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Masters Degrees (Women's History)

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The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. Read more
The Master of Arts program in Women’s Studies at the University of Alabama is an interdisciplinary program working cooperatively with other departments to provide knowledge of the cultural history and status of women, and to conduct research on the forces which shape women’s role in society. In 1972 a group of University of Alabama students initiated a project to introduce courses in women’s studies into the curriculum. They identified faculty who would be willing to develop courses on women and, by the spring of 1975, a women’s studies minor had been created in the College of Arts and Sciences. That same year, an independent program in women’s studies–the first in the Southeast–was launched. The Master of Arts degree program was established, with the first graduate students enrolled, in 1988. The Women’s Studies program, part of the Department of Gender and Race Studies, includes a core faculty, a graduate adjunct faulty, and participating faculty from almost every discipline.

Master of Arts Program Description

The University of Alabama Master of Arts in Women’s Studies is a thirty (30) credit hour degree program which focuses on feminist research. The program emphasizes interdisciplinary and cross-cultural methodology, as well as analytical and theoretical perspectives on women. Students can specialize in feminist theory, the culture of southern women, women in the civil rights movement, or other areas of feminist and interdisciplinary research.

Requirements

The requirements of the program of study are as follows:

Plan I (thesis plan) requires at least 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 15 hours of elective courses, and 6 hours of thesis research), and a thesis.

Plan II (comprehensive exam) requires 30 hours of coursework (including 9 hours of core courses, 21 hours of elective courses), and a comprehensive exam.

Admission Standards

Applicants must meet the admission standards of the Graduate School For current Graduate School admission requirements, consult http://www.graduate.ua.edu. In addition, applicants should have had at least an introductory women’s studies course or its equivalent, or take it before enrolling in the graduate program. International students must have a TOEFL score of 550 (or 213 on the computerized TOEFL).

Financial Aid

The University of Alabama Women’s Studies program is one of the few programs in the U.S. with a permanent number of graduate assistantships, which we award to qualified students on a competitive basis. (Several universities have graduate programs in women’s studies, but few have full-time assistantships in women’s studies; our graduate assistants teach Introduction to Women’s Studies or they perform research with a faculty member.) If you plan to apply for an assistantship or financial aid, your application should be filed by February 15.* Assistantships include a tuition scholarship for fall and spring sessions, doubling the value of the award. *(Applications for the program are accepted throughout the year. Check with the department for the current amount paid per assistantship.)

Courses

Core Courses
WS 530: Feminist Theory: Women in Contemporary Society (3)
WS 532: Issues and Problems in Women’s Studies Research (3)
WS 570: Gender, Race, and Class: Cross-Cultural Approaches (3)
WS 599: Thesis Research (6)

Elective Courses
WS 500/501: Independent Study in Women’s Studies
WS 502/503: Seminar in Teaching Women’s Studies
WS 510: Special Topics (i.e., Women and Utopia, Feminisms on Film etc.)
WS 520: Women and Work
WS 521: Women’s Studies Practicum
WS 525: Feminist Theory: Major Texts
WS 540/541: Seminar in Women’s Studies
WS 550: Women in America
WS 560: Women and Public Policy
WS 590: Women and Law
WS 592: Women in the Labor Force
WS 594: Sex Discrimination
AMS 525: Women in the Civil Rights
EH 635: Seminar in Feminist Literary Criticism
HY 500: Women in the Americas
SOC 529: Language and Social Analysis

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A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise. Read more

A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise.

You work closely with a director of studies and a supervisor who are specialists in your chosen field to produce an extended thesis of up to 80,000 words in the case of doctoral research.

We have a vibrant research culture and we value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University. There are regular research training events, seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment. Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work.

We are regularly advertising studentships funded by Sheffield Hallam University directly or through the North of England Consortium for the Arts and Humanities. It may also be possible to apply for Arts and Humanities Research Council studentships. Some part-time teaching may also be available.

We are a group of 18 historians specialising in the period from the late eighteenth century to the present. We have research clusters in:

  • imperial and global history
  • economic and business history
  • women’s and gender history
  • European history
  • popular culture and politics in Britain

Current staff research interests are wide-ranging and include • Africans in Europe/Black European history • modern Armenia • Britain and the Great War • the history of Czechoslovakia • colonialism and anti-colonialism in India • economic crises and disasters • European colonialism and imperialism • feminism and empire • German history in the twentieth century • globalisation • industrial and natural disasters • labour history • local and community history • migration • military and naval history • nineteenth-century radicalism and popular politics • rural history • Stalinism • US history.

Please see the Humanities staff pages for a list of staff and their current research.

This degree is hosted in the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School.

Course structure

Full-time – at least 35 hours a week on average over three years

Part-time – at least 12 hours a week on average for up to seven years

There is a split mode available for international students who want to study in their own country.

