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Masters Degrees (Wildlife Epidemiology)

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Our course provides a link between the theory and practice of wildlife management. We teach from the perspective of regulatory authorities associated with UK wildlife management. Read more

Course Overview

Our course provides a link between the theory and practice of wildlife management. We teach from the perspective of regulatory authorities associated with UK wildlife management. You will receive advanced training in policy and science implementation. It is professionally focused and relevant to a range of roles in the sector.

The course aims to provide graduates with: advanced knowledge of wildlife management theory, the principles of biodiversity and conservation, epidemiology and wildlife conflicts; practical skills in wildlife and environmental data collection, data analysis, data handling, statistics and modelling methodologies with a focus on providing evidence for policy; training in humaneness and welfare for Home Office licensing; field skills in wildlife monitoring, surveying, tracking and sampling integrating with GIS; problem solving skills to address wildlife problems in a policy context.

Much of the training and many case studies will focus on UK and EU policy. The generic training will allow you to work in other countries where policy and management are strongly linked.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/wildlife-management-msc/#modules

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/wildlife-management-msc/#howtoapply

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more
Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

-This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
-It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
-You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
-The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
-You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunites to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme: Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572. Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
-A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
-Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
-Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
-Ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

Core courses
-Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, advanced linear models, experimental design and power analysis)
-Measuring biodiversity and abundance
-Programming in R
-Independent research project

Optional courses
-Molecular analyses for biodiversity and conservation
-Biodiversity informatics
-Molecular epidemiology and phylodynamics
-Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
-Single-species population models
-Multi-species models
-Spatial and network processes in ecology & epidemiology
-Introduction to Bayesian statistics
-Freshwater sampling techniques
-Invertebrate identification
-Vertebrate identification
-Human Dimensions of Conservation
-Principles of Conservation Ecology
-Protected Area Management
-Animal welfare science
-Legislation related to animal welfare
-Enrichment of animals in captive environments
-Care of captive animals
-Biology of suffering
-Assessment of physiological state

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.

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The Master of Veterinary Public Health Management will provide you with the perfect learning environment if you're a busy professional based in a regional or rural centre in Australia, or if you're located overseas. Read more
The Master of Veterinary Public Health Management will provide you with the perfect learning environment if you're a busy professional based in a regional or rural centre in Australia, or if you're located overseas. This flexible course is delivered largely through distance education units of study, using online classrooms, with three short residential intensive blocks (three to five days in length) during the course. You will enjoy a wide range of core and elective units of study which include studies in veterinary, widlife and aquatic wildlife epidemiology, food safety, zoonoses, disease control, animal health economics, policy development, leadership skills, data analysis for policy making, risk analysis, project management, and research.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty. Read more

Programme description

Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty.

The diseases that can be transmitted between animals and people also threaten the health of livestock keepers, their families and their communities. In many developing regions farmers and animal health workers are often ill equipped to deal with this risk.

This programme draws together expertise from across the University to deliver first-class teaching and research to tackle these issues.

Building on a solid foundation of biological, immunological, pathological and epidemiological principles, this online MSc will equip you with the skills needed to identify, control and manage animal diseases and the expertise to tackle the international animal health challenges of the 21st Century.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Students may study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

Year 1: certificate
Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance
Host Responses to Infection
Pathogen Strategies for Transmission and Survival

Year 2: diploma
You will undertake the following compulsory course:

Zoonotic disease

Choose one one of the following two courses:

Surveillance and control of transboundary diseases affecting international trade
An introduction to transboundary diseases and their impact on trade and wildlife populations

Then choose from the following electives (up to 60 credits):

Control of economically important parasites
Environmental and nutritional diseases of livestock of international importance
New developments in epidemiology and the control of vector borne disease
Veterinary vaccinology
Wildlife animal health and environment
Technology advances in veterinary diagnostics
Animal disease survey design and analysis
Project planning and decision support for animal disease control
Animal healthcare systems in the post-privatisation era
Introduction to health and production of aquatic species
Introduction to GIS and spatial data analysis
Advanced GIS and spatial epidemiology and modelling
An Introduction of Project Cycle Management
Globalisation and health
The Modern Zoo
The Use of Artificial Reproductive Technologies in Threatened Species
Pastoralism and herd health
Zoonotic diseases in a global setting
Socioeconomic Principles for One Health

Year 3: masters
For a masters, you will choose either to conduct a written reflective element of 10–15,000 words or to take Project Cycle Management and Funding Application Preparation.

