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Masters Degrees (Wildlife Conservation)

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IN BRIEF. Obtain the skills, training and qualifications you need to become a wildlife conservation scientist. Opportunity to travel overseas. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Obtain the skills, training and qualifications you need to become a wildlife conservation scientist
  • Opportunity to travel overseas
  • Solve contemporary problems in wildlife conservation and master analytical tools
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Presently, the world faces its first human induced massed extinction event due to the misuse and non-sustainable use of the planet's resources. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) estimates that more than 20 percent of all vertebrate species are at immediate risk of extinction due to human activities. In addition, this year’s WWF Living Planet Report presents concerning evidence that the world’s wildlife populations have declined on average by 58% since 1970, and are likely to decline even further by the end of the decade. This Global Biodiversity Crisis is being tackled at different levels by conservation professionals and scientists.

This MSc course focuses on training wildlife conservation scientists on how to solve and mitigate the problems that wildlife is facing across the globe. The aim of this course is to provide you with the skills you will need as a wildlife conservation scientist, and to enable you to help solve or mitigate real world problems using appropriate quantitative approaches.

COURSE DETAILS

You will receive a broad training in wildlife conservation to help enable you to deal with the complexity of problems faced by wildlife.This MSc course, includes six 15 credit modules to allow you to gain a broader and more appropriate curriculum and includes field course monitoring to give practical hands-on experience.

The modules for this course aim to provide you with the  skills a modern wildlife conservation biologist needs to execute their role effectively in a wide-range of institutions from NGOs, Federal Agencies to Universities.You’ll be taught by highly qualified, research-active staff within the well-respected School of Environment and Life Science. 

TEACHING

This course is taught using a mixture of approaches including the following:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Discussion/debates
  • Guest speaker presentations
  • Student presentations
  • Computer based practicals

ASSESSMENT

You will be assessed in a variety of ways including theoretical essays, practical assignments, oral presentations and a dissertation.

CAREER PROSPECTS

According to the Society for Conservation Biology (2015), jobs in Conservation Biology are growing at a rate of 3% per year. Wildlife conservation biologists are employed around the world in a wide-range of institutions from NGOs and Federal Agencies to universities.

This course reflects the growing importance of solving the global biodiversity extinction crisis and specifically halting the extinction of animal species. This is recognised globally by governments in a number of significant international treaties, meetings and agreements including the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

There is global recognition for the need to employ more conservation scientists to solve and mitigate the problems caused by human activities that are detrimental to the survival of wildlife.



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The MRes Wildlife Conservation research masters degree is an exciting addition to our portfolio of programmes, designed for graduates of biology, zoology, ecology and other relevant biological or ecological disciplines. Read more

The MRes Wildlife Conservation research masters degree is an exciting addition to our portfolio of programmes, designed for graduates of biology, zoology, ecology and other relevant biological or ecological disciplines. It offers you the chance to build on the background of your undergraduate degree, while allowing you to develop within the field of wildlife conservation.

Introducing your degree

This is the course page for MRes Wildlife Conservation at the University of Southampton. Find out everything about Wildlife Conservation and what studying here involves.

In this course page we explain a range of key information about the course. This includes typical entry requirements, modules you can take and how assessment works. We also suggest career opportunities open to you as a University of Southampton graduate of MRes Wildlife Conservation.

If you still have questions, please get in touch and we’ll be happy to answer any enquiries. See our contact us page for our telephone, email and address information.

Overview

Please note: This programme is currently undergoing its five year review. There may be some slight changes to the programme which will be implemented from September 2018. This process should be completed in early 2018. We therefore advise that applications are made after this date, so that you are fully informed when making your application. We will shortly welcome our fifth intake of students and any changes made to the programme will be informed by our experiences from the previous five cohorts, of course including student feedback.

This Wildlife Conservation Masters course is jointly delivered as a collaborative programme with Marwell Wildlife. It offers an unusually high degree of interaction between the University and an action-oriented Conservation organisation. The aim of this MRes is to produce individuals with the skills, experience and academic credentials required for a career in Conservation biology.

In order to provide an immersive experience for students and to ensure we have the scope to cover all that the MRes encompasses, the course is based on a full calendar year, running from the start of Semester one (October-Jan), through semester two (Feb-June), and beyond, right up until late September. The MRes is a full-time course only, with no provision for a part-time option at this time.

