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Masters Degrees (Widening Participation)

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The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. Read more
The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. You will enhance your ability to facilitate and lead the development of expert knowledge within your specific area of higher education including academic practice.

In an increasingly global world the study of higher education is no longer limited to local, regional or national contexts. Universities influence and are influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological change and ongoing sophistication of higher education national and international characteristics. The study pathway therefore aims to enhance practice, research and policy of higher education within these fluid contexts. The course contributes to the personal development of those concerned with the study of higher education both formally and informally in a wide range of institutional settings and locations. Coursework encourages you to bring together your personal understanding of issues relating to specific aspects of higher education with the established and current body of professional and academic research literature relevant to your professional or personal aims. Underpinned by the development of advanced, specialist research skills, the course allows you to progressively broaden the knowledge and understanding of your chosen aspects of higher education. It emphasises the synthesis of theory and practice, including academic practice, and the importance of both structure and agency when understanding interactions within higher education institutions.

Careers

The MA graduates from a wide range of backgrounds, including tutors, lecturers and academics from different disciplines and educational contexts will benefit from the provision of specialist knowledge and research methods training. The course actively seeks to support the professional development, employability and career progression of managers, administrators and academic-related, professional staff (e.g. learning technologists, academic developers). The offering of a range of specialised research skills is tailored to enhance the expertise of these professionals as well as those aspiring to progress to higher levels of management in the areas of higher education policy, widening participation and access in higher education institutions. Invited lecturers from external higher education and policy institutions will highlight possible pathways for future employment within specialist organisations or universities in a number of countries. The design of authentic course assessment tasks underlines the importance of developing specialised research and professional skills applicable in the workplace. Equally, the research skills element of the course will equip participants with necessary skills for progression to doctoral or independent research.

Module list

• National and International Perspectives on Higher Education Policy

This module examines policy and policy-making as distinct processes of implementation and change. Students will consider the approaches of different countries to important debates in the field including the purpose and nature of universities, funding, internationalisation, access and widening participation, management, quality, and regulation processes. Utilising policy analysis methods as well as key concepts and theoretical frameworks students will critically examine comparative evidence to enhance their knowledge and understanding of higher education principles, processes and practices drawing on individual national case studies. The module covers the following broad areas of higher education policy, policy-making and change:

• Access, recruitment and widening participation
• Quality assurance and regimes of (de)regulation in higher education
• Management and change at institutional, national and international level
• Tiers of higher education provision, rankings and their implications for governments and universities.
• Higher education financing and shifting patterns of funding.
• Internationalisation, global competition and cross-border flow of students and researchers.

• Universities as Contemporary Learning and Teaching Environments

This module examines the historical development of research in teaching-learning with a view to identify key contributions that influenced how we conceptualise teaching-learning in the university sector. Several theoretical traditions are presented (e.g. communities of practice, student approaches to learning, actor network theory) and emphasis is placed on the role of assessment and feedback as well as the wide-scale implementation of technological media in higher education and their impact on new modalities of learning. Students will be offered the means to enhance their critical understanding and use of relevant theory by supporting critical and systematic reflection on the changing nature of teaching-learning in higher education, on the changing management landscape, and on the relationships between them in national and international contexts.

• Special Research Methods in Higher Education

This module provides an overview of the methods and methodologies applied to research in higher education. In doing so, it provides links between higher education and educational and social research in general without losing its particular focus and applicability on higher education settings. The meanings and associations between methods are discussed and their position in wider epistemological paradigms is considered. Students will be given an overview of the development of these methods and methodologies in higher education and will develop applied research skills on methods relevant to their practice or interests. Conclusions will be drawn on the methodological opportunities and challenges of the presented research methods and their supplementary to wider educational and social research will be critically examined.

• Educational and Social Research Methods

This module provides you with the opportunity to consider the aims and intentions of educational research, critique published journal articles, and examine the role of evidence from research as a basis for improving education and social care. You will gain grounding in educational research issues, methods and strategies together with knowledge of how to match intended outcomes with specific educational questions and methods of investigation.

