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Summary. This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. Read more

Summary

This course offers students knowledge, skills, understanding and reflective practice in the field of community youth work and an opportunity to gain a professional qualification in community youth work. The programme has three main aims: 1. The development of effective professional practitioners in community youth work. 2. The delivery of a postgraduate programme that will challenge, develop and engage critically in issues that relate to the field of community youth work through informed and innovative methods of teaching and learning. 3. To enhance the professional skills and employability of community youth workers.

About

The programme will initially be studied in part-time mode. This is the second revalidation of this programme offering potential students a unique opportunity to gain a professional qualification, validated by the North South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) and an academic award of the University of Ulster. Students will follow six modules for the postgraduate diploma in community youth work for the professional endorsement by the NSETS leading, if desired, to the award by dissertation of a MSc in Community Youth Work. Students will be required to have the postgraduate diploma before embarking on to the Masters level. The modules are arranged to meet the criteria set out by NSETS and to meet the needs of students training to become professional workers. All students will follow a placement module which is supervised by a University tutor and a practice teacher. The placement is an opportunity for CYW staff to assess at first hand the development of professional practice based on the monitoring student skills through reflective practice. The course maintains both academic and professional coherence through the use of modules that underpin fundamental concepts of community youth work, i.e. the context of youth. The module has been specifically designed to facilitate the needs of a postgraduate programme and will be taught exclusively for this cohort. Past experience suggests that it is important to build a strong collegial group early on in the programme. While it is envisaged that other modules will be taught alongside the undergraduate course the first module is explicitly designed to create a sense of belonging for the new intake.. This is followed by more applied modules, i.e. principles and practice of youth work; communities in focus and the in-situ/exigency placements at the beginning of year. After the placement students will follow the principles and practice of youth work: leadership, management and supervision module preparing them for management roles in youth work and the critical thinking and professional development module to consolidate their learning and to focus on areas that they may wish to research or develop further including inter-professional collaboration. The modules have been designed to facilitate the underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become a professional community youth worker. The modules are: (i) THE CONTEXT OF YOUTH WORK; (ii) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; (iii) COMMUNITIES IN FOCUS; (iv) IN-SITU AND EX-AGENCY REFLECTIVE PLACEMENTS; (v) PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF YOUTH WORK; SUPERVISION, LEARDERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT; (vi) CRITICAL THINKING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Award of postgraduate diploma in community youth work with professional endorsement; (i) DISSERTATION Award of MSc in Community Youth Work.

Work placement / study abroad

This assessed practice period placement(s) focuses on youth and community work in the context of an agency. Students will build on learning from the taught modules and their own experience. They will use the placement to reflect and evaluate their practice in four disparate but inter-related areas: 1. The development of self; 2. Understanding individuals; 3. The role and function of the group; 4. The agency context within a given community. The students will therefore be offered opportunities to experience; a. Informal education work with young people and adults, individually and in groups, b. Youth service and community agencies, c. Different types of youth and community work provision. d. A reflective and evaluatory experience with supervisory support by a professionally qualified in-situ practice teacher.

Students are expected to: develop appropriate programmes of social education within the constraints of the agency. - develop their 'helping' and 'enabling' skills. - gain experience in terms of the management of practice. - gain an understanding of a specialist agency which focuses on a particular target group (ex-agency placement). - link the practice experiences with theoretical concepts. - record and evaluate their work.

Professional recognition

Endorsed by the North/South Education and Training Standards Committee for Youth Work (NSETS) (JNC Recognised) for the purpose of professional qualification.

Career options

Due to the nature of this postgraduate programme being initially about professional endorsement the career opportunities for students is already set, i.e. they are in employment. The development of a new module, ‘Critical thinking and professional development’ is an indication of the staff teams belief in enhancing the understanding of continuing professional development through evidence- based practice and the development of critical thinking. The students on the programme will benefit from reflecting on their profession and indeed looking at how it is viewed in relation to other professions. One can assume, if past history about the course is anything to go on, that those who gain the PGD in CYW will be highly skilled, knowledgeable and highly employable. For others the course itself if part of their professional development as many students have been working the in the field without professional training.



