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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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This course asks you to question not only your own practice, but also the essence of what we understand as jewellery itself. Jewellery’s function is diverse and complex, from personal adornment to political statement, and the materials and processes that reflect this are as equally diverse. Read more
This course asks you to question not only your own practice, but also the essence of what we understand as jewellery itself. Jewellery’s function is diverse and complex, from personal adornment to political statement, and the materials and processes that reflect this are as equally diverse.

The wearable object, perhaps more than any other, has manifold relationships with people, its rich history is loaded with social significance and visual language. This route calls students to question the ways in which, jewellery communicates, and the role the wearable plays in contemporary society.

Exploration of both hands-on and digital innovation is encouraged in the development of design, making and communication practices. There is access to an extensive range of material and CAD/CAM workshop facilities and opportunities to experience a diverse range of creative cultures, including related design and craft disciplines such as Graphic and Fashion Design.

Design Network

Based in the heart of the School of Art, MA/MFA Design: Jewellery is part of an innovative design network — a community of staff and students exploring design ideas in a discursive, cross-disciplinary studio environment. Critically informed practical designers, the group works experimentally, inspired by new insights and possibilities.

While studying towards a particular qualification at MA/MFA level, students experience their subject in the broader context of contemporary design practice.

Specialist Environment

Dedicated spaces for the postgraduate community have been developed to enable the postgraduate community to flourish. These spaces, for thinking and practice, are located centrally within the School of Art, allowing easy access to an extensive range of workshops where the combination of traditional and state of the art equipment opens up a world of exciting possibilities.

Course Content

The MA Design: Jewellery is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – whatever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design: Jewellery award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This route is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Resources

We have developed a dedicated postgraduate area occupying an entire floor of the main School of Art building, offering an exciting space to be, both intellectually and practically. The centre is located in the newly refurbished Chatham Tower with studios, design laboratories, seminar rooms and extensive workshops that form the nucleus of this vibrant, cross-disciplinary learning environment.

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The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems. Read more

About Mobile and Embedded Systems

The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems: tomorrow’s digital cities, Industry 4.0, cyber-physical systems (CPS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will all depend on embedded sensing of real-world phenomena, in-situ computation as well as automated information exchange and data distribution using machine-to-machine (M2M) com­munications between local and distributed control systems and machinery.

The ‘smart grid’ is one example of an application for future embedded systems, as it uses real-time sensing of the available renewable energy to determine where energy is to be routed across the power grid and controls intelligent machinery to increase production during peak times; this requires that internet-connected smart meters are installed in industrial plants and private homes alike to facilitate real-time sensing and control of technical systems.

Another exciting area of application for embedded systems is mobile and wearable technology, which allows users to access and manipulate information ‘on the go’ as the system provides relevant and timely information — indeed, this is one of the main purposes of mobile information technology such as smartphones and tablet computers. Additional meaning for this Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is generated by the context of the device, the user, the location and many more factors, all of which are sensed and computed by a plenitude of embedded sensors and collocated or connected systems.

Wearable devices such as fitness trackers and smart watches collect bio-physiological and health-related data to facilitate novel applications, including smart contact lenses and feedback systems for the learning of physical activities. At the same time, increasing cross-device interoperability means that users of head-mounted augmented reality and virtual reality displays can, for instance, use their entire smartphone screen as a keyboard and have the typed text displayed on augmented reality glasses.

Programme content

The programme is divided into three module groups with core and elective modules. These are:

1. Human-Computer Interaction
2. Systems Engineering
3. Data Processing, Signals and Systems

Features

- Excellent rankings for computer science, e.g. in U-Multirank and the CHE rankings
- A strongly research-oriented two-year programme with a modern, broad range of subjects
- Allows flexible interest-based selection of modules from the groups ‘Human-Computer Interaction’, ‘Systems Engineering’ and ‘Data Processing, Signals and Systems’
- A fully English-taught programme
- An outstanding staff-student ratio
- Participation in cutting-edge research projects
- Excellent research and teaching infrastructure
- An extensive network of partnerships with academic institutions and businesses worldwide
- A great student experience in Passau, the ‘City of Three Rivers’

Language requirements

Unless English is your native language or the language of your secondary or undergraduate education, you should provide an English language certificate at level B2 CEFR, e.g. TOEFL with a minimum score of 567 PBT, 87 iBT or ITP 543 (silver); IELTS starting from 5.5; or an equivalent language certificate.

