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Masters Degrees (Wildlife Management)

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The Master in Conservation Biology, with specialization in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management, aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of animal behaviour and evolutionary ecology, in the framework of conservation biology and wildlife management. Read more

The Master in Conservation Biology, with specialization in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management, aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of animal behaviour and evolutionary ecology, in the framework of conservation biology and wildlife management. This two-year master program consists in both lessons and fieldtrips, while half of the second year is devoted to a personal research project conducted by students in an international research team.

OUR MASTER PROGRAM

The Master program has a two-year span, with most of the courses taught in english. Our teaching philosophy is based on the idea that biodiversity conservation must be grounded in a multi-level knowledge approach, mixing key disciplines in ecology and evolution with recent technical advances in the fields of biometry, molecular ecology and management tools. The teaching content is rooted in our established strengths in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology, quantitative ecology and research design. The master program is enriched by input from professional conservationists and managers, to put courses in the broader context of project management and decision-making policies.

The specific teaching objectives aim at developing and improving students’ skills to:

  • engage with concepts and theory in behavioural ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management from interdisciplinary perspectives at an advanced scientific level.
  • assess the ability of organisms to react, cope with and adjust to environmental change occurring over different spatial and time scales.
  • appreciate the opportunities offered by new technological developments for the future of research on animal behaviour and wildlife management
  • combine theory, hypotheses, methods, data and fieldwork so as to identify and develop innovative research questions and design.

Half of the second year is devoted to conducting a personal research project and writing a thesis of 12,000 words. Research projects are conducted within an international team previously selected by the students, and led with the support of an expert supervisor.

TEACHING & FIELDTRIPS

Teaching consists of lectures, seminars by international researchers, class tutorials and practical training in the laboratory and in the field, providing in-depth exploration of key issues. Our teaching philosophy is to stimulate balanced and evidence-based discussions and debates between academic staff and students. Such interactions provide efficient training to identify and explore theory, methods and practice in an academic environment.

Field courses allow students to apply the methods and ideas developed in the classroom to practical use in the field. Each year, you will attend at least one week-long fieldtrip, and several one-day field sessions. The "Camargue field course" provides the opportunity to work on a model species for wildlife management in the Camargue Natural Regional Park (CNRP): the greater flamingo. Fieldwork will be grounded on extensive research on wildlife populations in the context of the various activities taking place in the CNRP. Other field courses address the quantitative analysis of animal behaviour, the monitoring of wildlife, and ex-situ conservation. The “Parc Polaire fieldtrip”, in the Jura mountains, allows students to experience the role of and, stakes faced by, a park dedicated to the conservation of European wild species such as the European bison and deer species.

CAREER PROSPECTS

The aim of our master program is to train future scientific leaders in animal behaviour and conservation biology, as well as future managers and policy officers in biodiversity, conservation and wildlife management.

Therefore, our program aims at providing both a diversified and specialized expertise in the general fields of animal behaviour and wildlife management. It also combines behavioural ecology and conservation biology as major disciplines with some other relevant topics – ethics and deontology, epistemology, socioeconomics of conservation, structure and management of environmental organizations, in addition to the hard science of biodiversity.

The master's Alumni Office helps alumni keep in touch with each other and organises alumni events.

LIFE IN DIJON, CAPITAL CITY OF BURGUNDY (FRANCE)

The whole of the program takes place at the University of Burgundy-Franche Comté, located in the scenic city of Dijon. The former capital city of the Duchy of Burgundy, Dijon is now a medium-size French city, where you can enjoy a vibrant and active cultural life, as well as quick getaways to the countryside and the world famous neighbouring vineyards of the so-called “Golden coast”.

Life in Dijon is very affordable and accommodation easily accessible. The city is well-equipped with modern tramway and bus lines, making commuting between any place in Dijon and the University easy and convenient.

Showing marks of its medieval past, Dijon has excelled in making any subsequent architectural revolution his own. Dijon possesses a fair number of outstanding museums and remarkable monuments, and is also internationally known as the hometown of the notorious French gastronomy. Dijon has a vibrant cultural life with music and food festivals all over the year. Cultural and leisure attractions are widespread, from classical music concerts to jazz festivals, food fairs, cinemas… Dijon is also host of several top-level professional sports teams (football, basketball, handball, rugby…), while also offering a large diversity of sports facilities for the amateur. From beach-volley fields to suburban hiking and cycling paths, urban parks and the much appreciated Lake Kir, incentives to jump in a pair of trainers will be everywhere.

GRANTS

Up to five fellowship grants (800 € per month, during up to 10 months) will be awarded each year to high quality foreign students, with a particular attention to applications coming from Mediterranean countries and Caribbean island nations and territories.

APPLICATIONS

During the first year, students take examinations associated with the Master in Conservation Biology, specialized in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Management. Examinations must be successfully passed (i.e. obtain 60 ECTS credits) in order to proceed to the second year. In the second year, the thesis following your research project accounts for half the marks of the second year.

For further information about how to apply, please directly contact the head of the master program, Professor Frank Cézilly ().

Please also visit our dedicated webpage (http://www.nature-conservation-ubfc.com/bewm/fr/), and like our facebook page (“Master BEWM – UBFC Dijon”) to stay up to date with the life of and the latest news about our program!



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Our course provides a link between the theory and practice of wildlife management. We teach from the perspective of regulatory authorities associated with UK wildlife management. Read more
Our course provides a link between the theory and practice of wildlife management. We teach from the perspective of regulatory authorities associated with UK wildlife management. You will receive advanced training in policy and science implementation. It is professionally focused and relevant to a range of roles in the sector.

The course aims to provide graduates with:
-Advanced knowledge of wildlife management theory, the principles of biodiversity and conservation, epidemiology and wildlife conflicts
-Practical skills in wildlife and environmental data collection, data analysis, data handling, statistics and modelling methodologies with -A focus on providing evidence for policy
-Training in humaneness and welfare for Home Office licensing
-Field skills in wildlife monitoring, surveying, tracking and sampling integrating with GIS
-Problem solving skills to address wildlife problems in a policy context

Much of the training and many case studies will focus on UK and EU policy. The generic training will allow you to work in other countries where policy and management are strongly linked.

