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Masters Degrees (Widening Participation)

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The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. Read more
The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. You will enhance your ability to facilitate and lead the development of expert knowledge within your specific area of higher education including academic practice.

In an increasingly global world the study of higher education is no longer limited to local, regional or national contexts. Universities influence and are influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological change and ongoing sophistication of higher education national and international characteristics. The study pathway therefore aims to enhance practice, research and policy of higher education within these fluid contexts. The course contributes to the personal development of those concerned with the study of higher education both formally and informally in a wide range of institutional settings and locations. Coursework encourages you to bring together your personal understanding of issues relating to specific aspects of higher education with the established and current body of professional and academic research literature relevant to your professional or personal aims. Underpinned by the development of advanced, specialist research skills, the course allows you to progressively broaden the knowledge and understanding of your chosen aspects of higher education. It emphasises the synthesis of theory and practice, including academic practice, and the importance of both structure and agency when understanding interactions within higher education institutions.

Careers

The MA graduates from a wide range of backgrounds, including tutors, lecturers and academics from different disciplines and educational contexts will benefit from the provision of specialist knowledge and research methods training. The course actively seeks to support the professional development, employability and career progression of managers, administrators and academic-related, professional staff (e.g. learning technologists, academic developers). The offering of a range of specialised research skills is tailored to enhance the expertise of these professionals as well as those aspiring to progress to higher levels of management in the areas of higher education policy, widening participation and access in higher education institutions. Invited lecturers from external higher education and policy institutions will highlight possible pathways for future employment within specialist organisations or universities in a number of countries. The design of authentic course assessment tasks underlines the importance of developing specialised research and professional skills applicable in the workplace. Equally, the research skills element of the course will equip participants with necessary skills for progression to doctoral or independent research.

Module list

• National and International Perspectives on Higher Education Policy

This module examines policy and policy-making as distinct processes of implementation and change. Students will consider the approaches of different countries to important debates in the field including the purpose and nature of universities, funding, internationalisation, access and widening participation, management, quality, and regulation processes. Utilising policy analysis methods as well as key concepts and theoretical frameworks students will critically examine comparative evidence to enhance their knowledge and understanding of higher education principles, processes and practices drawing on individual national case studies. The module covers the following broad areas of higher education policy, policy-making and change:

• Access, recruitment and widening participation
• Quality assurance and regimes of (de)regulation in higher education
• Management and change at institutional, national and international level
• Tiers of higher education provision, rankings and their implications for governments and universities.
• Higher education financing and shifting patterns of funding.
• Internationalisation, global competition and cross-border flow of students and researchers.

• Universities as Contemporary Learning and Teaching Environments

This module examines the historical development of research in teaching-learning with a view to identify key contributions that influenced how we conceptualise teaching-learning in the university sector. Several theoretical traditions are presented (e.g. communities of practice, student approaches to learning, actor network theory) and emphasis is placed on the role of assessment and feedback as well as the wide-scale implementation of technological media in higher education and their impact on new modalities of learning. Students will be offered the means to enhance their critical understanding and use of relevant theory by supporting critical and systematic reflection on the changing nature of teaching-learning in higher education, on the changing management landscape, and on the relationships between them in national and international contexts.

• Special Research Methods in Higher Education

This module provides an overview of the methods and methodologies applied to research in higher education. In doing so, it provides links between higher education and educational and social research in general without losing its particular focus and applicability on higher education settings. The meanings and associations between methods are discussed and their position in wider epistemological paradigms is considered. Students will be given an overview of the development of these methods and methodologies in higher education and will develop applied research skills on methods relevant to their practice or interests. Conclusions will be drawn on the methodological opportunities and challenges of the presented research methods and their supplementary to wider educational and social research will be critically examined.

• Educational and Social Research Methods

This module provides you with the opportunity to consider the aims and intentions of educational research, critique published journal articles, and examine the role of evidence from research as a basis for improving education and social care. You will gain grounding in educational research issues, methods and strategies together with knowledge of how to match intended outcomes with specific educational questions and methods of investigation.

• Postgraduate Major Study

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of their Master's Major project and involves a dissertation of 14,000 words or the equivalent. The Major Project enables students to demonstrate the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and / or research understanding. It will involve the ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice. The project enables students to expand or redefine existing knowledge, to develop new approaches to changing workplace situations and / or to contribute to the development of best practice. It asks the student to communicate these processes in a clear and elegant fashion and to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. Students' research topics must be negotiated with their appointed supervisor. An application for ethical approval and ethics discussion paper must then be submitted. The project may take the form of a written dissertation, a formal presentation and full research paper, an exhibition, a performance, an artefact or the development of software, or other written, aural or visual material. The project may be formed from a combination of these modes but will normally include a written component.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a number of ways, from systematic literature reviews to reflective accounts on your professional practice, to ensure you're learning effectively. Other forms of assessment may include presentations, critical analyses of existing research, producing a dissemination poster and a research project. Each module comprises of one summative assessment and one core formative assessment. The assessment of the modules places emphasis on authenticity of the assessment tasks. Assessment are designed to strengthen your ability to conduct research in higher education settings.

