• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
"women's" AND "rights"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Women's Rights)

We have 23 Masters Degrees (Women's Rights)

  • "women's" AND "rights" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 23
Order by 
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses. Read more
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses.

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Practice engages students in a critical and nuanced examination of this paradox, while providing them with the practical skills necessary to apply global norms at the local level.

Why study International Human Rights at York?

The LLM in Human Rights Law and Practice provides the knowledge, skills and networks necessary for mid-career professionals and recent graduates to work in the human rights field. The LLM is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Our LLM is distinctive because students:
-Work on real human rights issues, which gives practical skills, hands-on experience and improved job prospects
-Get the opportunity to work alongside human rights defenders during a two-week field visit to Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or placement in York
-Learn from international human rights defenders based at the Centre
-Explore how international human rights law interacts with national public policy in various states

LLM Structure

Three core modules cover international human rights law, policy and advocacy. Optional CAHR modules cover several topical issues through a human rights lens: culture, development, migration, and post-conflict justice.

The programme requires you to undertake a placement with human rights organisations in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or the UK. This is an important part of the degree programme and will develop your practical skills and provide hands-on experience, both of which will prepare you for working in this field and improve your career prospects.

The LLM is taught in weekly lectures and seminars covering specific case studies and including skills training on oral presentations, advocacy, report writing, and memos.

Compulsory Modules
The compulsory modules reflect the three sides to human rights activism: law, policy and practice.
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Applying international human rights law (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits; term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits; terms 3-4)

Optional Modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Four optional modules taught by Centre staff will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also choose optional modules taught by other departments, from the list below.

Optional modules taught at CAHR
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught at the York Law School
-Corporate responsibility and law
-Financial citizenship and social justice

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Placements
A key part of the LLM is exposing students to the practice of international human rights law at the domestic level. Thus students have the opportunity to pursue a placement and related project with our NGO partners in Malaysia and York. The fieldwork takes place over a two week period in weeks 9 and 10 of the autumn term in either Kuala Lumpur or York. Please note that the Malaysia trip/placements will only run if there are sufficient student numbers.

Students will be expected to work together in small groups in partnership with a human rights organisation. This will include:
-Extensive background research on country context, the host organisation, relevant thematic issues etc.
-Devising a project prior to the field visit, in collaboration with the host organisation
-Two weeks of intensive work in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or York in November and December
-Ongoing discussions about project completion once students return to York

Where after the LLM?

Our LLM provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian organisations, charities, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

For example, recent graduates are working with:
-Foreign and Commonwealth Office
-UK-based bar association
-Egyptian human rights NGO
-Development NGO in West Africa
-East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Network
-Human Rights Watch
-Pakistan's judicial sector
-UK-based NGO working with sub-Saharan children affected by HIV/AIDS

Read less
The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights. Read more
The development of this LLM specialisation will capitalise on the Centre for Gender Studies as a multi-faculty centre from 2012, allowing students to engage with contemporary gender theories alongside existing PG Law modules that engage issues in gender and women's rights.

Students are required to take a core module in Feminist Legal Theory, alongside units on the human rights of women, gender and migration and gender and armed conflict.

Students combine the study of units specifically focused on gender and/or women's rights with the modules from the large list of law options available to LLM students at SOAS, allowing the student to tailor their programme to suit future goals.

In taking this module, students should hope to develop an understanding of the role of gender as a tool for analysis and critical analytical skills in feminist legal methods.

Students will also study the work of gender experts in contemporary institutions and situate contemporary legal reforms on women's rights and gender perspectives within feminist histories, while analysing the role of non-Western feminist actors and theories in leading future legal reform and gender perspectives.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm-in-law-and-gender/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law and Gender:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) as a core course.
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

Read less
The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. Read more
The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. In 1972 a group of University of Alabama students initiated a project to introduce courses in women’s studies into the curriculum. They identified faculty who would be willing to develop courses on women and, by the spring of 1975, a women’s studies minor had been created in the College of Arts and Sciences. That same year, an independent program in women’s studies–the first in the Southeast–was launched. The Master of Arts degree program was established, with the first graduate students enrolled, in 1988. The Women’s Studies program, part of the Department of Gender and Race Studies, includes a core faculty, a graduate adjunct faulty, and participating faculty from almost every discipline.

