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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. Read more
Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. The Masters in Modern History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Members of the Centre for Gender History, the Centre for War Studies and the Centre for Scottish Cultural Studies are all leaders in their fields.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also have unparalleled access to Scotland's world-leading collections including the National Library of Scotland, the National Collections and the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
-Internships are available with the Hunterian Museum. There are also opportunities to work closely with other key institutions such as Glasgow Museums and Glasgow Women's Library.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include:
-Secret intelligence in the 20th century
-American material culture
-Introduction to social theory for researchers
-American counterculture
-History of medicine, 1850-2000
-The American way of war
-Topics in historical computing
-Issues, ideologies and institutions of modern Scotland
-Gender, politics and power
-Christianity and sexual revolution.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as;
-The art of war
-Democracy and governance: classical political thought
-Political philosophy
-2D digitisation
-Archives and records theory
-Employers, elites and the state: capitalism in Britain.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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History is practised everywhere. by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. Read more
History is practised everywhere: by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. History and historians play important roles at the level of the both the nation and the neighbourhood, contributing to public debates, policy decisions and popular education and entertainment.

Public history is concerned with the practice of history outside of academia in all its myriad forms and public historians come in all shapes and sizes: they are consultants, museum professionals, archivists, preservationists and curators, cultural resource managers, policy specialists, and community activists, among many other roles. What they share is a commitment to making history relevant, beneficial, informative and instructive within the public sphere. The practice and significance of ‘public history’ has grown significantly in recent years, as historians become more aware of audiences beyond the academy, of the role of history in politics, of the need for their research and analysis to have an impact in the real world, and of the growing public and media interest in popular history and heritage.

This MA will introduce you to key aspects and issues of the practice of public history. It will provide you with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to undertake critical assessments of public history projects and interventions - as well as to create your own. Its focus on public history in practice will provide you with a wide range of examples of different types and methods of public history, from museums and material culture, to public history in the media, to the role of history in policy making. This MA aims to give you a sense of the wide range of public history, the variety of roles played by historians in public, and the importance and impact of public history in politics, culture, and society.

The compulsory modules will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography, the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material, and the contemporary practice of public history. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the Department via the 2 option modules you choose, which are drawn across disciplines including archaeology, classics, the history of art and museology. Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise.

The MA Public Histories provides relevant training for careers in media, education, museums and heritage, publishing, and policy, and it also provides rigorous training in the historical discipline suitable to prepare you for further personal or professional research, or research at MPhil/PhD level.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Many Birkbeck historians take very active public roles as policy consultants, columnists in newspapers, editors of digital history websites, and leaders in community history projects. Students on the MA Public Histories will be given the opportunity to benefit from their expertise.
Tutors and potential dissertation supervisors on the course could include Dr. Julia Laite, whose work focuses on aspects of women's history and policy and who is an expert in history online; Professor Matt Cook, who works extensively in community history, oral history and queer history and is a Director of the Samuel Raphael History Centre; Professor David Feldman, who has worked extensively in history and policy related to migration and minorities and is Director of the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism; Professor Orlando Figes, an expert in oral history and the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russia; and Dr. Fiona Candlin, an expert in museum studies, whose work focuses on small museums and public heritage.
MA Public Histories will be taught in Bloomsbury, at the heart of academic London, which contains one of the world's greatest concentrations of first-class library facilities, archives, museums, and heritage and public history organisations.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our Department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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This course explores themes in Irish history from the late medieval period to the 20th century. Read more
This course explores themes in Irish history from the late medieval period to the 20th century. All students receive research training in using Irish historical resources and take a core course on contemporary and Irish historiography, then opt for pathway study in either 'Irish Women's History' or 'Culture, Politics and Identity in Ireland', and a research dissertation of their choice. For more details, visit: http://www.qub.ac.uk/history

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The MA Irish History is studied through the Culture, Politics and Identity strand. This is a general strand, with an emphasis on the relationship between culture and politics in the history of modern Ireland from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Read more
The MA Irish History is studied through the Culture, Politics and Identity strand. This is a general strand, with an emphasis on the relationship between culture and politics in the history of modern Ireland from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Designed as a flexible means of pursuing modern Irish history, it can be individually tailored to allow students to focus on specific research interests beyond the core themes of culture and politics, including Migration, (taught in collaboration with staff from the Centre for Migration Studies) and Women's History and Gender. Further information about the MA Irish History in general is available from the co-ordinator, Dr Fearghal McGarry ()