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to enhance your career in animal management throughout the world with first-rate expertise and a highly regarded qualification.

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Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more
Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

-This Animal Welfare Degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM); a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health
-When studying Animal Welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
-In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
-A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
-The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
-You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
-You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture.
-We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. -Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. -Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
-We have currently the following partners involved in this programme: Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA); Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie; Blair Drummond Safari Park; Chester Zoo; The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne); National Museum Scotland.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
-Ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
-Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
-Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

Core courses
-Key research skills: Scientific communication; Introduction to R; Advanced linear models; Experimental design and power analysis
-Animal ethics
-Animal welfare science
-Legislation related to animal welfare
-Independent research project

Optional courses
-Enrichment of animals in captive environments
-Care of captive animals
-Biology of suffering
-Assessment of physiological state
-Freshwater sampling techniques
-Marine sampling techniques
-Invertebrate identification
-Vertebrate identification
-Molecular analyses for DNA barcoding and biodiversity measurement
-Phyloinformatics
-Conservation genetics and phylodynamics
-Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
-Single-species population models
-Multi-species models
-Spatial processes
-Introduction to Bayesian statistics

Animal Welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.

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Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare. Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Read more
Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare.

Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Emerging veterinary infectious diseases and human diseases, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, emphasise the threat posed by these issues.

The One Health approach recognises the relationship between health and disease at the human, animal and environment interfaces and has become an important focus in both medical and veterinary science. It promotes a “whole of society” treatment of health hazards and a systemic change of perspective in the management of risk.

Under the microscope

If you are interested in One Health and the control of infectious disease (particularly in the developing world), then this unique course could be for you. We welcome applications from individuals with a background in public health, veterinary sciences, animal or biological sciences, social and environmental sciences, ecology and wildlife health. If you are interested in this field, but do not have the relevant background, please speak with the course directors who can consider such cases on an individual basis.

The course is delivered jointly by the RVC, University of London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

The course

The MSc consists of eight modules of 15 credits each, plus a compulsory research project (MSc only) of 60 credits -15 credits for integration of One Health principles learnt through development of and writing a research proposal and 45 credits for the empirical or trans-disciplinary innovative study.

The MSc consists of the following modules:
- Foundations of One Health
- Introduction to disease agents for One Health
- Infectious disease emergence core module
- Introduction to One Health epidemiology and surveillance
- Economics of One Health
- One Health skills development
- Medical anthropology and public health
- Optional module choice from; vector biology and vector parasite interactions, environmental epidemiology, epidemiology and control of communicable diseases, and globalisation and health
- Research project (MSc only)

How will I learn?

The MSc may be completed full-time in one year or part-time over two to three years, and consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

The PGDiploma is shorter (eight modules with no research project component) and may be completed in two terms.

The course starts in September each year and you will split your time between the RVC and LSHTM. Students studying the MSc will then undertake a four-month research project in an area and country of their choice.

Learning outcomes

The course will provide you with:

- A comprehensive foundation on the principles of diseases in the context of socio-ecological systems, global health and food safety
- Knowledge and skills in relation to One Health methodologies, transdisciplinary interactions and in using a systems approach

At the end of the course you will be able to:

- Understand the One Health concept and approach problem solving using a trans-disciplinary methodology
- Understand the origin, context and drivers of infectious disease at the human, animal and environment interface
- Evaluate impacts of multi-host infections on human, animal and ecosystem health and economics directly, or indirectly, via food, disease vectors or the environment.
- Develop a One Health systems approach to complex disease issues in monitoring, surveillance, diagnosis, prevention and control
- Critically review published literature
- Design a research project (MSc students only)

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One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Read more

Programme description

One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Its original emergence was largely driven by the threat of global pandemics of disease, in particular highly pathogenic avian influenza and SARS. There was a recognition that the complex health challenges faced in the 21st century required a new interdisciplinary approach that included both the natural and social sciences.