The course is run jointly by the School of Biology at Newcastle and the National Wildlife Management Centre (NWMC) at Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA).

APHA provides advice to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) on wildlife management and is involved with the development, assessment and implementation of policy associated with wildlife problems in the UK. It is concerned with invasive species, wildlife disease and has a large portfolio of research and management that is implemented at the national scale.

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The Master of Wildlife Management (MWLM) degree is a three-semester 180-point postgraduate degree designed to train students with the skills necessary for employment in some aspect of wildlife or ecological management or research. Read more
The Master of Wildlife Management (MWLM) degree is a three-semester 180-point postgraduate degree designed to train students with the skills necessary for employment in some aspect of wildlife or ecological management or research.

Other important goals of the course are to develop in students:
-An understanding of the ecological basis of conservation, harvest management and pest control.
-Skills in handling, marking, observing and surveying wild animals.
-An appreciation of the practical realities of wildlife management from the administrative and legal points of view.
-A knowledge of the biology, ecology and behaviour of wild animals in New Zealand.
-Skills in communicating about the management of, and scientific research of, ecological communities. Verbal presentations, debating, dealing with the media, popular science writing and scientific report writing are all emphasised and taught.

Information for new applicants

A candidate would normally have completed a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree in a related subject area before undertaking the MWLM, but the degree is also open to those with other qualifications.

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of papers worth a total of 180 points, normally comprising WILM 401, WILM 402, and WILM 501, plus papers worth at least 100 points from WILM and ZOOL papers, and other 400-level papers. Every programme of study must include WILM 404, (or equivalent) if ZOOL 316, has not been passed previously, and must include WILM 406, if 300-level course work in Conservation Biology has not been taken previously.

A candidate may be exempted from some of the required papers as prescribed in regulation 2(a) on the basis of previous study. A candidate who has completed the requirements for the Postgraduate Diploma in Wildlife Management shall be exempted from those papers in the programme for the degree that have previously been passed for the diploma.

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Prepare for employment in the competitive wildlife conservation sector. Emphasis is placed on CV development. Relevant extracurricular activities help you to hone the skills and qualities desired by employers. Read more
  • Prepare for employment in the competitive wildlife conservation sector
  • Emphasis is placed on CV development
  • Relevant extracurricular activities help you to hone the skills and qualities desired by employers
  • Less than 50% of the contact hours are spent in a lecture room

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Species and habitat conservation
  • Mammal conservation
  • Management of vertebrates for conservation
  • Conservation genetics
  • Field trips

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

All our master’s programmes emphasise the practical skills that employers need, whether that is the ability to identify plants, carry out environmental assessments or use the latest cutting-edge molecular techniques. As a University of Reading MSc graduate, you will be well equipped to work in the field or the lab, and in the private or public sector. Many of our graduates go on to study for a PhD and pursue a career in research either in industry or in universities.

Typical roles of graduates from our ecology and wildlife-based MSc programmes include conservation officers, project managers, field ecologists and environmental consultants. Graduates from our biomedical MSc programme typically go on to pursue PhD studies or work in the pharmaceutical industry.



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The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. Read more
The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. These in turn have knock-on effects such as climate change, water and food shortages, habitat and species loss and the impact of non-native species.

One of the areas where these factors come together is in the field of countryside management where the public use of the countryside interacts with professional land managers and can result in conflict.

In the context of this programme and the degree programme from which it has developed the term countryside management encompasses a broad range of topics and land uses ranging from conservation management to rural land use planning and interpretation to land use history.

Students are expected to have a broad knowledge of how the countryside that we see around us has developed in a historical context and how this relates to factors such as climate, ecology and soils. This in turn helps to determine current land use practice whether it be for agriculture or forestry, conservation management or recreation.

Inevitably these land uses are interlinked in complex ways and the countryside manager is expected to be able to identify the potential conflicts and to arrive at appropriate management options.

Of course there is rarely a simple answer in such situations and the resulting decisions have to be based on an understanding of the competing claims and an awareness of how to work with individuals, interest groups and communities to ensure that stakeholders' views have been taken into account.

Course Content

There are eight taught modules providing for the development of a range of technical, practical and professional skills. Residential study weekends are also used as a vital tool in delivering some of the practical aspects of the course.
In the modules an element of student choice is often built in through the use of essay and other course work topics that cover areas of potential interest. The modules will be of value individually to those in employment who are looking for Continuing Professional Development.

Taught modules are:

Planning and the Legal Framework

This module will provide a background to the legislation and policy framework within which the countryside is managed. This will include planning, biodiversity and landscape and will focus on the role of EIA and SEA. The planning system is prone to conflicts between interest groups and students will look at case studies that highlight some of the main issues that arise.

Habitat and Species Management

Habitats and species have been the subject of management for centuries but only comparatively recently has there been a focus on their management for conservation reasons. In practice species management relies on appropriate habitat management although there are times when more specific prescriptions are appropriate. This module will look at management through a number of case studies which will be examined in detail. The case studies will include both desk studies and field visits and students will be encouraged to research appropriate examples in their own areas.

Visitor Management

Visitor management is a crucial part of countryside management and should be integrated into area and site management plans. An understanding of visitor management and the opportunities for education, interpretation and marketing, is a requirement for senior countryside managers. Students will look at the full range of visitor management issues from visitor profiles and motivations to site design and the impacts on wildlife and the wider environment.

