play in a range of organizational contexts; and to apply the principles and techniques of leadership and management in a range of contexts.

- Care of the Critically Unwell Woman:
This module will enable you to develop in-depth knowledge and skills when caring for the critically unwell woman, during the child bearing continuum. Work-based learning is incorporated into the module in order to recognise and value your professional expertise. While practicing midwifery in an area where women with high dependency needs will be cared for, you will also spend clinical time developing your skills in the high dependency or intensive care unit.

- Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE):
This module will focus on the specialist knowledge and the clinical skills that are required to enable you to competently undertake a thorough Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE) in clinical practice. You will utilise in-depth knowledge and understanding that you have gained to enable you to recognise the deviations from the normal to initiate appropriate care and referral. Critical reflection and completion of the practice documents will allow you to further identify your learning needs and develop your scope of professional practice.

- Global Impact of Responsive Parenting:
This module is designed to examine the positive health impact responsive parenting has on the mother and infant dyad, the wider family, society and the Globe. Historical child rearing styles will be reviewed and debated to highlight their negative effects on child development and on society. The module will explore the current understanding of neurophysiology of infant brain development and how parenting interactions can affect this process. The module will conclude with positive practical steps for health professionals to encourage responsive parenting with the parents they work with every day.

Assessment -

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your learning in a variety of ways during this course. Assessment will vary between modules, but includes patchwork text, reflective essays, action plans, reports, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), essays, ‘journal style’ articles (to prepare you to publish your work) and a major project on a subject of your choice.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

Distance learning - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/distance-learning

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics
• Civil Society and International Development
• Critical Security Studies
• Rights-Based Approaches to Development
• War, Technology and Culture
• Approaches to IR
• Violence, Conflict & Development
• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• The Policy Making Process
• State of Africa
• Politics in Contemporary Britain
• War in Space
• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• War, Identity and Society
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs
• Women Writers of the 1940’s
• Women Writing India
• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939
• Contemporary Women’s Writing
• Angela Carter
• Gender in Contemporary European Culture
• Literature in Social Context
• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt
• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939
• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Welsh Writing in English offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in Welsh Writing in English

The MA allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA is openly structured. You define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

You develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Welsh Writing in English course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. There are three core modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing.

Part-time study is also available.

Welsh Writing in English Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to Welsh Writing in English.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of Welsh Writing in English.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Welsh Writing in English typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advanced Research Skills
• Dylan Thomas and the Rise of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• Women Writing Modern Wales
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Welsh Writing in English graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as education; publishing; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Welsh Writing in English from an English or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to early modern history.

Research Interests

The Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW) is directed by Dr Kirsti Bohata, alongside Professor Daniel Williams who during the past decade has developed comparative approaches to the literatures of Wales. He took over from Professor M.Wynn Thomas OBE, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the English Association. Kirsti Bohata’s areas of specialism include Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Writing and the Production History and Culture of the Book. Professor
Dai Smith is Raymond Williams Chair of Welsh Cultural History within CREW, Dr John Goodby is a poet, leading scholar of post-war Irish poetry and specialist in Dylan Thomas, while Peter Lord, the leading historian and interpreter of Wales’s visual culture, is the Centre’s Research Fellow who recently published an edition of the Winifred Coombe Tenant Diaries. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through CREW and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

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This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library. Read more

Summary

This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library.

Modules

Approaches to the long 18th century; research skills (in English or history); dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: 18th-century fiction; English social and cultural life in the long eighteenth century; philosophy and the art of tragedy; slavery and abolition in the Atlantic world; towards modernity and after; unknown Jane Austen; women and writing the French revolution; other relevant optional modules.

Visit our website for further information...



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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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