View the programme specification document for this course

Career Opportunities

This MRes allows those with career aspirations within conservation to enhance their prospects in a number of ways. You will develop your academic credentials and your practical skills, jointly, without having to choose to invest in one route or the other. You will be exposed to, and have the opportunity to work alongside, practicing conservation biologists, providing you with valuable experience and insight into the realities of working in conservation. By undertaking an in-depth 8 month research project you will develop some specialist knowledge within your area of interest, and be exposed to a wider network of conservation biologists and other industry professionals working for organizations that collaborate with Marwell Wildlife (for example, European Association of Zoos and Aquaria, Kenya Wildlife Service, Natural England). This wide range of experience, and any contacts within the conservation network you have made, will assist you when applying for positions within conservation NGOs and wildlife focused government agencies.

Additionally, graduates will find the MRes programme an excellent way to prepare for a PhD in conservation science as you will gain experience of undertaking postgraduate research, as well as having the opportunity to begin developing your own specialist area of study, off the back of your 8 month in-depth research project . Students should note that the research undertaken for the MRes Project would be independent of research for a PhD.



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This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. Read more

This comprehensive course provides an in-depth view of the contemporary issues and techniques required of professional wildlife conservationists working both in the UK and overseas. The course is taught not only by our experienced academic staff but with the assistance of world-leading experts and conservation practitioners both in class and also in the field.

Importantly throughout the course we stress a holistic appreciation of the link between field and laboratory-based work and the necessity of professional level communication with a range of audiences. Where possible teaching will be undertaken through workshops and seminars so providing a more immersive environment to help develop an understanding of the operation of professional-level applied conservation skills in communication and problem solving.

What happens on the course?

The focus throughout is on animals in their wild settings and as such there is a strong emphasis on fieldwork and applied wildlife research. Modules to be studied are:

  • 7AB012 Conservation Genetics - This module is focused on genetic applications to problems of conservation, reflecting the diversity of concerns relevant to conservation biology and covering the management of captive populations for conservation. Modern genetic techniques used by conservationists are also examined.
  • 7AB009 Advanced Survey and Monitoring Techniques –The desktop survey, design, collection, processing, analysis and output production of environmental data (physical, vegetation and organismal) will be explored in a problem-based setting. This will involve the integrated use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), geospatial imagery, telemetry, image acquisition, sound acquisition, ground-truthing and field survey techniques.
  • 7AB011 Primate Conservation and Behaviour - This module focuses on the evolution of primate societies and asks how environmental and demographic factors influence animals’ decisions about how to organise their social and reproductive strategies. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding key theoretical concepts and how these may be applied to empirical studies of non-human primates. This module explores also the science of scarcity and diversity of wild primate populations and the successful management of captive populations for conservation.
  • 7AB013 Research Methods for Wildlife Conservation - This module prepares you with the skills needed for wildlife conservation research. You will develop advanced skills in literature searching and critical analysis of published work. You will explore the development of a research question, research design, data handling and statistics. You will prepare a professional portfolio of your research methods covered in the module.
  • 7AB010 Field Course - The module will examine the whole process of research trip planning from funding and logistical planning through to the detail of content for individual session activities. The culmination of this process will be a residential field course in the UK or overseas.
  • 7AB014 Conservation of UK Protected Species – In-depth consideration of the conservation of UK protected species including their ecology, protection legislation, conservation measures, habitat management and habitat creation.
  • 7AB015 The Masters Project module - an opportunity to plan, undertake and deliver an extended, problem-focused, original independent investigation related to the chosen programme of study and is a requirement for the award of a Masters degree.

Whilst the majority of the material will be delivered by the core Departmental staff the course aims to bring-in external speakers from wildlife research, practice and policy to allow students access to the knowledge of professionals working in the sector.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course has evolved from the BSc Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Conservation and explores some of the areas that are more suited to higher-level study. It is expected that students will come from subject areas that have an animal conservation/behaviour background, or else current conservation professionals that are seeking to update their subject and skills knowledge.