Various start dates

Your study depends on your chosen area of research but includes a compulsory research methods module for students without prior research qualifications at postgraduate level.

Assessment

  • research programme submitted for approval by our research degrees committee
  • report and oral presentation for the confirmation of PhD stage
  • submission of thesis and viva

Employability

Following your research degree, you can go on to teach history in further and higher education. You can also find careers in other related areas such as

  • museums
  • work as an archivist
  • a career in libraries
  • university administration
  • the media.


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This masters degree is designed for students who want to prepare for a PhD or gain research skills and knowledge in a specific area of history for their professional development. Read more

This masters degree is designed for students who want to prepare for a PhD or gain research skills and knowledge in a specific area of history for their professional development. You research an aspect of modern British, European or global history and develop skills as a researcher and specialist in your area.

During the course you work towards a 30,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed between you and your supervisor. It is ideal if you want to pursue a specific topic or research area in detail.

Throughout the course you receive one-to-one support from an experienced supervisor with expertise in your chosen area of study. Your supervisor guides you through the course, helping you conduct a literature survey and engage with theoretical, methodological and critical issues.

This is a flexible course that allows you to combine work with professional development. Supervision sessions are arranged individually with your supervisory team ensuring content is tailored to your individual needs.

We have a vibrant research culture and we value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University. There are regular research training events, seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment. Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work. The Humanities Research Centre runs a monthly postgraduate research group which functions as an informal setting where postgraduates can get to know one another and where they have the opportunity to present and discuss their work.

We are a group of 18 historians specialising in the period from the late eighteenth century to the present. We have research clusters in:

  • imperial and global history
  • economic and business history
  • women’s and gender history
  • European history
  • popular culture and politics in Britain

Current staff research interests are wide-ranging and include • Africans in Europe / Black European history • modern Armenia • Britain and the Great War • the history of Czechoslovakia • colonialism and anti-colonialism in India • economic crises and disasters • European colonialism and imperialism • feminism and empire • German history in the twentieth century • globalisation • industrial and natural disasters • labour history • local and community history • migration • military and naval history • nineteenth-century radicalism and popular politics • rural history • Stalinism • US history.

Please see the Humanities staff pages for a list of staff and their current research.

This degree is hosted in the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School.

Course structure

You complete

  • research skills workshops
  • 30,000 word dissertation

Assessment

  • 30,000 word dissertation and viva

Employability

This research degree offers you continuing professional development, particularly in related areas such as • teaching • media • journalism • marketing • editing • publishing. You also gain more general employability skills.

The course also provides an established route into a PhD and an academic career.



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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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This programme offers an outstanding learning experience in a great city, in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians. Read more
This programme offers an outstanding learning experience in a great city, in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians. Core training in historical skills and methods is combined with a wide range of specialist taught options. These include theory, cover all periods from medieval to late modern, and focus predominantly on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America, although our geographical coverage is steadily expanding.

Why this programme

◾History staff also contribute to the Masters programmes in American Studies, War Studies and Global Security, and you can take taught options from these and other programmes, enhancing student choice.
◾The learning and research environment is dynamic and supportive because of the critical mass of staff and postgraduate students, grouped in clusters and centres which sponsor seminar programmes and other research-led initiatives. You are positively encouraged to participate.
◾Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of history. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.

Programme structure

You will take 1 core and 5 optional courses, taught over two semesters, September to March. Teaching in history courses is overwhelmingly seminar and discussion-based. From April onwards you concentrate on your dissertation, submitted in September at the end of the programme.

Our pathway structure allows you to take either our generic Masters History, or to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following:
◾Gender History*
◾Scottish History
◾Medieval History
◾Early modern History
◾Late modern History
◾History of Medicine*

(*with two bespoke core courses)

Core course

Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH)

Optional courses

A very wide selection is available. We positively encourage you to explore options within and without History.

Career prospects

As well as continuing to PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, the media and teaching.

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This program is offered jointly with the Department of Gender Studies. It is operated by five European universities and students can study at two or more. Read more
This program is offered jointly with the Department of Gender Studies. It is operated by five European universities and students can study at two or more. Special requirements and deadlines for MATILDA can be found at: history.ceu.edu/matilda

Department of History

Our department offers students interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives on Eastern, Central and Western Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Middle East and Central Asia. The department has gained worldwide recognition as a center of excellence in comparative and transnational history. It is recognized for its innovative directions in research, teaching and theoretical reflection. The international faculty offers a wide range of expertise, extending from the history of the Habsburg, Romanov and Ottoman Empires to study of totalitarian regimes in the 20th century; from religious studies to numerous aspects of cultural, intellectual and social history.

