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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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This MA will use the unique contributions of Shropshire to many areas of science. As those contributions include the theory of evolution, major geology advances and leading roles in the industrial use of iron and other materials, this focus will not restrict you as a student in any way. Read more
This MA will use the unique contributions of Shropshire to many areas of science. As those contributions include the theory of evolution, major geology advances and leading roles in the industrial use of iron and other materials, this focus will not restrict you as a student in any way. You will have the opportunity to explore any aspect of the history of science as you develop an understanding of how social factors have influenced scientific advances and how those, in turn, have impacted on society.

Why study History of Science at Shrewsbury?

Shropshire has had a strong influence on the development of science since the 19th century. Two of its most famous sons are Charles Darwin and William Penny-Brookes. Charles Darwin's theory of evolution has been highly influential in all areas of biology and beyond. Also known as the 'Father of the Modern Olympics', William Penny-Brookes promoted the use of exercise in prevention and treatment of illness. Apart from these two examples, Shropshire has had crucial roles in advances in many other areas, including geology, medicine and the industrial revolution. This Masters programme will cover scientific advances over the centuries, and within each module one section will cover Shropshire's unique contributions to the subject.

Features:

During this course, you will literally be following in the footsteps of many scientific giants – of which Charles Darwin was the greatest. You will be able to walk Darwin's thinking path while pondering how geology has shaped our evolution; sit in the library where Darwin was schooled in natural history; and reflect on one county's immense contribution to the world we know today.

Programme Structure:

The modules given below are the latest example of the curriculum available on this degree programme. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to change from time to time for reasons which include curriculum enhancement, staff changes, student numbers, improvements in technology, changes to placements or regulatory or external body requirements.

The programme is modular with six taught modules – each worth 20 credits - and culminates in a 60-credit Dissertation. Modules are as follows:
- A Brief History of Time - a review of major advances in science over time – with a particular emphasis on building the research skills required for Level 7. Your literature searching, critical appraisal and writing skills will be developed through a series of group exercises.

- Darwin and Evolution - a look at how the evidence Darwin collected on the Beagle voyage persuaded him of the truth of evolution. You will discuss the influence of his family on his theory and also on the delay to publish. You will also follow the development of evolutionary theory – through the modern synthesis to molecular evolutionary studies.

- History of Medicine - in which you will learn about the important medical advances that have been made over the centuries. William Farr (the father of medical statistics) from Kenley was the first to use statistics effectively in epidemiology, demonstrating that the source of cholera was polluted water. Other important Shropshire medics include Henry Hickson (one of the fathers of anaesthesia) and Agnes Hunt (the first orthopaedic nurse and founder of the Shropshire Orthopaedic Hospital, which later moved to Oswestry and is now known as Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital).

- The Rocks of Ages - in which you will explore the unique rich geological heritage in a county that represents most of the rock types found throughout most of the geological period of time. You will also examine the work of the geological pioneers, such as Impey Murchison, and their contribution to our modern understanding of earth sciences.

- Iron and the Industrial Revolution - Shropshire's pioneering scientific and technological iron founding processes contributed directly to the development of modern metallurgy. In this module you will explore the inquisitiveness of the industrial pioneers such as Abraham Darby and their understanding of the natural environment that led to the birth of the industrial revolution.

- Dissertation - which aims to provide you with an opportunity to investigate systematically and in depth a topic of direct relevance to the programme of study and your personal interests; to enable you to draw on and contribute to the development of the growing body of knowledge in the broad history of science field; and to enable you to present the outcomes of personal research in the form of a substantial review paper and an academic research article suitable for publication in an appropriate research journal.

Assessment

We use a flexible mode of delivery, including three-day intensive modules and evening lectures to facilitate attendance from students in employment, both nationwide and internationally. Assessments vary between modules – but will be coursework only – and will include a review paper, a report case study, poster, or an oral presentation. Please contact us for further details.

The Dissertation is assessed by the production of a substantial review paper and an academic research article suitable for publication in an appropriate research journal.

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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with Classical Chinese Confucian texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history of and developments in translation and commentary.

Confucian Classics Studies (SICH7013) will explore some of the main texts of Confucianism, and interpretations of the philosophy and the cultural impact of these texts, including The Book of I Ching, The Book of History and Three Annals of Spring and Autumn.

Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius. Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the Exoteric traditions of the Han version of the Songs, the Sayings of Confucius and his disciples, the Six Secret Strategic Teachings, An Essay on Government by Liu Yi, Yangzi Book on Government and On the Important List of Government.

Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on key Confucian texts from the Compilation including, for example, Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals and The Book of Discussion on Legalism.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables students to engage in a detailed study of the reception of Confucianism in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows students to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7013 Confucian Classical Studies
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Confucian Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Confucian Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. Read more

Course Description

The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. The University of Liverpool has been at the forefront of Public Health for over 150 years and now has an influential voice on the world stage and close links with many institutions, disciplines and public health bodies. The aim of the Department is to contribute to the improvement and maintenance of the health of people, locally, nationally and internationally, through:
• excellence in education and research
• the development of a learning environment that encourages staff and students to fulfil their potential

The Department provides advice to governmental policy makers locally, nationally and internationally and hosts the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Policy Research on the Social Determinants of Health. The Department is home to a multi-disciplinary team of academic staff drawn from a range of subjects including medical and health sciences, epidemiology, sociology, community development, policy analysis, statistics, and history. It is actively involved in research, education and health service work related to promoting the health of the public.

The Master of Public Health programme is delivered at both our Liverpool and London campuses. On completion of the Master of Public Health, students should have a foundation in the science and art of public health, including an understanding of the concepts of health and disease and factors, which may affect these. The resulting knowledge, skills and attitudes should enable them to put public health principles into effect in a variety of settings including research, practice and the interface of applied research. They will be able to demonstrate an in-depth systematic understanding of public health research and all students carry out a small-scale original research project that conveys the public health context and implications.

Public Health encompasses a broad range of subjects some of which require traditional analytical scientific thinking (for example statistics) whilst others require a more flexible and creative approach (for example health inequalities). The practice of effective public health requires the synthesis of these aspects and the MPH is designed to enable students to gain competence in the application of these disciplines.

The modules are designed to cover the set syllabus whilst allowing students the flexibility to learn in a way and time best suited to their individual needs. Areas that are most effectively covered by interaction and discussion, as well as those that may be conceptually difficult, are covered by direct contact. Even here a didactic teaching style is used only as necessary, with the emphasis of teaching being on interaction and experiential learning. The intention is to develop the ability in students for self-directed learning, so the styles of teaching and learning change in emphasis through the modules. In the early stages the material is subject based but as the student matures in knowledge and skill the material becomes more interactive and problem solving in approach. Broadly a student will be encouraged and guided in the development of five key areas:

1. In-depth knowledge of the main disciplines of public health.
2. Ability in self-directed learning and management of personal development.
3. Ability to critically evaluate, reflect and analyse.
4. Effective communication of ideas in both written and spoken formats.
5. Ability to work effectively both alone and in teams.

The programme offers the option of full-time study over one year, or part-time for up to 3 years for students who wish to study while in employment and where the programme can form an integral part of their professional development.

Here’s what some of our students said about the MPH Programme at the University of Liverpool:

“I loved the level of interaction and discussion. I’ve really enjoyed this year and I’ve found it very useful.”
“Fantastic lecturers. The most amazing support and constantly guiding the course along.”

“Standard of teaching – lecturers / speakers was exceptional. I enjoyed meeting and interacting with the people in the group as we were from quite different backgrounds. “
“The MPH at Liverpool has been key in enabling progression to my current role.”

“The MPH has proved to be a real asset and I certainly wouldn't have got the job without having studied at Liverpool.”

“The modules covered a wide range of topics and issues relevant to public health.”

“Well coordinated – lots of support. Lots of enthusiastic tutors.”

**Additional Entry Requirement Information

The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is available to any University graduate in a health or health-related profession, as well as non-health-related graduates and others approved by the University. This includes:

• Graduates in medicine of an approved university who have not less than one year (and preferably longer) post-registration professional experience;
• Other health-related graduates of an approved university or other institution who have not less than two years of professional experience;
• Non-health-related graduates, and others who have satisfied the requirements of approved Exam Boards, or have satisfied the University that they are suitably qualified to undertake a postgraduate course. They must have at least three years approved professional experience, and either completed the final examination of an approved professional institution, or obtained some other qualification approved for this purpose by the University.
• In addition, applicants require a GCSE Grade C or GCE O Level pass in Mathematics and English, or an equivalent qualification.
International students

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The University of Liverpool Management School is one of an elite group of institutions worldwide to be AACSB-Accredited. The MSc International Business aims to provide students with knowledge and systematic understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of International Business. Read more
The University of Liverpool Management School is one of an elite group of institutions worldwide to be AACSB-Accredited.