Master of Arts Program Description

The University of Alabama Master of Arts in Women’s Studies is a thirty (30) credit hour degree program which focuses on feminist research. The program emphasizes interdisciplinary and cross-cultural methodology, as well as analytical and theoretical perspectives on women. Students can specialize in feminist theory, the culture of southern women, women in the civil rights movement, or other areas of feminist and interdisciplinary research.

Requirements

The requirements of the program of study are as follows:

Plan I (thesis plan) requires at least 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 15 hours of elective courses, and 6 hours of thesis research), and a thesis.

Plan II (comprehensive exam) requires 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 21 hours of elective courses), and a comprehensive exam.

Admission Standards

Applicants must meet the admission standards of the Graduate School For current Graduate School admission requirements, consult http://www.graduate.ua.edu. In addition, applicants should have had at least an introductory women’s studies course or its equivalent, or take it before enrolling in the graduate program. International students must have a TOEFL score of 550 (or 213 on the computerized TOEFL).

Financial Aid

The University of Alabama Women’s Studies program is one of the few programs in the U.S. with a permanent number of graduate assistantships, which we award to qualified students on a competitive basis. (Several universities have graduate programs in women’s studies, but few have full-time assistantships in women’s studies; our graduate assistants teach Introduction to Women’s Studies or they perform research with a faculty member.) If you plan to apply for an assistantship or financial aid, your application should be filed by February 15.* Assistantships include a tuition scholarship for fall and spring sessions, doubling the value of the award. *(Applications for the program are accepted throughout the year. Check with the department for the current amount paid per assistantship.)

Courses

Core Courses
WS 530: Feminist Theory: Women in Contemporary Society (3)
WS 532: Issues and Problems in Women’s Studies Research (3)
WS 570: Gender, Race, and Class: Cross-Cultural Approaches (3)
WS 599: Thesis Research (6)

Elective Courses
WS 500/501: Independent Study in Women’s Studies
WS 502/503: Seminar in Teaching Women’s Studies
WS 510: Special Topics (i.e., Women and Utopia, Feminisms on Film etc.)
WS 520: Women and Work
WS 521: Women’s Studies Practicum
WS 525: Feminist Theory: Major Texts
WS 540/541: Seminar in Women’s Studies
WS 550: Women in America
WS 560: Women and Public Policy
WS 590: Women and Law
WS 592: Women in the Labor Force
WS 594: Sex Discrimination
AMS 525: Women in the Civil Rights
EH 635: Seminar in Feminist Literary Criticism
HY 500: Women in the Americas
SOC 529: Language and Social Analysis

Read less
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences. Read more
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences.

More about this course

Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. Theoretically, we are confronted with the issue of how to reconcile unconditional rights with consequentialist ethics of political responsibility and rival ideologies of social order. Practically, we are confronted with particular powers, interests and conflicts demanding judgement and action that is at once moral and pragmatic. The MA in Human Rights and International Conflict will explore such issues and attempt to cultivate such judgement. The course provides both a solid academic grounding in human rights and international relations and a wide choice of optional modules. Students are trained in research methodology, before completing a 12-15,000 word dissertation dealing in depth with a subject of their choice.

Taught by published experts in human rights, peace and conflict studies, international relations, politics, history, philosophy, women's studies and other subjects, this multidisciplinary course equips students with the kind of understanding necessary to work for peace, justice and human rights in the real world.

Assessment is largely by coursework. Core modules also involve two assessed presentations and two unseen examinations. One third of the assessment for the MA is by dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-History and Theory of Human Rights (core, 20 credits)
-Human Rights and International Conflict Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Human Rights and the International Order (core, 20 credits)
-International Conflict Resolution (core, 20 credits)
-Theory and Research Methods in International Relations (core, 20 credits)
-American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century (option, 20 credits)
-Citizenship and Social Justice (option, 20 credits)
-Human Security (option, 20 credits)
-International Relations and the Legal Regulation of Conflict (option, 20 credits)
-Religion and International Relations (option, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (option, 20 credits)
-The New Europe in the New International Order (option, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (option, 20 credits)
-Work Placement Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will be trained in the kind of research and analytical skills that will qualify them to take a wide range of opportunities for both further study and for employment in the private, public and third sectors. Most especially, an academic training in human rights and conflict management will qualify its recipients to take opportunities in a range of exciting, international non-governmental organizations. Graduates of our previous courses in human rights or international security have gone on to work in such organizations.