• Postgraduate Major Study

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of their Master's Major project and involves a dissertation of 14,000 words or the equivalent. The Major Project enables students to demonstrate the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and / or research understanding. It will involve the ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice. The project enables students to expand or redefine existing knowledge, to develop new approaches to changing workplace situations and / or to contribute to the development of best practice. It asks the student to communicate these processes in a clear and elegant fashion and to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. Students' research topics must be negotiated with their appointed supervisor. An application for ethical approval and ethics discussion paper must then be submitted. The project may take the form of a written dissertation, a formal presentation and full research paper, an exhibition, a performance, an artefact or the development of software, or other written, aural or visual material. The project may be formed from a combination of these modes but will normally include a written component.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a number of ways, from systematic literature reviews to reflective accounts on your professional practice, to ensure you're learning effectively. Other forms of assessment may include presentations, critical analyses of existing research, producing a dissemination poster and a research project. Each module comprises of one summative assessment and one core formative assessment. The assessment of the modules places emphasis on authenticity of the assessment tasks. Assessment are designed to strengthen your ability to conduct research in higher education settings.

Your Faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly, supportive and experienced staff. With over 150 research students across our three doctoral programmes (PhD; DProf and EdD), we provide the multi-disciplinary perspective and potential for academic debate that reflects our position as a leader in practitioner-focused and practice-led research studies.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, social services, local and regional authorities, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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Your programme of study. To help you stay in the classroom this programme is offered online to enable you to work and study flexibly from anywhere in Scotland or internationally as this programme is also relevant in other countries. Read more

Your programme of study

To help you stay in the classroom this programme is offered online to enable you to work and study flexibly from anywhere in Scotland or internationally as this programme is also relevant in other countries. If you work in any context where a relationship is required to support an individual in learning. You are able to apply your learning directly into your teaching and widening participation in the classroom where you can positively affect the life opportunities of the next generation.

You develop your skills in pastoral care in order to support young people in their educational workplace setting or other appropriate agency. This postgraduate programme is open to all professionals who have a caring role with young people. It aims to provide a response to the continuing professional development needs of those who wish to extend their skills and knowledge into new areas of guidance, care and support which pertain within their establishment, but in particular, within an educational setting. 

Graduates of this programme have enriched their learning and application and some have benefited from promotion. We are able to offer you teaching lead research directly from our three broad interrelated themes of 'Communities and Partnerships,' 'Professional Learning and Teaching Education,' and 'Pedagogy and Innovation.' We also work in interdisciplinary research such as 'Pathways to a Healthy Life' and 'The North and the Environment.'

Courses listed for the programme

Compulsory Courses

Semester 1 

Choose from one guidance and one counselling module plus:

  • Care and Support in Action (Distance Learning)
  • Managing Personal Support in Schools
  • Counselling and Mentoring Approaches in Educational Settings
  • Critical Approaches to Academic Literature
  • Research Methods
  • Work - Based Project / Dissertation

Optional

  • Personal and Social Development, Health and Wellbeing
  • Curriculum, Careers Guidance and Education for Enterprise

Semester 2

  • Critical Approaches to Academic Literature
  • Research Methods

Optional

  • Personal and Social Development, Health and Wellbeing or Curriculum, Careers Guidance for Education for Enterprise

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You study a programme which is unique to Aberdeen as few other universities offer anything similar
  • The qualification can be applied immediately whilst you are learning within the classroom
  • The programme is accredited by University of Aberdeen and open to professionals in teaching, FE, Health, Social Work and Community Education

Where you study

  • Online
  • Part time
  • 12, 24, or 26 Months

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page



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Become a competent and capable clinical psychologist. Receive training which emphasises psychotherapy, reflective practice, complex clinical issues and applicable research skills. Read more
Become a competent and capable clinical psychologist. Receive training which emphasises psychotherapy, reflective practice, complex clinical issues and applicable research skills. As the first in the country to be approved through a joint partnership between the Health and Care Professions Council (HPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS), and having run since 1982, this programme will enhance your psychological career and enable you to become a highly reflective scientist practitioner.

