• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"welfare" AND "rights"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Welfare Rights)

We have 65 Masters Degrees (Welfare Rights)

  • "welfare" AND "rights" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 65
Order by 
About the MSc programme. The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues.

Human rights are not just an object of study, but also a matter of policy, intervention and practice. The programme links theory and practice in a multidisciplinary way and aims to equip you with knowledge of the key legal, sociological and philosophical issues relevant to human rights.

During the programme, you will engage in an academically rigorous way with some of the most compelling issues in contemporary human rights. The programme is unique in linking legal, philosophical, sociological and political perspectives on human rights though a rigorous and analytical approach.

The programme serves as an introduction to the core standards and structures of human rights and discusses a range of key issues in the current, ongoing debates about the role of human rights. While these may change from year to year, thematic issues that the compulsory course covers include: genocide, humanitarian intervention, militarism, war and warfare, religion, culture and human rights and transitional justice.

The programme is run by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. In addition to teaching and research, the Centre runs a very active public events programme which includes public lectures, visiting speaker seminars and conferences involving world-leading human rights academics and practitioners. You also benefit from masterclasses and guest practitioner seminars organised throughout the year exclusively for students on the programme.

Graduate destinations

This programme provides an excellent foundation for a variety of academic and non-academic careers, including in: law, especially international law and advocacy (albeit usually with other qualifications); foreign policy; working for activist organisations in the humanitarian sector; international and domestic human rights; development; civil liberties; welfare; as well as in specialised agencies concerned with, for example, refugees; women's rights; torture victims or children's rights. 

During the programme, you will have opportunities to meet alumni of the MSc Human Rights who are working in a range of international, government and non-governmental organisations.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

This programme offers a range of units suitable both for those with some previous knowledge of human rights law and for those seeking an introduction to specific human rights law issues. Units cover the traditional fields of human rights law (eg International Law and Human Rights) and more specialist areas (eg Employment Rights, International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights, Migration Law, Privacy Law).

Programme structure

Part one - You may study four units from the following list, or three units from the list and one further unit chosen from any of the other LLM programmes:
-European Human Rights Law
-General Principles of International Law
-Individual Employment Rights
-International Criminal Law
-International Law and Human Rights
-International Law and Use of Force
-International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights
-Migration and Work
-Migration Law and Policy - International, European and Human Rights Dimensions

Assessment is by examination and/or essay. Please view our programme catalogue for further information on the course structure and units available. Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation topic within the field of human rights law for approval by the Law School. After passing part one, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

Many of our graduates go into legal careers specialising in human rights law and a number go on to work for non-governmental organisations or international organisations such as the United Nations.

Read less
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

The International Law LLM programme offers a range of units, suitable both for those with some previous knowledge and for those seeking an introduction to specific international law issues. The units are mainly in the field of public international law, although private international law issues can be explored through International Commercial Litigation, Arbitration or many of the other commercial law units.

Programme structure

Part one - You may study four units from the following list, or three units from the list and a further unit chosen from any of the other LLM programmes, or two units from the list and two from the LLM in European Legal Studies.
-General Principles of International Law
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Criminal Law
-International Law and the Use of Force
-International Law and Human Rights
-International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights
-International Law of the Sea
-International Law of Trade and Aid
-International Law and Use of Force
-Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
-Maritime Security
-Migration Law and Policy – International, European and Human Rights Dimensions
-World Trade Law

Assessment is by examination and/or essay. Please view our programme catalogue for further information on the course structure and units available. Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation topic within the field of international law for approval by the Law School. After passing part one, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

This programme provides students with a strong foundation for a broad range of careers that involve an international law perspective, such as international arbitration. Graduates go on to act as solicitors and barristers, as well as lawyers and researchers in international and European Organisations such as the United Nations or the European Commission. A number work for NGOs and other agencies. Some graduates go on to further study or to research in other universities.

Read less
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

The Labour Law and Corporate Governance LLM offers a range of units for those wishing to specialise in employment and company law matters. It provides an opportunity to study both employment and company law aspects of modern business comprehensively.