Read less
The MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights is a flagship programme of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at NUI Galway. It offers a unique opportunity for in-depth study of the gender dimensions of globalisation and global issues, through an interdisciplinary programme that combines the fields of. Read more
The MA in Gender, Globalisation and Rights is a flagship programme of the Centre for Global Women’s Studies at NUI Galway. It offers a unique opportunity for in-depth study of the gender dimensions of globalisation and global issues, through an interdisciplinary programme that combines the fields of: gender and women’s studies, international development, human rights, and peace and conflict studies. Students acquire the theoretical, conceptual and practical tools needed to apply a gender perspective and undertake gender analyses in relevant domains of practice and employment at local, national and international levels, as well as for advanced research at doctoral level and beyond. In addition to modules on globalisation, development, human rights, gender and feminist theory, health and sexuality, women in agriculture, historical perspectives, and peace and conflict, skills-based modules are offered in research methods, applied gender analysis and empowerment. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an accredited, two-month professional placement with a relevant organisation working on issues related to programme themes.

Read less
Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision. Read more
Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision.

The course will expose you to the fundamental aspects of international human rights and provide you with the opportunity to critically examine different systems of law at a higher level. In addition, our LLM provides an opportunity to acquire, or build upon existing skills gained from your undergraduate course - enhancing employment opportunities in the legal profession and providing a basis for progression to doctoral studies.

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

Continuing Professional Development

The LLM is accredited for Continuing Professional Development purposes by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

What's covered in the course?

The LLM International Human Rights also provides you with an opportunity to assess how international human rights law offers protection to different categories of vulnerable groups. You’ll also study the new and emerging area of law and catastrophe.

We’ll develop your ability to analyse and evaluate the principle features of international human rights, as well as being able to synthesise complex legal issues, arguments and discourse. You’ll learn how to communicate complex and abstract ideas in an articulate and confident manner, as well as developing a host of transferrable skills that employers crave.

The key areas on International Human Rights covered on the LLM modules include:
-Research methods
-The United Nations human rights system
-Regional human rights systems
-Women’s rights
-Children’s rights
-The rights of refugees
-The relationship between business and human rights
-Environmental rights
-Criminal justice
-The right to life

Why Choose Us?

-Our outstanding facilities include two mock courtrooms and an e-learning suite that can be used to bring study to life.
-Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in the country; our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities including Cambridge University. Two members of the Society are the current Web Legal national mooting champions.
-The School’s Centre for American Legal Studies operates the UK’s largest US internship scheme, giving you the opportunity to gain practical experience in federal and state public defenders’ offices, private attorney offices and American university law schools.
-We have strong professional links with the Birmingham Law Society (the UK’s largest Law Society outside London), the four Inns of Court, and respected firms such as Squire Sanders LLP.
-We also boast a comprehensive law library and an outstanding team of staff with extensive practice experience. This gives you ample access to information, experience and insight.

Course Structure

The LLM is taught by an outstanding team of professional research active staff who have extensive practice experience.

The modules are delivered through weekly seminars, which you’re required to underpin with preparatory reading and research. The seminars are designed to facilitate participation and you will be required to articulate your preparatory reading and work in the seminar and complete activities.

You’ll also conduct work via our online learning system, Moodle. We’ll use this support interaction with the materials through online activities, including discussion forums.

To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) you must complete 60 credits of taught modules. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) you must complete 120 credits of taught modules. To qualify for the LLM you must complete all the taught modules and a dissertation.

Employability

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

You may be working, or aspiring to work as a solicitor, barrister, or in-house counsel specialising (or seeking to specialise) in this area of the law. Public sector organisations increasingly require the 'private sector' skills and understanding which you will develop throughout your studies.

Read less
International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

Read less
The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues. Human rights are not just an object of study, but also a matter of policy, intervention and practice.

The programme links theory and practice in a multidisciplinary way and aims to equip students with knowledge of the key legal, sociological and philosophical issues relevant to human rights. During the programme, students will engage in an academically rigorous way with some of the most compelling issues in contemporary human rights. The programme is unique in linking legal, philosophical, sociological and political perspectives on human rights though a rigorous and analytical approach.

The programme serves as an introduction to the core standards and structures of human rights and discusses a range of key issues in the current, ongoing debates about the role of human rights. While these may change from year to year, thematic issues that the compulsory course covers include: genocide, humanitarian intervention, militarism, war and warfare, religion, culture and human rights and transitional justice.