The course is designed to provide many opportunities for students specifically:

  • Wolverhampton is developing a national reputation for the study of Animal Behaviour and Wildlife Conservation. Studying the MSc provides real opportunities to influence the direction of study and research of the staff and student body.
  • There are significant opportunities to undertake fieldwork in a range of local, national and international settings. This is an important driver for the department and provides a strong applied focus for Masters-level study across the range of modules studied.
  • A strong emphasis is placed on developing the link from strategic/logistical planning through field and laboratory work to the professional communication of the information generated.
  • The facilities of the new Science building at the university provide a significant opportunity to develop complementary wildlife-related laboratory skills which are often not explored at undergraduate level.
  • Innovative approaches to learning are used including student-led workshops, seminars and practical activities that mirror workplace scenarios. This gives students a strong role in directing their own development and links strongly to career development and aspiration.
  • There is a strong emphasis on the individual and the nurturing of individual study and career aspirations.

Career path

The course prepares you for a role as a conservation professional working with strong applied and field-based components. In particular it gives you key opportunities for employment in conservation-type roles in the UK and beyond where higher-level qualifications are essential for demonstrating topic knowledge and technical competency. Such roles are found in a host of statutory and non-governmental organisations across the wildlife sector.



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Our Master’s degree provides a unique training experience for someone seeking to develop a successful career in conservation. With the rapid decline of biodiversity, wildlife conservation is a crisis discipline. Read more

Our Master’s degree provides a unique training experience for someone seeking to develop a successful career in conservation.

With the rapid decline of biodiversity, wildlife conservation is a crisis discipline. This urgency has led to growing local, national and international demand for specialists with academic and practical conservation skills.

Why Study Wildlife Conservation with us?

We aim to build on and consolidate your existing skills/knowledge, and offer exposure to advanced concepts and practical applications in wildlife conservation. This will be done through exploration of our expertise in field and lab-based research on key species and habitats, in the UK and further afield.

Our staff are engaged in pioneering projects locally, nationally and globally, and have led the development of wildlife crime as an academic subject area. We are also involved in conservation of globally threatened species such as the Trinidad piping guan, Grenada dove and Philippine duck.

You will be engaged in a peer-based learning environment that includes field and lab work, which will provide insights into key research in wildlife conservation. We will also focus on the development of your professional skills and profile for your future career, and encourage links and networking opportunities with practitioners in the field.

What will I learn?

You will study a combination of specialisations considered core to wildlife conservation, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), statistical techniques, population and habitat management, and emerging sub-disciplines including wildlife crime, behaviour and welfare in conservation, and conservation genetics.

How will I be taught?

Teaching is delivered through Moodle; internet discussion boards; and residential school, including lectures, lab sessions, field trips and tutorials.

Modules typically require 200 hours’ study time, including:

21 hours of lectures, seminars, group discussions and laboratory/ field activities

10 hours of tutorial support

169 hours of directed self-study.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is via lab/essay assignments; critical assessments/ reviews; research/funding proposals; multiple-choice quizzes/short answer questions; field reports; individual/group oral presentations; and preparation and presentation of posters. There are no examinations.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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Develop the practical skills you need for a career in wildlife conservation. Learn through a mix of face-to-face and distance-learning, on a course that’s been developed in partnership with environmental organisations to ensure you’re skilled and employable in this rewarding area. Read more
Develop the practical skills you need for a career in wildlife conservation. Learn through a mix of face-to-face and distance-learning, on a course that’s been developed in partnership with environmental organisations to ensure you’re skilled and employable in this rewarding area.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-wildlife-conservation

Our planet is in urgent need of capable and well-trained wildlife conservationists to find solutions to the problems of biodiversity loss. If you’re passionate about wildlife and planning a career in conservation our exciting Masters course will equip you with the skills you need. You’ll focus on the sustainable management of wildlife and habitats, with an emphasis on developing practical field skills and the ability to analyse and interpret data in the interests of conservation. Our course has been developed with international conservation organisations, so you can be sure you’ll be gaining skills and knowledge valued by employers in the field.

Through your choice of optional modules you'll be able to focus your study on areas such as sustainability, business, wildlife management and behaviour change. Or develop deeper knowledge of skills such as wildlife conservation and biogeography. Field trips give you the chance to apply your skills whilst working on conservation projects in the UK and abroad.

You’ll have the opportunity to visit a research station in Borneo and apply your skills in a tropical forest conservation project. Every year we welcome a wide range of guest lecturers who share their inspiring and innovative experiences of working in wildlife conservation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-wildlife-conservation

Careers

Careers areas include conservation biology, environmental consultancy or in conservation education. You may find work in a non-governmental organisation (NGO), charity, zoo, private company, a government body or in a related field such as ecotourism. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Animal and Environmental Sciences PhD.