Species Identification and Familiarity

The ability to accurately identify a range of species is crucial to aid in species conservation and to properly evaluate an area for its biodiversity. Central to species identification is the use of field keys and identification guides. This course will be based around a week long, intensive series of practical and laboratory based sessions to provide participants with the necessary skills to implement habitat and species survey techniques. Training in computer recording packages will also be provided to ensure best practice in species recording is maintained

Project Management for Countryside Professionals

Countryside Managers need to be able to effectively manage their own as well as the work of others. The skills of project planning/reporting/acquisition of funding and the proper upkeep of work related files and paperwork is fundamental to effective management. A strong component of this module will also involve the development of team management skills as well as health and safety awareness.

Integrated Planning Management

Multifunctional land use is a well recognised term. It is part of the planning system at differing scales and with multi-partnership and stakeholder involvement. The module will define both the industry organisations commonly involved in multifunctional land use planning and the other likely stakeholders. The land use changes proposed will take account of the historical and cultural aspects of the landscape.

Integrated planning management is undertaken at different scales ranging from individual project management plans and environmental statements to strategic planning at regional, national or European level. The module will look at how the production of these plans and strategies might be expected to integrate with other planning policy and legislation. Integrated management systems are collective.

Methods and Delivery

This course is studied part time through on-line distance learning. This allows those in continuing employment or with family commitments to participate. With the exception of several weekend schools and a short study tour, the learning is carried out in the student's home or work place.

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study 4 modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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Concern for the global environment is continuing to grow. As a result there is a continuing demand for skilled and experienced professionals in environmental management. Read more

Concern for the global environment is continuing to grow. As a result there is a continuing demand for skilled and experienced professionals in environmental management. This course gives you the technical knowledge and skills to meet these demands. Alongside these technical competencies the course will help you to develop transferable competencies (e.g. communication, critical thinking, use of IT packages) which professional bodies and employers recognise as being essential to environmental professionals.

We have strong links with public and private sector organisations allowing us to make sure that the course meets the needs of employers.

In the first semester you study core environmental topics and material that assist you to settle in to postgraduate study. In the second semester you have the option to study

  • the management and sensitive use of natural resources (international resource management strand)
  • the conservation of wildlife and landscapes (wildlife and landscape management strand)
  • a mix of the above topics allowing you to tailor your studies to your own particular interests (environmental management strand)

To ensure your learning is interesting and relevant to the workplace, we use a range of teaching methods including class discussions, case studies based on real life scenarios and field visits. You also have the opportunity to take a module where you do a project for a real organisation to help you develop skills in managing a project, and to develop contacts in the sector where you plan to work.

Most of our teaching staff have previously worked in the sector and have retained strong links with public and private sector organisations allowing us to draw on real world experience in our teaching. Our environment subject area also has a proven track record in research.

We also offer most modules on this course as standalone short courses.

The course is suitable for you whether you are progressing from a related first degree or if you come from a non-environmental background. As part of the support to students from a non-environmental background we offer an optional module that introduces key ecological concepts for those wishing to work in that area but who have no relevant previous experience or study.

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

Course structure

Core modules

  • Environmental perspectives and policy development
  • Introduction to GIS
  • Environment and infrastructure
  • Professional practice

International resource management strand

  • International water management
  • Environmental management systems
  • Carbon and energy management

Wildlife and landscape management strand

  • Cultural landscape management
  • Habitat management
  • Ecological survey and evaluation

To complete the masters, you also take • applied research methods • dissertation.

Options

International resource management strand

One from • minerals and waste • consultancy project • cultural landscape management

Wildlife and landscape management strand

One from • applied ecology • minerals and waste • water management • consultancy project

Environmental management strand

Alternatively you can select four modules from those available in semester two.

Assessment

  • briefing papers
  • oral presentations
  • project work
  • reports
  • proposals
  • reflections
  • essays.

Employability

The environmental consultancy sector is continuing to grow and so this is the main source of employment for most of our graduates. The consultancy sector spans both the ecological and resource management strands of the course.

Other employment opportunities include

  • environmental consultancies
  • government agencies
  • advising on the development and implementation of an environmental management system in almost any business
  • voluntary conservation organisations, such as the RSPB and the County Wildlife Trusts
  • national park authorities and local authority countryside services

Many part-time students are supported by employers and many find that they progress in their workplace after completing the course.



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The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. Read more
The world’s environments have long been threatened by human impact. As pressures on the natural environment intensify, there is a growing need for professionals skilled in conservation and environmental management. They need a wide range of skills, including biodiversity, survey techniques, environmental management and monitoring systems, geographical information systems and an understanding of relevant ecological principles, legislation and regulatory frameworks, which demands a multidisciplinary approach.

This Masters programme in Wildlife and Conservation Management brings together the physical, chemical, biological, socioeconomic, administrative and legislative aspects of land planning, providing the skills you need for an exciting and rewarding career as an environmental conservation manager. It combines a broad understanding of the science and management of conservation, putting emphasis on integrating specialist knowledge and practical skills with IT and communication.

Our extensive and exciting fieldwork programme will train you in a wide range of environmental survey and assessment techniques.

This Masters degree is accredited by the Environment and Resources Professional Group of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/385-msc-wildlife-and-conservation-management

What You Will Study

Modules include:
- Applied Geospatial Analysis
- Restoration Ecology
- Environmental Management and Legislation
- Wildlife Surveying
- Terrestrial and Aquatic Conservation
- European Field Expedition*
- MSc Project

Optional modules:
- Tropical Ecology*
- Tropical Environmental Monitoring*
- Tools for Sustainable Development
- Work Based Learning Project
- Remote Sensing for Environmental Management

*Please visit our course page on the University of South Wales website for information regarding our Field Trips.

*Please note:* the course structure outlined above is indicative of what you will study and may change from year to year. Consequently there may be a difference between the information shown here and the course when it is delivered.

Learning and teaching methods

Full-time students spend two days at University, usually Wednesday and Thursday, and around 12 hours per week in lectures and practical sessions.

Part-time students attend one day per week. First year part-time students attend on Wednesdays and second years attend on Thursdays.