To facilitate daily life in Germany, it would be beneficial for you to have German language skills at level A1 CEFR (beginner’s level). If you do not have any German skills when starting out on the programme, you will complete a compulsory beginner’s German course during your first year of study.

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Do you have a keen interest in the value of creativity and design and how this can best be used as a strategic tool for organisations?. Read more
Do you have a keen interest in the value of creativity and design and how this can best be used as a strategic tool for organisations?

The MA Design Management course will allow you to harness the power of design and innovation in a corporate context.

Offering industry engagement in fashion management or design strategy and innovation, you will develop transferrable design knowledge that will enable you to recognise the value of design and provide effective leadership and management within this sector. You will also have the opportunity to undertake a series of collaborative projects with third parties or organisations currently working within this industry.

On completion of this course you will leave with an in-depth understanding of how design can contribute to leadership, sustainability and business or social innovation, in addition to possessing the necessary skills to build and manage organisational growth through the development and launch of new products, services and brands.

This course has several available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-ma-dtfdmf6/

September distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-dl-sept-dtddmt6/

January distance learning - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/design-management-dl-jan-dtddmf6/

Learn From The Best

Our academic team is made up of research-active experts with extensive knowledge of the design industry. This knowledge is integrated into all aspects of their teaching to ensure that all content within this course is relevant to the workplace and current and emerging trends.

All staff within this department have a strong commitment to developing your skills and knowledge by developing your critical thinking and your ability to apply your skills to complex real-world problems.

They will be there to support you through every step of your course, ensuring you leave with confidence and full understanding of all aspects of this dynamic industry.

In addition to our teaching staff, you will also have access to specialist communities of practice that will provide the foundation for your learning journey through research networks and cross-organisational collaboration. These communities will provide industry engagement in design strategy and innovation or fashion management.

Teaching And Assessment

The MA Design Management course incorporates learning through investigation and the application of design methods in a business context.

The theory-based aspect of the course covers essential elements such as creative thinking, intellectual property, inter-cultural communication, research principles, reflective practice, contemporary influences and commercialisation.

These contextual modules provide the perfect foundation for the remainder of your degree, which develop your understanding the field of design management.

Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials, which are assessed by coursework and design projects. You will also have the opportunity to participate in collaborative projects and, where possible, field trips to allow you to put your skills into practise in a real-world context.

Upon completion of the taught modules, you will undertake research report under the supervision of your dedicated tutor who will provide advice and guidance at all stages.

Module Overview
DE7001 - Design Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7002 - Design Process (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Optional, 60 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)
DE7006 - Design Management 1: Articulating Design Value (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7007 - Design Management 2: Strategy (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at the Northumbria School of Design, which is located at City Campus East – a dedicated learning space that is located within Newcastle city centre.

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as our University library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – and well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Your learning experience will be enhanced though the use of technology and learning materials such as module guides, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists will be available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Design Management course is taught by our team of research-active academics who incorporate their individual areas of specialism into the course’s contextual modules to ensure they reflect the realities of the design industry and today’s modern working environment.

The development of your own research skills is at the core of the MA Design Management course content and you will develop research-informed methods of understanding the complexity inherent in real-world situations. These methods will enable you to make better decisions, advance the field of your practice and add new knowledge that will help you perfect your skills in your own particular discipline.

Supported by subject specialists and industry networks, you will also have the opportunity to join an expert-led community of practice in focussed on design strategy or fashion management to further enhance your learning experience.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Design Management course will allow you to develop your leadership skills and understanding of how design can be utilised by businesses to enhance opportunities and facilitate growth.

You will engage with industrial multidisciplinary projects based on real life situations, allowing you to enhance your CV and personal development through collaboration with those currently working within this dynamic industry. Some of the recent examples of industry projects include work on oral healthcare with Procter and Gamble, wearable technology projects with the CPI National Centre for Printable Electronics, person-centred healthcare services with the Academic Health Science Network and the development of innovative kitchenware with Lakeland.

