• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"weapons"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Weapons)

  • "weapons" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 36
Order by 
The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

Read less
Examines the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime and the way in which proliferation influences other issues in international relations. Read more
Examines the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime and the way in which proliferation influences other issues in international relations. This programme utilises knowledge and tools of analysis from history, political science, the hard sciences, philosophy and sociology.

Key benefits

- Drawing on the strengths of the Department of War Studies, this programme is multidisciplinary, utilising knowledge and tools of analysis from history, political science, the hard sciences, philosophy and sociology.

- Through guest speakers and when possible, field trips, the programme also draws on the broad range of expertise available in government and the NGO community.

- The Centre for Science and Security Studies, located within the Department of War Studies, provides a vibrant home for the MA, with its own speaker series and a growing cadre of PhD students and researchers. When possible, the Centre also offers internships on current research projects; students are also encouraged to apply for internships at other London-based institutions working in the field, such as the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC) and IISS.

- The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a training institution for War Studies.

- The Department places great emphasis on recruiting leading experts who bring with them not only a wealth of knowledge and ideas but an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/non-proliferation-and-international-security-ma-.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The development and spread of weapons technology has been and continues to be of central importance in international relations, with today’s growing concerns about the spread of chemical, biological and nuclear (CBN) weapons and their means of delivery to both state and non-state actors. Our MA programme enables you to examine the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime, and the way in which proliferation influences other key issues in international relations, including the causes of war and peace, military doctrine and strategy, and the rise (and possible decline) of the state as the central actor in international relations. Our programme is composed of a core module plus a choice of optional modules and a dissertation, and provides an ideal base for further academic or policy research or any career involving critical analysis.

Our MA programme is designed as a one-year full-time or two year part-time taught programme which offers you the opportunity to engage critically with ideas in international relations and social and political thought concerned with the study of conflict and peace, and their application to empirical case-study material. The compulsory module applies these ideas to the issue of proliferation. The various options available will allow you to broaden your programme of study by taking other contemporary or historical options offered by the department, or to focus on proliferation by taking specialised options that are being developed.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the causes, processes and effects of weapons proliferation, the evolution and effectiveness of the international non-proliferation regime, and the way in which proliferation influences other key issues in international relations.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas, exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

Read less
The MA in Science and Security is designed to provide an integrated understanding of science and international politics. Developments in technology are central to all aspects of international conflict, and a multidisciplinary understanding of these developments is necessary to fully comprehend their policy implications. Read more
The MA in Science and Security is designed to provide an integrated understanding of science and international politics. Developments in technology are central to all aspects of international conflict, and a multidisciplinary understanding of these developments is necessary to fully comprehend their policy implications. Topics include nuclear weapons, arms control verification, cyber security, and terrorism.

Key benefits

• A unique programme designed to develop students' abilities to understand and analyse the security implications of scientific and technological developments, utilising knowledge and tools of analysis from the hard sciences, political science, history, philosophy and the sociology.

• The Centre for Science and Security Studies, based in the Department of War Studies, provides a vibrant home for the MA. The Centre has a growing cadre of PhD students and researchers, and sponsors its own speaker series. Students on the MA are encouraged to apply for internships (on Centre research projects and/or with other relevant institutions in London, such as the Verification Research, Training and Information Centre (VERTIC) and IISS).

• With a typical 50-50 mix of students with a hard science versus social science/humanities background, the programme provides an excellent opportunity for students to learn from each other as well as from staff and visiting lecturers; in recent years students have institutionalised this by forming their own reading group.

• Students have access to visiting academics, serving officers, government ministers and other experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.

• The Department of War Studies is unique in the UK and one of very few university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon.

• The Department has an excellent reputation as a graduate training institution and is recognised by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a training institution for War Studies.

• The Department places great emphasis on recruiting leading experts who bring with them not only a wealth of knowledge and ideas but an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

• The unrivalled location in the heart of London beside the River Thames brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities.