We teach using a combination of lectures, laboratory sessions, problem solving tutorials, video presentations and practicals. You will also undertake fieldwork excursions within the UK and overseas (additional costs apply). The number of hours of formal teaching will vary depending on your module choice. You will also be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning by completing guided reading and various interactive computer packages. Based on individual circumstances the MSc Project may be extended into your third year of study and will be agreed as part of a discussion with the course leader.

Please note: some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

- Work based learing project:
This optional module enables our students to gain 60 hours work experience under the supervision of an employer. You will also be assigned an academic supervisor who will advise you on a suitable employer based on your area of interest. Recent organisations who have hosted our students include Capita Symonds, Natural Resources Wales, Wales Heritage Coastal Path and Warwickshire Wildlife Trust.

- Employment prospects:
Graduates from our MSc Wildlife and Conservation Management have progressed to careers in the Environment Agency, utility companies, local, national and international conservation organisations, environmental consultancies, and regional and national government. Several others have progressed on to PhD study and into academic careers.

Assessment methods

You will be assessed through a range of methods depending on your module choice, these include: examinations, coursework such as writing reports of field excursions. You will also analyse case studies, undertake presentations, participate in workshops and analyse data.

Field trips

Fieldwork provides unforgettable educational and social experiences, bringing to life the theory and concepts of the lecture theatre. South Wales is a fantastic study location on the edge of rural and urban environments.

Cardiff, Wales’ capital city, the Brecon Beacons National Park and the Glamorgan Heritage Coast are all close to the University. They provide exceptional fieldwork locations that can be explored in a day. We make full use of these locations across our earth and environment courses to cover the practical aspects of our modules.

As part of this degree you will undertake residential fieldwork excursions, typically to Portugal and Mid Wales (additional fees apply). Some fieldwork trips will extend beyond the two days of study, but you will be notified in advance in order to plan appropriately.

If you choose to study the Tropical Ecology module, you will have the opportunity to complete a scientific scuba diving course, either locally or at a tropical location (for an additional fee which is approximately £2000). Previous locations have included Indonesia, Costa Rica, Honduras and Borneo.

The Tropical Environmental Monitoring module, will enable you to undertake studies in Southern Africa in locations such as Botswana for an additional fee which is approximately £2000.

The European Field Expedition module involves studying in Portugal. The fee is approximately £500-£600.

Please note: the exact locations of all overseas field trips may vary each year and is based on the area’s suitability for academic study and the overall cost of the trip. In addition some field trips will take place on weekdays besides Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Important Information

Please be aware of the physical demands of this course which has modules with significant fieldwork elements. If you therefore have a disability which is likely to be affected by these physical demands, please get in touch with the course leader Dr Gareth Powell as soon as possible. We will then investigate the reasonable adjustments that we can make to ensure your Health and Safety. Please note that if any Health & Safety aspects cannot be overcome, we may not be able to offer you a place on the course of your choice.

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Why choose this course?. This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. Read more

Why choose this course?

This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. The course is taught not only by our experienced academic staff but with the assistance of world-leading experts and conservation practitioners both in class and also in the field.

Importantly throughout the course we stress a holistic appreciation of the link between field and laboratory-based work and the necessity of professional level communication with a range of audiences. Where possible teaching will be undertaken through workshops and seminars so providing a more immersive environment to help develop an understanding of the operation of professional-level applied conservation skills in communication and problem solving.

What happens on the course?

The focus throughout is on animals in their wild settings and as such there is a strong emphasis on fieldwork and applied wildlife research. Modules to be studied are:

7AB012 Conservation Genetics - This module is focused on genetic applications to problems of conservation, reflecting the diversity of concerns relevant to conservation biology and covering the management of captive populations for conservation. Modern genetic techniques used by conservationists are also examined.

7AB009 Advanced Survey and Monitoring Techniques –The desktop survey, design, collection, processing, analysis and output production of environmental data (physical, vegetation and organismal) will be explored in a problem-based setting. This will involve the integrated use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), geospatial imagery, telemetry, image acquisition, sound acquisition, ground-truthing and field survey techniques.

7AB011 Primate Conservation and Behaviour - This module focuses on the evolution of primate societies and asks how environmental and demographic factors influence animals’ decisions about how to organise their social and reproductive strategies. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding key theoretical concepts and how these may be applied to empirical studies of non-human primates. This module explores also the science of scarcity and diversity of wild primate populations and the successful management of captive populations for conservation.

7AB013 Research Methods for Wildlife Conservation - This module prepares you with the skills needed for wildlife conservation research. You will develop advanced skills in literature searching and critical analysis of published work. You will explore the development of a research question, research design, data handling and statistics. You will prepare a professional portfolio of your research methods covered in the module.

7AB010 Field Course - The module will examine the whole process of research trip planning from funding and logistical planning through to the detail of content for individual session activities. The culmination of this process will be a residential field course in the UK or overseas.

7AB014 Conservation of UK Protected Species – In-depth consideration of the conservation of UK protected species including their ecology, protection legislation, conservation measures, habitat management and habitat creation.

7AB015 The Masters Project module - an opportunity to plan, undertake and deliver an extended, problem-focused, original independent investigation related to the chosen programme of study and is a requirement for the award of a Masters degree.

Whilst the majority of the material will be delivered by the core Departmental staff the course aims to bring-in external speakers from wildlife research, practice and policy to allow students access to the knowledge of professionals working in the sector.

Why Wolverhampton?

  • Wolverhampton is developing a national reputation for the study of Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Conservation. Studying the MSc provides real opportunities to influence the direction of study and research of the staff and student body.
  • There are significant opportunities to undertake fieldwork in a range of local, national and international settings. This is an important driver for the department and provides a strong applied focus for Masters-level study across the range of modules studied.
  • A strong emphasis is placed on developing the link from strategic/logistical planning through field and laboratory work to the professional communication of the information generated.
  • The facilities of the new Science building at the university provide a significant opportunity to develop complementary wildlife-related laboratory skills which are often not explored at undergraduate level.
  • Innovative approaches to learning are used including student-led workshops, seminars and practical activities that mirror workplace scenarios. This gives students a strong role in directing their own development and links strongly to career development and aspiration.
  • There is a strong emphasis on the individual and the nurturing of individual study and career aspirations.