Career Paths

Our master’s graduates have been accepted to PhD and postdoctoral programs at UC-Berkeley, Cambridge, University of Chicago, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Yale and other leading universities. Professionally, our graduates pursue careers with governmental institutions and international NGOs, as academics at leading universities and research institutes, and as journalists and media consultants worldwide.

Scholarships

CEU is committed to attracting talented students and scholars from around the world and provides generous merit-based scholarships available to students from any country. In 2015-2016, 85% of CEU students received financial aid, ranging from tuition awards to full scholarships with stipends and housing. Learn more about available funding options at http://www.ceu.edu/financialaid

For more information, see the contact page: http://bit.ly/2iVvU1r

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Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. Read more
Modern History at Glasgow brings together social and political historians, active in research on topics from the French Revolution to the War on Terror in Afghanistan. The Masters in Modern History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

◾Members of the Centre for Gender History, the Centre for War Studies and the Centre for Scottish Cultural Studies are all leaders in their fields.
◾You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
◾Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
◾You will also have unparalleled access to Scotland's world-leading collections including the National Library of Scotland, the National Collections and the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
◾Internships are available with the Hunterian Museum. There are also opportunities to work closely with other key institutions such as Glasgow Museums and Glasgow Women's Library.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
◾Research resources and skills for historians.

Optional courses

Course options may include
◾Secret intelligence in the 20th century
◾American material culture
◾Introduction to social theory for researchers
◾American counterculture
◾History of medicine, 1850-2000
◾The American way of war
◾Topics in historical computing
◾Issues, ideologies and institutions of modern Scotland
◾Gender, politics and power
◾Christianity and sexual revolution.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as
◾The art of war
◾Democracy and governance: classical political thought
◾Political philosophy
◾2D digitisation
◾Archives and records theory
◾Employers, elites and the state: capitalism in Britain.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others, specialising in sub-fields such as security studies, international relations theory, women’s issues, international history, development, environmental policy, foreign policy analysis, quantitative methods, international economics, etc. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. Your dissertation will give you the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of your knowledge.

Course content

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a one year programme (twelve full months). This degree programme can also be taken in a part time capacity over two years. Students must take 180 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done over the summer for full time students). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:

Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
Research Methods I
Dissertation

Students will also have the option to study some of the modules listed below:

China and the World
China in International Relations
International Political Economy
Development Politics
Other languages 1A (Mandarin, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Other languages 1B (Mandarin, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
International Political Economy
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organisation
China and Africa

Please refer to the website for more detailed module information by clicking the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/internationalstudies/pg/ma-international-relations-china.aspx

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Our class size

We anticipate that the 2016 class size will be approximately ten students.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.

Postgraduate scholarships

To encourage academic excellence, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) offers a comprehensive and expanding range of scholarships to postgraduate students. For more information please click the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/study/postgraduate/masters/scholarships/index.aspx

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Historians have long been fascinated by modernity and the societies to which it gave rise. Read more

About the course

Historians have long been fascinated by modernity and the societies to which it gave rise. The MA Modern History explores these changes, allowing you to explore the political cleavages and cultural uncertainty unleashed by the great revolutions, the mobilisations and resistance of the two world wars, and the transnational forces of empire and globalisation.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Modernity and Power: Individuals and the State in the Modern World; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Voices of the Great War: gender, experience and violence in Great Britain and Germany, 1914-1918; The Fin-de-Siècle; Autobiography, Identity and the Self in Muslim South Asia; Stories of Activism, 1960 to the Present; Cold War Histories; Sex and Power: The politics of women’s liberation in Modern Britain; Worlds of Labour: working class lives in colonial South Asia; City Life in Jacksonian America, 1828–1850.

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This course explores themes in Irish history from the late medieval period to the 20th century. Read more
This course explores themes in Irish history from the late medieval period to the 20th century. All students receive research training in using Irish historical resources and take a core course on contemporary and Irish historiography, then opt for pathway study in either 'Irish Women's History' or 'Culture, Politics and Identity in Ireland', and a research dissertation of their choice. For more details, visit: http://www.qub.ac.uk/history

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On this programme you’ll gain an advanced knowledge of many aspects of modern Ireland, together with the research skills you’d need to take your work further. Read more
On this programme you’ll gain an advanced knowledge of many aspects of modern Ireland, together with the research skills you’d need to take your work further.

The Diploma and MA programmes share four compulsory modules taught by experts in early Irish history, politics, Irish language, history, cultural geography, literature, drama and women’s history.

All modules are taught in small-group seminar format, with each requiring two pieces of assessed coursework. For an MA you’ll need to research and write a dissertation of 20,000 words (60 credits).

The programme’s available one year full-time, or part-time over two years.

Why Institute of Irish Studies?

An important and influential Institute.