Launched in 2014, this programme utilises the many strengths of the University of Edinburgh across multiple disciplines to provide the key training and skills required for a successful career in this emerging field.

The One Health programme is part of the Global Health Academy and we share many elective courses with other programmes in the Academy. This provides a great deal of flexibility allowing you to personalise your studies to reflect your professional interests and career aspirations. As well as learning from our expert tutors you will join with students from around the world on a number of different master’s programmes to share experiences and knowledge.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Year 1: Courses for the Certificate
The Certificate comprises three compulsory courses. Each course is taught over a period of ten weeks. The three courses in the Certificate are:

Introduction to One Health
Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance
One Health Policy and Practice

Year 2: Courses for the Diploma
For the diploma a selection of courses totalling 60 credits must be made from the following courses. Each 20-credit course is taught over a period of ten weeks, whilst the 10-credit courses are taught over a five-week period.

•Socio-economic Principles of One Health
•Zoonotic Diseases
•Zoonotic Diseases in a Global Setting
•Emerging Infectious Diseases
•Communication and Public Engagement of Conservation
•Introduction to GIS and Spatial Data Analysis
•Wildlife Disease Management
•Ex-Situ Wildlife Management
•Environmental Law
•Extreme and Fragile Ecosystems
•Water and Sanitation
•Introduction to Transboundary Diseases and their Impact on Trade and Wildlife Populations
•Managing Ecosystems for Human Health and Wellbeing
•Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
•Surveillance and Control of Transboundary Diseases Affecting International Trade
•Pastoralism and Herd Health
•Animal Disease Survey Design and Analysis

Please note that although all courses are offered, we cannot guarantee that places will be available on all elective courses to all students, each year (it will be at the discretion of the Programme Director to assign places on courses and this will depend on demand).

Year 3: Completion of the MSc programme in One Health
The written reflective element is an assignment of 10-15,000 words (60 credits). This may take the form of one of the following:

a written dissertation
a casebook (relating to relevant professional experience)
a personal portfolio of reflective and practical activity
a research project

Students will be required to submit a proposal that demonstrates an appropriate level of critical analysis, academic knowledge and reflection, or one health practice depending on the choice made, prior to being admitted to the masters year. The University of Edinburgh’s common marking scheme will be applied.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, we offer online credit-bearing courses which run for 11 weeks at a time. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Career opportunities

A qualification from our programme will enhance your career prospects in academia, research, government departments, non-governmental organisations, international development and the private sector.

Despite being a relatively new field, One Health is rapidly gaining global recognition and current students have already reported improvements in career development through studying on the programme.

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The One Health concept recognises the interconnectedness of human, animal and ecosystem health. A One Health approach involves applying a coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approach to address potential or existing risks that originate at the animal-human-ecosystems interface. Read more
The One Health concept recognises the interconnectedness of human, animal and ecosystem health. A One Health approach involves applying a coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approach to address potential or existing risks that originate at the animal-human-ecosystems interface. The overarching aim of One Health is to achieve optimal health for humans, animals and the ecosystem. This Masters in One Health aims to offer online, specialist teaching to students to acquire knowledge and skills required to work within a One Health framework. The programme seeks to explore an integrative approach to human, veterinary and ecological health, recognising the importance of interdisciplinary collaborations and the interconnectedness of public health, environmental issues, veterinary and human medicine. The programme also raises awareness of cultural and societal factors that influence how One Health approaches are translated into practice.

Why this programme

◾The flexible, online delivery of this programme by world researchers and clinicians allows you to study from anywhere across the globe.
◾Glasgow employs some of the most prominent UK researchers in the One Health framework, giving you access to up-to-date expertise.
◾Our teaching is research-led. The courses have been developed to reflect the latest academic research and up-to-date challenges of One Health.
◾During a course, from week to week you will interact with your teachers and fellow students using online discussion boards. Your teachers will direct and observe the discussion and respond to student questions about the course content.
◾You will have the opportunity to collaborate on a research project under the supervision of a member of academic staff or an external supervisor.
◾The One Health concept is gaining momentum worldwide and an early adoption thereof is putting the University of Glasgow at the forefront of teaching and learning within the One Health framework.