Programme structure

Part one - You may study four units from the following list, or three units from the following list with a further unit chosen from any of the other LLM programmes:
-Company Law
-Corporate Governance in the UK and US
-Global Perspectives on Corporate Governance
-Individual Employment Rights
-International Corporate Finance
-International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights
-Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
-Migration and Work
-The Law and Policy of Mergers and Acquisitions

Assessment is by examination and/or essay. Please view our programme catalogue for further information on the course structure and units available. Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation topic within the field of labour law for approval by the Law School. After passing part one, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

The LLM programme provides a solid foundation for a wide variety of legal careers. Graduates from this programme may go on to careers ranging from commercial lawyers to human resources specialists.

Read less
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

The Law and Globalisation LLM programme offers a range of units for those wishing to examine these issues from a broad perspective, both economic and socio-political. The units cover the international legal framework, trade, employment and human rights, from both a practical and a theoretical perspective.

Programme structure

Part one - You may study four units from the following list, or three units from the list with a further unit chosen from any of the other LLM programmes.
-European Human Rights Law
-Environmental Law
-General Principles of International Law
-Global Perspectives on Corporate Governance
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Corporate Finance
-International Criminal Law
-International Law and Human Rights
-International Law and the Use of Force
-International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights
-International Law of the Sea
-International Law of Trade and Aid
-International Public Contract Law
-Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
-Maritime Security
-Migration and Work
-Migration Law and Policy - International, European and Human Rights Dimensions
-World Trade Law

Assessment is by examination and/or essay. Please view our programme catalogue for further information on the course structure and units available. Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation within the field of law and globalisation for approval by the Law School. After passing part one, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

This programme opens doors to a wide variety of future careers in law, finance and global governance. Students go on to work in law firms specialising in human rights or business law, international NGOs and governance organisations.

Read less
The first of its kind in the UK, this MA builds upon our established reputation as a leading provider of advice related higher education courses. Read more
The first of its kind in the UK, this MA builds upon our established reputation as a leading provider of advice related higher education courses.

Do you work or hope to work in the Advice Sector? Want to take your skills and understanding further with a leading industry-recognised qualification?

Staffordshire University’s Social Welfare Law, Policy and Advice Practice MA allows advisers of all kinds to achieve a unique masters degree through our well-established Distance Learning methods.

Expanding on existing advice undergraduate degrees first established in 2003, and our professional accreditation course (Certificate of Credit in Money Advice Practice), this course sets a new standard for the professional educational needs of the advice sector.

Modules

-Advice Work Practice
-Social Welfare Policy and Social Context
-Social Welfare Law and Practice
-Equality, Human Rights and Diversity
-Negotiated Independent Study Module
-Research
-Dissertation or Project

Each module has been designed with the assistance of our partners in the sector, ensuring the course meets the needs of a broad range of advice practitioners in areas such as Welfare rights, Money Advisers, Housing Advisers and Social welfare.

Teaching is delivered by a team with considerable sector experience. It includes current managers and members of trustee boards across, ensuring our staff are well-positioned to support your learning and maximise your potential by building on your existing experience.

Each module is delivered online through Blackboard VLE, using interactive discussions to support your learning around work commitments. All students therefore need reliable access to the internet.

Read less
Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

Read less
The MA in Social Work enables you to develop a sound grounding in social work skills, knowledge and values and we are committed to training you to the highest intellectual and professional standards. Read more

The MA in Social Work enables you to develop a sound grounding in social work skills, knowledge and values and we are committed to training you to the highest intellectual and professional standards. This innovative and challenging two-year programme has been validated by the HCPC (Health and Care Professions Council). Those who successfully complete the programme will be eligible to apply to register as a qualified social worker with the HCPC.

The programme enjoys strong relationships with service users and carers and a range of statutory and voluntary agencies. You will experience high-quality placements which offer excellent learning opportunities and support in practice. You will also have the unique opportunity to apply for a placement in the University’s own voluntary social work agency, the Family Assessment and Support Unit (FASU), which was awarded one of the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes for Higher and Further Education for its innovations in practice learning. Many UK students receive support from the NHS Social Work Bursary Scheme. Opportunities also exist for students to take part in our annual International Social Work Student Conference. 

