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Masters Degrees (Warfare)

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The Sensors Electronic Warfare PgCert has been designed for officers of the Armed Forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

The Sensors Electronic Warfare PgCert has been designed for officers of the Armed Forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry.

The programme covers a selection of Electronic Warfare (EW) topics relevant to military systems, covering the specification, analysis, development, procurement, and technical management of military radar, electro-optics and infrared sensor systems.

The main focus of the programme being EW in relation to sensor systems, requires a good understanding of these systems before going on to consider how to defend them from electronic attack or intercept.

Course overview

PgCert students must complete a taught phase consisting of six specified modules.

Graduates achieve a high level of understanding and detailed knowledge of military communications and sensor systems with particular regard to electronic warfare. Successful graduates of this course should be fully equipped for roles in defence intelligence, systems development and acquisition, involving the specification and analysis of such systems, working individually or as part of a team.

Modules

Core -

Electromagnetic Propagation and Devices
Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
Radar Principles
Radar Electronic Warfare
Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2

Facilities and resources

The course is delivered via lectures, laboratory demonstrations and tutorials. The teaching of the modules is reinforced by visits to relevant outside organisations and scheduled outside of teaching periods.

Funding

Please contact for more information on funding.

Career opportunities

Successful graduates of this course should be fully equipped for roles in defence intelligence, systems development and acquisition, involving the specification and analysis of such systems, working individually or as part of a team either in the military or in the defence industry.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Sensors-Electronic-Warfare

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Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest. Read more
Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest.

The first of its kind in the UK, the interdisciplinary MA in Ancient and Medieval Warfare offers archaeological, historical and literary approaches to the subject.

The course consists of a flexible combination of taught modules and individual research, which enables you to specialise in a specific period if you wish, or, if you prefer, to study a particular theme across a wider timespan.

The course provides a solid foundation of research skills which can serve as a basis for doctoral research, but it also provides transferable skills, which will be valuable for a career in any field.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the history and development of warfare in the Ancient and Medieval worlds
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches

Structure

The course can be completed in 1 year by full-time study or completed part-time over three years.

You take a mix of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits. On successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to your dissertation (60 credits).

You research and write a dissertation (20,000 words) on a topic or theme of your choice in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Themes in Ancient and Medieval Warfare
Ancient and Medieval Warfare Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes (depending on modules chosen).

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

Prospects

Our graduates typically find employment with organisations such as: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Element Productions, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government, national and international universities.

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This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective. Read more
This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective.

A thorough grounding is provided in research methods and in the historiography and economics of warfare while a wide choice of options complements the broad range of possible dissertation subjects that can be supported by our staff.

All students will study three core modules:

Historical Methods
Research Skills: Dissertation Preparation
Economics of War

Students who did not take the BA War Studies degree at the University of Birmingham will also study an additional core module: Writing the History of Warfare.

Those who did not take the BA War Studies degree will then take 40 credits of optional modules, while University of Birmingham BA War Studies graduates will take 60 credits of optional modules. These are chosen from:

40-credit special subject modules (which run across the autumn and spring semesters)
20-credit advanced options (taken in the autumn or spring semesters)

Each module is assessed by 4,000-word essay and you will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Communications Electronic Warfare PgCert has been designed for officers of the Armed Forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

The Communications Electronic Warfare PgCert has been designed for officers of the Armed Forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry.

The course covers a selection of Electronic Warfare (EW) topics relevant to military communications systems, covering the specification, analysis, development, procurement, and technical management of military information systems.

The main focus of the course, being EW in relation to communications systems, assumes a good understanding of these systems before considering how to defend them from electronic attack or intercept.

Course overview

PgCert students must complete a taught phase consisting of six specified modules.

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7.