[[Modules & assessment
Core modules:
GIS Tools for Biodiversity Mapping and Conservation
Invasive Species and Other Drivers of Distribution Change
Communication Skills for Conservation
Landscapes, Ecological Networks and Ecosystem Services
Current Topics in Wildlife Conservation
Research Methods
Masters Research Project

Optional modules:
Behavioural Ecology and Conservation
Study Tour: Understanding Biodiversity and Sustainability
Better Business
Governance and Behavioural Change

Assessment

Your work will be assessed in a range of ways to reflect the scope and aims of our course. These include assignments, field-work, case studies, group work and presentations.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

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Explore contemporary wildlife conservation on this Masters. The course is delivered by world-leading experts in wildlife conservation and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV/drone technology). Read more

Explore contemporary wildlife conservation on this Masters. The course is delivered by world-leading experts in wildlife conservation and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV/drone technology). You will be able to learn fieldskills during an overseas field trip and will have the opportunity to conduct your own conservation research project.

  • Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
  • Delivered by world-leading experts in the field of wildlife conservation and drone technology
  • LJMU is the only UK university to offer a Masters degree in cutting edge drone technology applications for wildlife conservation
  • Overseas field trip to Tanzania included in the fees – this is a fantastic opportunity to observe chimpanzees in the wild. You will practice and develop advanced skills in behavioural observation, non-invasive sampling of health and welfare indicators and conservation monitoring*
  • World-class teaching and laboratory facilities (including drone technology, genetics and GIS facilities)
  • Opportunity to design and complete a wildlife conservation study abroad using the latest software packages, such as ArcGIS, R, and Distance 

* The air fare, site accommodation and site costs are paid by Liverpool John Moores University. You will be required to meet other potential costs, such as field clothing, visas and immunisations if required.



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Become a specialist wildlife conservation practitioner with practical skills, experience and knowledge innovation to protect the world’s most vulnerable species. Read more
Become a specialist wildlife conservation practitioner with practical skills, experience and knowledge innovation to protect the world’s most vulnerable species. Learn from our conservation partners and work with major conservation organisations to prepare for a rewarding career.

Key benefits

The course is delivered on site at Bristol Zoo Gardens and its sister site, the Wild Place Project. These locations give you an opportunity to develop your skills and test innovative strategies and products.

We have excellent links to industry and business in the South West, including Avon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. Sites of international conservation importance, such as the Avon Gorge and Somerset Levels, are on our doorstep, so there are plenty of fieldwork opportunities.

Course detail

This exciting course is not just theoretical. It's designed to give you hands-on experience of contemporary and advancing techniques for conserving biodiversity in a rapidly changing world. It's delivered in collaboration with the internationally renowned Bristol Zoological Society (BZS), and is unique in the way it prepares you for complete practical conservation.

Alongside developing your abilities and practice in ecosystem and species conservation, communication and effecting behaviour change, the MSc Advanced Wildlife Conservation in Practice course has a strong emphasis on developing your innovation and entrepreneurial skills. There is an ever more pressing need for conservationists to create and work with emerging technologies to ensure we maximise the opportunities for biodiversity conservation.

Modules

• Advanced ecosystem conservation in practice
• Advanced species conservation in practice
• Communication for conservation
• Innovation and Enterprise in Conservation
• Research Project

Format

Teaching is split equally between BZS staff and UWE Bristol staff, with some additional content from other partner organisations, such as RSPB and the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (Slimbridge). You'll have the opportunity to become immersed in a major conservation organisation, interact with experts engaged in ground-breaking conservation projects across the globe, and meet practising conservationists and ecologists from a wide range of organisations. This gives you the opportunity to develop your professional network and hone your skills towards the job you want.

Each teaching block includes a guest tutor from an outside organisation, while some of the module assignments will require you to network with conservation managers from your local area.

Assessment

Each module assessment is specifically designed to allow you to develop your practical skills and understanding, and increase your employability once you graduate. They will usually take the form of mini-projects and will require you to master advanced techniques in wildlife conservation and evaluate their effectiveness in a range of circumstances. The projects include presentations, portfolios and reports. There are no formal written exams.