The University of Hull is one of the founding members of the Humber Social Work Teaching Partnership, which includes the biggest employers of social work practitioners in the area.

Study information

Year 1 core modules

  • Introduction to Social Work: Individuals, Families and Communities
  • Mental Health and Social Work
  • Social Work and the Law
  • Social Work with Adults
  • Social Work with Children and Families

Year 1 specialist modules

You will choose two of these modules:

  • Domestic Violence and Abuse
  • Managing Substance Use
  • Loss, Dying and Bereavement
  • Working with Young Offenders

Plus 20 practice skills training days across the first year.

Year 2 modules

You complete two practice modules and your dissertation, plus 10 practice skills training days across the year.

Placements

You are provided with two placements, 70 days in the first year and 100 days in the second year, which are designed to enable you to meet the Professional Capabilities Framework’s national occupational standards. Placements are provided in a range of voluntary and statutory agencies in a variety of settings.

Dissertation module

The dissertation is 15,000–20,000 words long. Workshops are held to assist you, and you receive individual supervision from a member of staff with expertise in your chosen area of study.

* All modules are subject to availability.

Future prospects

High quality placements are provided in both years of the course with a range of voluntary and statutory agencies in a variety of settings, offering students excellent experience and career development opportunities.

We organise a Careers Fair every Easter so that social work students can meet representatives from a range of employers from the statutory and independent sectors in the region and beyond.

While the most common occupation is that of social worker, our graduates are also employed as community workers, welfare rights advisers, housing officers, youth justice officers and drugs specialists. Some other post-graduates choose to embark upon further study in therapeutic practice and research and have returned to the University of Hull to complete doctorates in social work.



Read less
Your programme of study. The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. Read more

Your programme of study

The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. If your first degree was in a specific area of law there is nothing preventing you from choosing another area of law completely or a complementary area. You could study environmental law areas such as oil and gas law, energy and environmental law, low carbon energy transition with further environmental regulation. If you are more interested in criminal law you could look at Criminology, the politics of human rights, humanitarian law.  If you are more interested in business you might choose international law, intellectual property law, world trade organisation or for business with a creative aspect you might think about specialist in cultural property issues or law for business and arts and museums law.  There are many possible mixes of these general areas of law you might want to explore. Employment possibilities are huge from this range of areas of law and include all notable areas to practise law and careers within the legal profession to welfare sectors such as employment, business, HR and finance.

Law careers

You may become a Barrister if you wish to represent people at High Court and Magistrates court to put legal argument forward for decision. You could start off as a legal executive to later qualify as a solicitor with further training or after a number of years experience you may wish to become a judge. If you want some work experience you could become a court usher. Other careers include a Paralegal. This role undertakes much of a lawyers role in drafting documents, meetings and contracts.  If you decide your law degree is useful for other areas you may look at Civil Service careers, become a politician, work in the police, city, or teach.

This programme is ideal if you want to be a generalist to an advanced level rather than a specialist in a specific area of law. You develop your analysis and research skills and you have the option of wide ranging courses to choose from which stretches your intellectual thinking capabilities in a top 10 School of Law (Complete University Guide 2018)

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Optional (4 courses 2 in Semester 1 and 2)

  • International Energy and Environmental Law
  • Oil and Minerals for Good
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Renewable Energy Law
  • International Law: A Time of Challenges
  • The Politics of Human Rights
  • Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Commercial Arbitration In the Asia Pacific
  • Private International Law: Concepts and Institutions
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • World Trade Organisation: Gatt
  • Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions
  • International Intellectual Property: Frameworks and Challenges
  • International Criminal Law
  • Copyright and Patents
  • Private International Law - Jurisdiction, Recognition and Enforcement