• The department is close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/science-and-security-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

There is an increased need in today's world to understand the security implications of scientific and technological developments. While science and technology have always affected national and international security, current developments in the fields of space, nuclear and biological weapons, and long-range missiles as well as work in such emerging fields as biotechnology and information technology suggest that the impact of science on security is becoming more diverse as well as more central to policy planners. At the same time, individuals and sub-national groups have more access to new technologies than ever before.

Our programme is designed to provide you with an integrated understanding of science and politics. This involves developing an understanding of the science underlying key weapons systems and technologies, the main concepts and tools of international politics and security studies, and the process by which scientists and policymakers can interact productively in the policy process. The goal is to equip you to be able to analyse the impact of current and future scientific developments on security.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is designed to provide you with an integrated understanding of science and international politics to cope with the demands of the emerging security agenda.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules are assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas, exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Whilst this is not a vocational programme, students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of military vehicles.

It will provide students with the technical knowledge and understanding of weapon systems and military vehicles to make them effective in their specification, design, development and assessment.

The course is accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Course overview

This course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two week duration).

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project . The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Earning the appropriate credits can lead to the following academic awards:

- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) – any combination of modules (building a total of 60 credits).
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) – all modules (120 credits).
- Master of Science (MSc) – all modules (120 credits) plus project (80 credits).

The Military Vehicle Technology MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of military vehicle systems. Both armoured and support vehicles are covered within the course.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course also offers a critical depth to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of current titles are given below:

- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of UGV Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Optimisation of the suspension system for a vehicle.
- Analysis of the off-road performance of a wheeled or tracked vehicle.

Modules

Core -

Introductory Studies
Solid Modelling CAD
Finite Element Methods in Engineering
Modelling, Simulation and Control
Weapon System Technology
Survivability
Vehicle Systems Integration
Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
Military Vehicle Dynamics
Military Vehicle Propulsion

Optional -

Fundamentals of Ballistics
Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
Gun System Design
Element Design
Guided Weapons
Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems
Reliability and System Effectiveness
Light Weapon Design
Rocket Motors and Propellants

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Funding

For more information on funding please contact

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take-up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/military-vehicle-technology.html

Read less
This is an innovative programme that focuses on the role and relevance of international law in a rapidly changing global security environment. Read more
This is an innovative programme that focuses on the role and relevance of international law in a rapidly changing global security environment. It reflects the breadth of contemporary international security issues, addressing issues as diverse as terrorism, armed conflicts and transnational organised crime.

Why this programme

-If you want to increase your horizons to an international platform, look beyond domestic legal orders and learn about global security issues, this LLM is ideal for you.
-You will be taught by an excellent team that truly understands international issues, with staff drawn from Canada, Germany, Scotland, Greece and Uzbekistan.
-You will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to work as security consultant or practitioner with governments, international organizations and NGOs.
-The programme includes optional participation in a student trip to Geneva.
-We offer excellent facilities including our dedicated School of Law library; our main University library also contains our extensive collection of legal materials and official publications and is a European Documentation Centre.
-The programme is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by experts in the field. The programme is complemented by guest speaker events and research workshops, allowing students to get involved with leading academics from outside Glasgow.

Programme structure

The courses are delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and project work. You are required to study one core course and three optional courses, as well as to submit a dissertation approved as falling within the area.

Core course
-International law and international security

Optional courses
-Advanced introduction to international criminal law
-Advanced introduction to the law of the United Nations
-International and European human rights law
-International law and international economic governance
-International security and international relations
-The laws of armed conflict
-The settlement of international disputes

Note: Some courses might not be available every year.

Background and Aims

The LLM in International Law and Security is designed for students interested in international law and a rapidly changing global security environment. It is an innovative, interdisciplinary and practice-oriented programme that combines legal courses with courses from politics and international relations. The programme aims to foster a critical understanding of contemporary global and regional security issues and the role of international law in addressing these issues.