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Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are especially designed for those that want to develop their expertise within their current profession. Read more
Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are especially designed for those that want to develop their expertise within their current profession. Your existing work will become the subject of your studies to enable you to work more effectively as a professional practitioner in your field. If you are self-employed or work in an organisation, paid or unpaid and in any employment sector, these work-based courses enable you to gain qualifications through your work.

Making use of Middlesex’s innovative work-based approach to learning your course of study will enable you to enhance your effectiveness in your current work role whilst simultaneously working towards your qualification. Middlesex work based learning courses are used by leading employers in the UK and internationally as they combine individual development with organisational and professional learning. Our courses in professional practice enable you to build upon existing higher education level study and professional qualifications to further your development and make an impact in your professional area. Our courses in Work Based Learning Studies take as the starting point your learning from experience and can be used to provide highly original and customised qualifications. The level of customisation is even reflected in the title of the qualification, e.g. MA Work Based Learning Studies (Leadership and Knowledge Management).

Our expertise is in supporting you to make the most of your potential in a rapidly changing and highly competitive knowledge driven economy. Professionals across a wide span of areas such as administration, construction, education, financial services, health, maritime, policing, retail, transport have already successfully used Middlesex work based learning. Take charge of your learning and career development by making Middlesex Work Based Learning work for you!
Depending upon your previous experience and learning, your course of study can be constructed to lead to MA/MSc Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate qualifications.

Professional Practice and Work Based Learning Studies courses are primarily supported through our on-line virtual learning environment, which means that you can gain your Masters degree or other qualification without having to find significant additional time to attend the University in person. However, there will be on-campus group based induction and workshop sessions available for all students to support your studies. In addition, on-line induction and workshop sessions will be held for those who cannot attend in person.


Benefits:

Enhance potential for career progression
Develop transferable work-based analytical and research skills
Develop expertise within your chosen field
Gain academic recognition for existing skills
Improve professional effectiveness
Use your existing work as the subject of your study
Flexible study that builds on your current work and/or professional practice

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This course focuses on the complex issues and challenges of 21st century social work. At Dundee, we have a range of expertise and experience, including interdisciplinarity (a specific and unique strength of the programme), leadership, research, values and social work practice. Read more
This course focuses on the complex issues and challenges of 21st century social work.

At Dundee, we have a range of expertise and experience, including interdisciplinarity (a specific and unique strength of the programme), leadership, research, values and social work practice. We are particularly keen to establish links between theory and practice. Our modules also draw on experienced and knowledgeable guest lecturers both from the field and from academic research.

Why study Advanced Social Work Studies at Dundee?

The MSc in Advanced Social Work Studies will allow you to engage with advanced level social work theory and develop the knowledge base and enquiry skills required to understand and contribute to 21st century social work.

The course curriculum will encompass taught modules which require you to engage with ethical issues and dilemmas relating to social work. You will have the opportunity to critically engage with the challenges and opportunities of inter-professional collaboration and the role that organisational culture and change plays in the way social work is shaped and delivered.

The course will require you to develop and apply research skills and methods to social work issues in order to produce a Master’s level dissertation. This will allow you to explore and examine social work issues and contexts in order to develop new ways of thinking and understanding, and in turn seek to be transformative and impactful.

Who should study this course?

If you do not require a qualification to practise social work, but wish to enhance and develop your social work skills and knowledge at Master's level, this course is for you. Without the requirement for practice placements, the qualification can be achieved within one year.

If you are a postgraduate student wishing to develop a research profile, or to further your career in terms of practice or leadership, this course is also suitable.

How you will be taught

At the University of Dundee, we emphasise the development of autonomous and self-directed learning, with support and guidance through structured personal tutor and module leaders. Our approaches include:

Lectures
Seminars
Group based discussions
Enquiry and action learning – collaborative research and problem solving.
Collaborative group inquiry activities (including inter-professional collaboration)
Online materials - discussion boards, academic activities, core materials and signposts to literature.
Independent and autonomous study and research which is supported and guided by module leaders and /or personal tutors.
Option for work based project to situate learning and research.