Careers / Further study

The course has been developed with a wide range of stakeholders from the ecological consultancy and charity sectors. We use their feedback to ensure the skills you gain are the ones employers are looking for. On completion of the course, you will be excellently placed to seek work in national and international conservation organisations and ecological consultancies, government agencies or even to set up your own NGO.

You may choose to continue your conservation research or go on to doctorate-level studies. The course also gives you the potential to become a chartered member of the Institute of Environmental Management.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –
The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Recanati-Kaplan Centre Postgraduate Diploma in International Wildlife Conservation Practice is an eight-month full-time course (of which one month is distance learning) focusing on the global dimensions of wildlife conservation, and the survey and analysis methods commonly used in the study of terrestrial mammals. Read more
The Recanati-Kaplan Centre Postgraduate Diploma in International Wildlife Conservation Practice is an eight-month full-time course (of which one month is distance learning) focusing on the global dimensions of wildlife conservation, and the survey and analysis methods commonly used in the study of terrestrial mammals. The course is intended for early-career conservationists, working with government agencies or NGOs, or recent graduates with considerable field experience, particularly in developing nations.

Please visit the WildCRU website for further details (http://www.wildcru.org/courses/diploma/) of the Recanati-Kaplan Centre Postgraduate Diploma in International Wildlife Conservation Practice

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/pgdip-in-international-wildlife-conservation-practice

IT requirements

This course uses the Department’s online assignment submission system. In order to prepare and submit your course assignments you will need access to the Internet and a computer meeting our recommended minimum computer specification (http://onlinesupport.conted.ox.ac.uk/TechnicalSupport/YourComputer.php). Students of this course may use the student computing facilities provided in Departmental buildings.

Accommodation

Students are normally accommodated in the study bedrooms at the Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Tubney House.

Scholarships

A grant by the founder of the Panthera Foundation (Dr Thomas Kaplan) provides for the sponsorship of candidates from the developing world. Depending on the amount of own or third party funding secured by candidates, applications can be made for any or all of the following costs:

- Course fees
- International travel, to and from the UK
- Accommodation
- Living expenses for the duration of the course

Please visit the WildCRU website (http://www.wildcru.org/courses/financial-support) for further details regarding the financial support available through the Recanati-Kaplan WilldCRU Scholarships.

Apply for this course

The deadline for applications is in mid-June each year. Conservationists working in developing nations are particularly welcome to apply. More on the applications process (http://www.wildcru.org/diploma/applying-for-the-diploma/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Our Ecology and Wildlife Conservation MSc equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a successful career as ecologists or in an environmentally-related field. Read more

Our Ecology and Wildlife Conservation MSc equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a successful career as ecologists or in an environmentally-related field. The course has a professional focus, preparing you for the workplace.

What you'll learn

The course aims to provide graduates with:

  • advanced conceptual understanding
  • detailed knowledge
  • specialised technical skills
  • professional awareness

You will study chosen areas of ecological science such as:

  • wildlife conservation policy and practice
  • environmental impacts
  • sustainable development.

Your Development:

Upon the completion of the course you will be able to evaluate and solve ecological problems. You will gain knowledge from many environmental disciplines.

We will teach you skills in a range of ecologically related areas enabling you to pursue a career in:

  • qualitative techniques
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • environmental impact assessment
  • the environment business
  • ecological surveys
  • environmental law
  • environmental management.


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***This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry***. The management of species, habitats and ecosystems is increasingly drawing upon principles and practices from other disciplines, such as business, marketing and human resources. Read more
***This programme is no longer accepting applications for 2017 entry***

The management of species, habitats and ecosystems is increasingly drawing upon principles and practices from other disciplines, such as business, marketing and human resources.

The MSc in Conservation Project Management draws upon the extensive conservation project management experience of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and equips you with the skills and tools you need to manage conservation projects effectively. The pathway is particularly suitable for managers of conservation projects who wish to build on their existing skills, or conservation practitioners who wish to move into a project management role. You spend time at the International Training Centre at Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in Jersey.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/274/conservation-project-management

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which integrates natural and social sciences

- Lecturers are research active, world-leading academics with practical experience of conservation project management in locations across the world

- Tailored courses in leadership and facilitation skills delivered by staff experienced in project managment within conservation

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides you with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels.