Career Path

The course prepares you for a role as a conservation professional working with strong applied and field-based components. In particular it gives you key opportunities for employment in conservation-type roles in the UK and beyond where higher-level qualifications are essential for demonstrating topic knowledge and technical competency. Such roles are found in a host of statutory and non-governmental organisations across the wildlife sector.

What skills will you gain?

  • A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of wildlife conservation and behavioural science.
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to your own research or advanced scholarship. Specifically you will develop the higher-level field and laboratory skills that are widely applied in the wildlife conservation community.
  • A practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline. Specifically you will understand the process of enquiry within wildlife conservation and behaviour from first principles and strategic/logistical planning through field and laboratory work to professional output (report, research paper, oral presentation etc.)
  • A conceptual understanding that enables you to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline as well as the knowledge to evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.
  • Applied skills and theoretical understanding linking policy and practice that allow you to fully engage with the advancement of knowledge in wildlife conservation and behaviour science.


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During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more. Read more

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation

During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more.

Programme summary

This programme focuses on policy, sustainable management and conservation of forest and nature; i.e. understanding and predicting the effect of phenomena such as global climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, ecotourism, timber production, hunting and animal reintroduction. Insights into all aspects of forest and nature conservation are required to address these issues with emphasis on both ecological and social aspects. The MSc Forest and Nature Conservation programme represents an integrated approach to natural resource management that can be applied at different scales, to diverse ecosystems and in varying political and social contexts. A tailor-made structure, an outstanding research environment and three comprehensive specialisations contribute to making the programme challenging for undergraduates from both the natural and social sciences.

Specialisations

Policy and society
The central study object is the dynamics between people, organisations and institutions within policymaking and policy innovation processes, referred to as `governance'; relative to forest and nature conservation issues, including spatio-temporal aspects. Issues in the field of economics, public administration, communication and strategic planning are addressed in order to conserve and manage forests and natural areas in a sustainable way. Examples are: recreation, communities and natural resources, deforestation, forest governance, sustainable forestry and certification schemes.

Management
This specialisation aims to design and assess realistic and feasible management options for forests and natural areas. The approach is based on specific knowledge and understanding of wildlife management, management of forests and other terrestrial vegetation. Special attention is given to the following questions: What is the best option for wildlife conservation? Do populations need to be managed or not? How does one determine an optimal population level? How should the effects of various management activities, at different spatial and temporal scales, be evaluated? How should the perceptions of different people be dealt with? What are the best options in forest management for a specific area? How to manage nature? How to deal with abiotic, biotic and social bottlenecks in restoration ecology? What is the role of N and P pollution? How to restore shallow lakes? How to restore tropical forests? It is also possible to focus on specific aspects of natural resource management.

Ecology
The emphasis is on understanding the ecological processes that form the basis for the structure, composition and functioning of forests and natural areas. You can specialise in tropical forestry, landscape ecology, animal ecology, forest resource management, plant ecology, biodiversity conservation or tropical nature conservation.

Your future career

The programme provides excellent preparation for Dutch as well as European and non-European jobs. Career possibilities include positions at research institutes and universities, government ministries and local authorities. Positions are also available at state and private forestry, nature conservation services, and environmental assessment agencies. Examples include the European Forest Institute, Birdlife International, and landscape and animal protection organisations such as RAVON or WWF. In the private sector, graduates find jobs at engineering and consultancy bodies, such as Royal Haskoning, the National Fund for Rural Areas or forestry companies. Graduates often begin their career by carrying out research, computer analysis and modelling of ecological systems, working in knowledge transfer or preparing policy documents. Eventually, their careers usually shift towards advisory work, consultancies, research coordination and project management.

Alumnus Wouter Wubben.
Wouter Wubben works for the municipality Westland and is responsible for matters concerning ecology, landscape and water quality. “When I just started working I could directly apply the ecological knowledge from my master, and I was able to pick up missing knowledge very quickly”. Wouter went to the USA to work on forestry for his internship. “During my internship I worked in the field with a lot of different teams, this experience now helps me to communicate with people involved with the implementation of municipality plans. I have a constantly changing job, I started with executive work but I am now responsible for the development of issues in ecology, landscape and water.”

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Biology
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Landscape Architecture and Planning
MSc Geoinformation Science
MSc International Development Studies.

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Humans are dependent on and live in close proximity with their livestock and the interfaces of livestock with wildlife are permeable and complex. Read more
Humans are dependent on and live in close proximity with their livestock and the interfaces of livestock with wildlife are permeable and complex. This programme addresses a clear need to integrate ecological disciplines with studies of disease in wildlife, livestock and human populations, with concepts of land management, livestock production and wildlife management

Why this programme

◾You can carry out a research project in an internationally recognized centre of excellence, working with world-leading researchers in animal science and ecology.
◾Being an online programme, we are equally able to access true experts, regardless of their national base. Recognised authorities will contribute to the programme from their home countries, including South Africa, Botswana, USA, Brazil, India and Australia.
◾This programme closely examines the often conflicting needs of land users and strives to obtain balanced input from individual land users, from special interest lobby groups, NGOs, government organisations, corporations and service providers to provide a rigorous theoretical background to understanding the practical causes of land-use conflicts involving livestock, wildlife and other drivers.
◾After completing this programme you will have gained a valuable understanding of the complex drivers of animal management, have developed a range of analytical and practical skills and will be able to construct well-founded, practical solutions to animal management problems.
◾This programme is unique in its approach to the "One Health" concept. Whereas most programmes in this domain examine animal and human health, this programme broadens the concept to include environment and land management, both of which are major drivers of the health of wildlife, livestock and the humans that depend on them.