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

History

The MRes in History introduces students to, and further develops their knowledge of methodological debates within the discipline of history, critical developments in the historiography, and most especially allows students to undertake a substantial piece of personal research under the supervision of an acknowledged expert. Supervision is offered in a wide range of topics, reflecting the expertise of scholars in History in more distant times and cultures, periods of revolutionary change and more recent themes including: Medieval church history and the crusades; Religion, print culture, gender in the Early modern era; the English civil war; the politics of Revolutionary France 1789-1871; modern Irish history; Eastern European Jewry; German occupation policy; Colonial and post-colonial India; the history of African Christianity; Local history, especially of the North Midlands from medieval to recent times; Genocide, political violence and terrorism; Gender and women's history; and the Social history of medicine.

The 2009 and 2010 groups include students working on district medical officers in Poor Law Unions and workhouses in North Staffordshire, the Isle of Man in the early middle ages, women murderers, the English crusaders, the creation of an independent Zambia, Polish holocaust trauma, and the Ukrainian famine.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Read more
Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Dissertation topics include historical medicine, political history and urban culture.

The programme is well-suited as preparation for PhD research.

Dissertation supervision is available in the following research areas:
-Classical, medieval and early modern medicine
-Death and burial
-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Gender
-Women's history and the history of sexuality
-Historical demography
-History of ideas
-History of psychiatry
-National identity
-Inter-ethnic relations and border issues
-Politics
-International relations and the impact of war
-Urban history
-Urban culture

Delivery

The MLitt has a formal research training component where you will develop your research skills and methodologies (20 credits).

You complete a number of detailed research assignments chosen according to your interests and experience (80 credits). You also undertake a dissertation of 16,000-24,000 words consisting of a sustained piece of original research (80 credits).

Study consists mainly of seminars, tutorials and independent learning supported by research training. You may also attend seminars from postgraduate taught modules (without assessment), in agreement with your supervisor and the relevant module leaders.

Facilities

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology provides access to some top quality facilities such as:
-The Great North Museum: Hancock
-Our libraries
-The Gertrude Bell Archive
-Computing facilities with access to relevant databases

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The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. Read more
The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. In 1972 a group of University of Alabama students initiated a project to introduce courses in women’s studies into the curriculum. They identified faculty who would be willing to develop courses on women and, by the spring of 1975, a women’s studies minor had been created in the College of Arts and Sciences. That same year, an independent program in women’s studies–the first in the Southeast–was launched. The Master of Arts degree program was established, with the first graduate students enrolled, in 1988. The Women’s Studies program, part of the Department of Gender and Race Studies, includes a core faculty, a graduate adjunct faulty, and participating faculty from almost every discipline.

Master of Arts Program Description

The University of Alabama Master of Arts in Women’s Studies is a thirty (30) credit hour degree program which focuses on feminist research. The program emphasizes interdisciplinary and cross-cultural methodology, as well as analytical and theoretical perspectives on women. Students can specialize in feminist theory, the culture of southern women, women in the civil rights movement, or other areas of feminist and interdisciplinary research.

Requirements

The requirements of the program of study are as follows:

Plan I (thesis plan) requires at least 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 15 hours of elective courses, and 6 hours of thesis research), and a thesis.

Plan II (comprehensive exam) requires 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 21 hours of elective courses), and a comprehensive exam.

Admission Standards

Applicants must meet the admission standards of the Graduate School For current Graduate School admission requirements, consult http://www.graduate.ua.edu. In addition, applicants should have had at least an introductory women’s studies course or its equivalent, or take it before enrolling in the graduate program. International students must have a TOEFL score of 550 (or 213 on the computerized TOEFL).