Your Faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly, supportive and experienced staff. With over 150 research students across our three doctoral programmes (PhD; DProf and EdD), we provide the multi-disciplinary perspective and potential for academic debate that reflects our position as a leader in practitioner-focused and practice-led research studies.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, social services, local and regional authorities, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

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You should consider this programme if you are a qualified and experienced teacher, trainer or other professional working in education or training, or in a related professional field such as health. Read more
You should consider this programme if you are a qualified and experienced teacher, trainer or other professional working in education or training, or in a related professional field such as health.

The programme will develop your advanced skills in educational research methods. These include critical analysis, evidence-based inquiry, critical literature review, and quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis.

Following a qualifying period, MPhil students can proceed to PhD studies in education and training.

Recent research projects include:

- Leadership and management in education
- Leadership in Higher Education
- Professionalism and professional practice
- Lifelong Learning
- E-Learning, social networking
- Pedagogy, learning theories and learning and teaching
- Widening participation, access, achievement and the student experience
- Creativity and complexity theory
- Childhood studies and history of education
- A range of other individually negotiated subject areas.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide you with a doctoral programme through research study and a supervised thesis

- To provide you with an advanced knowledge of educational research methods within education, training, health and allied fields

- To help you to develop advanced skills in contemporary theoretical knowledge, critical analysis, doctoral research and evidence-based inquiry. This will enable you to make a contribution to knowledge informed by original research and scholarship.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/edu

What you'll study

Recent research projects include:

- Leadership and management in education
- Leadership in higher education
- Professionalism and professional practice
- Lifelong learning
- E-Learning, social networking
- Pedagogy, learning theories and learning and teaching
- Widening participation, access, achievement and the student experience
- Creativity and complexity theory
- Childhood studies and history of education
- A range of other individually negotiated subject areas.

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their research thesis.

Career options

This programme offers enhanced career opportunities in the education, training, health and allied fields.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Your programme of study. To help you stay in the classroom this programme is offered online to enable you to work and study flexibly from anywhere in Scotland or internationally as this programme is also relevant in other countries. Read more

Your programme of study

To help you stay in the classroom this programme is offered online to enable you to work and study flexibly from anywhere in Scotland or internationally as this programme is also relevant in other countries. If you work in any context where a relationship is required to support an individual in learning. You are able to apply your learning directly into your teaching and widening participation in the classroom where you can positively affect the life opportunities of the next generation.

You develop your skills in pastoral care in order to support young people in their educational workplace setting or other appropriate agency. This postgraduate programme is open to all professionals who have a caring role with young people. It aims to provide a response to the continuing professional development needs of those who wish to extend their skills and knowledge into new areas of guidance, care and support which pertain within their establishment, but in particular, within an educational setting. 

Graduates of this programme have enriched their learning and application and some have benefited from promotion. We are able to offer you teaching lead research directly from our three broad interrelated themes of 'Communities and Partnerships,' 'Professional Learning and Teaching Education,' and 'Pedagogy and Innovation.' We also work in interdisciplinary research such as 'Pathways to a Healthy Life' and 'The North and the Environment.'

Courses listed for the programme

Compulsory Courses

Semester 1 

Choose from one guidance and one counselling module plus:

  • Care and Support in Action (Distance Learning)
  • Managing Personal Support in Schools
  • Counselling and Mentoring Approaches in Educational Settings
  • Critical Approaches to Academic Literature
  • Research Methods
  • Work - Based Project / Dissertation

Optional

  • Personal and Social Development, Health and Wellbeing
  • Curriculum, Careers Guidance and Education for Enterprise

Semester 2

  • Critical Approaches to Academic Literature
  • Research Methods

Optional

  • Personal and Social Development, Health and Wellbeing or Curriculum, Careers Guidance for Education for Enterprise

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You study a programme which is unique to Aberdeen as few other universities offer anything similar
  • The qualification can be applied immediately whilst you are learning within the classroom
  • The programme is accredited by University of Aberdeen and open to professionals in teaching, FE, Health, Social Work and Community Education

Where you study

  • Online
  • Part time
  • 12, 24, or 26 Months

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page



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Become a competent and capable clinical psychologist. Receive training which emphasises psychotherapy, reflective practice, complex clinical issues and applicable research skills. Read more
Become a competent and capable clinical psychologist. Receive training which emphasises psychotherapy, reflective practice, complex clinical issues and applicable research skills. As the first in the country to be approved through a joint partnership between the Health and Care Professions Council (HPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS), and having run since 1982, this programme will enhance your psychological career and enable you to become a highly reflective scientist practitioner.