Key features

Study an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognised research degree, one of the first to award the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Benefit from service user involvement through working closely with the Service User and Carer Consultative Group.

Widening participation in clinical psychology - candidates from diverse backgrounds and experiences are welcome.

Benefit from our commitment to producing competent and capable clinical psychologists who work as highly reflective scientist practitioners.

Become eligible to apply for registration as clinical psychologists with the Health and Care Professions Council, with the opportunity to gain Chartered Psychologist (C.Psychol) status, and full membership of the Division of Clinical Psychology with the British Psychological Society.

Take advantage of excellent relationships with local services in the South West of England; local clinicians are committed to supporting training and offer a wide range of placements in both rural and urban settings.

Course details

Each year of this programme begins with an extended teaching block, the remaining teaching is then spread regularly throughout the year. The remainder of your time will be spent on clinical placements with teaching interspersed to complement the clinical experience you gain. Over the duration of the programme you will also undertake year-long placement periods. During your first year of study you will work with children, young people and families, and people with learning disabilities. As a first year trainee you will also gain a foundation level qualification in systemic family therapy (independently accredited by the Association of Family Therapy).

In your second year, you will gain experience interacting with adults and older adults. In this year greater emphasis is placed on working with individuals.

Your third year is a time for consolidating your new skills and preparing for future work in the health service. This year will take account of current legislation and policy with regard to the role of clinical psychologists in the National Health Service. For example, emphasis has been placed on acquiring competencies in supervision, consultation and leadership in line with recent policy guidelines. Research activities bridge the academic and clinical components of the programme with time allocated particularly in year three for a major empirical research project.

Applying

All applications for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology are made via:

The Clearing House

Fairbairn House

71-75 Clarendon Road,

Leeds, LS2 9PL.

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The structure and choice of the content you negotiate as part of your award, is congruent with a philosophy of adult learning. Read more
The structure and choice of the content you negotiate as part of your award, is congruent with a philosophy of adult learning. As a student you will embrace responsibility for your own learning, using initiative and insight to discover what you need to learn with learning intrinsically related to your personal context and experience. Within this process, you will learn to reflect upon experience, developing new concepts, attitudes and behaviours to apply to future decision making and judgements. Through negotiation of learning activities and outcomes prior experience is valued and as a student you will become personally engaged in learning in a way that is personally motivating and significant to you.

In recognition of the uniqueness of experience, the individuality of journey is central to the award philosophy with students able to:
-Study at your own pace and convenience
-Negotiate aims and learning outcomes tailored to experience and context
-Negotiate the nature and form of your learning activities
-Negotiate an appropriate method of assessing your learning

In order to facilitate this individual journey a Negotiated Learning Advisor will support you throughout your award, enabling you to develop a Learning Contract that demonstrates at least 25% of the Award is achieved through negotiated learning modules.

Course overview

The aims of the award reflect the University values of widening participation, providing a programme of study that reflects individual needs and diversity in that the award is devised to:
-Offer bespoke programmes of learning to meet the needs of students and employers.
-Provide an award to support the Faculty’s engagement within health and social care career pathways.
-Maximise opportunities for independent and work- based learning.
-Provide individuals with the opportunity to gain postgraduate qualifications through negotiation.
-Offer flexible entry and exit points; PgC, PgD.
-Provide opportunities for students to build upon prior learning.

Although the individual nature of learning on this award has been stressed, it is recognised there may be groups of students whose learning needs are so similar they may form a cohort. Such cohorts could be supported by an employer, or sponsor who has identified a number of common learning outcomes and who share learning experiences, or they may be a group of individuals who have a shared health or social care work-based or career orientation.