What you will study

Semester 1

Decision Making (30 credits) - which will provide a critical insight into contemporary social work issues around risk, values, ethics and social work law.

Research Methods for Professional Enquiry (30 credits) - which will provide students with a Master’s level knowledge of research skill.

Additionally students will have the opportunity to select one optional module from the MSc Social Work, MSc Community learning and Development or MSc Leadership and Innovation courses which will provide interdisciplinary learning and collaboration.


Semester 2

Research project (60 credits) relevant to Social Work which will be supported by a dissertation supervisor and ongoing collaboration with peers. This module will run the full length of the semester and the full dissertation will be completed during the summer.

Inter‐Professional Collaboration and Organisational change (30 credits) - joint module with Community Learning and Development and Leadership and Innovation students.

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods will include a combination of:

reflective and critical essays
oral presentations
research visualisations
research reports
Careers

Careers

The programme will prepare you for your chosen career in social work or a related field and gives you the flexibility and choice about how best to do this. The scope for applying advanced social work skills is vast - social workers are employed in a wide variety of settings, beyond what might traditionally be considered 'social work.'

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For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Read more
For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Especially when considering the development and production of technology based devices and services. MSc User Experience Engineering brings together knowledge and skill sets into a single programme focused on the user experience where computing technology is the heart of the devices and services.

Why study MSc User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

The importance of human computer interaction and good interface design is increasingly recognised as the key to the future of successful software development.

At the University of Dundee we provide students with the knowledge skills and support necessary to become move into a career in user experience engineering. The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing and as such you will have the opportunity to learn from leading researchers.

What's great about User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

This course is designed to:
Give you a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of user experience research and implementation in the domain of computing and technology.

Enable you to acquire advanced knowledge and skills in the professional procedures necessary to ensure that user experience research and requirements-gathering is both valid and actionable in technology implementation contexts.

Enable you to understand and engage with contemporary debate about the role, ethics and utility of user experience research in commercial and other settings.

An additional aim for overseas students is to provide you with educational and cultural experiences which are unique to the UK.

Our facilities:
You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

The start date is September each year. The MSc course lasts for 12 months and the PGDip lasts for 9 months.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered principally by a mix of traditional lectures, study of academic background texts, lab and studio based practice sessions, and field and project based learning. These will be supplemented by seminars and workshops on key areas of practice

What you will study

The course will be taught in 20 credit modules plus a 60 credit dissertation. Students will be required to complete 180 credits for the award of the MSc (including 60 credits for the dissertation). Students completing 120 credits (without the dissertation) will be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma.

Semester 1 (Sept-Dec)
Computing the User Experience (20 Credits)
Elective Module- one from:
Internet and Computer Systems
Software Development
Software Engineering
Agile Engineering
Technology Innovation Management
Secure e-Commerce
Computer Graphics
Computer Vision
Multimedia Audio
International Marketing
Eye Movements & Cognition (10 Credits)
Quantitative Methods (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (Jan-Mar)
Research Methods (20 Credits)- experimental design requires researchers to understand the context of the research being undertaken and being able to apply appropriate methods to measure and compare data. This module aims to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of research methods relevant in the context of computing.
Research Frontiers(20 Credits) - Students select a total of four units from available units which currently include:
Accessibility & Computing (AC)
Applied Computational Intelligence (ACI)
Constraint Programming (CP)
Games (G)
Intelligent Agents (IA)
Aspects of Assistive Technology (AT) and Augmentative and Alternate Communication (AAC)
Interactive Systems Design (ISD)
Space Systems (SS)
What Computer Eyes Can Do (CE)
Eye Gaze Tracking
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) (20 Credits) - the aim of this module is to provide you with a broad introduction to human-computer interaction through study of the components, both human and machine, which make up interfaces and the ways in which they interact, illustrating this with examples of good and bad practice.