Modules

Core:
- Electromagnetic Propagation and Devices
- MES-CP - Communications Principles
- Information Networks

Career opportunities

Successful graduates of this course should be fully equipped for roles in defence intelligence, systems development and acquisition, involving the specification and analysis of such systems, working individually or as part of a team either in the military or in the defence industry.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Communications-Electronic-Warfare

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This course provides education and training in selected military electronic systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected military electronic systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of military radar, electro-optics, communications, sonar or information systems, where the emphasis will be on an Electronic Warfare environment.

Students taking the Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) course variant are able to choose to study, and will be awarded, either the Communications Electronic Warfare PgCert or Sensors Electronic Warfare PgCert.

Overview

A Military Electronic Systems Engineering graduate achieves a high level of understanding and detailed knowledge of military communications and sensor systems with particular regard to electronic warfare. In addition, the MSc course enables the student to carry out an in-depth investigation into an area of electronic warfare to further enhance their analytical capability. Successful graduates of this course should be fully equipped for roles in defence intelligence, systems development and acquisition, involving the specification and analysis of such systems, working individually or as part of a team.

A typical course cohort comprises 10-15 full time students and up to 4 part time.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

Course overview

- MSc students must complete a taught phase consisting of twelve modules, followed by an individual dissertation in a relevant topic.
- PgDip students must complete a taught phase consisting of twelve modules.
- PgCert students must complete a taught phase consisting of six specified modules.

Core Modules

The MSc/PGDip taught phase comprises 10 compulsory modules and a choice of either Information Networks and Advanced Radar, or, Aeronautical Engineering Parts 1 and 2.

Core:
- Electromagnetic Propagation and Devices
- MES-CP - Communications Principles
- Communications Systems 1 and 2
- Radar Principles
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- Information Networks

Elective:
- MES-AR - Advanced Radar
- MES-ASDP - Advanced Sensor Data Processing
- Aeronautical Engineering 1
- Aeronautical Engineering 2

Individual Project

The project aim is for the student to undertake an extensive analytical research project using appropriate research methodology, involving simulation and modelling, measurements, experimentation, data collection and analysis. This will enable students to develop and demonstrate their technical expertise, independent learning abilities and critical research skills in a specialist subject area relevant to the field of study of the course.

Assessment

By examination, assignments and thesis.

Career opportunities

This course is typically a requirement for progression for certain engineering and technical posts within UK MOD.

Successful graduates of this course should be fully equipped for roles in defence intelligence, systems development and acquisition, involving the specification and analysis of such systems, working individually or as part of a team either in the military or in the defence industry.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/military-electronic-systems-engineering.html

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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences..

Why this programme

◾This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
◾The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
◾All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include
◾Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
◾The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
◾Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
◾Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include
◾Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
◾The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.

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Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more

Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, you can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

  • The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high-calibre training institution.
  • It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.
  • You are taught by experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies and institutions.
  • Situated close to the seat of government, the City, Imperial War Museum, National Maritime Museum, Royal Courts of Justice and Inns of Court, you have unique opportunities to network with key high-profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.
  • Our MA courses are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Description

Our course challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our course prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master’s degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

Course purpose

Our course offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have two hours per week over two 10-week terms. This can be split into one lecture + one seminar or combinations thereof, You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of training workshop/ supervision, to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3000-6000 words), presentation, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.



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This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present. Read more

About the course

This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present.

The core modules on the course examine:

- the Royal Navy in the twentieth century.
- warfare in ancient and medieval times.
- the impact of the French and Industrial Revolutions on warfare in the age of 'total war'

Optional modules give students the opportunity to study the Second World War, warfare in modern Africa and, additionally, the programme draws on Brunel’s expertise in intelligence studies. Students have the chance to take an optional module in this area with Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS).

Students will also complete a 15,000 dissertation on any military history topic, drawing on the wide expertise of staff in the department.

Aims

The MA in Military History will provide students with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of debates and interpretations of military history.

Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in specific subject areas.

Students will be encouraged to extend and develop their analytical, evaluative and critical capacities, and increase their ability to reflect on their own learning and intellectual development.