Graduate destinations

The degree will provide a strong foundation for a variety of academic and non-academic careers, including in: law, especially international law and advocacy (albeit usually with other qualifications); foreign policy; working for activist organisations in the humanitarian sector; international and domestic human rights; development; civil liberties; welfare; as well as in specialised agencies concerned with, for example, refugees; women's rights; torture victims; children's rights. During the programme, you will have opportunities to meet alumni of the MSc Human Rights who are working in a range of international, government and non-governmental organisations.

Read less
Engage critically with debates around the relationships between gender, violence and conflict. You’ll consider perspectives from anthropology, international relations, sociology and law. Read more
Engage critically with debates around the relationships between gender, violence and conflict. You’ll consider perspectives from anthropology, international relations, sociology and law. You have the opportunity to explore critical and feminist approaches to social research and its ethics.

The course focuses on:
-Gendered experiences of violence
-Conflict and peace
-Militarisation
-Masculinities and femininities
-Representations and embodiment
-Institutionalisation of violence

How will I study?

In the autumn and spring terms, you’ll take core modules and options. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on your dissertation.

Assessment is through term papers, coursework assignments, practical exercises and presentations as well as the final 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

[[Careers[[
This MA is for you if you’re working in – or planning to work in – the fields of:
-International development and diplomacy (including on gender, gender-based violence, conflict and security, and peace-building)
-The charity sector/NGOs
-Various activist movements, women’s rights, and peace and justice nationally or internationally

The MA is also excellent preparation for a PhD in Anthropology, Gender Studies, International Relations or International Development.

Read less
*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery. Read more
*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery.

Engage with human rights practice by linking the legal, theoretical and technical skills needed to work in international organisations, fighting injustice, oppression and persecution.

You will study contemporary debates in human rights promotion and protection, researching the stories of violations, asylum, surveillance, peacekeeping and torture that are behind many of today's news headlines. Working with your tutors and alongside industry professionals, you will have the opportunity to investigate claims of human rights abuses, gather evidence and build cases for legal proceedings.

Your course will also hone your research and project management skills and develop your ability to write compelling funding applications and construct budgets, which are essential requirements for a career in this area.

Created in collaboration with tutors from our Leeds Law School, your course will provide you with the expertise and practical skills to help protect human rights and tackle abuses.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalhumanrights_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Careers options include working for Non-Governmental Organisations, legal and security services and international organisations. Employers will value your critical and analytical skills and personal effectiveness. Our expert staff engage with many major organisations, which will benefit you when looking for a career in this field.

- Research & Project Manager
- Grant writer & Fundraiser
- Campaigner
- Human Rights Practitioner

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will learn from a highly-skilled and research-active teaching team who are experts in human rights law and practice, security, peace studies, evidence-gathering and crime investigation.

Our team of academics include Dr Steve Wright, an expert on torture technologies and surveillance employed by governments across the world, Dr Robin Redhead an expert on indigenous people and women's rights, Professor Eddie Halpin who is Chair of HURIDOCS, the Geneva-based human rights information and documentation centre and Dr Rachel Julian who was invited by the international NGO Nonviolent Peaceforce to evaluate their project in Georgia using unarmed civilian peace-keepers.

Other tutors have worked closely with organisations such as Amnesty International, CND, the UN and the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. Guest lectures will provide you with the chance to engage with professionals working in the field, ensuring your course is at the cutting-edge of human rights practice. Recent speakers include Andrew Gilligan, London Editor of The Sunday Telegraph, Tony Bunyan, Director of Statewatch and Stephen Bowen, Director of the British Institute of Human Rights.

John Willott

Senior Lecturer

"I love working with students from across the globe - seeing them learning from each other and sharing experiences is a big part of our course. Our involvement in international research, consultancy and advocacy, and links to key organisations means we know the kinds of knowledge and skills graduates need to develop their careers and make a difference."

John has recently been working on a UN-funded project to combat violence against women in Uganda, Cambodia and Nepal. He authored 'Acid Violence in Uganda: A Situational Analysis', helping develop a co-ordinated action plan to address the problem, which was presented to the government and legal, health and social services.

Facilities

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Study areas
Our City Campus has plenty of dedicated social areas for you to work with your peers. You will have modern spaces and the latest IT equipment which will allow you to debate and discuss ideas with fellow students.