Graduate destinations

Working in health and Social Care.

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The East European Studies MRes provides area-specific, language-oriented, advanced research training in the methodologies and approaches of economics, politics, sociology, history, culture and literature. Read more

The East European Studies MRes provides area-specific, language-oriented, advanced research training in the methodologies and approaches of economics, politics, sociology, history, culture and literature. The MRes offers two pathways: social sciences, and arts and humanities, enabling students to tailor the programme to suit their own experience and interests.

About this degree

Students develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline -specific research skills, area-specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region. The programme produces multidisciplinary researchers specialised in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, with language proficiency and cultural, historical and institutional awareness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 330 credits over two years: 150 credits are taken in year one and 180 in year two. Two pathways are available: social sciences, and arts and humanities.

The first year of the programme consists of a core language module (30 credits), optional modules (75 credits) and electives (45 credits). The second year consists of core modules (45 credits) including language (30 credits), electives (30 credits) and dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules

Year One:

  • Beginner's New Language MA module offered at SSEES

Year Two:

  • Intermediate Language MA module offered at SSEES
  • Interdisciplinary Area Studies II

Optional modules

Social Science Pathway Year One

  • A choice of 75 credits from:
  • Quantitative Methods (15)
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)
  • Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Political Analysis (15)
  • Political Sociology (15)
  • Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research (15)
  • Understanding and Analysing Data (15)

Arts & Humanities Pathway Year One

  • Literary and Cultural Theory (30)
  • Political Analysis (15)
  • Political Sociology (15)
  • Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research (15)
  • Historical Methods and Approaches (30)
  • Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Understanding and Analysing Data (15)
  • Both pathways take electives in years one and two and 30 credits of compulsory language in each year

Dissertation/report

All MRes students undertake an independent research project in the second year which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars and language classes. Students will be assessed by unseen and written examinations, coursework assignments, essays and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Sutton Scholars Officer, Widening Participation
  • PhD in East European Studies, UCL
  • Editorial Assistant, P Press
  • Policy and Communication Assistant, Investment Management Association (IMA)
  • Publisher, College of Eastern Europe

Employability

Graduates of the programme will possess the attributes to complete a PhD within three years or to enter the labour market directly with advanced analytical and research skills, regional expertise and proficiency in a language of the area. The rigorous exams we set for our language courses mean that potential employers or prospective PhD supervisors will know that our graduates can work effectively with the languages they have studied. 

Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-eastern Europe and Russia.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: SSEES - School of Slavonic & East European Studies

64% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Whether you are starting a career in Human Resource Management or are already working in the sector, and if you would like to progress at a professional level, this Human Resource Management Masters which is accredited by the CIPD can help you to achieve your career goals. Read more

Whether you are starting a career in Human Resource Management or are already working in the sector, and if you would like to progress at a professional level, this Human Resource Management Masters which is accredited by the CIPD can help you to achieve your career goals. Our business school holds devolved status from the CIPD and was given after ten years of student performance above the national average in all areas

You may already have studied at a university, or perhaps have some work experience in a related people management role. As a student on this MA you will have the opportunities to initiate or improve your critical understanding of complex managerial, HR and organisational issues. The course will develop the knowledge; skills and attitudes appropriate to middle and senior management and advanced practitioners in the HR field. If you are not already a member of the CIPD the successful completion of the course enables you to apply for Chartered Membership Status.

The course will assist you to make a strategic contribution to any organisation; it will also advance your career allowing you to successfully compete for higher level posts within the field of HR. This course not only gives you the advanced diploma through CIPD accreditation but also awards you a Masters from a well respected university who is committed to widening participation and innovative programmes.

Why Wolverhampton?

The University of Wolverhampton Business School currently holds devolved status from the CIPD. This is the culmination of 10 years of student performance above the national average in all areas.

The course aims to develop your knowledge and understanding of the disciplines of HR, encouraging critical reflective thinking and developing independent personal development skills.