You will also develop your business and employability skills, in addition to achieving a master’s level qualification in this discipline.

Your Future

Once you have completed the MA Design Management course you will possess an in-depth understanding of how to harness the power of design within a corporate context. You will also be suitably qualified to take on managerial and leadership roles within the design sector.

This course will prepare you for broad range of jobs within design companies, private organisations and the public sector, in addition to specialist jobs within your chosen specialism. Completion may also enhance promotion prospects in some professions.

This course will also provide you with a strong foundation for progression to PhD studies.

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There is a great need for suitably qualified engineers to fulfill the existing and future needs of the global smart economy. This course addresses that need by providing an exciting range of topical modules and a state-of-the-art engineering facility. Read more

Overview

There is a great need for suitably qualified engineers to fulfill the existing and future needs of the global smart economy. This course addresses that need by providing an exciting range of topical modules and a state-of-the-art engineering facility. The programme also offers the student a chance to develop their research skills in a full-time three month project.

In the world of increasingly connected things and people, electronic engineers develop the technology that is the interface between the digital and the physical worlds. With the increasing pervasiveness of electronics enhanced things, and the need for ever-present wire-free communication, there is an increasing demand for engineers with experience in wireless communications systems and embedded computing systems.

The internet of things will lead to billions of wirelessly connected devices that will fundamentally change our approach to wireless systems and networks. To address this, there is a need for well qualified graduates who can design solutions based on solid understanding of the wireless environment and electronic hardware.
Similarly, as we continue to embed intelligence in everything from home appliances to cars and wearable sensors to robotic systems, there is growing need for engineers who understand the unique problems of real time application deadlines, resource constrained computing environments, and embedded intelligence.
The ME Electronic Engineering has been designed to provide two specialized module sets that introduce advanced techniques and topical content: one focusing on wireless communications and the other on embedded systems. These are supported by core modules which provide techniques that are widely applied and reusable across a range of engineering applications.
The programme has been designed to have a large project element to allow students to demonstrate their expertise in their chosen specialism. In addition students will be invited to present their work in an open day to invited local industry leaders. A small number of placements may be available for students graduating in 2016 (to be confirmed).

Course Structure

Note: As module availability may change year on year, applicants should check the Department web site for the most up to date list of modules available for 2016-2017, see web address below:

https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/electronic-engineering/current-students

Career Options

Graduates will have enhanced qualifications and up to date knowledge of modern cutting-edge techniques and technology suitable for a range of electronic and ICT positions in the smart economy.

Graduates of this course are well qualified to work in wireless communications and embedded systems space. Both of these areas are seeing business growth and, despite the demand, both areas are experiencing a shortage of suitably skilled engineers. Therefore this programme will significantly enhance your job prospects in these fields.
The region around Maynooth and the Greater Dublin Region is host to one of the greatest concentrations of ICT companies – ranging from large multinational companies such as Intel, IBM and Google to a very active and strong ecosystem of specialist and start-up companies. Maynooth University is at the heart of this industry and this programme will provide opportunities for students to engage with the community.
As a result of the advanced techniques introduced and the substantial project, this programme also provides a suitable foundation for students who may be considering undertaking further research in the area of the internet of Things, embedded systems and wireless communication.
International students from outside the European Economic Area may also avail of the Third Level Graduate Scheme which allows graduates to remain in Ireland for up to 12 months after graduation to seek employment and if successful to apply for a Work Permit or Green Card Permit.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHJ50 Full-time


The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Applicants may be required to attend for interview as part of the admissions process.

Applicants who do not hold a degree in Electronic, Electrical, Computer, or Telecommunications Engineering should include a complete syllabus describing the content of their primary degree.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules & Structure

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme:

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing
Interactive Media Critical Theory- 15 or 30 credits
Physical Computing: Arduino and Related Technologies- 30 credits

In Year 2 you will study the following:

Studio Practice- 120 credits
Computational Arts Critical Studies- 60 credits

Assessment

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & Careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?. Read more
Would you like to improve your career prospects, start your own business or develop further specialist design skills?