Key features

Study an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognised research degree, one of the first to award the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Benefit from service user involvement through working closely with the Service User and Carer Consultative Group.

Widening participation in clinical psychology - candidates from diverse backgrounds and experiences are welcome.

Benefit from our commitment to producing competent and capable clinical psychologists who work as highly reflective scientist practitioners.

Become eligible to apply for registration as clinical psychologists with the Health and Care Professions Council, with the opportunity to gain Chartered Psychologist (C.Psychol) status, and full membership of the Division of Clinical Psychology with the British Psychological Society.

Take advantage of excellent relationships with local services in the South West of England; local clinicians are committed to supporting training and offer a wide range of placements in both rural and urban settings.

Course details

Each year of this programme begins with an extended teaching block, the remaining teaching is then spread regularly throughout the year. The remainder of your time will be spent on clinical placements with teaching interspersed to complement the clinical experience you gain. Over the duration of the programme you will also undertake year-long placement periods. During your first year of study you will work with children, young people and families, and people with learning disabilities. As a first year trainee you will also gain a foundation level qualification in systemic family therapy (independently accredited by the Association of Family Therapy).

In your second year, you will gain experience interacting with adults and older adults. In this year greater emphasis is placed on working with individuals.

Your third year is a time for consolidating your new skills and preparing for future work in the health service. This year will take account of current legislation and policy with regard to the role of clinical psychologists in the National Health Service. For example, emphasis has been placed on acquiring competencies in supervision, consultation and leadership in line with recent policy guidelines. Research activities bridge the academic and clinical components of the programme with time allocated particularly in year three for a major empirical research project.

Applying

All applications for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology are made via:

The Clearing House

Fairbairn House

71-75 Clarendon Road,

Leeds, LS2 9PL.

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The structure and choice of the content you negotiate as part of your award, is congruent with a philosophy of adult learning. Read more
The structure and choice of the content you negotiate as part of your award, is congruent with a philosophy of adult learning. As a student you will embrace responsibility for your own learning, using initiative and insight to discover what you need to learn with learning intrinsically related to your personal context and experience. Within this process, you will learn to reflect upon experience, developing new concepts, attitudes and behaviours to apply to future decision making and judgements. Through negotiation of learning activities and outcomes prior experience is valued and as a student you will become personally engaged in learning in a way that is personally motivating and significant to you.

In recognition of the uniqueness of experience, the individuality of journey is central to the award philosophy with students able to:
-Study at your own pace and convenience
-Negotiate aims and learning outcomes tailored to experience and context
-Negotiate the nature and form of your learning activities
-Negotiate an appropriate method of assessing your learning

In order to facilitate this individual journey a Negotiated Learning Advisor will support you throughout your award, enabling you to develop a Learning Contract that demonstrates at least 25% of the Award is achieved through negotiated learning modules.

Course overview

The aims of the award reflect the University values of widening participation, providing a programme of study that reflects individual needs and diversity in that the award is devised to:
-Offer bespoke programmes of learning to meet the needs of students and employers.
-Provide an award to support the Faculty’s engagement within health and social care career pathways.
-Maximise opportunities for independent and work- based learning.
-Provide individuals with the opportunity to gain postgraduate qualifications through negotiation.
-Offer flexible entry and exit points; PgC, PgD.
-Provide opportunities for students to build upon prior learning.

Although the individual nature of learning on this award has been stressed, it is recognised there may be groups of students whose learning needs are so similar they may form a cohort. Such cohorts could be supported by an employer, or sponsor who has identified a number of common learning outcomes and who share learning experiences, or they may be a group of individuals who have a shared health or social care work-based or career orientation.

Graduate destinations

Working in health and Social Care.

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Whether you are starting a career in Human Resource Management or are already working in the sector, and if you would like to progress at a professional level, this Human Resource Management Masters which is accredited by the CIPD can help you to achieve your career goals. Read more

Whether you are starting a career in Human Resource Management or are already working in the sector, and if you would like to progress at a professional level, this Human Resource Management Masters which is accredited by the CIPD can help you to achieve your career goals. Our business school holds devolved status from the CIPD and was given after ten years of student performance above the national average in all areas

You may already have studied at a university, or perhaps have some work experience in a related people management role. As a student on this MA you will have the opportunities to initiate or improve your critical understanding of complex managerial, HR and organisational issues. The course will develop the knowledge; skills and attitudes appropriate to middle and senior management and advanced practitioners in the HR field. If you are not already a member of the CIPD the successful completion of the course enables you to apply for Chartered Membership Status.