Financial Aid

The University of Alabama Women’s Studies program is one of the few programs in the U.S. with a permanent number of graduate assistantships, which we award to qualified students on a competitive basis. (Several universities have graduate programs in women’s studies, but few have full-time assistantships in women’s studies; our graduate assistants teach Introduction to Women’s Studies or they perform research with a faculty member.) If you plan to apply for an assistantship or financial aid, your application should be filed by February 15.* Assistantships include a tuition scholarship for fall and spring sessions, doubling the value of the award. *(Applications for the program are accepted throughout the year. Check with the department for the current amount paid per assistantship.)

Courses

Core Courses
WS 530: Feminist Theory: Women in Contemporary Society (3)
WS 532: Issues and Problems in Women’s Studies Research (3)
WS 570: Gender, Race, and Class: Cross-Cultural Approaches (3)
WS 599: Thesis Research (6)

Elective Courses
WS 500/501: Independent Study in Women’s Studies
WS 502/503: Seminar in Teaching Women’s Studies
WS 510: Special Topics (i.e., Women and Utopia, Feminisms on Film etc.)
WS 520: Women and Work
WS 521: Women’s Studies Practicum
WS 525: Feminist Theory: Major Texts
WS 540/541: Seminar in Women’s Studies
WS 550: Women in America
WS 560: Women and Public Policy
WS 590: Women and Law
WS 592: Women in the Labor Force
WS 594: Sex Discrimination
AMS 525: Women in the Civil Rights
EH 635: Seminar in Feminist Literary Criticism
HY 500: Women in the Americas
SOC 529: Language and Social Analysis

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The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of. Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Read more
The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of: Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Specialism is also possible in translating and interpreting.

The Modern Languages MPhil is offered through the School of Modern Languages. We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

Chinese

-Chinese translating and interpreting
-Chinese numerology, number and gender in nursery rhymes (Dr V Pellatt)
-Cross-cultural studies between China and the West
-Chinese modernity studies
-Modern Chinese literature and culture
-Chinese-English translation
-Global Chinese diaspora studies
-Chinese-American studies
-Cultural theory (Prof J Qian)
-Contemporary society, especially identity, ethnicity and religion
-Minority nationalities (eg Xinjiang or Uyghur studies)
-Chinese state or popular nationalism and national identity
-Islam in China
-Performing arts, music cultures and popular culture in mainland China (Dr J Smith Finley)
-Transnational Chinese cinema
-Stardom
-Independent documentary filmmaking
-Gender and sexuality in Chinese media (Dr S Yu)

French

-Contemporary women's writing (Dr Robson, Dr El-Maïzi)
-19th century literature and culture (Prof Harkness, Prof Cross)
-Dialectology (Dr Hall)
-French and Algerian cinema (Prof Austin, Dr Leahy)
-History, politics and gender (Prof Cross, Prof Harkness)
-Language change (Dr Hall, Dr Waltereit)
-Popular culture (media, sport, music) and public policy (Dr Dauncey)
-Postcolonial cultures (Prof Austin, Dr El-Maïzi)
-Trauma and culture (Prof Austin, Dr Robson)

German

-20th century German and contemporary literature (Dr T Ludden, Dr B Müller)
-GDR literature and censorship (Dr B Müller)
-Representations of the Holocaust and/or World War II (Dr B Müller)
-Literature and philosophy - cultural and critical theory (Dr T Ludden)
-Women's writing (Dr T Ludden)
-Medieval German and comparative literature (Dr E Andersen)
-Morphological theory - morphology, phonology and dialectology of German and Dutch (Dr C Fehringer)

Japanese

-Gender studies (Dr G Hansen)
-Popular culture, film and media studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Political studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Literary studies (Dr G Hansen)

Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies

-Anthropology, anthropological linguistics and sociolinguistics of Latin America, including Quechua language (Prof Howard)
-Semantics, philosophy of language, history and spread of Spanish in Latin America, Latin American dialects and Creole (Prof Mackenzie)
-Political, social and intellectual history of Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially Brazil and Southern Cone (Prof Hentschke)
-History of education in Latin America in 19th and 20th century Latin America (Prof Hentschke, Dr Oliart, Prof Howard)
-Discourses of race and identity in Latin America (Prof Howard, Dr Oliart, Dr Morgan)
-Latin American film, literature and theatre (Dr Page)
-Spanish and Latin American cultural history and popular culture (Dr Catala Carracso, Dr Morgan, Dr Oliart, Dr Fernández)
-Catalan nationalism (Dr Catala-Carrasco)
-Spanish novel (Dr Catala Carrasco)

Translating and Interpreting

We can offer supervision for projects involving English plus Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Quechua, Spanish, Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian.