Semester 3 (Apr-Sept)
Research Project or Field Project (60 Credits) - this module will provide you with a professional level experience of specifying, conducting and presenting a substantial piece of user experience research.
Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be a mix of continuous or coursework assessments and exams, with group and individual projects assessed by set deliverables and final presentation.

Careers

This programme is intended to enhance the employability of graduates in the following ways:

For technologists and computing professionals, this programme should build their skills in implementing technology that are appropriate to the needs and wishes of users in the relevant usage context

For human factors specialists, this programme should build their understanding of the fit between users and technology and should enhance their methodology skill set when exploring beyind the understanding of the human factors towards the deployment of appropriate or enhanced user experiences.

For design specialists, this programme should build their skills in marrying technologies and materials to the requirements of users and in blending this within appropriate aesthetics.

For UX team managers this programme should enhance their insights and give them practical experience of the skill sets of all members of their teams in order to direct their work so as to optimize the user experience within real business and technical constraints.

For all professionals, this programme should enhance their ability to communicate the impact of the user experience investigations on their work and the impact of their work on the user experience, not only within the UX team but also to other business functions such as senior management and marketing.

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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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-MA Experience Design offers the opportunity to study an exciting and expanding area of the Creative Industries. -Experiment and explore immersive practice and develop innovative and effective combinations of practices, media and spatial design. Read more
-MA Experience Design offers the opportunity to study an exciting and expanding area of the Creative Industries
-Experiment and explore immersive practice and develop innovative and effective combinations of practices, media and spatial design
-Develop high-level skills in experience design incorporating your chosen specialisms or areas of interest supported by expert tutors
-Project-based work where the emphasis is on the creative, informed application of new technologies and devices to produce compelling user experiences
-You will be able to produce a substantial self-initiated experience design project supported by excellent resources and expertise

Why choose this course?

MA Experience Design is an interdisciplinary award which is designed to allow students to study a newly emergent subject area which combines a range of design practices whose main focus involves space (both physical and virtual) and the presentation of a range of digital (and other) media over a period of time.

Typical applications include museum exhibition design, theme park design, immersive theatre, fine art installations, locative and immersive games and virtual reality.

You will learn about interdisciplinary approaches to planning, design and evaluation of the products created within the experience economy, together with the ways specialist disciplines can be deployed as part of producing meaningful immersive experiences.

You are encouraged to experiment with designing audience experiences through digital ‘sketches’ and then, through developing more extended works informed by your individual interests, pursue a substantial, practical enquiry into an original creative application of experience design in a major project.

Careers

Exhibition designers for museums and heritage organisations, Immersive games developers, VR producers, User Experience innovators, Installation artists, Immersive theatre designers, digital entrepreneurs, interactive marketing designers.

Teaching methods

The course is delivered through a mix of seminars, lectures and tutorials by an expert, specialist, teaching team. As an Experience Design student, you will produce a range of practical projects and gain skills in a variety of technologies and systems while at the same time developing your knowledge of current developments and practices across the Experience Industry.

For your master’s degree project, you will specify and then produce a substantial artefact designed to provide a meaningful immersive experience which reflects your own interests and career plans.

We particularly encourage experimentation and cross-disciplinary projects including those that seek to redefine the ambitions, functions and social organisations that experience design can support. During the course, some students may participate in selected undergraduate technical classes in addition to their masters study so that they can update or develop specific skills. Professional, theoretical and critical skills are also taught alongside the technical and design content through the use of academic blogs and presentations.

All students on this course will work on a live commercial brief providing first hand experience of relevant professional practice.
All students on this programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Work Placement

There are work related learning opportunities on this course, all students complete a live external brief as part of their coursework.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Media Discourses
-Practice 1: Media
-Practice 2: Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective. Read more
Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective.

Your studies will provide a broad level of understanding by exposing you to the variety of ways in which our subjects are approached in diverse contexts, and there will be a particular focus on the global south, and on recognising how responses to social issues have developed.

There will also be an emphasis on issues which have an international dimension, such as human rights and social justice, trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

[Why choose this course?]]