International wildlife trade is big business and ranges from high volume timber and fishery products to the more traditional wildlife products from endangered species used in horticultural, pet, leather and medicinal trades. International trade and over-use are implicated in the decline of around one third of threatened species.

Equally, many of the world’s poorest people depend on the use or sale of wildlife products for their livelihood. Meeting the twin goals of reducing poverty and stemming the rate of species loss requires improved management of trade in natural resources.

The programme examines the dynamics of international wildlife trade from all angles: the practical mechanisms set up to regulate wildlife trade, the ecological assumptions, social, cultural and economic drivers of trade, along with the challenges, pressures and the political environment that underlines relevant international law and policy.

This pathway is designed for people from areas such as government management and scientific authorities, NGOs, international agencies and donors who are working to improve sustainability of wildlife trade. It examines a number of mechanisms for delivering sustainable wildlife trade, especially the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), with whom DICE has developed a Memorandum of Understanding to offer this pathway.

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Benefit from DICE members' expertise and in-depth knowledge of CITES and wildlife trade

- Teaching with integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Heathrow Animal Reception Centre and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey. Previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with leading organisations involved in the monitoring of wildlife trade and enforcement of regulations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests:

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management. Read more
The MSc in Conservation Biology provides you with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management.

Modern conservation science transcends the traditional boundaries of biology, ecology and environmental management. Today’s managers of biodiversity need to be versed in a broad range of specialist fields, from population ecology and human community development, through to international wildlife trade and the economics of conservation, as well as the latest techniques in endangered species recovery.

Our MSc in Conservation Biology is an interdisciplinary pathway that integrates all of these aspects of conservation biology. It is designed for wildlife managers with practical experience in international conservation work looking to acquire formal scientific training, as well as students with academic qualifications looking to develop a career in conservation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/273/conservation-biology

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which integrates natural and social sciences

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF 2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is a research-focused Master's training course in Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation. The ability to collect robust scientific evidence is a critical skill for biologists aiming to mitigate biodiversity loss. Read more

This is a research-focused Master's training course in Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation.

The ability to collect robust scientific evidence is a critical skill for biologists aiming to mitigate biodiversity loss. This course focuses on developing core research skills whilst carrying out student-led projects in the fields of animal behaviour and conservation.

The course provides a strong foundation for a career in wildlife conservation.

Why Study Biological Sciences: Wildlife Behaviour and Conservation with us?

Our teaching team consists of active researchers working on a diverse range of study species, both in the wild and in captivity. We work with a range of partner organisations, both within the UK and internationally, to ensure our students’ projects contribute directly to the conservation of the species or habitats involved.

Students work closely with their supervisory team to acquire the specialist skills necessary to pursue their chosen career path. Our department’s proactive, diverse and inclusive research community provides extensive opportunities for peer-learning and research collaboration.

What will I learn?

A compulsory Wildlife Research Methods module provides advanced training in core skills including project design, field techniques, statistical analysis and GIS.

Students will then select a further taught specialist module relevant to their research project, which may include Conservation Genetics or Behaviour and Welfare in Wildlife Conservation.

An individual research project is then undertaken throughout the year and is the primary focus of this course. 

2018-19 Research Projects

  1. White-Faced Darter Dragonfly Ecology in the Italian Alps
  2. Welfare assessment of semi-feral ponies
  3. Tawny Owls in Cheshire (with Cheshire raptor study group)
  4. Study of Desert Birds on Lanzarote: An Example of how Geodiversity Underpins Biodiversity (with Lanzarote Island Council and Desert Watch/Eco-insider)
  5. Social Networks and Welfare in Captive Livingstone’s Fruitbats Pteropus livingstonii (with Durrell Wildlife Park)
  6. Pond colonisation on the Black Isle (with Scottish Natural Heritage)
  7. Kinship analysis of captive Humboldt’s penguins Spheniscus humboldti
  8. Invertebrate and bird behaviour on limestone pavements
  9. Highland Dragonfly Occupancy and Distribution
  10. Great Crested Newt occupancy on the Black Isle (with Scottish Natural Heritage)
  11. Conservation of Endangered Primates in Ghana’s Rainforests (with West African Primate Conservation Action)
  12. Conservation Genetics of the Natterjack Toad
  13. Conservation genetics of the endangered Eld’s deer
  14. Behavioural and facial expression indicators of pain in zoo species (with Marwell Wildlife)
  15. Alpine Aliens: Distribution and spread dynamics of invasive alien plant species in the North-western Italian Alps

Please note some projects will require a student contribution towards research costs in addition to course fees, up to a maximum of £3000. This should be discussed with the relevant supervisor prior to accepting a place on a specific project.