Programme structure

The aims of the programme are to:
◾Integrate ecological disciplines with studies of disease in wildlife, livestock and human populations with basic concepts of land management, livestock production and wildlife management
◾Comprehensively examine the factors that influence the managment of wildlife and livestock species, including human culture and the physical environment
◾Provide training in the use of analytical tools for wildlife, livestock and land management
◾Develop the ability to critically analyse wildlife and livestock management processes and critically analyse and evaluate solutions to the important challenges of sustainable wildlife and livestock management.

Career prospects

This programme will suit students who need to broaden their knowledge and skills to improve their employability in organisations that have a mandate to provide services to diverse stakeholders in complex systems. Veterinarians in government agencies with wide ranging responsibilities, in conservation organisations and NGOs would find this particularly useful. Similarly, conservation biologists who have little or no familiarity with livestock production or animal health will benefit.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Environmental Biology. Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course focuses on the relationships between living organisms and the terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments, coupled with the interactions that result from natural and anthropogenic processes.

On the Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course you will benefit from advanced training in the interpretation of local and global environmental issues, field and theoretical aspects of biology and ecology, and in analytical techniques. You will also develop the skills necessary to work confidently in vocational areas such as conservation, environmental impact assessment, environmental management, monitoring and education, and foster an objective, scientific and realistic approach to environmental biological issues that you may have to face in a professional capacity.

Graduates from the Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course go on to work for government agencies such as CCW, Environment Agency, English Nature, Scottish Heritage, Fisheries Research Services, CEFAS. Other organisations include zoos, wildlife parks and reserves, national parks, environmental departments, research and development of SMEs as well as large companies. Graduates also go on to do postgraduate research.

Modules

Modules on the Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management MSc include:

Core Science Skills and Research Methods

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Term papers in Environmental Biology

Environmental Assessment and Management

Ecosystems

Remote sensing of the changing environment

Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

Please visit our website for a full description of modules for the Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management programme.

Facilities

As a student on the MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management programme, you will benefit from a range of facilities such as:

Our excellent facilities include a unique built Animal Movement Visualisation Suite (£1.35m), incorporating an electronic wall linked to a computer-tesla cluster for high-speed processing and visualisation of complex accelerometry and magnetometry data derived from animals. Coupled with this facility is the Electronics Lab with capacity for research, development and realisation of animal tags with new capacities (sensors, energy-harvesting systems, miniaturization, 3-D printing of housings etc.); a custom-designed 18m on coastal research vessel; a recent investment of £4.2m on a new suite of state-of-the art Science laboratories; and the £2m unique Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR) with a 750 m2 controlled environment building, with programmable recirculating aquatic systems, unique within the UK’s higher-education sector. These are tailored for research on a diverse range of organisms, ranging from temperate to tropical and marine to freshwater. Coupled with this are nutrient and biochemical analytical capabilities.

Student profiles

“I’ve spent four years as a student at Swansea University, three years as an undergraduate studying Marine Biology and a year as a postgraduate undertaking the MSc in Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management. Whether studying or partying I can honestly say I had a fantastic time the whole way through! It was through my undergraduate study that I realised how amazingly diverse the marine ecosystem is, but also how vulnerable it can be and the level of exploitation it endures. This prompted me to undertake the MSc, which furthered my knowledge in many aspects of conservation and environmental issues around the world on sea and land. With my experience and expertise gained from studying at Swansea I have secured a job working with WWF Cymru in Cardiff as Marine Policy Officer where I am helping work towards a sustainable future for the Welsh marine environment.”

David Parker

BSc Marine Biology

MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management

Marine Policy Officer, WWF Cymru, Cardiff

Research

We are 7th in the UK and top in Wales for research excellence (REF 2014)

93.8% of our research outputs were regarded as world-leading or internationally excellent and Swansea Biosciences had the highest percentage of publications judged ‘world-leading’ in the sector. This is a great achievement for the Department, for the College of Science and indeed for Swansea University.

All academic staff in Biosciences are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture.



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Around the world, the quality and quantity of water in streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands and underground is significantly affected by human activity. Read more

Around the world, the quality and quantity of water in streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands and underground is significantly affected by human activity. At Cranfield University, we capitalise on our industry connections to provide students with the up-to-date skills and knowledge needed to tackle these challenges in a career in today’s environmental water management sector.

Who is it for?

The course is ideal for graduates wishing to develop the expertise needed to solve environmental water management problems. It is designed to complement and expand your existing knowledge of science, policy and practice, making it suitable for students from a range of backgrounds. Recent students have joined us from undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in engineering (civil, hydraulic, agricultural), physical geography, chemistry and environmental sciences, as well as from professional careers.

Our strong industry links make the course particularly suited for those looking to work in the water industry, government or environmental and engineering consultancy, and in a wide range of roles including water quality, water resources, aquatic habitat and wildlife, flood defence, and policy.

The option to undertake the course on a part-time basis allows you to extend your professional development within your current employment.

Why this course?

At the UK’s only exclusively postgraduate university, students get the unique experience to work with researchers whose primary purpose is to understand the needs of their sector. Therefore all components of the Environmental Water Management course are designed with the same end goal in mind: to produce the best graduates for jobs in water resources, hydrology, water quality, habitat conservation and creation, and flood risk management.

To do this, you will first reinforce your knowledge of topics and methods in eight core areas (hydrology, ecology, water quality, modelling, drought, flood risk, urban water, and catchment management). You then integrate this learning and apply it to a real-world problem in the group project. Over a 10-week period, you will work in a team of 6-8 students from a range of MSc courses on a consultancy project, handling all stages of project design and delivery from initial meetings to scope out the work to the final report and presentation. Topics vary yearly as they respond to the needs of our industrial partners, put typically relate to water resources, aquatic ecology and flood risk management. Finally, you will delve into a single topic for your individual thesis project, strengthening your skills in project design and management; data collection, analysis and interpretation; and report writing, all of which are essential for your future career.