The MSc International Business aims to provide students with knowledge and systematic understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of International Business. Graduates will gain a sound theoretical grounding in the area of International Business and develop a range of analytical and personal skills.

Programme Overview

If you want to pursue a career in international management—but want to develop a more in-depth understanding of global business issues, or even study a business subject for the first time—MSc International Business is for you. The programme aims to provide a thorough understanding of management concepts as well as detailed knowledge of international business in theory and practice. You will learn and practice a range of intellectual, interpersonal and technical skills. You will also connect with practitioners and develop the business awareness and confidence required to succeed as a manager in international business.

Upon completion of the programme you will be equipped to work within various business functions in both large and small multinational firms. The programme may also provide a stepping stone to PhD study and a career as an academic researcher in international business.

How will you benefit?

Taught by international business experts

You will undertake modules which reflect the unique expertise of our academic staff: studies of international strategy and management, including important business and management issues arising in emerging economies. Research specialisms which inform teaching on the programme include intellectual property protection systems in diverse institutional settings; the impact of geographical location (including in major cities), on the strategies and operations of multinational firms; the impact of differences in institutional systems for the strategies of multinational firms; and strategy and operations in emerging economies, including technology transfer.

Learn specialist theory

You will be exposed to current theories and practices in large and small businesses around the world. The programme develops understanding of theoretical and conceptual frameworks that enhance understanding of the strategy and operations of multinational firms, including exporting and importing, and a wide range of different types of foreign direct investments. You will learn how cross-cultural differences influence the structure of management systems and operational functions in the wide variety of international business activities undertaken by multinational firms. The complex nature of the international business environment is examined, including the effects on international business activities of major changes to economic, technological, social, institutional and cultural environments. The influence on effective international management of the changing nature of business interactions between countries is also examined. The programme has a strong focus on emerging economies such as Brazil, China and India.

You will cover the key business topics of accounting, marketing, finance, and economics. Combined with knowledge of the key characteristics of international business environments, and international strategy, you will be able to analyse major issues in international management and deal with the challenges of the global business environment.

Gain the skills employers look for

You will develop the highly sought-after range of skills required to meet the needs of international business. Written and spoken communication skills are improved through report writing and presentation delivery, while analytical skills are honed through the use of industry-standard financial and statistical software. Crucially, you will learn cross-cultural management of business activities and people. You will develop competencies in working and negotiating in teams comprised of people with different languages, cultural and ethnic backgrounds. You will gain practical experience of cross-cultural working and strategy formulation through group work, simulation games and case studies.

Connect with international business managers

You will learn from a range of international business leaders during regular guest lectures. Speakers are drawn from multinational corporations and government and private sector agencies that support the international business activities of firms. These sessions also present you with valuable networking opportunities.

Key Facts

REF 2014
27th in the UK for 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent), 100% impact and 88% environment at 4* and 3*.

Why University of Liverpool Management School?

'Learning to make a difference'

AACSB-Accredited, the University of Liverpool Management School is in the top 5% of business schools worldwide. Regarded as one of the most rigorous assessments, many top global recruiters will only consider candidates from AACSB-Accredited schools – a clear signal that our programmes respond to the needs of business and meet specific standards of excellence.

The University of Liverpool Management School works with today's leaders in business and management to prepare its students to be the leaders of the future. The school's mission is 'Learning to make a difference' and there is a fundamental belief that the purpose of the School's research and teaching is to develop students who are not only good managers, but individuals who are truly committed to making a difference. We hope that our students will use the knowledge and skills they gain here in their future roles to help solve some of the most endemic problems individuals, enterprises and communities face.

Career prospects

The aim of this programme is to jointly prepare tomorrow’s business leaders with unique exposure to the rapidly evolving field of Big Data and the opportunities, challenges and developments associated with running or expanding digital business enterprises.