The MA in Military History will give students transferable skills in writing, discussion, analysis, and independent judgement.

Students will also work independently, thus demonstrating initiative and the ability to organise their time and work through their research project (a dissertation) of 15,000 words.

Course Content

The MA consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation
War in History, 1789 to present
The Royal Navy in the Twentieth Century
European Warfare in the Age of Muscle.

Optional modules:

Intelligence History: Failure and Success
The Second World War
War and the Military in Modern African History
International Security

Special Features

Taught by internationally recognised academics in the field of Military History, Naval History, War Studies, Intelligence History and Security/Intelligence Studies.

Situated in London, the MA Military History has established links to world-renowned archives and libraries based in and close to London including the Caird Library (National Maritime Museum), The National Archives and the Imperial War Museum, among others.

Students on the MA Military History can automatically receive membership to the Royal Institute for International Affairs.

Students have access to the Specialist Angus Boulton Military History library held at Brunel University.

The MA in Military History regularly invites guest speakers to lecture on specialist subjects. Previous speakers have included, Professor Ilan Pappe (University of Exeter), Emeritus Professor Avi Shlaim (Oxford University), Sir Tony Brenton (Cambridge University), and Professor Brian Holden-Reid (KCL).

Research at Brunel

The Isambard Centre for Historical Research
The Isambard Centre for Historical Research brings together scholars at Brunel whose work examines the tensions inherent in the transnational connections that have shaped the modern world. The Centre takes its title from the University’s namesake, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. During the nineteenth century, the dockyards, steamships and railways that he built, revolutionised transportation and communication, helping to create the infrastructure that underpinned increasing global trade. People, products, ideas and cultural artefacts were all transmitted along these routes, producing transnational exchanges that stretched across traditional political, cultural and geographic divides. But such processes helped to make borders as well as transcend them. They stimulated anxieties that led to new efforts to control, define and regulate ownership, identity and exchange. Attending to these dual impulses is crucial if we are to understand the social, cultural and political landscapes of the modern world.

Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies
Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS) is a University Inter-Disciplinary Research Centre, taking in members from the School of Engineering and Design, School of Law, and from the Department of Economics and Finance from the School of Social Sciences, as well as core members from the Department of Politics and History. BCISS is the first academic Centre established in the UK to deal specifically with intelligence issues, policy and institutions. Established in November 2003 the Centre aims to promote and develop social science and policy-oriented approaches to intelligence.

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Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. Read more

Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Academically rigorous course on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

Our War in the Modern World MA will give you an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of warfare and international security since the end of the Second World War. You will examine contemporary warfare and security issues in the light of the wide-ranging political, technological, economic and social changes since 1945. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare, and to understand the contexts in which modern conflicts take place.

The course is structured so that you will first develop an understanding of warfare, security issues and geo-political changes. You can then choose optional modules and write your dissertation, giving you the opportunity to concentrate on those aspects of contemporary war and international relations that interest you most.

Course purpose

Our course is designed to offer you an engaging, well designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

You will typically have five hours per week of ‘seminars’ (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks per 20-credit module, as well as 160 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will typically have two hours per week online discussion time for four weeks to complement the 592 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500 word short essay (25%), one 3,000 word long essay (70%) and student participation in the seminar discussions (5%).

The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD while one teaches part time at King’s.



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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats..

Why this programme

◾You will develop your knowledge of the security challenges impacting our rapidly changing social and political environment at a local, national and global level. These range from terrorism and cyber warfare to disease, migration and climate change.
◾You can combine a broad spectrum of subject areas into your degree, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, archaeology, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in policy development exercises: working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.
◾The programme will also include a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.

Programme structure

You will take four core and selection of optional courses. You will also complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. In addition to the general degree programme, you have the opportunity to study one of three specialised pathways.

Core courses
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾International security and global politics
◾Research design OR Qualitative methods
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses

Pathways

Cyber security and intelligence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine how cyber issues and information communications technologies challenge the way states and citizens alike attempt to use and constrain information in a range of societies for security purposes. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Human-centred security
◾Information systems and databases
◾Systems and networks.