The Institute has played a significant part in Ireland’s recent history. The Director, Professor Marianne Elliott OBE, FBA was a major player in the Northern Ireland peace process and the achievements of the Institute have been recognised in the award of a £5million Tony Blair Chair in Irish Studies.

Links with the Irish community.

Historically, the city of Liverpool has always had strong links with the north and south of Ireland. It has long been the hub of Irish migration and you will be in an ideal position to experience living in a multicultural society with a distinctive Irish component. There are excellent links between the Institute and the Liverpool Irish community providing a rich seam to be mined for research purposes as well as opportunities for students to get involved in voluntary work.

Friendly and supportive.

The Institute is based in a fine Regency house in Abercromby Square, on the main University campus where all staff foster a particularly friendly and supportive atmosphere for students.

Renowned speakers.

The high external esteem of the Institute is reflected in the calibre of public lecturers it regularly attracts. In recent years, speakers have included President Michael D. Higgins, President Mary McAleese, former Irish President Mary Robinson, Roddy Doyle, Seamus Heaney, John Hume, Peter Mandelson, US Senator George Mitchell, Paul Muldoon, Tom Paulin, Fintan O’Toole, Jonathan Powell, Dr John Reid, the late David Ervine, the late Dr Mo Mowlam, Peter Robinson and David Trimble. The Institute also hosts events for the Liverpool Irish Festival every October and these have included lectures by the authors Blake Morrison and Patrick McCabe, the filmmaker Peter Lennon and the Keeper of Antiquities of the National Museum of Ireland Dr Eamonn Kelly.

Career prospects

Our programmes aim not only to provide an in-depth understanding of Ireland but also to provide students with key transferable skills, such as presentation skills and opportunities for networking with businesses, voluntary organisations and leading members of the Irish Studies academic community. The MA programmes have dedicated skills modules designed to equip students with key employment skills for a range of sectors such as questionnaire design, interviewing techniques and textual and data analysis. Former postgraduates have gone on to further study as well as a wide range of successful careers in areas such as teaching (at both university and secondary level), journalism, research and museum work. As Ciaran O’Neill, who completed a PhD in 2010 and the current Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow at Hertford College, Oxford, highlights: ‘I came to Liverpool in 2006 to begin a PhD part-time at the Institute of Irish Studies. While there I won external full-time funding from the National University of Ireland which enabled me to complete my doctorate in 2010 before taking up a post-doctoral position at Oxford two weeks later. The years I spent at the Institute were among the best in my life both professionally and personally. What I will remember most is a tight-knit community of warm and friendly staff who excel in their own disciplines, a hard-working and vibrant post-grad community and a lively and engaged student body. In short, the Institute is a fantastic place to study, to research and to grow and develop as an academic.’

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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

History

The MRes in History introduces students to, and further develops their knowledge of methodological debates within the discipline of history, critical developments in the historiography, and most especially allows students to undertake a substantial piece of personal research under the supervision of an acknowledged expert. Supervision is offered in a wide range of topics, reflecting the expertise of scholars in History in more distant times and cultures, periods of revolutionary change and more recent themes including: Medieval church history and the crusades; Religion, print culture, gender in the Early modern era; the English civil war; the politics of Revolutionary France 1789-1871; modern Irish history; Eastern European Jewry; German occupation policy; Colonial and post-colonial India; the history of African Christianity; Local history, especially of the North Midlands from medieval to recent times; Genocide, political violence and terrorism; Gender and women's history; and the Social history of medicine.

The 2009 and 2010 groups include students working on district medical officers in Poor Law Unions and workhouses in North Staffordshire, the Isle of Man in the early middle ages, women murderers, the English crusaders, the creation of an independent Zambia, Polish holocaust trauma, and the Ukrainian famine.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Read more
Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Dissertation topics include historical medicine, political history and urban culture.

The programme is well-suited as preparation for PhD research.

Dissertation supervision is available in the following research areas:
-Classical, medieval and early modern medicine
-Death and burial
-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Gender
-Women's history and the history of sexuality
-Historical demography
-History of ideas
-History of psychiatry
-National identity
-Inter-ethnic relations and border issues
-Politics
-International relations and the impact of war
-Urban history
-Urban culture

Delivery

The MLitt has a formal research training component where you will develop your research skills and methodologies (20 credits).

You complete a number of detailed research assignments chosen according to your interests and experience (80 credits). You also undertake a dissertation of 16,000-24,000 words consisting of a sustained piece of original research (80 credits).

Study consists mainly of seminars, tutorials and independent learning supported by research training. You may also attend seminars from postgraduate taught modules (without assessment), in agreement with your supervisor and the relevant module leaders.

Facilities

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology provides access to some top quality facilities such as:
-The Great North Museum: Hancock
-Our libraries
-The Gertrude Bell Archive
-Computing facilities with access to relevant databases

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