• Study, compare and evaluate different welfare regimes and indigenous responses to human need within a framework of equality and social justice
• Explore the ethical aspects of your subject including attention to power and anti-discriminatory practice
• Develop a comprehensive and critical understanding of the knowledge, theoretical and ethical underpinnings and approaches to international social work and social development in diverse global contexts
• Gain an in-depth knowledge and critical appreciation of research models and methods, and acquire a high level of skill in evaluating and undertaking research while working within a robust ethical framework
• Benefit from a programme that will give you the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings, for example working for NGOs, governments or voluntary organisations.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-social-work-and-social-development#about

Course detail

This course offers global perspectives, theoretical foundations, ethics and practice skills equipping social work and social development professionals to respond effectively in diverse country contexts and make global-local connections. It aims to enable students to develop cultural competence and the ability to work effectively in different global contexts.

You will develop critical thinking, enquiry and evaluation in response to human need encouraging reflectiveness, increasing self-awareness and questioning of models of practice. You will also develop team working skills as be exposed to multi-disciplinary and culturally diverse working, both through collaboration with other students and observing practice in community-based projects.

The course aims to equip students with the skills to carry out research and to understand the implications of research for practice. It also provides the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of a specialist subject of your own choosing.

The practice skills element of the course enables students to apply theory to practice and to develop the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings; for example working for NGOs, government or voluntary organisations.

Modules

• International Social Work and Social Development
• Comparative Social Work and Cultural Competence - Approaches, Policy and Practice
• Models and Methods of Social Investigation
• Human Rights, Advocacy and Social Justice
• Complexities of Forced Migration: Human Displacement, Trafficking and Refuge
• Humanitarian Aid, Non-governmental Organisations and Social Work in Disasters
• Gender in International Social Work and Social Development
• International Relations - Globalization
• Practice Skills Workshops – Project Management, Training and Development, Evaluation and Communication Skills
• Dissertation

Assessment

The assessment methods include:
• Case studies
• Reflective accounts of student experience
• Individual and group presentations
• Design of a training package
• Analysis of qualitative and/or quantitative data
• The dissertation allows you to undertake a research project and communicate knowledge, findings and recommendations

Careers

There is growing demand in both developed and developing countries for the skills of social work and social development professionals. A wide range of job opportunities is available in both the statutory and non-statutory sectors, these include specialist roles in NGOs and various humanitarian organisations.

Job titles for typical successful Masters students include: Social Development Worker, Child Protection Worker, Community Worker, Animateur, Project Worker, Women’s Worker, Gender based Violence Specialist, Advocacy Worker. Roles in policy and research in the public, private and NGO sector are also open to graduates.

Further study options include PhD or the Professional Doctorate for Home/EU Students.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The MPA + MSW Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in social service agencies. It also helps social workers gain the management and administrative skills needed for roles as supervisors, administrators and agency heads. Read more
The MPA + MSW Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in social service agencies. It also helps social workers gain the management and administrative skills needed for roles as supervisors, administrators and agency heads. Similarly, public administration practitioners recognize the need for specialized knowledge and skills to respond to an environment of increasing policy and organizational complexity within social welfare agencies. The program is designed to ensure students acquire both the management and social work skills necessary to excel in these environments.

By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings, and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, students are often able to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study without compromising the professional standards of either program.

Successful completion of the dual-degree programs results in two degrees: a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) and Master's in Social Work (MSW).

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Letters of recommendation
- Personal statement
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Applicants must also meet the following program-specific requirements:
MPA:
- Two letters of recommendation
Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as professors, work supervisors, and professionals from organizations where the applicant has served as a volunteer or in another capacity. When evaluating the letters of recommendation, the admissions committee looks for evidence of academic achievement, community involvement, and personal characteristics that suggests the applicant has the capacity to foster an institutional culture that advances democratic administration and governance.

- Personal statement
The personal statement should be no more than 500 words or two (2) double-spaced, typed pages and should answer the question,"Why do I want an MPA?" You may wish to describe your reasons for pursuing graduate studies in public administration, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee. In the personal statement, the committee assesses the student's commitment to public and/or nonprofit administration as well as his/her ability to communicate in writing.