During your studies you will have the opportunity to engage in a number of activities outside of normal teaching these may include guest lectures, visits to companies or residentials. These activities are designed to enhance your knowledge, understanding as well as enjoyment of your course.

Career path

For anyone wishing to pursue or further their career within the field of HR, it is essential that a CIPD postgraduate qualification is obtained, giving membership to the professional body.

International, national and local recruitment to the field of HR is growing and, as such, competition for employment is high. Our programme is a robust course that has been highly commended by the CIPD for many years.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you, the student, will be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate contemporary organisations in terms of their principal operating environments.
  2. Critically analyse how resourcing, talent management and reward strategies are developed and evaluate the different theories and perspectives within employment law and employee relations.
  3. Identify and justify a business issue that is of strategic relevance to the organisation in terms of research and research methods.
  4. Analyse and critically evaluate the historical and theoretical basis of organisational designs and their development in terms of their value and contribution to organisational life.
  5. Critically evaluate the practice, relevance and contribution of HRM and HRD to organisational success and effective change management using major contemporary research and debates in the field of HR.
  6. Synthesise relevant critical thinking through academic research completing an independent research project/dissertation at Masters level.

Who accredits this course?

All modules are aligned to the national standards for the profession, and are endorsed by the CIPD. Completion of the course enables students to apply for professional membership.



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The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. Read more
The MA in International Development is a unique interdisciplinary programme taught by academics, practitioners and policymakers to understand the multifaceted political, economic and legal processes that shape development. It is suitable for students seeking to understand the field of international development as well as for practitioners who already have substantive experience. It provides conceptual tools and practical skills for a variety of careers in international affairs.

The programme seeks to contribute to a critical understanding of contemporary issues in development and provides practical tools for a future engagement. It considers theoretical, practical and ethical issues by interrogating development discourses, objectives and effects, and by seeking to understand forms of inclusion/exclusion and intervention in societies. Issues covered include economic development, poverty eradication, legal empowerment, public-private partnerships, social entrepreneurship, trade and privatisation, informal economies and finance, and technological initiatives.

The programme is offered jointly by the School of Politics and International Relations, Kent Law School and the School of Economics, to provide you with an interdisciplinary approach to development and to allow you to specialise in your field of interest, such as development economics, development and migration, development and conflict, or human rights. You may choose between an economic stream and a politico-legal stream, complemented by a wealth of elective modules from various departments.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/55/international-development

About the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS)

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Development allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Development in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Development with Human Rights Law'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to pursue a career in the field of international development

- provide a detailed knowledge and a high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas

- provide access to a range of disciplinary perspectives on international development, in the framework of an interdisciplinary graduate school with cognate programmes in international relations, conflict analysis, international law, and migration studies

- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures and policy fields of international development

- provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international development of individual interest from among the range of options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work that is at the frontiers of scholarship

- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the discourses and practices associated with the field of international development, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution

- provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of the contending approaches and issues in international development, and allows you to place the subject in its proper context within the broader field of international studies

- encourage you to develop critical, analytical, communicative and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts (transferable skills).

- develop skills in the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions

- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills), in particular through a substantial dissertation.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution. Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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If you are a professional with a particular area of research interest in the field of education, the MA (Ed) by Dissertation through Flexible Study may offer you an ideal route towards a Master’s degree. Read more

If you are a professional with a particular area of research interest in the field of education, the MA (Ed) by Dissertation through Flexible Study may offer you an ideal route towards a Master’s degree.

Introducing your course

This is the course page for MA (Ed) Dissertation through flexible study at the University of Southampton. Find out everything about Dissertation through flexible study and what studying here involves.

In this course page we explain a range of key information about the course. This includes typical entry requirements, modules you can take and how assessment works. We also suggest career opportunities open to you as a University of Southampton graduate of MA (Ed) Dissertation through flexible study.

If you still have questions, please get in touch and we’ll be happy to answer any enquiries. See our contact us page for our telephone, email and address information.