Programme structure

This programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied and the number of credits obtained. There is a set of core courses and optional courses that can be undertaken to complete a certificate (60 credits), diploma (120 credits) or masters (180 credits).

We place emphasis upon community building and creating a sense of presence within the online learning environment using a range of educational technology tools, such as asynchronous and synchronous discussions, virtual classrooms, wikis, interactive quizzes, audio and video resources, to create a sense of students being at and part of the University

The first year of study will explore the One Health framework and examine the value thereof, and provide foundations in epidemiology. The first year also introduces zoonoses and infectious diseases, a core area of One Health. During the second year of study, students will be able to choose courses in an area of special interest from a range of subject areas from human and veterinary medicine and public health. Students planning to continue on to Masters level are required to study research methods, a course that will provide the necessary skills to plan, research and write a dissertation. The third year of study will allow students to gain in depth knowledge in their area of special interest by undertaking a research project. The research project is a written dissertation. The format of the dissertation output is flexible and may include a research paper, a grant application or a briefing paper for a company / policy maker.

Core courses

◾Introduction to One Health
◾Zoonoses and infectious disease
◾Introduction to epidemiology
◾Research methods (MSc students only)
◾Dissertation (MSc students only)

Optional courses

◾Global veterinary medicine
◾Globalisation of public health
◾Veterinary epidemiology: methods in surveillance and field investigation
◾Veterinary public health and service delivery
◾Infectious disease control
◾Wildlife and livestock management
◾Ecological Principles
◾Health economics
◾Health promotion: principles and practice
◾Health technology assessment in a global context

Studying online - http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/onehealth/#/studyingonline

Career prospects

Graduates of the One Health programme may establish careers for front line healthcare providers, for example as developers and implementers of prevention and treatment programs. Graduates may be employed by international health organisations (ie WHO, FAO OIE), local agencies, government agencies (ie DFID, public health sector) or non-governmental organisations. Graduates may also establish careers in the academic sector, specialising in a One Health subject (for example zoonotic diseases).

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Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Read more

Program Description

Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to a One Health approach to sectoral and multidisciplinary integrative mechanism to enable research aimed at sustainably reducing the burden of zoonoses. RUSVM’s geographical location in the Caribbean, its existing research focus on One Health, its experienced faculty and its global partnerships will allow students to gain a hands-on educational experience on one of the most topical global issues.

Zoonoses and other diseases affecting livestock production and health have serious impacts on the economic growth, health and food security and alleviation of poverty in tropical and resource constrained countries. Students will have the opportunity to explore the complex interplay of altered environments and infectious diseases as an increasing threat to agriculture, public health and endangered/threatened species, on a global basis.

The MSc One Health degree program requires 41 credits ( based on guidelines from the United States Department of Education), obtained through coursework and a project, leading to the submission of a thesis. Students are required to undertake specified core courses amounting to 23 credits. The MSc program is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis as well as part-time over 2 or 3 years.

Course Structure

• Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics (5 cr.)
• Public Policy Formulation & Implementation (3 cr.)
• Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)
• Research project design (1 cr.)
• Conservation medicine/ecosystem health (5 cr.)
• Zoonoses (intersection between human and animal health) (3 cr.)
• Surveillance and diagnostic methods (3 cr.)

The program also includes a research project/Mini Dissertation (15 cr.) and a 1-week residential in St Kitts (1cr.) as well as electives (dependent on availability) such as animal health program management (2 cr.), safety of foods of animal origin (2 cr.), disaster management (2 cr.).

Learning Outcomes

The MSc One Health degree program is designed to provide the skills and preparation needed for careers in a broad range of environments. The flexible program of study has particular strengths in:
• Tropical animal health and diseases
• The intersection of animal health and human health
• Epidemiology
• Conservation medicine
• Food safety
• Policy Formulation
• Leadership
• research and diagnostic methods
• the interface between domestic animals and wildlife

On completion of the degree program the student will have gained knowledge, research skills and research experience in topics relevant to the broad field of One Health. The program provides graduates the background and experience to assess, investigate and manage animal health and zoonotic disease risks, to design and execute targeted research in animal health, and to manage veterinary intervention in the prevention and control of animal disease. Within the program the student will have had the opportunity to focus on an area of interest, such as area disease control, vector borne diseases, zoonotic infections or conservation medicine.