Semester 2

Optional

  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art and Museums
  • Principles of Environmental Regulation
  • Choice of Law for Business
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Nuclear Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage
  • Criminal Evidence and Proof
  • Criminal Law
  • The use of Force in International Law
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • International Trade and Finance Law
  • Private International Law of Family Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Carriage of Goods By Sea
  • Oil and Gas Law: Taxation of Upstream
  • Downstream Energy Law
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law
  • Commercial Tax Law and Policy
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration in the Energy Sector

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by a School of Law ranked 10th in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2018). The University has been teaching and researching law since the Middle Ages.
  • You develop skills which are vital to the legal profession in a highly personalised environment with high contact from your lecturers.
  • You get a great range of options which you can tailor to your own requirements and build upon your undergraduate degree and experience to widen your career options, and you can take your qualifications further with programmes such as International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • January or September

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life" target="_blank">living in Aberdeen and https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php" target="_blank">living costs

You may be interested in:



Read less
Our LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage with the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law and to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance. Read more

About the course

Our LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage with the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law and to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance. By studying this course, you will tackle traditional subjects as well as new and emerging issues, such as the regulation of international society and the legal mechanisms of human rights during international and non-international armed conflicts. Your study will reflect the local, national and international nuances of this complex subject matter.

Why study Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at Aberystwyth University?

96.5% of Aberystwyth Law School’s publications were judged to be of an internationally recognised standard or higher in the most recent research assessment – REF 2014

All members of academic staff in Aberystwyth Law School are active in research and publication and participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal and related fields

Aberystwyth is a multinational community. Aberystwyth Law School participates actively in international and European academic
networks and frequently hosts visits by academics and experts from other countries

Expansive research is carried out within the Department across a range of research areas and within a range of research centres.
Postgraduates integrate into our research culture through Departmental research seminars and postgraduate conferences

Over the years a large number of well-known legal academics have taught in Aberystwyth Law School

Study nearby to the National Library of Wales, one of five UK copyright libraries.

Benefit from a mature and well-stocked library for Law and Criminology (Thomas Parry Library) and from generous information technology provision

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

Course content

On this course you have the flexibility to choose from a comprehensive and wide range of optional modules, allowing you to tailor your study to your needs and interests. Whichever modules you take, you will be given a thorough grounding in legal theory and practice to make you ready for the rigorous demands of the modern legal workplace. This study of legal theory is then always balanced with the investigation of an array of fascinating case studies to illuminate your study and put you in touch with an authentic experience of legal cases.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within a specialism of your choice. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

Core modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

Definitional Elements of Substantive International Crimes
Foundations of Public International Law
General Principles of International Criminal Liability and Defences
Human Rights in the Information Age
Institutions of International Criminal Law
International Business, Environment & Human Rights
International Humanitarian Law
Introduction to International Human Rights Law
Mental Health and Human Rights
Migration and Asylum Law
Sources of International Criminal Law
Study Skills
Subsistence and Welfare Rights
The Philosophy of Human Rights Protection
The Sociology of Human Rights Violations

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of coursework essays (120 credits). Each student will complete then a master’s dissertation (60 credits) which deals with an area of chosen study.

Skills

On this course you will gain a wealth of skills vital for success in legal and more general employment. You will:

• study the cutting-edge developments of many areas of law
• develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to urgent contemporary issues
• master a range of legal methodologies
• learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information from a fascinating array of fields
• learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build a winning argument based on your own rigorous research and analysis
• develop your abilities in structuring and communicating complex ideas efficiently
• develop your planning, analysis, presentation, project management and professional independence
• enhance your problem solving and creative thinking skills
• devise and sustain a self-initiated programme of study
• develop study and research skills
• work effectively with others

Careers

This course will be particularly attractive to those seeking careers in transnational corporations, specialist online trading, corporate lobby groups, international law firms, technology companies and a range of governmental and non-governmental organisations.

Read less
This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. Read more
This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. The skills you learn will progress your career in social welfare policy development, delivery or research. Or it is also relevant if you are thinking of starting a career related to social policy in the public, voluntary or private sectors.
The focus of this course is on contemporary substantive issues in social policy development and delivery, and social policy research methods. You'll develop your theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues related to policy-making, social welfare delivery, equality and social justice, and research methods.