- Significant work experience (5 or more years in the public and/or nonprofit sectors) can earn applicants a positive adjustment to their admissions scores. However, the lack of work experience does not result in a penalty.

- The GRE is not required. If GRE scores are submitted, the admissions committee evaluates them by averaging the applicant's quantitative, verbal, and analytical writing scores.

MSW:
- Minimum of 24 credit hours (undergraduate) in the liberal arts and sciences, with a minimum of 15 credit hours in the social sciences (anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology)

- Paid or volunteer experience related to human services

- Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can attest to your potential for graduate study, such as those with whom you have worked in an academic, professional, volunteer or work-related capacity
* The MSW program has a special letter of recommendation form that must be used to evaluate MSW applicants. Use the Letter of Recommendation for MSW form. Please download and save the form to the computer first, before beginning to fill out the form. Then, open the file from the computer and enter text. Please do not use the version that opens in the web browser.
* If you are a college student or a recent graduate, one letter must be from a college instructor.
* If you are or have recently been employed, one letter must be from an employment supervisor.

- Personal statement (6-8 pages)
Follow the guidelines in the Personal Statement for MSW document.

- Resume or curriculum vitae (max. 2 pages)
Include paid or volunteer experience related to human services.

- A signed copy of the Social Work Contract
* By signing the above document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of social work as set forth by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.
* Review the Code of Ethics before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Certification of Information

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This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiner for Physiology Programmes (May 2011)

"I viewed a range of Research Projects this year. As always they are aligned to staff expertise – I strongly support this focus as I think it enriches the student experience to work with a knowledgeable and often highly motivated staff member."

In addition to the core modules listed above, students choose an optional module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
Students also undertake two further compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. Read more
This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. At the same time, it enables students to become professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (with JNC recognition) for practice in the UK. Learning on the programme incorporates reflective professional approaches to informal education which enable the development of young people and communities. These are integrated together with wider critical learning on shaping the wider social, political and organisational context in which such practice takes place. The programme combines academic study on taught modules, two periods of fieldwork practice and students conducting their own choice of research with support from experienced researchers. The fieldwork practice placements enable students to develop their practice within local agencies (e.g. local charities and non-governmental organisations) with supported from experienced supervisors. Find out more about the programme from staff and students by watching our short videos.

Course structure

Core modules:
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 1 (15 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 2 (30 credits)

Students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, fieldwork reports, self-assessment, oral presentation and a 10,000 word research report. There are no examinations. To gain a Durham University MA, you must gain 180 credits at Masters level (pass mark 50%)..

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars, fieldwork practice and study visits.

Within an ethos of informal education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes, which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community and youth work and reflect the diverse range of community and youth settings within which practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion, drawn from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area. Two assessed periods of fieldwork practice offer opportunities for learning in practice settings related to community and youth work.

The MA Community and Youth Work provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to professional roles and responsibilities in practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this.

Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations, and assessed fieldwork practice. There is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives that students are encouraged to attend, such as extra-curricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to the professional discipline.

Other admission requirements

Applicants with substantial professional experience may be admitted by concession without an upper second class honours degree, providing that they have demonstrated an ability to undertake Masters level work. All applicants for this programme have to pass an informal interview, which can be conducted either in person in Durham or via telephone/webcam. This will also give applicants an opportunity to find out more about the programme from a member of the teaching team and have any questions answered. If potential applicants have any queries about the entry criteria or programme before making an application, we are happy to respond to informal queries at any stage and to discuss the programme with you.

Admission is subject to satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure check being undertaken upon an offer of a place being made, to assess whether applicants have any previous convictions that prevent them from working with vulnerable people. The cost of a DBS check is currently £44.