The Masters reflects the breadth of contemporary international security issues, addressing topics as divers as terrorism, armed conflicts, transnational organized crime, drones and autonomous weapons systems, espionage and surveillance in cyberspace, weapons of mass destruction, failed states, resource and energy security, poverty, climate change, pandemics and natural catastrophes.

The LLM in International Law and Security is designed to respond to the increasing demand for lawyers with a background in international law and security, whether in international organizations, ministries and other governmental agencies, civil society, academia or in legal practice. The leading teaching team is made up of experts from Germany, Scotland, Greece, Canada and Uzbekistan.

As part of the taught masters programme, there is a compulsory one-week induction programme, tailored specifically for the LLM. This offers students information and guidance on learning methods, research skills, and on non-academic aspects of life and study in Glasgow.

Career prospects

There is a high demand for law professionals with expertise in international law and security. You will be well placed for roles in international institutions, government departments (ministries of foreign affairs, defence, justice, home affairs, and development), non-governmental organisations and law firms.

Read less
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. The International Studies (Global Political Economy) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to the globalisation of economic relations, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2016/international-studies--global-political-economy-/international-studies-global-political-economy/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers. .

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as the globalisation of economic relations and the potential challenges it poses for states and the governance of the international system. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables you to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional Advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by n international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Read more
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations.

The International Studies (International Relations) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced International Studies, including the application of these to real world cases and issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-international-relations/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers the central foundations of the contemporary study of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip provides you with first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the changing nature of security in a global era. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the changing nature of security in a global era. The International Studies (Security) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to contemporary debates on 'human security', culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-security/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers issues such as changes in the nature of war, military culture, and security itself, both as a practice and academic discipline. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this course is covered in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. Read more

Course Description

On this part-time, distance learning course you will learn how to evaluate and interpret different forms of forensic evidence and how to consider its relevance to police investigations. You will study the scientific principles and practical application of the many and varied techniques used to forensically examine different evidence types.

You will learn how to select the most appropriate techniques for different evidence types, how to interpret the results and how to apply critical analysis to determine what that means in terms of evidential value.

The skills and knowledge you will gain on this course will enable you to confidently argue the reasoning behind the interpretation and evaluation of forensic evidence and to demonstrate in a court of law that you are credible as an expert witness.

This course is offered in association with the University of Florida and the University of Canberra.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course Structure

If you complete all of the modules and a dissertation you will be awarded an MSc. However it is also possible to compete only the modules, without a dissertation, and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), or to complete just the first year modules and receive a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) These are 'exit awards' which means that you cannot apply for them directly; you must apply for the MSc.

Core Modules:

Crime Scene Examination
Trace Evidence Analysis
Evidential Value and Interpretation
Research Methods

Option Modules (choose 4-6):

Physical Evidence modules

Fingerprint corrosion of metal
Arson investigation
Forensic engineering
Toxicology of chemical weapons (F)
Blood distribution and spatter (F)
Environmental forensics (C)

Biological Evidence modules

Biological evidence and serology (F)
Forensic toxicology (F)
Biological evidence and serology (F)

Human Remains modules

Introduction to forensic archaeology
Introduction to forensic anthropology
Forensic entomology (F)
Forensic genetics (F)

Management modules

Crime scene management
Intelligence gathering and data mining

*Modules marked F or C are taught by the University of Florida or the University of Canberra.

After completing your modules, you will complete a dissertation of approximately 15,000-20,000 words, which may be related to work-based issues you are facing.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

Read less
This course has been designed specifically to provide an opportunity to a wide range of attendees, which include military officers, defence industry staff, government servants and civilian students. Read more

Course Description

This course has been designed specifically to provide an opportunity to a wide range of attendees, which include military officers, defence industry staff, government servants and civilian students.

The course offers advanced academic background necessary for students to contribute effectively to technically demanding projects in the field of explosives and Explosives Ordnance Engineering (EOE). It does this by introducing them to up-to-date and current research, which enables them to obtain a critical awareness to problem solving and capability to evaluate both military and commercial best practice in the field of EOE.