You'll gain an advanced understanding of national and international factors influencing policy development and implementation. The changing relationship between the State, voluntary sector and private sector in terms of social welfare delivery. You'll also explore how ideas of equality, diversity, justice and human rights shape institutions and the programmes they offer.

You'll engage with recent research linked to changing family forms and how family policy impacts on children and families. You'll be equipped to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics then analyse and present the material such research generates.

The course fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilise your research knowledge and research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of social policy and broader social science research professions.

Flexible modes of study

You can choose between three modes lasting one, two or three years allowing you to study whilst maintaining other life commitments.

Modules

Social policy analysis
The voluntary sector and the state: protagonist or partner
Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
Approaches to social change: equality, social justice and human rights
Family policy
Data analytic techniques for social scientists
Dissertation

Teaching and learning

Modules are assessed by coursework. There are different kinds of writing required which include: a critical reading log, a self-reflective essay, a methodological critique of a research article, a research proposal, extended essays, an evaluation of social change and a dissertation.

Modules are supported by Moodle, the LSBU virtual learning environment where most course reading will be made available. The classroom is envisaged as a core learning environment where you can discuss new ideas but also to think how they can be applied to previous or current work or voluntary experiences. Attendance is crucial for building your knowledge and skills. You'll be making use of computer laboratories in order to develop your use of a range of programmes that can be used to analyse quantitative and qualitative methods.

Timetable

Full-time:
Eight or nine hours of scheduled teaching per week with an additional 25 hours of independent study.

Part-time:
Three hours of scheduled teaching per week with an additional six hours of independent study per module.

Placements

If you are not already working in an environment which is linked to social welfare you'll be encouraged to undertake voluntary work which will give you useful experience alongside the degree. In addition it may become used as a location where you can undertake primary research for your master's dissertation. The Employability team at LSBU can help students find voluntary placements.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in areas linked to social policy and social welfare. You'll be able to access work in the statutory, commercial or voluntary sectors and operating at central, and local government levels, for example, local government; MORI, NSPCC and DEMOS. The acquisition of specific social policy and research methods knowledge will also enhance your career opportunities if you are currently working in the field in social policy development and delivery or in undertaking social policy related research. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Read less
The MA International Social Policy is designed to equip students with the knowledge and research skills that they will need to thrive in the globalised, interdependent societies of the twenty-first century. Read more
The MA International Social Policy is designed to equip students with the knowledge and research skills that they will need to thrive in the globalised, interdependent societies of the twenty-first century. The questions it addresses include:

• How are welfare states adapting to new economic and political realities?
• What are the implications of climate change and global warming for the future of social policy?
• What lessons about social reform can differing nations learn from one another?
• How should we explain differences in the financing and organisation of diverse welfare systems?
• To what extent can cross-national forms of provision and citizenship rights be devised?
• Is globalisation undermining the ability of national governments to determine welfare policies?
• What influence is exerted by organisations such as the World Bank, the IMF, the UN, the International Labour Organisation and the World Trade Organisation?
• What influence does the European Union have on national policy-making?
• What are the existing trends in, and future prospects for, levels of global poverty?
• To what extent are Non-Governmental Organisations influencing policy-making?

Our aim is to not simply to inform students about recent debates and literatures but to assist their ability to investigate these topics and develop their own independent research interests. We hope and expect that many students will later pursue research careers (including PhDs) and/or work in the field of policy-making.

The core modules are: Welfare Policy (10 credits), Research Methods & Research Management (20 credits), Climate Change & Social Policy (10 credits), Fundamentals of International Social Policy (20 credits), Globalisation, Europeanisation and Public Policy (20 credits), Dissertation (60 credits).

In addition there are a range of elective modules to choose from, including: Human Rights and Modern Slavery (10 & 20 credits), Migration, Multiculturalism and Mobilisation (10 & 20 credits), Civil Society: the Role of NGOs (10 & 20 credits), Leadership, Strategy & Performance in the Public Sector (10 & 20 credits).