Offering the perfect blend of theory and practice in the context of business and society, the MA Design course will enable you to focus on your own specialist area of design practice, in disciplines such as 3D design, fashion communication, fashion design, fashion marketing, graphic design, communication design, service design, interaction design, industrial design, interior design, 3D design and transportation design.

Developed specifically for those with a design background or relevant qualification, you will undertake a series of taught modules to develop your knowledge and practical skills, before competing a final project or thesis around your chosen specialism.

In addition to the taught aspect of this course, you will also have the opportunity to undertake a series of collaborative projects with industry and, where possible, field trips to collaborative companies or exhibitions to further enhance your learning experience.

Learn From The Best

Our academic team is made up of research-active experts with extensive knowledge of the design industry. This knowledge is integrated into all aspects of their teaching to ensure that all content within this course is relevant to the workplace and current and emerging trends.

All staff within this department have a strong commitment to developing your skills and knowledge by developing your critical thinking and your ability to apply your skills to complex real-world problems.

They will be there to support you through every step of your course, ensuring you leave with confidence and full understanding of all aspects of this dynamic industry.

In addition to our teaching staff, you will also have access to specialist communities of practice that will provide the foundation for your learning journey through research networks and cross-organisational collaboration. These communities will focus on strategic innovation, performance products and service design.

Teaching And Assessment

This MA Design course incorporates practice-based learning that is informed by contemporary and contextual influences and founded on your own personal aims and professional direction.

The first two semesters of this course will focus on developing your core skills through the completion of four modules: design thinking, design practice, direction and experimentation.

Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials, which are assessed by coursework and design projects. You will also undertake collaborative projects and, where possible, field trips to allow you to put your skills into practise in a real-world context.

Upon completion of the taught modules, you will undertake a final project or thesis to demonstrate all of the skills you have acquired on this course. This will be undertaken under the supervision of your dedicated tutor who will provide advice and guidance at all stages.

Module Overview
DE7001 - Design Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7002 - Design Process (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7003 - Project / Thesis (Core, 60 Credits)
DE7004 - Design Practice 1: Professional Direction (Core, 30 Credits)
DE7005 - Design Practice 2 : Experimentation (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)

Learning Environment

This course is delivered at the Northumbria School of Design, which is located at City Campus East – a dedicated learning space that is located within Newcastle city centre.

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as our University library – which is ranked in the top three in the UK – and well equipped working space, The Hub, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Your learning experience will be enhanced though the use of technology and learning materials such as module guides, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists will be available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA Design course is taught by our team of research-active academics who incorporate their individual areas of specialism into the course’s contextual modules to ensure they reflect the realities of the design industry and today’s modern working environment.

The development of your own research skills is at the core of the MA Design course and you will develop research-informed methods of understanding the complexity inherent in real-world situations. These methods will enable you to make better decisions, advance the field of your practice and add new knowledge that will help you perfect your skills in your own particular discipline.

Supported by subject specialists and industry networks, you will also have the opportunity to join an expert-led community of practice in strategic design and innovation, performance product design or service design, as well as engaging with traditional disciplines such as fashion and industrial design.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course will allow you to enhance your practical skills and knowledge in a specialist area of design.

You will work on live industry projects that will enhance your CV and personal development through collaboration with those currently working within this dynamic industry. Some of the recent examples of industry projects include work on oral healthcare with Procter and Gamble, wearable technology projects with the CPI National Centre for Printable Electronics, person-centred healthcare services with the Academic Health Science Network and the development of innovative kitchenware with Lakeland.

You will also develop your business and employability skills, in addition to achieving a master’s level qualification in this discipline.

Your Future

Once you have completed the MA Design course you will possess the skills and ability to make an impact in the design industry, whether you are just starting out in your career or looking to enhance your professional development.

This course will prepare you for broad range of jobs within design companies, private organisations and the public sector, in addition to specialist jobs within your chosen specialism.

Completion may enhance promotion prospects in some professions, in addition to providing enhanced opportunities for management level roles.

This course will also provide you with the knowledge and experience to be able to set up your very own design company, in addition to providing a strong foundation for progression to PhD studies.