Our research specialisms are:
-Interpreting (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Psycholinguistics of interpreting and translating (Dr M Jin)
-Translating literature (Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and culture (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and ethics, ideology and power (Prof R. Howard, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation products, processes and strategies (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translator and interpreter training and assessment (Dr Y Chen, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Reflective/autonomous learning and educational psychology (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Wu)
-Audiovisual translation studies (Dr Y Chen)

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This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library. Read more

Summary

This course allows students to specialise in the history and culture of the long 18th century, through interdisciplinary study encompassing literature, history, philosophy, and visual and material culture; students are introduced to concepts and issues central to current research and study the collection of early women's writing at Chawton House Library.

Modules

Approaches to the long 18th century; research skills (in English or history); dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: 18th-century fiction; English social and cultural life in the long eighteenth century; philosophy and the art of tragedy; slavery and abolition in the Atlantic world; towards modernity and after; unknown Jane Austen; women and writing the French revolution; other relevant optional modules.

Visit our website for further information...



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Our MA program provides students with a broad knowledge of anthropological theory and research methods. Students build their research and writing skills in their graduate courses, culminating in the preparation of a significant piece of scholarly writing, which constitutes their MA thesis. Read more

MA Program

Our MA program provides students with a broad knowledge of anthropological theory and research methods. Students build their research and writing skills in their graduate courses, culminating in the preparation of a significant piece of scholarly writing, which constitutes their MA thesis. The MA in Anthropology at UBC is based upon a combination of coursework, research and a thesis. Most students attain their degree within two years of starting the program; it is possible for a well-organized person to complete degree requirements during the first twelve to eighteen months of study.

The MA at UBC consists of the following course of study. Candidates must successfully complete

(1) Anthropology 500 (History of Anthropology)

(2) a professional seminar (Anth 506)

(3) an advanced methods course in ethnographic, archaeological or museum studies

(4) at least six credits of other elective courses

(5) after submitting an approved thesis proposal, a six credit thesis. The Anthropology MA thesis at UBC is modeled upon an article in a scholarly journal. It may be based upon original field research. In all cases, MA theses are limited to no more than 50 pages.

The Department accepts part-time MA candidates. The admission and residency requirements are the same as for the regular MA program, and the degree must also be completed within a five-year period. Anthropology 500 and 506 must be completed in the first year of study, the thesis proposal by the end of the second year.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Anthropology
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Research focus

UBC offers graduate study in the fields of socio-cultural anthropology (including legal, medical, and ecological anthropology, oral and expressive culture, religion, globalization, and applied anthropology), linguistic anthropology, anthropological archaeology, biological anthropology, and museum studies. Faculty research interests include North America, Asia (Russia, India, Japan, and Korea), Mesoamerica, South America, Oceania, Europe, and Africa. The program provides training in quantitative, qualitative, archaeological and museum methods.

Related Study Areas

Interdisciplinary contacts are encouraged, and links are maintained with departments and programs such as Asian Studies, the Institute of Asian Research, Linguistics, History, Geography, Sociology, and the Centre for Women's and Gender Studies.

Facilities

Extensive research facilities are available in the Museum of Anthropology, and in the Laboratory of Archaeology. The UBC Library has excellent collections to support program interests, as well as a large collection of microform theses and dissertations, and the Human Relations Area files. Anthropology has a dedicated graduate computer lab with a wide range of software to support quantitative and qualitative research.

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The Film Studies MLitt combines taught modules and individual research. It is well suited as preparation for PhD research. We have a thriving community of postgraduate students working in film across the Schools of Modern Languages, English Literature, Language and Linguistics, and Arts and Cultures. Read more
The Film Studies MLitt combines taught modules and individual research. It is well suited as preparation for PhD research. We have a thriving community of postgraduate students working in film across the Schools of Modern Languages, English Literature, Language and Linguistics, and Arts and Cultures.