Overview

Individual study

This innovative programme does not adopt a traditional classroom model of delivery, but enables you to develop specialist expertise through a combination of independent study and small-scale research, usually in your own work context, with tutor support and full access to University facilities.

Specialist study is available across a wide range of areas, and we encourage you to contact us to discuss whether we could support you with your particular area of interest. For example, in recent years some generic areas have included:

  • investigating aspects of pedagogy
  • addressing curriculum-related issues in schools and colleges
  • enhancing professional development 
  • investigating issues of inclusion and widening participation
  • developing technology-based approaches to learning.

Group study

The programme is also ideal for groups working more collaboratively, and can be tailored to address organisational needs, for example, groups of colleagues working together within a single school/organisation or across a number of schools/organisations. Subject to demand, we can offer a bespoke pathway which combines a small taught component with group seminars and individual tutorials, emphasising collaboration and the role of constructive dialogue between peers as co-investigators. Group members undertake distinct but related projects, and workplace tutorials can be arranged.

View the programme specification document for this course



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An MPhil/PhD is an opportunity to undertake a major piece of research under the supervision of someone with academic expertise in your field. Read more
An MPhil/PhD is an opportunity to undertake a major piece of research under the supervision of someone with academic expertise in your field.

As a research student, you will be interested in your own development as a lifelong learner and will seek to engage in critical debate and key issues of education and lifelong learning. You will develop your skills as an independent and active learner, and apply your research skills with theoretical perspectives and understandings of lifelong learning. You will be immersed in an academically stimulating and challenging environment, with easy access to high-quality research resources.

On completing an MPhil/PhD degree you will have developed advanced skills in research and scholarly writing, and will be able to use these to embark on, or further, a career in research. As many of our students study part-time, you may have the opportunity to apply your developing research skills in your current career.

We have academic experts in education after the compulsory phase, including adult, community, further and higher education as well as professional learning, and supervision is offered in a range of areas. These include:

- Lifelong learning
- Higher education policy and practice
- Lifelong learning and widening participation policy and practice
- Workplace learning
- Transitions from learning to working
- The academic workplace
- Professional learning and education
- Post-compulsory education
- Adult education
- Continuing education
- Gender and education
- Education in later life
- Education and social class
- Community-based learning.

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'Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.' - Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013). Read more

'Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.' - Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013)

The University of Greenwich has long been a centre for excellence in teacher training and education, and we have a strong commitment to meeting the needs of those who want to study at the highest academic level. 

Many of our applicants who work in vocational areas choose the PhD in Education and Training, whereas applicants who work in schools tend to choose the PhD in Education, but the choice is open and the only difference is in the final title. Doctoral applicants choose which PhD to apply for depending on what they would like the final title of their doctorate to be. 

Our PhD in Education and our PhD in Education and Training are intended for qualified and experienced lecturers, teachers, trainers, other professionals working in education or those who want to explore education as an academic subject. Both PhD programmes are flexible but rigorous, and are designed to support you through the challenges of doctoral study and research. 

Academic support

We currently have 20 students on our PhDs in Education programmes at the University of Greenwich. They are each supported by a supervisory team of three lecturers, with a strong background in practical and academic experience, both in educational research and in doctoral supervision.

Our programme has a dedicated programme leader, programme administrator, and a wide range of supervisors. Students' progress will also be monitored and supported by committees within our department and the university. Your fellow students will also provide a rich source of peer support, alongside the students from our Health and Social Care PhDs and Psychology PhDs.

Degree structure

If you apply successfully for our MPhil/PhD programmes you will initially be enrolled on an MPhil, and then upgraded to PhD after you have completed a substantial piece of doctoral level work.

You meet regularly with your supervisory team throughout the process, and they will support you both in the practicalities of producing a dissertation and defending it at viva. The team will also help you develop advanced skills in contemporary theoretical knowledge, critical analysis, doctoral research and evidence-based inquiry; ultimately, this will allow you to reach doctoral standard, that is, it will allow you to make a contribution to knowledge informed by original research and scholarship.