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This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing- N/A

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course. This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. Read more
Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course.

Who is it for?

This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. It is open to science and engineering graduates and those working within hospitals or related industry who want to work in healthcare organisations, in the medical devices industry, or in biomedical engineering research.

The course will suit recent graduates and/or clinical engineers with a technical background or those working in healthcare who want to move into a management position.

Objectives

With several medical conditions requiring extensive and continuous monitoring and early and accurate diagnosis becoming increasingly desirable, technology for biomedical applications is rapidly becoming one of the key ingredients of today and tomorrow’s medical care.

From miniaturised home diagnostic instruments to therapeutic devices and to large scale hospital imaging and monitoring systems, healthcare is becoming increasingly dependent on technology. This course meets the growing need for biomedical and clinical engineers across the world by focusing on the design of medical devices from conception to application.

One of the few accredited courses of its kind in London, the programme concentrates on the use of biomedical-driven engineering design and technology in healthcare settings so you can approach this multidisciplinary topic from the biological and medical perspective; the technological design and development perspective; and from the perspective of managing the organisation and maintenance of large scale equipment and IT systems in a hospital.

This MSc in Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course has been created in consultation and close collaboration with clinicians, biomedical engineering researchers and medical technology industrial partners. The programme fosters close links with the NHS and internationally-renowned hospitals including St. Bartholomew's (Barts) and the Royal London Hospital and Great Ormond street so that you can gain a comprehensive insight into the applied use and the management of medical technology and apply your knowledge in real-world clinical settings.

Placements

In the last few years there have been some limited opportunities for our top students to carry out their projects through placements within hospital-based healthcare technology groups or specialist London-based biomedical technology companies. Placement-based projects are also offered to selected students in City’s leading Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE). As we continue our cutting-edge research and industrial and clinical collaborations, you will also have this opportunity.

Academic facilities

As a student on this course you will have the opportunity to work with cutting-edge test and measurement instrumentation – oscilloscopes, function generators, analysers – as well as specialist signal generators and analysers. The equipment is predominantly provided by the world-leading test and measurement equipment manufacturer Keysight, who have partnered with City to provide branding to our electronics laboratories. You also have access to brand new teaching labs and a dedicated postgraduate teaching lab. And as part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught through face-to-face lectures in small groups, where there is a lot of interaction and feedback. Laboratory sessions run alongside the lectures, giving you the opportunity to develop your problem-solving and design skills. You also learn software skills in certain modules, which are taught inside computer labs. We also arrange hospital visits so you gain hands-on experience of different clinical environments.

We arrange tutorials for setting coursework, highlight important subject areas, conduct practical demonstrations, and offer support with revision. You are assessed by written examinations at the end of each term, and coursework assignments, which are set at various times throughout the term.

You also work towards an individual project, which is assessed in the form of a written thesis and an oral examination at the end of the summer. The project can be based on any area of biomedical engineering, telemedicine or technology management and will be supervised by an academic or clinical scientist with expertise in the subject area. Many projects are based in hospital clinical engineering departments, or if you are a part-time student, you can base the project on your own workplace. You will have regular contact with the supervisor to make sure the project progresses satisfactorily. Some of the programme’s current students are working on a project focusing on devices that use brain signals to move external objects such as a remote control car and a prosthetic arm.

Some of the previous projects students have worked on include:
-A cursor controller based on electrooculography (EOG)
-Modelling a closed-loop automated anaesthesia system
-Design of a movement artefact-resistant wearable heart rate/activity monitor
-Review of progress towards a fully autonomous artificial mechanical heart
-Design of smartphone-based healthcare diagnostic devices and sensors.

If you successfully complete eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Completing four modules (60 credits) will lead to a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

Along with the 60 credit dissertation eight core modules cover diverse subject areas including biomedical electronics and instrumentation, technology infrastructure management, as well as the latest advances in medical imaging and patient monitoring.

The course includes a special module which gives you an introduction to anatomy, physiology and pathology designed for non-clinical science graduates.