Careers Support

From the moment you start your MSc you will have access to a specialist careers team which includes a professionally qualified MSc Careers Adviser and a dedicated International Employer Engagement Officer.

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“The persuasive power of an odor cannot be fended off, it enters into us like breath into our lungs, it fills up, imbues us totally. Read more
“The persuasive power of an odor cannot be fended off, it enters into us like breath into our lungs, it fills up, imbues us totally. There is no remedy for it”

Patrick Suskind, Le Parfum

The inescapability of a scent’s inebriation is very much akin to the power of attraction of a beautifully designed dress. It is with this idea in mind that newest postgraduate course of IFA Paris was built: offering an innovative approach to Perfume and Cosmetics management through the integration of its 20 years expertise in fashion.

The philosophy of the MBA in Perfume and Cosmetics Management revolves around 3 pillars:

Discovery:
Students are being immersed in a workshop environment allowing them to get an intensive and practical training fostering creativity while at the same time allowing them to discover each strategic components and stakeholders of the beauty industry

Experimentation:
While travelling between IFA’s campus locations in Paris and Shanghai our students are able to experience first-hand the intrinsic characteristics of emerging and mature markets thanks to IFA Paris learning by doing pedagogy.

Self-affirmation:
The overarching Capstone thesis reflects the students’ commitment to the development of a unique and individual project.

The MBA in Perfume and Cosmetics Management also takes advantage of the unique heritage and bi-cultural affiliation of IFA Paris as it “sits” perfectly at the confluence of a geographical dichotomy:

The West as the upholder of traditional luxury values:
Participants will spend 2 terms in Paris in order to have access to what the rest of the world considers as the birth place of luxury.

The East as the catalyst transforming the “Luxe DNA”:
Thanks to IFA Paris unique combination of campus rotation system and synergetic curriculum, participants will be able to explore the latest market and technological evolutions in the beauty industry in an area of the world (North Asia) considered as the most important source of growth.

The development of 7 special seminars provides participants with “windows” into unique activities or phenomenon of the beauty industry. They are organized across our campuses of Paris and Shanghai according to the market specificities of those 2 locations. While in France students will be exposed to the traditional art of perfume making through an immersive experience thanks to our Olfactory Lab and our seminar titled “Parfums a la Francaise”. During their rotation in Shanghai participants will discover the booming segment of skin care for men and explore the different invasive and non-invasive plastic surgery techniques. The ultimate goal is to offer participants the opportunity to improve their professional portfolio with experiences that will ultimately render their profile more sophisticated and attractive to potential employers.

Finally, from inception to graduation, and regardless of their location, Postgraduate students of IFA Paris will benefit from the support of a unique department called the “Career and Alumni Center”. The industry relation arm of IFA Paris’ academic courses is in charge of organizing bi-weekly guest lectures and field trips to attune our students with the latest trends in the beauty industry.

Capitalizing on strong collaborations with groups such as LVMH, Richemont or Kering, the Career and Alumni Center will give access to exclusive brand launch events, fashion shows, art exhibitions or professional trade-shows in order to build the students’ own professional network.

Our MBA Courses are structured with the ECTS framework in mind as set by the Bologna Convention. Upon completion of their studies participants will gather a total of 120 ECTS that they will be able to transfer if they wish to further their studies. The Course is also accredited by IDEL/IDEART* and is certified as “International Master”.
*For more information feel free to visit http://www.idel-labels.eu

Course structure

Our Perfume and Cosmetics Management course covers a wide range of modules clustered into five main module groupings:

Marketing and Management:

This grouping encompasses a series of modules that will be sequentially planned based on the structure of a marketing plan. The overall body of knowledge acquired by the students will prepare them to:

Analyse complex marketing challenges based on practical case studies
Allocate resources strategically to achieve pre-determined objectives
Craft brand DNAs allowing for the achievement of a sustainable competitive advantage

Business Issues:

The capacity to listen and interpret markets’ signals is a key component of today’s managers. It needs to be continuously cultivated. Within this module grouping students will discover the idiosyncrasies of the fashion industry from an economic and financial view point.