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The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also undertake additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, and choose one optional module from Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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The MSc in Biomedical Science (via Distance Learning) is ideal for those interested in earning a Master’s degree while continuing to work. Read more

About the Programme

The MSc in Biomedical Science (via Distance Learning) is ideal for those interested in earning a Master’s degree while continuing to work. Developed for working graduates of engineering, technology or science who wish to upskill or change career direction, the 14 module course will introduce students to interdisciplinary research using technologies and skills from scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines. Modules include: Molecular & Cellular Biology, Anatomy (gross and histology), Innovation & Technology Transfer, Biomaterials, Molecular & Regenerative Medicine, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Tissue Engineering, Stereology, Biomechanics, Project Management, Experimental Design and Data Analysis, Monitoring for Health Hazards at Work, Lasers & Applications, Product Development, Validation and Regulation. Course contributors include senior academics, industry experts and scientists who are actively engaged in research in all areas of biomedical science.
The NUI Galway programme is based within the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science (NCBES), an interdisciplinary centre of research excellence with a primary focus on five research themes that include; Biomedical Engineering, Cancer, Infectious Disease, Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (see http://www.ncbes.ie for more details).

Career Opportunities

Current participants work in medical device and pharmaceutical companies including Boston Scientific, Abbott, Medtronic, Elan, Stryker, Allergan, Advanced Surgical Concepts, Pfizer, and Tyco Healthcare. Whether industry- or healthcare-based, precise job descriptions vary from sales, to R&D engineers. Completion of this new distance-learning biomedical science programme will broaden career prospects of new graduates and those who have already joined the work force.
As a current participant has said, “I feel the course has enhanced my position in my company, as well as opening up other career opportunities. It is a course well-worth pursuing,” Dermot, Senior Process Development Engineer.

A Prime Location

The NUI Galway campus offers students the vibrancy and activity of a bustling community with over 40,000 students. Offering an extensive range of academically-challenging undergraduate and postgraduate degrees and diplomas of international quality, NUIG’s programmes provide students with opportunities for personal and academic development, as well as equipping them with the skills and knowledge necessary to embark on successful careers. The University's long-standing policy of innovative programme development ensures that the teaching programmes respond to the ever-changing needs of employers and of the economy.
Being a University City, Galway is a lively energetic place throughout the year. The University, situated close to the heart of Galway, enjoys an intimate relationship with the city and during the academic year, 15% of the population of the city are students. A compact, thriving city, Galway caters to youth like few other places can. The University's graduates have played a pivotal role in all areas of the development of Galway, including the arts, industry and commerce.

Programme Delivery

The course is delivered over two years, based on a blended learning format; a mixture of face-to-face contact (approximately 9 hours per module) in addition to 12-18 hours per week of self-directed study combined with e-tutorial on-line support. Students attend on-campus lectures/tutorials on a Friday afternoon and/or Saturday, approximately once every 5 weeks. The final module of year one consists of practical experimentation, when students obtain hands-on experience of a range of biomedical and engineering techniques. Students are required to attend 3-4 practical sessions during this module. Completion of a research project (preferably at place of work) is also required. Semester 1 exams are held in January and Semester 2 exams are held in June. Students will also be required to produce a thesis based on a research project preferably carried out at their place of work.

Minimum entry requirements

Second Class Honours in any science, engineering, medical or technology discipline. Candidates with a general (ie non-honours), or third class honours, B.Sc./B.E. can still apply provided they have at least three years relevant work experience.

Apply

Apply online at http://www.pac.ie (look for college of science postgraduate course code GYS19). Selection is based on the candidate’s academic record at an undergraduate level and their relevant work experience.

First-hand Testimonials

“The masters in distance learning is ideal for anyone who wants to continue with their education without having the full time commitment of other courses that are 9-5, 5 days a week. The modules undertaken during the courses are varied and regardless of a physics or biology background the work is challenging without being too involved. The lab work is excellent-getting to work with new and exciting technologies the module notes are excellent and the tutors and lectures are brilliant.” Sinead, Physicist, self-employed
"A great course. Hard work, but fun. Well designed to meet the needs of the biomedical/medical device industry. It has added hugely to my understanding of the body, its function and the requirements of medical devices and the materials which go into them. I feel that it has expanded my horizons hugely." Martin, Senior Quality Engineer, Boston Scientific

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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



Read less
This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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