Social and cultural perspectives (not running in 2017-18)

Provides you with the opportunity to examine global security from a critical perspective, reflecting on social and cultural aspects and constructions of 'security'. Important to this pathway will be an interrogation of the relationship between security, vulnerability and the ethics of care. Specialised courses within this pathway include:
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾A range of related optional courses.

Strategy and defence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine shifts in Western strategic thought in both a historical and contemporary setting. Particular attention will be given to how strategy and defence is currently developing within a new interdependent global context. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾The American way of war: from Revolution to the War on Terror
◾A range of related optional courses.

Career prospects

You can move into careers such as working with governmental and non-governmental organisations, business and international/transnational organisations. Recent graduates have gone on to work for the BBC, the United Nations, the UK armed forces, a US based research agency and UK based private security and risk analysis companies. Others have gone to undertake a PhD.

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The MA in War. History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years. Read more
The MA in War: History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years.

Looking at political, cultural and social history, this MA is for those who want to study war in all its multi-faceted complexity, from the everyday and the personal, to the national and the global. We offer expert teaching and supervision on British, European, American and Middle Eastern modern and contemporary history.

The main conflicts you will cover are: the First World War and the Second World War; the Balkan Wars of the 1910s and the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s; the wars of Decolonization and those of New Imperialism; the Cold War and its ‘side-wars’; the War on Terror and the current conflicts in the Middle East.

Why study with us?

Studying this degree you will acquire expertise on:

• War and conflict studies
• Modern international history
• Interdisciplinary learning and researching

You will be taught in a truly interdisciplinary manner, utilising a number of disciplines: cultural and social history, politics and international relations. You can build the degree structure that suits best your interests and future plans.

You can specialise in particular disciplines, or you can explore a wide range of new methods. You will also have the choice of three different types of elective work (e.g. extended essays or primary-source based seminars). Our students can also use the nearby world-famous Mass Observation archive. They also tend to be involved in the events and research projects run by the University of Brighton’s Understanding Conflict cluster, such as our latest initiative on ‘Contesting Britain at War’.

We offer flexible modes of study for those with personal or professional commitments. After finishing the MA you will be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

Areas of study

There are two Core Modules that you will have to take, one on the forms and one on the legacies of war. ‘Forms of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ examines the lead up to war and what is happening in wartime. It looks at: the political, ideological and wider structural causes of war; the human experience at the home-front and at the war-front; the politics and methods of warfare as they have evolved in time; the different modes of practical, political, and intellectual resistance against invasion and occupation. ‘Legacies of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ looks at the impact of war, at what is left after a conflict: the emotional and personal effects of war; how a conflict continues to exist on material and psychological landscapes; the multiple ways through which personal, collective and global memories of killing and sacrifice are constructed; the politics of what we decide to remember and what to forget; the activist, political and theoretical efforts to stop war from happening again.

Beyond the two Core Modules you can also pick a number of option courses that relate to you interests, for example: Public History and Heritage; Cultural Memory; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity; Globalisation and Global Politics; Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Genocide; International Relations theory; Aesthetics and Philosophy; Cultural Theory; Philosophy and Critical Theory. Alternatively you might want instead to research and write a stand-alone extended essay, or you may opt for a more practical-based unit on teaching and learning higher education, offering you the opportunity to learn more about undergraduate teaching.

You will also take a Research Methods module that will help you develop the academic skills necessary to engage in the 20,000-word Dissertation, for which you are guided by one of our faculty with subject expertise.

Careers and employability

Our graduates are particularly well-equipped to follow career paths in sectors that deal with violent conflicts, their consequences and resolution, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the Ministry of Defence, and international bodies (e.g. United Nations).

Much more broadly our degree opens the path to sectors that value critical research skills and a good knowledge of modern history and politics, such as media and journalism, politics and government, museums and archives, and publishing.