This course enables students to learn in a flexible manner as it offers both part-time and full-time learning all with full access to an outstanding remote virtual learning environment and on-line literature through our extensive library facilities. Other qualities and transferable skills include opportunities that will enhance employment potential in this field, problem solving, self-direction and informed communication skills.

This course meets the educational requirements for the Engineering Council UK’s register of Chartered Engineers (CEng); the course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Overview

This course specialises in explosive ordnance and engineering and is world class in teaching and research. We have a diverse student body drawn mainly from personnel linked to the military from numerous industries and institutions in the UK as well as overseas providing a rich educational experience. Our class size is normally 20 - 25 comprising a combination of full and part time students.

Start date: Full-time: September. Part-time: by arrangement

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7.0

Course overview

Part One of the MSc course contains an introductory period followed by academic instruction, which is in modular form. Students take ten core modules covering the main disciplines and choose two optional modules based upon their particular background, future requirements or research interests. To qualify for the Explosives Ordnance Engineering MSc, students must successfully complete formal examinations, individual coursework, one group project and a research project.

Research project:
In Part Two, students undertake a research project - a list of prospective projects is provided each year by the teaching staff. Alternatively, with the agreement of the teaching staff/supervisor, students may undertake appropriate research of their own choice.

The structure of this course has been devised so that students learn the fundamental elements of EOE from an academic perspective whilst having the opportunity to learn something new by selecting elective modules.

Modules

The MSc is 200 credits of which 90 are compulsory, 80 are for the thesis and 30 credits are elective.

The PgDip is 120 credits of which 90 are compulsory and 30 credits are elective.
Full modules are 10 credits each; half modules are 5 credits each.

Core:
- Ammunition Systems 1 (Warheads)
- Ammunition Systems 2 (Delivery Systems)
- Ammunition Systems 3 (Target Effects)
- Future Developments: Scanning the Horizon in EOE
- Insensitive Munitions (Half Module)
- Introduction to Explosives
- Manufacture and Material Properties of Explosives
- Gun Propellants
- Research Methodology
- Testing and Evaluation of Explosives (Half Module)
- Transitions To Detonation (Half Module)
- EOE Project Phase

Elective:
- Explosives and the Environment (Half Module)
- Explosives for Nuclear Weapons
- Pyrotechnics
- Computer Modelling Tools in Explosives Ordnance Engineering (Half Module)
- Risk Assessment for Explosives (Half Module)
- Forensic Investigation of Explosives and Explosive Devices
- Rocket Motors and Propellants

Individual Project

The aim of the project phase is to give the students an opportunity to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding acquired on the taught phase of the course to a practical problem in EOE. A list of available project titles is produced in the first few months of the course so that a student can make an early choice and begin planning their programmes well before the project phase begins. Suggestions for projects may come from a variety of sources, for example an individual student’s sponsor, a member of staff, or the wider EOE community.

Group Project

To integrate module learning into an overall critical evaluation of new trends in EOE the students undertake a group project, which considers current ‘Hot Topics in EOE’, for example, nanotechnology, insensitive munitions, analysis and detection and environmental initiatives. The group project involves the students working together to research these hot topics and to critically appraise the facts, principles, concepts, and theories relating to a specific area of EOE. They do this as a group and then individually prepare elements of a presentation that they feedback in groups to their peers in an open forum. The presentation is then graded from an individual and group perspective.

The group project enables the students to work as a team, enhances their communication skills and encourages the ability to present scientific ideas in a clear and concise manner. It also gives the students an understanding of the procedures and challenges associated with peer review and grading and prioritisation of presented work against a clear assessment framework.

Assessment

Coursework, examination, group project and individual thesis (MSc only).

Career opportunities

Many of the students are linked to military employment and as such are sponsored through this route. Therefore the majority of the students continue to work for them on completion of the course. However, the course has the potential to take you on to enhanced career opportunities often at a more senior level across a range of roles corresponding with your experience.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/explosives-ordnance-engineering.html

Read less
The MSc in International Defence and Security deals with some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice. Read more

Course Description

The MSc in International Defence and Security deals with some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice.