The course will assist you to make a strategic contribution to any organisation; it will also advance your career allowing you to successfully compete for higher level posts within the field of HR. This course not only gives you the advanced diploma through CIPD accreditation but also awards you a Masters from a well respected university who is committed to widening participation and innovative programmes.

Typical modules include:

Contemporary Issues in International Human Resource Management

Organisational Change and Development

Human Resource Management in Context

People Resourcing and Reward

Key Issues in Employee Relations and Employment Law

Leading, Managing and Developing People



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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. Read more
The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. It is suitable for students seeking to understand the field of international development as well as for practitioners who already have substantive experience. It provides conceptual tools and practical skills for a variety of careers in international affairs.

The programme seeks to contribute to a critical understanding of contemporary issues in development and provides practical tools for a future engagement. It considers theoretical, practical and ethical issues by interrogating development discourses, objectives and effects, and by seeking to understand forms of inclusion/exclusion and intervention in societies. Issues covered include economic development, poverty eradication, legal empowerment, public-private partnerships, social entrepreneurship, trade and privatisation, informal economies and finance, and technological initiatives.

The programme is offered jointly by the School of Politics and International Relations, Kent Law School and the School of Economics, to provide you with an interdisciplinary approach to development and to allow you to specialise in your field of interest, such as development economics, development and migration, development and conflict, or human rights. You may choose between an economic stream and a politico-legal stream, complemented by a wealth of elective modules from various departments.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/55/international-development

About the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS)

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Development allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Development in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Development with Human Rights Law'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to pursue a career in the field of international development

- provide a detailed knowledge and a high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas

- provide access to a range of disciplinary perspectives on international development, in the framework of an interdisciplinary graduate school with cognate programmes in international relations, conflict analysis, international law, and migration studies

- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures and policy fields of international development

- provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international development of individual interest from among the range of options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work that is at the frontiers of scholarship

- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the discourses and practices associated with the field of international development, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution

- provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of the contending approaches and issues in international development, and allows you to place the subject in its proper context within the broader field of international studies

- encourage you to develop critical, analytical, communicative and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts (transferable skills).

- develop skills in the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions

- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills), in particular through a substantial dissertation.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution. Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MBA Top-up is a fast track programme for those who already have a post graduate qualification in management. A key element of this programme is the MBA dissertation. Read more
The MBA Top-up is a fast track programme for those who already have a post graduate qualification in management. A key element of this programme is the MBA dissertation.

A variety of teaching and learning methods provide access to learning to meet a range of learner needs and are aimed at; widening participation amongst learners, avoiding exclusion and developing learner skills in both academic and workplace arenas. The methods employed include: lectures; workshops; tutorials (group and individual) and guest speakers.

However individual tutors are free to introduce techniques that they view as especially suitable in aiding learning in their specialist area. The learning and teaching strategy for each individual module is detailed in the module guides that you will receive at the beginning of each semester.

What you will learn

Depending upon the syllabus of your previous programme of study, you will have the opportunity to study one of the taught modules outlined below in addition to the Research Methods and Academic Skills module and the Dissertation.

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An MPhil/PhD is an opportunity to undertake a major piece of research under the supervision of someone with academic expertise in your field. Read more
An MPhil/PhD is an opportunity to undertake a major piece of research under the supervision of someone with academic expertise in your field.

As a research student, you will be interested in your own development as a lifelong learner and will seek to engage in critical debate and key issues of education and lifelong learning. You will develop your skills as an independent and active learner, and apply your research skills with theoretical perspectives and understandings of lifelong learning. You will be immersed in an academically stimulating and challenging environment, with easy access to high-quality research resources.

On completing an MPhil/PhD degree you will have developed advanced skills in research and scholarly writing, and will be able to use these to embark on, or further, a career in research. As many of our students study part-time, you may have the opportunity to apply your developing research skills in your current career.

We have academic experts in education after the compulsory phase, including adult, community, further and higher education as well as professional learning, and supervision is offered in a range of areas. These include:

- Lifelong learning
- Higher education policy and practice
- Lifelong learning and widening participation policy and practice
- Workplace learning
- Transitions from learning to working
- The academic workplace
- Professional learning and education
- Post-compulsory education
- Adult education
- Continuing education
- Gender and education
- Education in later life
- Education and social class
- Community-based learning.