Students will acquire and enhance intellectual skills in scientific assessment and research methodology, as well as practical skills in communication, organization and scientific writing.

Delivery

The taught component will be instructed by distance learning via eCollege®, our virtual learning environment. You will be taught by our faculty and specialist modules may be delivered by our partner institutions.
The research project may be carried out in St. Kitts and Nevis or in other locations, as appropriate, under the supervision of a RUSVM faculty member. The research component may be desk-based, lab-based or through fieldwork and will result in the submission of a thesis. A short residential component will allow the student cohort to share their perspective and dissertation work to the RUSVM research community.

Assessment

Assessment will be conducted through traditional and novel methods suited to an online delivery mode and will include, for example, essays, critical review of peer-reviewed articles, online tests and quizzes, blog writing, research proposal writing, research/fieldwork journal development, group discussions, group project work and social media interactions. The degree is based on certified completion of research training plus other designated projects and the completion of a thesis.

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The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Read more

MSc Animal Sciences

The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife.

The focus is to deliver skilled professional animal scientists who are well equipped to tackle problems related to sustainable livestock development as well as to the management of livestock and companion animals. The animal-human interaction plays an important role in this study programme. Themes like animal nutrition, animal health, animal welfare, levels of management, genetic diversity and socio-economic factors are all widely discussed.

Programme summary

Humans interact with animals in many different ways, ranging from raising livestock for food to keeping pets for companion. Animal husbandry and livestock development are not only constrained by technical factors, such as feed supply, animal health, management and genetics, but also by infrastructural and socio-economic factors. Consequently, today’s animal scientists need in-depth scientific training combined with a critical attitude towards all factors that limit the sustainable development of animal husbandry. Our individually tailored programme trains students to become expert animal scientists, well-equipped to tackle relevant issues of livestock and animal management.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Animal Sciences you can choose from various specialisations. Each of the specialisations trains you to become an expert in the field. The specialisations in MSc Animal Sciences are:

Animal Breeding and Genetics
Understanding how genetic differences work and how they can be used in a sustainable manner in a wide range of species plays a central role in this specialisation. Students learn how breeding and genetics can contribute to safe and healthy food from animal origin and how it contributes to the health and welfare of animals.

Animal Nutrition
This specialisation deals with the interaction between animals and their nutrition. Students learn about the way animals digest and convert food by studying the nutrient flows and the physiology of the animals in relation to the composition of feeds. They also learn about the effect of feed in relation to health, welfare and behaviour of the animal.

Applied Zoology
Understanding the relationship between structure and function of all systems within the body is the main focus of this specialisation. Students look at organ structures, hormones, bone structure or the immune system of animals and learn how these systems respond to external influences.

Animal Health and Behaviour
Knowledge of the adaptive capacity of animals is required to be able to determine how to keep an animal healthy and how changes affect the animal. Students learn to study behaviour, stress or immune parameters or energy metabolism to determine e.g. which housing system or feed regime is best for animal health and welfare.

Animal Health Management
How can the risk of transmission of infectious diseases be quantified between and within groups of animals? And which factors are of influence on this process? In this specialisation, students learn to combine animal health management at population level with socioeconomic aspects by studying aspects of veterinary epidemiology.

Animal Production Systems
In this specialisation, students will look at animal production systems in relation to the environment worldwide. Students learn about human and animal interaction. They will also study the environmental, economical and social impact that animal production has on the world.

Professional Tracks and International Programmes
In addition to a specialisation, students can choose a professional track that leads to a specific type of career. You can focus on Research, Education, Communication & Policy, or Business & Management. We also offer international programmes that lead to a double master degree, i.e. in Animal Breeding & Genetics, Sustainable Animal Nutrition & Feeding, European Animal Management, or Animal Welfare Assessment.

Your future career

Our graduates work as nutritionists, policymakers, breeding specialists, advisors, managers, researchers or PhD students. They work for feed manufacturing companies, pharmaceutical companies or breeding organisations but also within regional and national governmental organisations, non-governmental organisations or research institutes and universities.