The programme draws upon our established expertise in international security, foreign and defence policy analysis, security studies, international law, conflict resolution, and environmental issues.

The course content is dynamic, challenging, and cutting edge, designed to equip you with the skills and insights needed to understand and authoritatively analyse contemporary debates in international relations using a mixture of theoretical and empirical tools to deal with and confront the challenges presented by contemporary world politics.

Course overview

The course consists of three core modules and a wide range of elective modules of which you must pass seven, followed by a dissertation.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Modules

There are three compulsory modules which must be taken whether studying the PgCert, PgDip or full MSc. There is then a choice of elective modules from a range of 14. For the PgCert, 1 elective module must be selected, and for the PgDip and MSc, 7 elective modules.

Core:
- Study Skills and Research Methodology
- Issues in International Security, Conflict and Development
- Defence in the 21st Century

Elective:
- Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution
- Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context
- International Law and Armed Conflicts
- International Criminal Law and Human Rights
- Intelligence in International Security
- Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
- Regional Security
- International Interventions for Peace and Statebuilding
- Managing Natural Disasters
- Weapons of Mass Destruction, Control and Verification
- Military Support to Disasters
- Crisis Management
- The Resilience Context
- Strategy for Resilience

Individual Project

A 20,000 word dissertation.

Assessment

There are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.

Career opportunities

This course is intended to attract students who are either currently employed in posts relating to Security Cooperation (Defence Attachés, Desk Officers within the MoD, representatives from the FCO and DFID) or those individuals who generally have an interest in issues pertaining to defence and security. Students may also wish to pursue careers with private security companies, think tanks, within academia or for foreign governments.

Applicants to this degree come from a range of backgrounds. While we have a number of candidates who have recently completed their undergraduate degrees, we also have a significant number who are civil servants working within defence, serving and retired military personnel and those who working within the financial services. The aim of this course is therefore to provide all students with a high quality, and transferable, postgraduate qualification.

The course therefore assists in taking you on to senior positions in the armed forces, government, international organisations, media and academia.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/international-defence-and-security.html

Read less
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

Read less
There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Read more
There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

This programme provides students with a theoretical and empirical understanding of the international security environment of the post-Cold War era, including the origins of conflicts and peace, the emergence of new security threats and the many different agencies involved in conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peacemaking today.

The MSc aims to be empirically relevant by teaching students how to apply theoretical concepts to contemporary conflicts and current affairs.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-International Security
-Security Governance
-Theories of Securitisation

Optional units - You will choose no more than three optional units from the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Units can vary from year to year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and Militarisation
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender: International Policy Development
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Read less
The world is undergoing significant strategic and geopolitical redefinition. Several major powers have been developing doctrines aligned with their wider strategic objectives in the 21st century. Read more
The world is undergoing significant strategic and geopolitical redefinition. Several major powers have been developing doctrines aligned with their wider strategic objectives in the 21st century.

You’ll investigate the relationships of the major states within the international system, with a focus on:
-The historical evolution and current revival of the concept of geopolitics including energy security, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the war on terrorism, and democracy promotion
-Grand strategies including the foreign policy of the US, the re-emergence of Russia and the rise of China
-Key regional dynamics including the Middle East, European security, international security in south and east Asia, and geopolitical rivalries in Africa

How will I study?

You take taught modules and options. You may also do a research placement. You will be assessed by term papers. You also write a supervised 10,000-word dissertation.

Field trip

This course offers an optional field trip to Brussels, Belgium or Geneva, Switzerland.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

This MA is ideal for you if you wish to pursue a career in the analysis of current international affairs as policy advisers, journalists, researchers, and global and country risk analysts in the security and private sector.

Our graduates have gone on to work in:
-Government foreign, defence and development ministries
-International media
-Journalism
-Academia
-Think tanks and research institutes such as IISS and RUSI

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X