Working in schools and in academia are, of course, standard options. Alternatively, many of our students go on to study for Doctorates with one of the Research Centres in Brighton.

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This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. Read more
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. You’ll analyse the role of war in human history from its early beginnings to the present day in a core module which focuses on historiographical debates about warfare. You can then choose to study optional modules about a broad range of topics in the history of war, from medieval and early modern times to today.

You’ll have opportunities to use internationally-renowned collections in your studies, including the Liddle Collection of artefacts and private papers from the First World War in our Brotherton Library, the holdings of the Royal Armouries Museum, Leeds, and material from the Imperial War museum North at Salford. The Second World War experience museum in nearby Wetherby provides a huge collection of private papers from the Second World War.

Course Content

As well as the three compulsory modules, you also choose two optional modules from a selection, for example:

- Making History: Archive Collaborations

- Warfare in the Age of the Crusades

- Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815

- Medicine and Warfare in the19th and 20th Centuries

- The War on Terror

- Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

- Guns and Global Security

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IN BRIEF. You will develop  practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security, cyber forensics, cyber warfare and cyber threat intelligence to fight against Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs). Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • You will develop  practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security, cyber forensics, cyber warfare and cyber threat intelligence to fight against Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs)
  • You will prepare yourself to obtain professional security certifications such as CISSP and CCFP
  • You will be among the most employable people on the planet!
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course builds on your previous knowledge of computer science and Information Technology (IT), and aims to provide you with an in-depth specialism in the fields of cyber security, cyber threat intelligence and digital forensics. You will gain advanced and in-depth knowledge of penetration testing, cyber forensics, malware reverse engineering and software vulnerability and will exploit research using a very hands-on approach. You will gain practical and real-world skills in all major areas of cyber security including penetration testing, digital forensics, cyber warfare and threat intelligence. Moreover, you will learn how to apply your skills in analysis, testing and maintenance of software systems or enterprise networks from a cyber security perspective.  

You will use your penetration testing and vulnerability assessment skills in finding weaknesses in existing devices and applications and to advise developers or network administrators to secure their application or environment. Your cyber forensics skills can be used to identify, collect, preserve and analyse a wide range of digital evidences and present them in the court of law. You will use your knowledge of programming to analyse different malwares to determine how they work and how countermeasures can be developed. Only a small percentage of cyber security professionals are capable of analysing advanced persistent threats and are capable of understanding and managing malware campaigns. Finally, your cyber threat intelligence knowledge and skills will help you to strategically fight against organised cyber crimes, understand and analyse cyber warfare activities and propose appropriate defensive and offensive mechanisms to reduce or eliminate those risks.

You will have close and active contact with industry experts with the opportunity to attend regular industry guest lecture programs in cyber security while you operate within a well-formed professional and ethical framework.

TEACHING

  • Projects and assignments enable you to apply what you have learned to a realistic problem; to develop independent learning skills; to demonstrate an ability make decisions in uncertain situations; and to develop your ability to compare and contrast alternative technologies.
  • Group activities in class are used to develop your team working and professional skills (though all assessment is individual).
  • Supervised work in computer laboratories is used to put into practice principles you have covered in supporting lectures.
  • Research skills are integral to the program, and you will be required to critique examples of work and then carry out your own research-based investigations in our assignments.
  • The issue of professionalism and ethics is woven in throughout the programme, and issues must be identified and addressed as part of all assignments and projects.

ASSESSMENT

  • Examination (25%) assesses your immediate response to  small or medium unseen problems
  • Coursework (40%) assesses your considered and in-depth response to a larger problem
  • Project (35%) assesses your ability to work independently, to plan a significant activity and, in carrying out the plan, to demonstrate originality in the application of your knowledge.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates from this course can work in a wide variety of technical security roles within business, banking, software, networking, government, consultancy, etc. This would include roles such as malware analyzer, penetration tester, information security manager, security consultant, forensics investigator or security programmer. There is a significant worldwide skills shortage in this area, particularly for graduates with the in-depth technical knowledge and skills that are developed by this course.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

This course has contacts with local industry such as software companies (such as Web Applications UK), infrastructure providers (such as UKFast) and security consultants (such as KPMG). These companies will provide you with a real-world perspective to help you appreciate the barriers that exist and the compromises that must be made to manage conflicting demands (known as the C-I-A triad).