The most innovative areas of biomedical and clinical engineering are covered and the content draws from our research expertise in biomedical sensors, bio-optics, medical imaging, signal processing and modelling. You will learn from academic lecturers as well as clinical scientists drawn from our collaborating institutions and departments, which include:
-Charing Cross Hospital, London
-The Royal London Hospital
-St Bartholomew's Hospital, London
-Basildon Hospital
-Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City, University of London

Modules
-Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology (15 credits)
-Physiological Measurement (15 credits)
-Biomedical Instrumentation (15 credits)
-Medical Electronics (15 credits)
-Cardiovascular Diagnostics and Therapy (15 credits)
-Medical Imaging Modalities (15 credits)
-Clinical Engineering Practice (15 credits)
-Healthcare Technology Management (15 credits)

Career prospects

This exciting MSc programme offers a well-rounded background and specialised knowledge for those seeking a professional career as biomedical engineers in medical technology companies or research groups but is also uniquely placed for offering skills to clinical engineers in the NHS and international healthcare organisations.

Alumnus Alex Serdaris is now working as field clinical engineer for E&E Medical and alumna Despoina Sklia is working as a technical support specialist at Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. Other Alumni are carrying out research in City’s Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE).

Applicants may wish to apply for vacancies in the NHS, private sector or international healthcare organisations. Students are encouraged to become members of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) where they will be put in touch with the Clinical Engineering community and any opportunities that arise around the UK during their studies. Application to the Clinical Scientist training programme is encouraged and fully supported.

The Careers, Student Development & Outreach team provides a professional, high quality careers and information service for students and recent graduates of City, University of London, in collaboration with employers and other institutional academic and service departments. The course also prepares graduates who plan to work in biomedical engineering research and work within an academic setting.

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Technology is becoming closely interwoven into everyday life. How we create and design these interactions is crucial to their success and the positive impact they have on our lives. Read more
Technology is becoming closely interwoven into everyday life. How we create and design these interactions is crucial to their success and the positive impact they have on our lives. This understanding forms the core of the IDEA program’s design philosophy: technology that is designed to delight its users.

We aim to infuse the latest technological innovation with a human-centred design thinking to solve complex problems. The IDEA program promotes a creative and critical approach, within the framework of research-driven interaction design and user experience methodologies. The result is an understanding of how to design interactive products, services and systems that will have lasting cultural and commercial importance.

In a foundation first semester, you will develop the essential industry knowledge and skills for working as an interaction or user experience designer, at ease with web and mobile applications. Once you have these core skills in human-centred design thinking, web/mobile interface design and software programming, you are trained to analyse and evaluate their application in a range of design contexts. This evaluative approach is what enables IDEA students to create meaningful interactive experiences that will become ubiquitous parts of our everyday life.

In the second semester, you will engage in design studio projects to extend these skills, both conceptually and technically. We offer a studio-based teaching environment in which you work individually or in teams to creatively solve design challenges. You will learn to design across multiple platforms and scales - from natural, tangible and wearable user interfaces to interactive architecture, creative robotics and urban informatics. Your ideas may even become the basis of prototype products, patents or start-up services.

You can adapt this program to suit your interests and passions by taking electives from other faculties. You will also build a compelling design portfolio showcasing not only your design skills but also your understanding of how best to convey the user experience of new products and services.

The course culminates in a capstone research project, industry internship or graduation design project. The Faculty draws on industry and alumni contacts to enable opportunities to build your professional network. These factors combine to position you as a well-connected creative industry specialist with expertise across the strategic, creative and technical domains.

The course is timetabled to suit your busy schedule. Subjects are run either in the evening or in intensive mode (a block series of Fridays and Saturdays). You can also study part-time. The course has embedded qualifications, enabling you to graduate after the foundation first semester with a Graduate Certificate, or continue on to Graduate Diploma or Masters level.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The User Experience Design MSc is a flexible course that you can tailor to your own professional interests. It will help to train you for roles that range from usability, interaction and interface design through to general project management and consulting. Read more
The User Experience Design MSc is a flexible course that you can tailor to your own professional interests. It will help to train you for roles that range from usability, interaction and interface design through to general project management and consulting.

The course is for designers and software developers wishing to enhance their knowledge of user-centred design and usability evaluation of software-enabled products.

Course content has been designed for maximum relevancy to the marketplace.