By completing this course, you will become part of a long line (>30 years) of environmental water management alumni who can now be found across the entire water sector, from entry-level scientists to senior managers and regulators, in the UK, Europe and beyond.

Accreditation

This MSc, PgDip and PgCert has been accredited by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). As a graduate of the MSc course, you are eligible for graduate membership in this leading professional body.

Course details

The course comprises eight assessed modules, a group project and an individual project.

Group project

A unique component of a Cranfield University taught MSc is the group project. Group projects are usually sponsored by industry partners and provide students with experience of working on real challenges in the workplace along with skills in team working, managing resources and developing reporting and presentation skills. Experience gained is highly valued by both students and prospective employers.

Individual project

The individual project provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research, think and work in an original way, contribute to knowledge, and overcome genuine problems. Students have the choice to work on projects sponsored by industry or related to current Research Council, EU or industry funded research.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 20%, Individual project 40%

Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search by filtering the results to suit your needs. Scholarships and bursaries are available to contribute towards fees and/or living costs for graduates applying for full-time Masters courses in the themes of Water, Energy and Environment. Please see below for the specific funding that is available and the eligibility criteria. Visit the funding finder.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Future Finance Student Loans Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Your career

Cranfield University environmental water management graduates are found all over the UK, EU and world working at all levels of the water industry, government, environmental and engineering consultancy, and charitable sector.



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The Master in Conservation Biology, specialization Ecology, Monitoring and Management of Ecosystems aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of structure, functioning, monitoring, and management of ecosystems submitted to various natural and anthropogenic pressures, in the framework of biodiversity conservation. Read more

The Master in Conservation Biology, specialization Ecology, Monitoring and Management of Ecosystems aims at providing a critical and conceptually-based understanding of structure, functioning, monitoring, and management of ecosystems submitted to various natural and anthropogenic pressures, in the framework of biodiversity conservation. Half of the second year is devoted to a personal Master thesis project.

The Master is a two-year course. In the first year, the course design is based upon the idea that biodiversity conservation must be based on a multi-level knowledge approach, mixing key disciplines in ecology, and including recent technical advances in numerical ecology, molecular ecology, wildlife monitoring and ecosystem management. The course content is rooted in our established strengths in functional ecology (ecosystem structure and function, population and community ecology), paleoecology (long-term evolution of ecosystems), ecotoxicology (fate and effects of pollutants), epidemiology (transmission of zoonotic pathogens), conservation biology (status and threats of patrimonial animal and plant species), numerical ecology, ecological modelling and research design. The master degree program is further enriched by input from professional conservationists and managers, with the aim to put courses in the broader context of project management and decision making procedures.

The specific course objectives are to develop abilities to:

  • critically engage with concepts and theory in functional ecology from interdisciplinary perspectives at an advanced scientific level,
  • critically assess the ability of populations and communities to react, cope with and adjust to environmental changes occurring over different spatial and time scales,
  • appreciate the opportunities offered by new technological developments for the future of research on ecosystem monitoring and management,
  • combine theory, hypotheses, methods, data and field work to identify and develop innovative applied or fundamental research questions and designs.

Teaching consists of lectures, seminars, class tutorials and practical training in the field and in the laboratory, which provide in-depth exploration of key issues. The teaching philosophy is to stimulate discussion and debate between academic staff and students to identify and explore theory, methods and practices in an academic space that encourages a critical dialogue.

Field courses allow students to apply in the field the methods and ideas presented in the classroom. Each year, they will attend one week-long fieldtrip and several field courses. One of these field courses (in the framework of the teaching unit “Conservation Biology and Ecosystem Management”) allows them to test a hypothesis dealing with the potential impact of anthropogenic disturbances on plant or animal populations or communities, in the context of the various activities taking place in the Jura Mountains, known for their outstanding landscapes, typical ecosystems (e.g. peatbogs, wood-pastures) and patrimonial species (e.g. boreal lynx). Other field courses address the assessment and the management of ecosystems, and the monitoring of plant and animal wildlife.

Students must pass the examinations taken during the first year (i.e. obtain 60 ECTS) in order to proceed without further selection into the second year.

The second year is mainly devoted to the thesis project within a research team or a professional structure (NGOs, consultancy companies, governmental agencies…) with the support of an academic supervisor, specialist of the related research domain. Half of this second year is devoted to researching and writing a thesis of about 12,000 words. The research topic will be devised at the end of the first year. The thesis accounts for half the marks for the second year.

Graduate destinations

The aim of the course is to train future scientific leaders in functional ecology, ecotoxicology and epidemiology as well as future managers and policy officers in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management. In that respect, the course combines functional ecology and conservation biology as two major disciplines with some other relevant topics – paleoecology, ecotoxicology, epidemiology, ethics and deontology, epistemology, environmental regulation and socioeconomics of conservation, structure and management of environmental organizations, in addition to the hard science of biodiversity.

The Master’s Alumni Office helps alumni keep in touch with each other and organises alumni events.

Application

Available spots: 16 in M1 and M2

Students already registered in a French university apply online on eCandidat. All information available on http://sciences.univ-fcomte.fr/pages/fr/menu3796/etudes-et-scolarite/candidature-aux-formations-15267.html.

Non-registered students should rather look at http://www.univ-fcomte.fr/pages/fr/menu1/accueil-international-131.html

Candidacy file:

  • Detailed Curriculum Vitae with personal, training, internship, professional, and other information allowing the recruitment committee to assess the quality of the candidacy.
  • Evidence of completion of upper secondary school (high school) in the form of final and official diploma and transcripts. Note that the transcripts must specify all coursework completed.
  • Cover letter.
  • Two letters of recommendation.

Application examination:

Examination by the recruitment committee of the Master EDGE

After a first examination of all complete files by the recruitment committee, some candidates may be called for an interview with some members of the recruitment committee.

