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Masters Degrees (Window Display)

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This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. Read more
This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery.

It covers a wide range of curatorial approaches, from management of the historical collection to creative curating of contemporary art, craft and design. The course takes a broad view of curatorial practice and the programme includes consideration of activities in the private domain of the domestic interior, and in virtual reality, as well as commercial treatments, such as shop window display.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is offered in both full and part-time modes. It is normally one year, (3 trimesters) in duration in full time mode or 6 trimesters in part-time mode. The first two trimesters comprise taught sessions and assessed projects, while the Master’s Project in the final part of the course is by negotiated project. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course leads to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, and completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA Curatorial Practice.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - Part one introduces generic research methodologies with part two considering subject specific material, analysis and evaluation techniques.

The Role of the Curator - The Role of the Curator considers the changing role of the curator and the ‘politics’ of curating. It addresses developments in critical theory and their impact on curatorial practices and includes topics such as representing communities, ethnicities, gender issues, ‘interventions’, gallery learning, the ‘post-museum’ and creative curating.

Collections and Collecting - This element of the course considers private activities in the domestic interior, as well as public collections and their management. It covers material culture, the urge to collect, the collection as shrine, oral history and its methods, object studies, research in the archiving and management of historical collections, with the collection at the Holburne Museum in Bath providing an important case study.

Cultures of Display - The module looks at public and private modes of display. As well as considering a range of museum and gallery practices, it includes studies in domestic display, commercial display and digital display.

Master’s Project - The Master’s Project is capable of accommodating a variety of approaches for assessment. Examples might include (but are not restricted to) the traditional written dissertation, perhaps drawing on historical or archival case studies, research into and/or curating of an exhibition in a particular venue, and forms of digital production, such as the construction of a museum or gallery specific web site.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The MA adopts a ‘practice-led’ approach; while some sessions are delivered by university academics at the Corsham Court Centre, others are delivered by our collaborators and relate to particular case studies or collections. There are field trips to museums and galleries in the Bath/Bristol area and opportunities to work alongside museum and gallery professionals on selected in-house activities. ‘Real life’ projects can be pursued in response to assessment assignments, especially in relation to the final ‘Master’s Project’ double module.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

• The ability to deal with complex issues in the area of curatorial practice history, theory and context, effectively employing skill in analysis and synthesis as necessary.
• The ability to independently plan and implement research activities in the subject fields of curatorial practice, demonstrating professionalism, self-direction and originality.
• The ability to effectively propose and curate exhibitions, drawing on research and understanding.
• The ability to initiate and contribute to debate and discussion in relation to curatorial practice.
• The capacity to advance knowledge, learning and skills in the subject fields of curatorial practice.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include:
• Curatorial work in museums and galleries
• Freelance curatorship
• Galleries/Arts administration
• Public Art
• Critical writing, such as exhibition reviews and catalogue essays

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Transform your creative practice by engaging with print media on our Master’s course at Cambridge School of Art. Using the latest techniques, you'll work on your own projects in our world-class facilities, and get invaluable experience of exhibiting, curating and collaborating. Read more
Transform your creative practice by engaging with print media on our Master’s course at Cambridge School of Art. Using the latest techniques, you'll work on your own projects in our world-class facilities, and get invaluable experience of exhibiting, curating and collaborating.

Overview

Discover the vital contribution that printmaking has made to the language of contemporary art practice, and how recent technological advances have broadened its definition.

Much of your time will be spent independently researching and undertaking your own practice-based projects. You’ll receive technical inductions for the use of both traditional and emerging processes (including relief printing and intaglio, screen print, lithography, photo-based and digital media) and be free to experiment with, and combine, them in your creative work.

Throughout the course you’ll have support from experienced print and fine art practitioners, and benefit from working in a supportive and critically informed art school. Our connection with the MA Printmaking course at Camberwell College of Art creates opportunities for exchange crits and gives you the chance to build networks with fellow artists. And you'll get a window onto the professional art world through our visiting lecturers, field trips and links to galleries.

Our series of workshops, tutorials, seminars, critiques, presentations and lectures, will allow you to develop research skills that you’ll use on this course and in your future career. In addition, you’ll gain experience of other areas of professional practice including curating and critical writing.

Our links with local printmaking and art organisations, such as Cambridge Original Printmakers, the Curwen Print Study Centre, Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in portfolio reviews, live projects and professional exhibitions.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays from 10am-5pm in Year 1, Tuesdays from 10am-5pm in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

As well as preparing you for a successful career in creative practice, our course will equip you for many other roles. Our past students enjoy careers in further and higher education, professional print workshops, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowship opportunities, in the UK and overseas.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

You’ll have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for our students and alumni.

Fortnightly lectures run by our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) will give you a chance to hear artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Our recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Visiting printmaking professionals have included Katherine Jones, Stephen Chambers, Sean Rorke, Rebecca Salter, Penny Brewill, Mike Taylor, Kate Palmer, Jo Love and Jane Dixon, Leo Brook and Amanda Couch.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Printmaking: Research and Context
Acts and Discourses
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

On our core modules you’ll demonstrate your progress through your visual research outcomes and supporting evaluative statements, except for the Master’s Dissertation, for which you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our fully equipped print studios, with industry-standard facilities including intaglio, screen, relief, litho and photo print processes. You’ll also have access to our 3D workshops, laser cutting facilities, large format digital printer, photography studios and dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging.

Studio teaching takes places in our print studio and MA Fine Art studios, which also act as lively hubs for our full- and part-time students in printmaking and fine art.

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