The Film Studies MLitt incorporates a formal research training component where you will develop your research skills and methodologies. You also submit a portfolio of essays chosen according to your interests and experience. You undertake a dissertation of 16,000 - 24,000 words consisting of a sustained piece of original research.

Study consists mainly of seminars, tutorials and independent learning supported by research training.

Dissertation supervision is available in:
-American cinema history
-British sound cinema, particularly 1940-60
-French cinema
-Contemporary Spanish and Latin American cinemas
-Chinese-language cinema
-Early cinema
-Cinema culture
-Cinema and landscape
-Women's film history
-Cinema and the city
-Writing on film
-Cinema and trauma
-Algerian cinema

Supervision is provided for dissertations that span the School of Modern Languages, the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, and the School of Arts and Cultures and sub-disciplines, ensuring the best fit between your interests and the expertise of our staff.

Facilities

You will have the opportunity to use Culture Lab, a complex for creative practice which includes a stock of film cameras and editing suites, as well as motion-capture, animation and sound-mixing technology.

The Language Resource Centre and Robinson Library hold large collections of international films and film magazines. You will also have access to a dedicated postgraduate suite including computers, workspaces, a kitchen and showers.

There are fantastic local film facilities including the Tyneside Cinema and British Film Institute Mediatheque. You will also have guided access to Tyne and Wear Archives.

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Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences. Read more
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences.

More about this course

Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. Theoretically, we are confronted with the issue of how to reconcile unconditional rights with consequentialist ethics of political responsibility and rival ideologies of social order. Practically, we are confronted with particular powers, interests and conflicts demanding judgement and action that is at once moral and pragmatic. The MA in Human Rights and International Conflict will explore such issues and attempt to cultivate such judgement. The course provides both a solid academic grounding in human rights and international relations and a wide choice of optional modules. Students are trained in research methodology, before completing a 12-15,000 word dissertation dealing in depth with a subject of their choice.

Taught by published experts in human rights, peace and conflict studies, international relations, politics, history, philosophy, women's studies and other subjects, this multidisciplinary course equips students with the kind of understanding necessary to work for peace, justice and human rights in the real world.

Assessment is largely by coursework. Core modules also involve two assessed presentations and two unseen examinations. One third of the assessment for the MA is by dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-History and Theory of Human Rights (core, 20 credits)
-Human Rights and International Conflict Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Human Rights and the International Order (core, 20 credits)
-International Conflict Resolution (core, 20 credits)
-Theory and Research Methods in International Relations (core, 20 credits)
-American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century (option, 20 credits)
-Citizenship and Social Justice (option, 20 credits)
-Human Security (option, 20 credits)
-International Relations and the Legal Regulation of Conflict (option, 20 credits)
-Religion and International Relations (option, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (option, 20 credits)
-The New Europe in the New International Order (option, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (option, 20 credits)
-Work Placement Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will be trained in the kind of research and analytical skills that will qualify them to take a wide range of opportunities for both further study and for employment in the private, public and third sectors. Most especially, an academic training in human rights and conflict management will qualify its recipients to take opportunities in a range of exciting, international non-governmental organizations. Graduates of our previous courses in human rights or international security have gone on to work in such organizations.

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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Our doctoral programme aims to respond to the needs and interests both of students seeking an academic career or other professional employment and of those who wish to pursue a line of intellectual enquiry for its own sake. Read more
Our doctoral programme aims to respond to the needs and interests both of students seeking an academic career or other professional employment and of those who wish to pursue a line of intellectual enquiry for its own sake. We aim to recruit both recent graduates and mature students who now have the time to pursue an intellectual enthusiasm, perhaps after a lifetime of professional work.

We offer supervision in most areas of German studies, including: baroque literature; eighteenth- to twenty-first-century literature, especially the novel; Anglo-German cultural relations; German literature in philosophical context; gender studies and women's writing; twentieth-century German history; history of German thought; German film and memory studies. There are also opportunities for supervision in interdisciplinary research, and candidates with such interests are especially welcome.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Modern Languages and Linguistics achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 73% of our research was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

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