Selection criteria:

  • Previous training in line with the Master EDGE objectives
  • Quality of the training (marks, ranks, distinction)
  • Internships and/or professional experiences in line with the Master EDGE objectives
  • Motivation and career objectives
  • Recommendation

General requirements:

To meet the general entrance requirements for programme studies at the Master’s level, you must have graduated from an accredited university with a degree equivalent to at least a Swedish Bachelor’s degree (180 ECTS). Please note that you must provide adequate supporting documentation in the form of diplomas or official transcripts specifying all courses completed, including any transferred credits from previous schools, both in the original language and translated into English or French.

Specific requirements:

Specific entrance requirements consist of previous university studies within the following subjects: biology, ecology, and statistics.

English requirement

In order to be eligible, the English language entry requirement corresponds to English studies at upper secondary (high school) level in France.

GRANTS

Up to five fellowship grants (800 € per month, during up to 10 months) will be awarded each year to high quality foreign students, with a particular attention to applications coming from Mediterranean countries and Caribbean island nations and territories.



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On this course you will investigate solutions for conserving our coastal zones, seas and oceans through the development of a coordinated strategy to distribute environmental, socio-cultural and institutional resources. Read more

Why take this course?

On this course you will investigate solutions for conserving our coastal zones, seas and oceans through the development of a coordinated strategy to distribute environmental, socio-cultural and institutional resources. It is a dynamic process and you will possess a genuine desire to ensure the long-term sustainability of the world’s coast lines.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Benefit from a wealth of coastal and marine environments on your doorstep – internationally important wildlife, urban development, maritime heritage and the busiest waterway in Britain
Complement your studies with case study analysis, lectures from guest speakers and fieldtrip opportunities
Learn alongside students from diverse international backgrounds and politico-economic cultures

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). On graduating from this course, you can expect to find roles within government agencies, environmental consultancies and observational or research institutions that oversee the investigation and application of resource management issues.

Module Details

You can opt to take this course in full-time or part-time mode.

You will be introduced to technical and analytical frameworks and concepts, which will enable you to study these three major themes:

The physical environment
The institutional frameworks that have been developed for coastal and ocean areas
The value of coastal and marine resources

The course is divided into three parts. The first two comprise the taught units of the course covering the key conceptual, institutional and applied bases of the subject. The third focuses on your dissertation.

Here are the units you will study:

Coastal and Marine Resource Management: You will examine the theory, concepts and frameworks of coastal and marine management, and use topical issues as examples of practical application.

Coastal Physical Processes and Shoreline Management: You will study the biophysical behaviour of contemporary coastal systems. You will then investigate how and why coastal risk management is practiced and examine the effects of management upon ‘natural’ systems.

Law of the Sea and Marine Spatial Planning: You will examine the nature of coastal and marine policy and the forces instrumental in creating such a policy. You will also learn about the law affecting the utilisation of marine space and resources and consider the stages, key stakeholders and approaches to marine planning in the UK, Europe and internationally.

Fieldwork and Research Methods: Firstly, you will examine the role and importance of fieldwork in coastal and marine resource management studies and practice. The concepts, issues and practices covered will mean you can undertake a field-based project on the compulsory residential trip. Secondly, you will have an introduction to research design and methods so you can conduct field research in two contexts: 1) the residential field trip and 2) for your dissertation/independent study.

Dissertation: This provides you with an opportunity to independently study a topic of your choice related to coastal and marine resource management.

Programme Assessment

The course provides a balanced structure of lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. You will generally be taught in small classes, providing an informal, friendly and supportive atmosphere for your studies.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

Preparation of web pages
Poster and oral presentations
Project reports
Literature reviews
Book chapters
Essays

Student Destinations

If you work or hope to work in an organisation involved in marine resource policy or in the use or development of maritime resources, or would like to contribute to the conservation of natural resources of coasts and oceans, this could be the course for you.

It will prepare you to work in industry, for central or local government, with community groups, for landowners or in a consultancy role. Alternatively, you might wish to pursue a career in research or education.

We aim to provide you with as much support as possible in finding employment through close industrial contacts, careers events, recruitment fairs and individual advice.

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You study biodiversity conservation as applied ecology in the context of land use - agriculture, forestry and amenity. Focusing on wildlife conservation in the UK and Europe, you develop practical skills in plant identification and habitat assessment from a wide range of upland and lowland areas. Read more
You study biodiversity conservation as applied ecology in the context of land use - agriculture, forestry and amenity. Focusing on wildlife conservation in the UK and Europe, you develop practical skills in plant identification and habitat assessment from a wide range of upland and lowland areas.

Your studies focus on wildlife conservation with a particular emphasis on agriculture, forestry and amenity. Elements of the course have strong links with national, statutory and non-governmental conservation organisations. Practical management skills are gained through involvement in management problems on nature reserves and field courses that provide experience in species identification.

The course has compulsory and optional modules, giving you the opportunity to tailor your studies to your personal interests. Through the compulsory modules you will develop knowledge and skills in core concepts such as:
-Understanding the range of temperate zone ecosystems and wildlife species
-Developing a critical awareness of contemporary conservation issues and research insights
-Understanding scientific survey, habitat assessment and experimental techniques and the ability to identify common species from selected habitats
-The development of effective management plans for species and ecosystems
-Understanding complex biodiversity and ecosystem management issues
-Advanced knowledge and understanding of the influence of environmental, management and land-use factors on ecosystems and wildlife species

You also undertake a major conservation project and are supported through training in designing and delivering a project based on a laboratory or field-based investigation. After choosing your topic you collect, analyse and interpret data to produce a thesis.

Our staff

You benefit from being taught by lecturers who are industry experienced and research active. Our research in integrated agricultural production focuses on soil science, plant science and ecology, spanning a range of scales from: pot – plot – farm – landscape.
Strategic research embraces work on:
-Soil quality
-Rhizosphere function
-Plant-soil feedback
-Soil-carbon dynamics
-Nutrient cycling

Applied research addresses issues of:
-Climate change mitigation (including biofuels)
-Ecological (organic) farming systems
-Low-input crop systems
-Agriculture-environment interactions

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