Upon completion, you'll be able to apply your knowledge and interaction design skills to novel interaction paradigms; make effective use of a broad range of design methods; obtain in-depth knowledge of developments in mobile, ubiquitous or wearable systems and understand the commercial contexts of interaction design.

Course structure

The course can be studied full-time or part-time.

For full-time students the academic year is divided into three 15-week semesters.

The taught element of the course is delivered during the first two semesters. Modules involve approximately 20 per cent classroom teaching and 80 per cent individual or group work. The third semester focuses on your major project.

Part-time students study alongside full-time students with a minimum attendance of one half day per week, depending on the number of modules taken.

Syllabus

On the course, you will study four core modules, two of which will require you to complete individual design projects.

You will also choose from a range of optional modules. These will allow you to specialise in the areas of the discipline that interest you the most.

Modules:

Interaction Design and Evaluation Process
Interface and Information Design
Research Methods
Major Project

Options (subject to change):

Marketing for Interactive Technologies
Interactive Technologies Business Context
Intellectual Property Law
Web Development
Creative Design Lab
Project Management
Independent portfolio project
Independent research project

Employability

Graduates have gone on to work as commercial interaction designers on both software and software-enabled physical products, as well as using this as a starting point for a research career in human-centred interaction design.

Our graduates are working in roles that include:

• digital consultant
• senior developer
• UX designer
• web designer
• digital marketer.

At the end of the taught element there is the possibility of a placement with a digital media company for the major project module. This puts real experience on your CV as you consolidate your expertise.

Brighton is acknowledged as a major digital media cluster.

There are plenty of opportunities to network with companies and organisations in the sector both through the course through external speakers and taking your own initiative. The course cohort has regularly attended the annual conference UX Brighton and students can attend the many digital media events organised in the city.

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The Digital Design MA is concerned with the creation of any digital or computer related content or products. This includes digital media, digital products, digital interiors, digital exhibitions and installations, digital graphics, digital fashion and even digital branding and marketing. Read more
The Digital Design MA is concerned with the creation of any digital or computer related content or products. This includes digital media, digital products, digital interiors, digital exhibitions and installations, digital graphics, digital fashion and even digital branding and marketing. You can specialise in the following:

• Digital media design, including multimedia design, web design, 2D and 3D computer animation, visual and special effects for TV and film, mobile app design for tablets and smart phones, computer and video games, virtual and augmented reality and 2D and 3D visualisation

• Digital product design, including the design of any computer-based or screen-based product such as smartphones, smart TV’s, tablet devices, smart watches, games consoles, smart household appliances, information systems and 3D digital printing

• Digital interior design, including digital display and projection design, intelligent interiors, digital lighting design and digital furniture design

• Digital exhibition, museum and installation design, including digital heritage resources, digital archeology, interactive kiosk and installation design, virtual museums and exhibitions

• Digital graphic design, including the design of e-books, e-learning, interface design, interaction design and digital signage

• Digital fashion design, including the design of wearable computing, smart clothing design and digital fabrics

• Digital branding and marketing design, including digital corporate identity design, logo design, social media marketing, digital channel advertising and promotion

You will have access to industry standard software and hardware such as Adobe Creative Suite and Autodesk MAYA while working in a dynamic environment with ongoing multimedia research and commercial projects. There are also opportunities to work on digital design projects set by external companies and other organisations. You will develop the skills and ideas to go on to employment as a digital designer or to set up your own business as a freelancer after graduation.

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This Master of Design is new for 2017. A professionally focused program of advanced study in contemporary design practice, the Master of Design course includes specialisations in interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design. Read more
This Master of Design is new for 2017.

A professionally focused program of advanced study in contemporary design practice, the Master of Design course includes specialisations in interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design.

You can also take a range of units from across these three to construct an advanced studies in design specialisation. This program is ideal for those keen to enter the expanding fields of professional design engagement, or design practitioners aiming to upgrade their expertise. You’ll be trained in advanced design thinking and processes that’ll equip you to create design solutions that engage experiential, communication, object and spatial contexts.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2017/design-f6002?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

- Advanced studies in design
This pathway allows you to construct, with approval, an individual program of study from across interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design. This enables you to tailor your unit choices while addressing the fundamental principles of advanced design practice and thinking. It’ll inspire you to connect research and practice across the design disciplines, and to become a thoughtful design practitioner. You’ll broaden your knowledge of key design constructs, deepen your professional learning in design areas of interest, and advance your capacity as a design professional.