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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a 30 to 90 minute performance accompanied by performance notes and a biography
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• five performances, each between 30 and 90 minutes long, accompanied by programme notes and a biography, of which the first performance can be your work from the MPhil requirement
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words can be from your MPhil requirement.

As with the MPhil, your DMus portfolio performances may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. You may wish to explore a range of roles and repertoire, or stick with just one concerto performance. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of, and instrumentation for, each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal the current musical and extra-musical influences on your work, and how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

Full-time and part-time candidates - you may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you ‘exit’ with the MPhil qualification.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Course detail

The DMus is a practice-led doctorate, and an alternative to the traditional PhD for experienced practitioners who wish to show an outstanding and innovative contribution a specific area of expertise.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, You will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 30 to 40 minutes in performance duration - you may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, or just one structurally ambitious work. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 75 to 90 minutes in performance duration - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 30 to 40 minutes. You may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, but must include one structurally ambitious work lasting 20 to 30 minutes. Alternatively, you may submit just one extended structurally ambitious piece, which your MPhil portfolio may be part of. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of and instrumentation for each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions, and you may choose to discuss the artistic ambition of each work. You must indicate, through backdated registration, the pieces intended for inclusion.

Although most of the pieces will be based on original ideas, you can also submit works developed from pre-existing material - for example, a folk-song arrangement or a fantasia on a theme.

Your proposal may discuss current musical or extra-musical influences on your work, and should explain how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography. You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition.

You may also include a CV with your proposal.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 60 to 80 minutes in duration, with optimised session files included
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise pieces by several artists, or several by the same artist. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• a portfolio of recorded music, 120 to 140 minutes long - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 60 to 80 minutes. The portfolio should include optimised session files of your recordings.
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces by one artist, or by several different ones, and your MPhil portfolio can be part of this extended work. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice (see pathway appendices), which may be as an extended technique or something more philosophical, ontological or aesthetically grounded - or preferably a combination of the two.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and an appended outline bibliography.

You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal, any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

Assessment of the submission will involve an oral examination conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when a student 'exits' with the MPhil degree.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and has allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice, as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and has allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice, as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

Course detail

The possible routes for the course are:
• MPhil leading to DMus
• DMus by Direct Entry
• DMus by Submission

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Electronic/Electro-acoustic Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions.

You should explain in your proposal how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice. This may be as an extended technique or something more philosophical, ontological or aesthetically grounded - or preferably a combination of the two.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal, any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. This will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
The programme will develop your conceptual and critical skills, which will allow you to engage with arts and management in an insightful way. Read more
The programme will develop your conceptual and critical skills, which will allow you to engage with arts and management in an insightful way. The curriculum is designed to allow you to pursue opportunities within specialist fields of study to an advanced level, including undertaking an extensive independent project or dissertation of your choosing.

You will gain understanding of organisations, managerial techniques and arts practices in the current arts and cultural landscape in the UK. You will have a placement that will enable you to develop greater self­ awareness, professionalism and apply practical and organisational project management skills.

Christ Church University is very close to the city centre of Canterbury which has a developing, vibrant arts community.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/arts-and-cultural-management.aspx

Suitability

The MA in Arts and Cultural Management programme is for early career or established artists/practitioners and project managers who wish to develop further knowledge, skills and understanding as confident leaders and managers in the arts. This may be in relation to establishing or developing networks, research and development, communication and marketing forums, funding applications, using unusual spaces for the arts, event organisation or programme planning, widening participation and audience development and strategies for evaluation.

Content

Term One
• Principles and Practice (Research skills)
• Placement Preparation
• Curatorial 1: Visual Arts /Gallery
• Performance Programming 1: Multidisciplinary work and Collaborative Practice
• Spaces and Places 1

Term Two
• Cultural Management
• Placement
• Curatorial 2: Museums/Heritage
• Performance Programming 2: Site-specific and Collaborative Practice
• Spaces and Places 2: Performance Technologies

Term three
• Individual Study - The Reflective Researcher
• Placement Reflection

Format

You will be taught through seminars, workshops and a practical placement. A number of guest speakers/artists/managers will share their experiences and strategies.

Assessment

You are assessed through a range of assignments consisting of, for example, written proposals, learning log/blogs, reflection and evaluation, dissertation, developing a web-page and/or developing a performance project.

What can I do next?

Here are some possible careers/next steps :
• Manager with an arts/cultural organisation – programming/curating/event manager/project manager
• Freelance developer of arts/cultural experiences/events
• Community outreach officer
• Freelance performer
• Undertake further study

Students that have undertaken this programme have become freelance artists establishing their own companies and events.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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