Read less
Our Masters degree in Social Policy is designed to develop students’ critical knowledge and understanding of social policy. Read more
Our Masters degree in Social Policy is designed to develop students’ critical knowledge and understanding of social policy. Together with active researchers you will be led through the key contemporary debates in social policy as well as learning how to develop and carry out your own social policy-focused research projects.

Our Master’s has a strong focus on critical and radical approaches to the study of social policy both here in the UK and from a global perspective. In particular the course is concerned with how social policies can reinforce and reproduce marginalisation and oppression in society for groups such as women, deprived communities, ethnic minorities, migrants, disabled people and older people. Concurrently, nevertheless, the program will also analyse how various social policies have been the result of resistance to dominant economic structures and should therefore also be conceptualised as key institutions formalising the rights of the same groups which social policies often oppress. Social policy is also a deeply political subject and as consequence our program explores the theoretical links between the economy and transformations in welfare systems.

With our strong focus on research methods, however, our course also enables students to develop the central skills required to analyse, understand and critically evaluate any social policy issue. Not only do we encourage students to understand policies comparatively, we also provide a significant amount of research training which covers the key philosophical issues and traditions in social science complimented by significant instruction on the uses and strengths of the range of methods and methodological approaches (i.e. quantitative and qualitative data analysis, focus groups, ethnography and so on).

Drawing on our vibrant and developing research culture we offer contemporary and relevant degree programme, drawing expertise from our interest in current social policy trends in Britain, Europe and globally. Studying for a Master’s in Social Policy is guaranteed to be an intellectually engaging experience which will allow students to develop the skills required for many relevant career pathways.

Curriculum

The programme consists of four modules and a dissertation (final research project) totalling 180 credits. Assessment methods will vary and may include academic essays, reports, presentations and examinations, research proposals and a research dissertation.

Advanced Social Theory (30 credits) – You will engage with, evaluate and critically analyse a range of social theory ranging in scope from classical social theory to post-modern approaches.

Advanced Studies in Social Research (30 credits)-You will understand the methodological principles and practices that underpin independent research at Master’s level. You will examine the research process, including design, data collection and analysis, interpretation and presentation.

Transformations in the UK welfare state (30 credits) – This part of the course explores the key issues in social policy in the UK in a contemporary perspective. Notably we will explore the relationship between social policies and the wider political economy, unpicking and critically analysing recent changes in social policy such as privatisation, marketization and austerity. The course will analyse these changes in the welfare state in relation to poverty, class, ‘race’, gender, ageing, sexuality and disability.

Comparative Social Policy and Globalisation (30 credits) – This part of the course will concentrate on developing an international perspective on social policy. The module has two main aims. Firstly, to comparatively analyse different welfare states across the world and, secondly, to explore social policy in relation to globalisation and global capitalism.

Dissertation/Research Project (60 credits) – The focus of the research project will be on an issue of relevance to the study of social policy. The study can involve the collection of primary data or a literature-based dissertation.

Read less
This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities. Read more

This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities.

Core modules will explore social theories, issues and research methods relevant to social policy and welfare. You will also develop core skills in critical policy analysis and policy evaluation. There will be opportunities to study and debate current policy issues, such as work and welfare, child and family policy or the challenges of ageing populations, with a focus on real-life examples.

Supported by our well-known research centres and taught by expert tutors, you’ll tailor the programme to suit your own interests and career aspirations. With a range of optional modules to choose from, you could pursue further advanced research skills or study complementary social topics such as disability studies, gender studies, racism and ethnicity studies, or globalisation.

You’ll gain an insight into some of the most sensitive and complex social issues affecting governments worldwide.

Research insight

You’ll learn in a research-intensive, stimulating environment. As well as the Leeds Social Sciences Institute which fosters collaboration, you’ll benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies, Centre for Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and many others. All of these centres run their own calendars of events such as workshops and seminars.