How will I be taught?

Teaching can be delivered via lectures, laboratory practicals, field trips and seminars supplemented by online materials such as discussion boards and analytical exercises.

You will have the opportunity to contribute to research seminars, a journal club and tutorials.

Taught modules consist of 32 hours of taught activities and 168 hours of independent study.

How will I be assessed?

Taught modules are assessed through coursework assignments.

The dissertation projects consists of at least 1,400 hours' study to produce a paper suitable for peer review publication.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Students apply to specific projects that change on an annual basis, but in recent years students have worked in Ghana, Cambodia, the Philippines, across Europe and in the UK.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php



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The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development.

The relationship between conservation and rural development can best be described as an uneasy alliance: on the one hand there is substantial common ground between them in terms of preventing environmental degradation, but on the other, they are often in direct conflict. This pathway explores the issues underlying the conservation/rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between the two.

The programme is relevant to the work of national management and scientific authorities, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies and donors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/271/conservation-and-rural-development

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which provides substantive natural and social sciences training in both conservation and rural development

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Within conservation science there is increasing recognition of the value of genetic data to support management decisions, however scientists and managers with the skills and knowledge to apply population genetic theory to conservation practice are lacking. Read more

Within conservation science there is increasing recognition of the value of genetic data to support management decisions, however scientists and managers with the skills and knowledge to apply population genetic theory to conservation practice are lacking. Within this arena, wildlife forensics is an exciting new field that is attracting increasing global attention in the fight against the illegal wildlife trade.

The Cert/Dip/MSc in Applied Conservation Genetics with Wildlife Forensics aims to provide a blend of theoretical and practical education in the application of genetic data to wildlife management and conservation law enforcement. The programme will cover all essential aspects, from population genetic theory, through data analysis, to the considerations involved in the interpretation and transfer of scientific findings to management, policy and criminal investigation.

Students will have the choice to specialise in either applied conservation genetics or wildlife forensics, with both options providing transferable scientific skills relating to knowledge acquisition and application, problem solving, science communication and decision making. The overall aim of the programme is to equip current and future wildlife professionals with the knowledge, skills and global networks to address modern challenges in conservation management and law enforcement.

The programme is designed as an institutional collaboration between the University of Edinburgh and SASA (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture), a government facility which houses the UK wildlife DNA forensics laboratory. Students will have a unique opportunity to learn from internationally recognised specialists in the application of genetic analysis to conservation management and wildlife forensics.

In addition, individual courses will engage a number of external tutors from local and international organisations with specific expertise in the subject matter. Course materials will based on actual examples from wildlife management projects and forensic casework.

Suitable participants include wildlife professionals interested in learning how DNA analysis can be applied to conservation management, from captive breeding programmes to reintroductions and natural population management.

The programme will also be appropriate for those working in wildlife law enforcement or wildlife policy sectors who want to understand how genetic data is now relied upon to inform conservation decision-making, trade regulation and criminal investigations.

As a comprehensive introduction to the fields of conservation genetics and wildlife forensics, the programme is will also provide a valuable stepping stone to students seeking to pursue an advanced scientific career in these fields.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh's excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Learning outcomes

Beyond gaining factual knowledge of the immediate subject matter, programme participation is designed to achieve a series of key learning outcomes:

Knowledge and Understanding

The student will be able to demonstrate a critical understanding of practical and ethical issues relating to the application of conservation genetics and wildlife forensics.

Practice: applied knowledge, skills and understanding

The student will be able to demonstrate how to plan, apply and interpret the outputs of appropriate research and forensic techniques.

Generic cognitive skills

The student will be able to analyse complex issues and identify solutions, even in the absence of complete or consistent information.

Communication, ICT, Numeracy Skills

The student will be able to communicate relevant scientific concepts and results, using appropriate methods, to a range of audiences with different levels of knowledge and expertise.

Autonomy, accountability and working with others

The student will be able to manage complex wildlife conservation and law enforcement issues and make or contribute to informed judgements that address current challenges in these fields.



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