Distribution and Retail:

New technologies are shaping the cosmetics and perfume offering of the 21st century in ways that do not always relate to product innovation. A large part of the most recent innovations concern the distribution and retail sector, with interesting cross-overs between the Fashion and the Cosmetics and Perfume industries.

Cosmetics and Perfume Environment:

Is perfume still a luxury? Are socially responsible brands more impactful? How is the impact of the fashion industry in the development of the cosmetics and perfume industry?... This module grouping will challenge students and develop their critical thinking approach in regards with the industry.

Cosmetics and Perfume Lifestyle:

While our MBA Program does not aim at creating technicians we believe it is important for our students to be totally immersed within the environment of cosmetics and perfumes. This is why we have devised a series of groundbreaking seminars and workshops: to allow our students to experience the specificities of the future industry they’ll be working for. From a week in an olfactory lab to test and create perfumes to a foray into the crafting of perfumes “A La Francaise”, everything has been devised to provide a groundbreaking experiential learning.

The Foundation workshop will be taught over 2 full weeks (75 Hours) and comprise the following modules:

Principles of Marketing – 15 Hours
Quantitative Research Approaches – 15 Hours
Accounting Principles – 15 Hours
Working Methodology – 15 Hours
Project Management – 15 Hours
Student Workload:

522 Hours of Face-to-Face lectures
783 Hours of Self-Study
840 Hours of capstone project
200 Hours of industry contact and collaboration

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. The two-year structure provides students with sustained periods of studio-based activity, with dissertation requirements coming early in the second year of study. The emphasis on practice is nonetheless informed and supported by theoretical and professional Study Units throughout the academic year. Whether specialising in a single discipline or working across media, MFA students will have time to develop and expand their studio work to the highest standards, bringing in relevant historical, theoretical and professional perspectives.

::MFA students can expect::

- Support in consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to studio practice through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- To develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Programme Aims

The MFA programme Aims and Learning Outcomes are consistent with the descriptors for a
qualification at QAA Level 7, as defined in the QAA Quality Code for Higher Education (Part A,
Chapter 1).

The programme aims are to provide:

Practical:

1. Provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students to develop their
creative, intellectual and material practices

2. Provide facilities and support through which students can further develop their skills and fluency
to an advanced level as accomplished practitioners, gaining a comprehensive understanding of
techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

3. Enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding and detailed knowledge of key
aspects of their field of study, as well as creative originality in their application

4. Encourage and support advanced experimental, creative approaches to studio work, much of
which is at, or informed by, the forefront of academic discipline, field of study or area of
professional practice (QAA Quality Code Part A, Chapter A1, p12)

Theoretical:

1. Provide a stimulating environment where advanced research methods and critical practices can
be articulated and where a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to personal
research and advanced scholarship can flourish

2. Increase student’s ability to deploy accurately advanced techniques of analysis and inquiry within
their chosen discipline

3. Enable students to articulate an advanced critical understanding of studio practice and its
contexts within contemporary visual art culture, much of which is informed by the forefront of
art practice and theory

Professional:

1. Provide support for personal and professional development, including development and
application of transferable skills such as self-management, decision-making, communication,
collaboration, problem solving, IT and research skills

2. Educate students to possess independence, self-understanding, self-reliance motivated toward
future learning, practice or employment

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

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In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. Read more
In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. This is reflected in the integrated structure of most poultry companies and the number of graduates and postgraduates employed by them.

Many companies have responded to the pressure on financial margins by setting up operations world wide. There continues to be a good demand for suitably trained graduate and postgraduate level entrants into the sector.

The skills and knowledge delivered by the Applied Poultry Science programme are highly relevant to companies using intensive methods of production and those responding to retailer demand for extensive systems. This enables both new entrants and existing employees wishing to build on their expertise and aspirations, to enhance their career opportunities within the poultry sector.

The Applied Poultry Science course is offered on a part-time distance learning basis.

It is designed to suit those in continuing employment or with other commitments. Participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including nutritionists, breeders, vets and other poultry sector workers, all of whom wish to develop their career and businesses.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- A sound knowledge of the underlying science of poultry production.
- A good understanding of the issues underpinning poultry production systems.
- A wide range of specialist skills appropriate to poultry science professionals.
- The ability to critically evaluate developments in poultry science, including nutritional, genetic,
- Welfare, quality assurance and environmental issues.
- The ability to produce professional level recommendations and reports.
- Research skills.