Recent research projects

Recent research projects include:

  • Leadership and management in education
  • Leadership in higher education
  • Professionalism and professional practice
  • Comparative studies
  • Work-based learning
  • Lifelong learning
  • E-Learning, social networking
  • Pedagogy, learning theories and learning and teaching
  • Widening participation, access, achievement and the student experience
  • Literacy and pedagogy
  • Creativity and complexity theory
  • Alternative education
  • Teachers as researchers
  • Experiences of LGBT+ teachers and students
  • Childhood studies and history of education.

There are also a range of other individually negotiated subject areas.

Application

As part of your application, please identify an area of research that you wish to pursue and submit a research proposal of approximately 1,500 words along with your application form. Please also submit a CV along with the form.

Location

Located at the university's prestigious Greenwich campus, the Education and Training programme has world renowned attractions right on its doorstep from the Cutty Sark to Greenwich Park.

With the opening of the highly anticipated Dreadnought Building on the horizon, not only will you study in the heart of the Greenwich campus, but you will also have access to state-of-the-art learning, teaching and social spaces.

Assessment

Students are assessed through their research thesis.

Careers

Graduates from this programme have gone on to a range of middle and senior academic and management roles in schools, colleges, universities and other educational institutions.



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The programme will develop your conceptual and critical skills, which will allow you to engage with arts and management in an insightful way. Read more
The programme will develop your conceptual and critical skills, which will allow you to engage with arts and management in an insightful way. The curriculum is designed to allow you to pursue opportunities within specialist fields of study to an advanced level, including undertaking an extensive independent project or dissertation of your choosing.

You will gain understanding of organisations, managerial techniques and arts practices in the current arts and cultural landscape in the UK. You will have a placement that will enable you to develop greater self­ awareness, professionalism and apply practical and organisational project management skills.

Christ Church University is very close to the city centre of Canterbury which has a developing, vibrant arts community.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/arts-and-cultural-management.aspx

Suitability

The MA in Arts and Cultural Management programme is for early career or established artists/practitioners and project managers who wish to develop further knowledge, skills and understanding as confident leaders and managers in the arts. This may be in relation to establishing or developing networks, research and development, communication and marketing forums, funding applications, using unusual spaces for the arts, event organisation or programme planning, widening participation and audience development and strategies for evaluation.

Content

Term One
• Principles and Practice (Research skills)
• Placement Preparation
• Curatorial 1: Visual Arts /Gallery
• Performance Programming 1: Multidisciplinary work and Collaborative Practice
• Spaces and Places 1

Term Two
• Cultural Management
• Placement
• Curatorial 2: Museums/Heritage
• Performance Programming 2: Site-specific and Collaborative Practice
• Spaces and Places 2: Performance Technologies

Term three
• Individual Study - The Reflective Researcher
• Placement Reflection

Format

You will be taught through seminars, workshops and a practical placement. A number of guest speakers/artists/managers will share their experiences and strategies.

Assessment

You are assessed through a range of assignments consisting of, for example, written proposals, learning log/blogs, reflection and evaluation, dissertation, developing a web-page and/or developing a performance project.

What can I do next?

Here are some possible careers/next steps :
• Manager with an arts/cultural organisation – programming/curating/event manager/project manager
• Freelance developer of arts/cultural experiences/events
• Community outreach officer
• Freelance performer
• Undertake further study

Students that have undertaken this programme have become freelance artists establishing their own companies and events.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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'Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.' - Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013). Read more

'Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.' - Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013)

The University of Greenwich has long been a centre for excellence in teacher training and education, and we have a strong commitment to meeting the needs of those who want to study at the highest academic level. 

Our PhD in Education and our PhD in Education and Training are intended for qualified and experienced lecturers, teachers, trainers, other professionals working in education or those who want to explore education as an academic subject. Both PhD programmes are flexible but rigorous, and are designed to support you through the challenges of doctoral study and research. 