- Collaborative design
Collaborative design places you conceptually and practically at the intersection of interior, graphic and industrial design practice. The program will set you design challenges involving image, text, products, narratives, systems, ervices, public and private space, materiality and virtuality. You’ll develop independent conceptual and practical design skills alongside an ability to be part of collaborative design processes. You’ll expand your awareness across design disciplines; develop multidisciplinary design expertise; and build broader skills in leadership, professional adaptability and complex project planning.

- Interaction design
The interaction design specialisation develops your skills in the design of contemporary artefacts, products and services that engage with interactive, user-focused technologies and processes. These can include, but aren’t limited to, health and medical equipment, ‘smart’ furniture, educational toys, wearable technologies, information kiosks and transport systems. You’ll use a diverse range of interactive processes, including the application of advanced technologies; electronics and programming; physical and virtual interface manipulation; engineering and material fabrication; and rapid prototyping. The specialisation gives you an understanding of the relationship between interactive activities, products and human behaviour.

- Multimedia design
Multimedia design develops your skills in digital communication environments. This includes: designing for the web; motion and animation; and interactive touchscreen devices and surfaces. Emphasising an advanced knowledge of existing and emerging digital design processes and systems, this specialisation embraces projects of varied scale, from hand-held smart devices to large public interactive screens. It develops your ability to build a communication narrative; use multimedia processes to fill community and business needs; and understand the end-user’s engagement with projects or products such as websites, apps and other screen-based media.

Course Structure

The course comprises 96 points structured into 3 parts:

Part A. Preparatory Studies for Advanced Design (24 points), Part B. Advanced Design Studies (24 points), and Part C. Advanced Design Applications (48 points).

- Students admitted at Entry level 1 complete 96 points, comprising Part A, B & C
- Students admitted at Entry level 2 complete 72 points, comprising Part B & C
- Students admitted at Entry level 3 complete 48 points, comprising Part C

Note: Students eligible for credit for prior studies may elect not to receive the credit and complete one of the higher credit-point options. A zero credit point unit in Art, Design and Architecture Occupational Health and Safety will also be undertaken. This unit is required of all students in the Master of Design and must be undertaken even if credit is obtained for Parts A or B.

Part A: Preparatory studies for advanced design
These studies provide you with the conceptual thinking and technical skill set required for advanced postgraduate study in this area. The studio unit brings together conceptual and technical abilities developed in the other two units.

Part B: Advanced design studies
In these studies you will focus on the application of conceptual thinking and technical skills to advanced design problem solving. You will analyse and create a project outcome based on research, critique, and the application of design processes appropriate to your specialisation. You will also choose a selective unit that will further build capacity in your chosen specialisation.

Part C: Advanced design applications
In these studies you will focus on the application of advanced design problem solving skills at a professional level. You will consolidate skills and practice of design research methodologies and may extend your research trajectory to further study. Part C is also supported by a selective unit to allow you to build capabilities in your chosen specialisation.

In the final semester you will pursue a major design project or participate in a leading industry project. The exegesis unit formalises the research component of Part C. The final semester brings together advanced technical ability, conceptual thinking, entrepreneurial studies and design management in practice.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/design-and-architecture

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2017/design-f6002?domestic=true

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The master provides the methodological tools and the design skills to become accessory designer, with professional application ranging from fashion to jewelry and sportswear. Read more
The master provides the methodological tools and the design skills to become accessory designer, with professional application ranging from fashion to jewelry and sportswear.

Students who complete the master will be able to design accessories for both the quality craftsmanship that in the high technology, so they can fit into companies from fashion, handbag, shoes, eyewear, jewelry, watches, leather goods, knitwear, hats, wearable hitech.
At the end of the Master, participants will receive the Master Degree in 1st level Master in Accessory Design.

Costs
9.000 €

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