FURTHER STUDY

Your MSc project will need you to demonstrate “originality in the application of knowledge”. Given a suitable topic, this may be able to be developed into an area where you can undertake a higher research degree to demonstrate “an original contribution to knowledge” which is the target for a PhD. You will get a chance to learn about the research interests of the University’s research active staff in order to help you develop a suitable topic. This may be directly in a security field, or applications of other fields of computing such as artificial intelligence or big data in cyber security and cyber forensics.



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This innovative MA course will challenge you to think critically about the impact of warfare on past societies and how the historical legacies of conflict resonate in our world today, and offers a broad and in-depth exploration of themes, allowing you to gain advanced expertise in historical research and scholarship. Read more
This innovative MA course will challenge you to think critically about the impact of warfare on past societies and how the historical legacies of conflict resonate in our world today, and offers a broad and in-depth exploration of themes, allowing you to gain advanced expertise in historical research and scholarship.

Why Study War, Conflict and Society with us?

The course offers an excellent opportunity to explore the social history of warfare, within a European and a global context. This broad historical narrative will provide you with the opportunity to study specific themes in depth, to understand the form and nature of warfare through the ages, and to contribute to the academic debate surrounding the relationship between conflict and society.

The County of Cheshire has had a long association with war and conflict. Chester has been the site of a siege, of convalescence and a reception centre for refugees displaced by conflict. There is a wide range of relevant source material deposited locally and in the wider North West region about this history.

What will I learn?

You will receive a firm grounding in advanced historical skills and an introduction to the key historiographical approaches in the discipline in the first term. In the second term, you will have the freedom to select three optional modules from a variety of modules. Alongside these modules (and for the duration of the year), you will work closely with a supervisor on a Research Dissertation, based on a topic of your choice.

How will I be taught?

Teaching is varied, taught by way of lectures, seminars and individual tutorials, and some modules include field trips. The Research Dissertation is structured around regular supervisory sessions.
Each module runs for 2.5 hours per week across an eight-week period. You will also undertake 35 hours per week of guided independent study.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment for the core and optional modules is via coursework of approximately 4,000 words, comprising:

essays
literature reviews
primary source commentaries
oral presentations.

Your Research Dissertation will be approximately 16,000 words in length.

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The MA Conflict, Security & Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. . Read more

The MA Conflict, Security & Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. 

Key benefits

  • Development and security are inextricably linked, yet all too often both academics and policymakers address them separately. Our MA in Conflict, Security & Development is a unique globally recognised course that brings together these interrelated areas of study, acknowledging that conflict, insecurity and underdevelopment interact in dynamic ways and that a full understanding of them requires a holistic approach.
  • The course exposes you to a variety of complex transnational issues, taking a multidisciplinary approach to some of the key questions facing policymakers and scholars today.
  • It is designed to enhance your analytical, research and critical thinking skills, to provide you with detailed practical knowledge of conflict, security and development around the world, and to prepare you to become a leader in the public and private sectors, government or academia.

Description

Our course is designed to provide students with an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the complex linkages between issues of security and development in contemporary international relations. The course encourages

you to explore the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. Our course’s core course introduces you to the major debates in the fields of security and international relations, regarding the interaction between processes of political and economic development, conflict and violent social change.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

There will be 40 hours of teaching per 40-credit module and 360 hours of self-study. For the dissertation module there will be 12 hours of dissertation supervision, to complement 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is:

  • Most 20 and 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (2,000-6,000 words), presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

Students on our MA courses have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.



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