From the start of the programme you’ll study core modules that introduce you to the social contexts and social problems that challenge policy makers, understanding society and social research. As the course develops you will focus more specifically on the welfare state, the process of social policy formation, and the kinds of evidence on which new policies and programmes are founded, and against which their effectiveness is evaluated.

You’ll gain a thorough understanding of research methods, the theoretical assumptions which underpin them and how these affect the way the findings are interpreted. You’ll also focus on specific examples such as welfare reform or employment activation policies.

With this foundation, you’ll choose from optional modules to specialise in topics that suit you. You could study contemporary social thought to contextualise your work, or look at issues such as labour mobility, care, healthcare, disability or ‘race’ and ethnicity. You could study further data analysis and research methods to prepare for future research.

At the end of the programme, you’ll submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research on a related topic of your choice, which allows you to demonstrate and apply the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Social Policy) 60 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits

Optional modules

  • China's Development 15 credits
  • Environmental Assessment 15 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Human Resource Management: An International Perspective 15 credits
  • Managing Change 15 credits
  • Understanding and Managing Effective Groups and Teams 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Management of Finance for Health 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Standards and Tools for Business, Environment and Corporate Social Responsibility 15 credits
  • Climate Change Mitigation 15 credits
  • System Dynamics: Modelling Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, workshops, tutorials and lectures. Optional modules may also use other methods such as online learning. However, independent study is crucial to this degree – it allows you to prepare for taught sessions, develop your research interests and build a range of skills.

Assessment

Your core modules will be assessed using essays. Optional modules may use other forms of assessment that reflect the diversity of the topics you can study, including presentations, book and literature reviews, research proposals and reports among others.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a wide range of knowledge and skills throughout this programme, including sophisticated skills in research, communication and analysis that will be useful in a variety of careers.

Social and Public Policy graduates have gone on to a wide range of posts across the third-sector public services, government and business. These have included central and local government departments, community bodies, housing and health organisations, research consultancies and advocacy or campaigning.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The MA Migration, Superdiversity and Policy will explore the social, economic and political impacts of international migration and examine current, proposed and ideal approaches to welfare provision in the era of superdiversity. Read more
The MA Migration, Superdiversity and Policy will explore the social, economic and political impacts of international migration and examine current, proposed and ideal approaches to welfare provision in the era of superdiversity. It will explore data to help map superdiverse populations and examine the rights and entitlements of migrants in different societies. Taking an applied approach, the programme will help studens to learn how to access data sources and undertake research in ways that can increase understanding of the nature of superdiversity and the needs of superdiverse communities.

You will explore the social, economic and political impacts of international migration and examine current, proposed and ideal approaches to welfare provision in the era of superdiversity.

You will address the ways that policy has been adapted and created in order to accommodate the changing social fabric in urban and rural areas. You will critically examine the suitability and adaptability of different models of welfare provision, to explore critiques of multiculturalism and to develop an understanding of postmulticultural modes of service delivery. You will be enabled to consider approaches to meeting the needs of diverse populations in equitable ways. Migration, Superdiversity and Policy is unique in bringing together theory and practice with cutting edge research and research methods to enable students to develop applied knowledge in a rapidly evolving field.

About the School of Social Policy

The mission of the School of Social Policy is to ‘understand the world – but also to change it’. This means doing high quality and relevant research, but using this as a starting point for making a practical difference in the real world (through our teaching, through professional training and CPD for managers and practitioners, through policy advice and work in front-line services, through raising public and media awareness and through working directly alongside local people and communities).

In turning this mission into practice, we are proud of our many achievements, including running the UK's oldest social work training programme (dating back to 1908, our multiple award-winning NHS Management Training Scheme, the relationships we have with local partners in the public and voluntary sectors, and our leading role in the largest senior leadership development programmes in the history of the health service.

More than three quarters of our research is rated as 'world leading' or 'internationally excellent' in terms of its rigour, significance and originality, and we have extensive international links with like-minded partners at Harvard, Melbourne, Peking, Vancouver, Seoul and beyond.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X