- Teaching spaces
Our classrooms and lecture theatres offer the ideal space to learn about the experiences and opinions of expert academics and visiting industry speakers.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Read less
This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Read more
This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Students will examine the key teachings of Islam as a religion and a civilisation that has come in contact with other cultures and civilisations. They will also explore other areas such as women and Islam, Islamic core sources and Islamic ethics in light of contemporary developments.

This programme is SCQF credit-rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). It is available on a full-time or part-time basis.

Future Study and Careers

This programme is relevant to any candidate who wants to learn about Islam and its connection with other revealed religions such as Christianity and Judaism.

Through establishing a foundation and some critical thinking on the subject matter, candidates will become confident in addressing various challenges in response to their personal or professional situations through working in a multicultural society.

Additional Information
For students requiring a Tier 4 student visa, an overall score of 6 in IELTS for UKVI (with 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other areas) is required.
The programme is comprised of five compulsory units (+ 1 optional unit).

The whole programme is equal to 72 credit points with 12 credit points for each unit. The Advanced Diploma will be awarded to students who successfully pass all units.

The compulsory units are as follows:

Introduction to Islamic Studies will introduce students to Islam, its history, important personalities in the early history of Islam, the development of Islam, its main sources and basic teachings. The students will also be introduced to the skill of transliterating for correct pronunciation of some Arabic/Islamic terms. On successful completion of this unit, students should know the basic teachings and the main sources of Islam. In addition, students will be able to understand some of the similarities and differences between Islam and other religions.

Islamic Core Sources and Approaches will give students a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic core sources and approaches. They will be introduced to the different sciences developed within Islamic studies from exegesis (tafsir) to Islamic law (fiqh) and principles of jurisprudence (usul al-fiqh). On successful completion of this unit, students should know the different methodological approaches developed by Muslim scholars within the Islamic tradition.

Islamic Ethics (Akhlaq) has always been an intrinsic and fundamental part of Islamic thought, manifested in both Muslim jurisprudence and Islamic theology. This unit will look at the centrality of ethics in the Islamic core sources and how early and classical Muslim scholars have conceptualised it. Modern debates about the significance of ethics in Islamic core sources will be critically examined.

Women and Islam is a lively subject used by those in both the Islamic and western worlds. It is a subject often used by critics to portray Islam as a misogynistic and oppressive religion. In their arguments, their first point of reference is the plight of Muslim women in many Islamic societies. The advocates of women’s rights in Islam encourage differentiation between the teachings of Islam and diverse cultural practices.

Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies is designed to strengthen students’ critical thinking while writing or reading scientific research, to familiarise students with theories and the practical application of research methodology, methods, design and strategy while conducting a research proposal. The unit also includes aspects of methodology of Muslim scholars in searching for the truth by considering the revealed knowledge of the Qur’an and Sunnah, evidence from iltizamand qiyas (logic) or even disputed sources

Core Units 

•Introduction to Islamic Studies (SCQF 9)
•Islamic Core Sources and Approaches (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Ethics (SCQF 10)
•Women and Islam (SCQF 10)
•Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies (SCQF 10)”

Optional Units 

•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 5)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 6)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 7)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 8)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 9)
•Arabic for Special Purposes (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Economics and Finance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Commercial Law (SCQF 11)
•Applied Islamic Banking and Insurance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Accounting and Auditing (SCQF 11)

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



Read less
Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme focuses on the issues surrounding gender based violence and human rights and principles of human rights. This discipline and subject area has a wide international reach in terms of how society and central government tackle the different levels of crimes against women and men in different countries and regions of the world looking at the very basic rights of people, expectations and challenges in some societies to top level and bringing in a range of other disciplines to analyse issues.  There are a wide range of career options within this subject area which range from international development and diplomacy to security, peace-building, charitable work to improve conditions in communities, women's and men's rights, international justice, policy and law making and so on.

In this programme the focus will be on ways we think about, understand and respond to violence. How do we know what counts as violence or a violent act?Why does legislation against violence so often transpire as inadequate, perhaps especially in the case of gendered and sexual violence? As the links between sex, gender and violence appear intimate and often lethal, a central but not exclusive focus of the programme will be on theories and practices of sex/gender. You are taught by experts in the School of Sociology.  

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods

Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Optional

Dimensions of Globalisation

The Comparative Study of European Societies

Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Semester 3

Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/291/sex-gender-violence/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned international experts from The Centre for Gender Studies and School of Sociology
  • University of Aberdeen provides an excellent range of interdisciplinary events which you can attend

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X