Alumna Linda van Zutphen.
"I work as a Communication Officer for the Research & Development and Quality Affairs department of Nutreco. This company is a global leader in animal nutrition and fish feed. I am involved in marketing and group communication about innovations, quality and sustainability. During my MSc Animal Sciences, I did my internship at Nutreco’s research facility in Spain. The MSc programme provided me with multidisciplinary knowledge on animal production and the skills to apply this. My job gives me the opportunity to combine my scientific background with my passion for communicating about the applications of our research in products for animal health."

Related programmes:
MSc Biology
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Biosystems Engineering
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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Programme description. Conservation Medicine is an emerging discipline that studies the complex relationships and interactions between animal health, human health and ecosystem health. Read more
Programme description
Conservation Medicine is an emerging discipline that studies the complex relationships and interactions between animal health, human health and ecosystem health. This programme provides veterinarians with the skills and knowledge required to be effective practitioners of conservation medicine.

This programme is designed to address the demand for online training in conservation medicine and provides in-depth training in a modular flexible format, ideal for veterinarians who wish to achieve a world-class award while maintaining busy professional and personal commitments.

Participants will gain the capacity and necessary expertise to contribute effectively to this rapidly growing multidisciplinary field and to enhance career opportunities.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning
Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

The programme is taught part time over three years, but its flexible nature will allow you a maximum of six years to complete it. Each year will consist of three, 11-week terms, structured into two blocks of five weeks of study, with a week in between for independent study and reflection.

It is also possible to complete the masters within two years by studying more than one course at a time so all taught courses are completed in year one, with the second year devoted to a dissertation project.

There are also options for studying for a certificate (one-two years) or a diploma (two-four years).

Expert tutors will support you through every stage of the programme and you can engage with fellow students in supportive and constructive online networks.

Your progress will be assessed through online presentations, essays, critical reviews of literature, student self- reflection activities, short answer questions, scientific posters, group wiki events, and peer review activities.

Year 1
Introduction to Conservation Medicine
Eco-System Health and Species Conservation
Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance for Conservation Medicine

Year 2
You will study two core courses - Veterinary Techniques and Interventions for Conservation Medicine, and Wildlife Disease Management - plus four optional modules from a choice of ten.

Year 3
During the written reflective element of the programme students will have the opportunity to further develop their scientific skills and utilise scientific theory. This written element allows a choice of either a written dissertation, a casebook relating to relevant professional experience, a personal portfolio of reflective and practical activity, or a short research project.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, we offer online credit-bearing courses which run for 11 weeks at a time. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Career opportunities

Graduates can use their conservation medicine qualification to enhance their career prospects in academia, research, governmental and non-governmental organisations and consultancies.

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Tropical veterinary science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas within the tropical veterinary science programs may include. Read more

What is tropical veterinary science?

Tropical veterinary science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas within the tropical veterinary science programs may include:
*Animal production
*Pathology
*Epidemiology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for veterinary science graduates who want to further their training in tropical veterinary health issues and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical veterinary science covers the field of animal health, welfare, and production with the aim of improving health and productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources, including wildlife in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Tropical Veterinary Science will be able to:
*Apply and adapt advanced knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments in veterinary and animal health issues relevant to developing countries and tropical regions of the World Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or context with creativity and independence
*Communicate theoretical knowledge using high level oral and written English language and, where appropriate, numeracy skills to a variety of audiences
*Make high level independent judgements in a range of professional functions, including professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks, with responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Tropical Veterinary Science (GCertTropVSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Veterinary Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)

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Tropical veterinary science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas within the tropical veterinary science programs may include. Read more

What is tropical veterinary science?

Tropical veterinary science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas within the tropical veterinary science programs may include:
*Animal production
*Pathology
*Epidemiology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for veterinary science graduates who want to further their training in tropical veterinary health issues and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical veterinary science covers the field of animal health, welfare, and production with the aim of improving health and productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources, including wildlife in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Veterinary Science will be able to:
*Apply and adapt advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of Tropical Veterinary Science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Apply an integrated understanding of tropical veterinary medicine and its application to improve human health and quality of life by means of increased and safe food production in tropical regions
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical veterinary medicine
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Tropical Veterinary Science (GDipTropVSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Master of Tropical Veterinary Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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