The MSc Applied Poultry Science degree is awarded by the University of Glasgow.

Course Content

The programme is a mix of technical, scientific, environmental and management skills development modules. It is taught largely by staff from the SRUC Avian Science Research Centre who are involved in poultry research studies on a daily basis and who aim to provide up to the minute, highly relevant knowledge transfer into the Applied Poultry Science programme.

The Avian Science Research Centre has a full range of facilities for those wishing to study or carry out research with SRUC ranging from a hatchery to a processing plant and a good range of different poultry production systems.

Poultry Production Systems

This module studies the poultry meat and poultry egg industry in terms of its structure and sectors including intensive and non-intensive systems. It includes global export and import markets for the major poultry meat and egg products and evaluates their quality assurance systems. It will examine the requirements for optimal performance within the various systems and investigate factors affecting performance.

Poultry Nutrition and Growth

Poultry nutrition and growth examines the principles of poultry nutrition, particularly the importance of different nutrients in terms of growth and production and how they are processed in the avian body. It includes a study of the major anatomical and physiological systems in poultry and describes the role of nutrition in poultry health in different production environments, with particular regard to nutrient deficiencies. The partitioning of energy and nutrients into the growth and development of the whole body and different components of the body will also be examined, as will methods of describing different growth patterns.

Incubation and Hatchery Practice

This module develops knowledge and an understanding of the science and technology that underpins the production of day-old stock. Students study embryo-genesis in poultry and how this is exploited by the poultry sector to maximise the production of viable hatchlings. At the conclusion of the module students will be able to critically evaluate poultry hatchery practices, where appropriate, from an international prospective.

Housing and the Environment

Large scale poultry production seeks to manage the birds’ environment to optimise the competing demands of welfare, productivity, quality and environmental protection in an economically viable way. Recognising the impacts of different housing alternatives, the relationship to environmental emissions, and the sustainability of systems are therefore essential skills for those engaged in the industry that this module addresses. The approach will initially be one of directed study in order that the full range of issues are covered; but later in the module, students will be asked to do a case study on a real poultry enterprise with the coursework being centred on the completion of the IPPC application form for an intensive poultry enterprise. Even though some students may not be familiar with large scale poultry enterprises, the structured approach required to carry out the IPPC assessment process, and the wealth of information available in the relevant technical document will give a sound basis for understanding the range of housing and environmental issues involved.

Poultry Behaviour and Welfare

This module explains the general principles of poultry behaviour and welfare and studies sensory perception, motivation and learning in poultry. It evaluates the behavioural and physiological indicators that are used to assess welfare in given circumstances. It examines current practice with respect to welfare and current welfare legislation.

Poultry Health and Hygiene

A range of different infectious and non-infectious diseases will be covered in depth, mostly affecting chickens and turkeys but with specific sessions on diseases of game birds and diseases of pigeons. The importance of notifiable diseases such as Newcastle Disease and highly pathogenic avian influenza will be emphasised, and the significance of other potentially zoonotic organisms such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, Chlamydophila Psittaci and West Nile Virus will be discussed.

Advanced Poultry Nutrition

Advanced poultry nutrition builds on the poultry nutrition and growth module and examines theoretical and practical poultry nutrition in greater depth. It links current nutritional theories, (eg. amino acid balance and requirements or the anti-nutrient and toxic properties of feedstuffs) with methods of alleviation. These are integrated with classical nutrition-balance studies and proximate analyses, exposing students to all aspects of a nutritional study. It also involves a detailed study of nutrition with respect to bird growth and health and the environmental constraints imposed on the system.

Experimental Design

This module aims to develop statistical skills to aid the technical, scientific and management decisions. It explores a range of statistical processes from the collection of data and its interpretation to the production of information charts, diagrams and tables and the analysis of data looking at differences, significance and trends.

Management Skills

With the labour market becoming more competitive there is a real need for today's graduates to develop skills beyond academic knowledge in order to thrive. This module introduces various management skills which include communication, teamworking, leadership, time management, decision-making, empowerment and motivation. It aims therefore to improve the student’s knowledge and ability to manage. A range of practical methods and approaches will be used to enable the students to better organise and motivate themselves and others.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme focuses on advanced level engagement with Classical Chinese texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature.

Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history of and developments in translation, commentary and reception of them. Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius.

Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the Exoteric traditions of the Han version of the Songs, the Sayings of Confucius and his disciples, the Six Secret Strategic Teachings, An Essay on Government by Liu Yi, Yangzi Book on Government and On the Important List of Government. Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on texts from each of the main philosophical traditions of Daoism and/or Confucianism.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables a detailed study of Sinology as a (set of) discipline(s) in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and the development of translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows the student to complete a detailed critical commentary on a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7011 Sinology Classics Readings
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Sinology will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established College in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London

Assessment

An MA degree in Sinology involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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Early Childhood Studies is an innovative field of study dealing with many aspects of childhood, with approaches drawn from a variety of disciplines including anthropology, psychology, child health, social policy, sociology, history and education. Read more
Early Childhood Studies is an innovative field of study dealing with many aspects of childhood, with approaches drawn from a variety of disciplines including anthropology, psychology, child health, social policy, sociology, history and education.

The MA International Study of Early Childhood is a taught programme with the teaching, learning and assessment being online. We envisage the MA attracting a range of students who want to study international perspectives on early childhood at a UK University. The on-line element of the course will be particularly attractive to students who need to balance work, family and financial commitments.

The MA is international in context, comprising a critical study of perceptions, cultures and experiences of early childhood in a range of different countries and contexts. The programme will promote the development of a broader international perspective to challenge normative stereotypes and perspectives, leading to a more critical analysis and understanding of early childhood. The programme therefore aims to explore and deconstruct dominant discourses around early childhood and young children and to focus on alternative ways of knowing and doing.

Students will develop skills and knowledge which will prepare them for a wide range of opportunities to work overseas and enable them to bring an international perspective to work in their own countries. The MA International Study of Early Childhood will equip graduates with a wide range of skills, knowledge and experiences from early childhood contexts across the world and will appeal to those who wish to become effective advocates for young children and also to further their careers both nationally and internationally and bring an international lens to their work with young children and families.

Programme Structure

There are a number of awards which can be granted depending on the number of modules successfully completed. These are:
- Single modules can be taken as Continuing Professional Development (CPD) modules. Certificate of Advanced Professional Studies (CAPS): awarded on successful completion of one module (30 masters level credits)
- Postgraduate Certificate: International Study of Early Childhood: awarded if you decide to conclude your studies on successful completion of two modules (60 masters level credits)
- Postgraduate Diploma: International Study of Early Childhood: awarded if you decide to conclude your studies on successful completion of four modules (120 masters level credits)
- MA International Study of Early Childhood: awarded on completion of four modules (120 credits), the research proposal (10 credits) and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words (50 credits). A total of 180 masters level credits is required to receive the award of MA.

Programme Highlights

- The programme offers participants opportunities to develop an international awareness and understanding of key themes in early childhood studies.
- Students will study materials from a range of different international and national contexts.
- Students will be able to develop their ability to see aspects of their own ‘local’ practice from an international perspective and understand the cultural values behind different practices.
- Graduates of this programme will be in a position to develop international awareness of core features of early years practice in their own countries, to bring knowledge from other countries to the development of this practice and/or to take on genuinely international roles in organisations which support or monitor early years provision across a range of countries.
- The programme will help students to develop their work in ways which give a greater acknowledgement to international variations in early years principles and practices.
- The programme will help students to understand the cultural heritage inherent in early years policy and practice within their own country.
- The online nature of participation and discussion will help students to develop skills in e-communication and cultural sensitivity which will be particularly relevant to any international work.
- Students will be encouraged to organise and undertake fieldwork for their research dissertation in another country or another - context, to enable them to gain further experience. However, this is an expectation, not a requirement and for some students this may not be a possibility.
- Students will have the opportunity to engage with lecturers who have direct experience of working with and undertaking research with young children in a range of contexts.
- Early Childhood Studies at Plymouth University is multi-disciplinary and students will have opportunities to engage with lecturers from a wide range of backgrounds including social policy, health, education, psychology and sociology.
- Assessment of work will include, but not be limited to, reflections upon on-line discussions, the use of case-studies and essays. There are no exams.

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