PhD Education and Training

Doctoral applicants choose which PhD to apply for depending on what they would like the final title of their doctorate to be. Applicants who work in schools tend to choose the PhD in Education, whereas many of our applicants who work in vocational areas choose the PhD in Education and Training. The choice is open and the only difference is in the final title.

Academic support

We currently have 20 students on our PhDs in Education programmes at the University of Greenwich. They are each supported by a supervisory team of three lecturers, with a strong background in practical and academic experience, both in educational research and in doctoral supervision.

Our programme has a dedicated programme leader, programme administrator, and a wide range of supervisors. Students' progress is also monitored and supported by committees within our department and the university. Your fellow students will also provide a rich source of peer support, alongside the students from our Health and Social Care PhDs and Psychology PhDs.

Programme structure

If you apply successfully for our MPhil/PhD programmes you will initially be enrolled on an MPhil, and then upgraded to PhD after you have completed a substantial piece of doctoral level work. You meet regularly with your supervisory team throughout the process, and they will support you both in the practicalities of producing a dissertation and defending it at viva. The team will also help you develop advanced skills in contemporary theoretical knowledge, critical analysis, doctoral research and evidence-based inquiry; ultimately, this will allow you to reach doctoral standard, that is, it will allow you to make a contribution to knowledge informed by original research and scholarship.

Research projects

Recent research projects include:

  • Leadership and management in education
  • Leadership in higher education
  • Professionalism and professional practice
  • Comparative studies
  • Work-based learning
  • Lifelong learning
  • E-Learning, social networking
  • Pedagogy, learning theories and learning and teaching
  • Widening participation, access, achievement and the student experience
  • Literacy and pedagogy
  • Creativity and complexity theory
  • Alternative education
  • Teachers as researchers
  • Experiences of LGBT+ teachers and students
  • Childhood studies and history of education.

There are also a range of other individually negotiated subject areas.

Application process

As part of your application, please identify an area of research that you wish to pursue and submit a research proposal of approximately 1,500 words along with your application form. Please also submit a CV along with the form.

Assessment

Students are assessed through their research thesis.

Careers

Graduates from this programme have gone on to a range of middle and senior academic and management roles in schools, colleges, universities and other educational institutions.



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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of History. Read more
The Secondary Postgraduate Certificate in Education is a one academic year (36 week) course that trains graduates to be secondary school teachers of History.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Course detail

If you believe that a study of History is central to the broad and balanced education of any young person, a good grounding in the subject and a history degree, if you have a passion for the subject and are not afraid to work hard to share it in a lively and engaging manner then this might be the course for you!

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the University. Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

Structure

The course is part of the Department of Education's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Enabling Learning
• Meeting Curriculum Challenges
• Becoming a Teacher

These units are studied in both the school and the University-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary.

In subject studies sessions, students get the opportunity to:

• Find out about the History curriculum
• Look at planning for stimulating, active learning
• Consider ways to stretch young people's curiosity and interest in history, including using:
o Historical sources
o Role play and drama
o Objects and artefacts
o Fieldwork (including optional residential fieldwork)
o Storytelling
o ICT

Format

We recognise that embarking on a new course of study can sometimes be quite a challenging undertaking. Students have three main sources of support and information from the University during the course: firstly, there is the Group Tutor in their subject area. Secondly, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor, and thirdly, any student can get support on a range of issues from the Department Student Adviser.

Placements

24 weeks are spent on placement: a total of eight weeks in one placement during the autumn term and either 12 weeks in a second placement with a further four weeks in an alternative setting (museum or heritage site, or archive education department or special school or ICT centre), or 16 weeks in a second placement during the spring and summer.

As well as teaching, the programme includes contact time with a Senior Professional Tutor and a Subject Mentor, directed study time and personal study time.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. You are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of QTS.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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