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The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. Read more
The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. It should be of interest to a wide range of individuals concerned both academically and professionally with contemporary security issues, challenges and problems. The course is taught by academics specialist in their field and who contribute to current legal and policy debates. It has been set up in such a way as to allow a flexible and contextual approach to the topics discussed.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teachings and Learning is predominantly through weekly synchronous and asynchronous online workshops. The learning ethos is to draw on the range and experience of our diverse student cohort

Our extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from within and outside the jurisdiction.

Modules are assessed by coursework which comprises of a 1000 word essay plan which feeds into a 3000 word essay. This method of assessment has proved very popular with students as it provides useful feedback for their final submissions.

The course is supported by the University’s web-based Blackboard facility with ICT an integral part of the programme. The University subscribes to extensive electronic legal data bases and journals while all students are registered users of UCLan’s network with a dedicated network space accessible remotely.

GRADUATE CAREERS

As well as international career prospects, this LLM also offers excellent domestic career prospects such as central and local governments; social work, probation, youth and community work; and the police, prison and immigration services. Security litigation is also a growing area of legal practice.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This LLM will introduce students to the substantive doctrine, values and policies of international criminal law by looking at different academic perspectives on international criminal law (ICL) and national, regional and international security as well as the nature, sources and rationale for ICL. Consideration will be given to the institutions of ICL: UN, ICJ, ICTY, ICTR and ICC as well as the history and development of the ICC (International Criminal Court). The 1998 Rome Statute, ICC Jurisdiction, internal organisation, and the first completed trials will be covered and students will be asked to critique the ICC using constitutional and political arguments for and against its creation and maintenance. Core offences under ICL such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression and torture will be examined alongside the defences to ICL charges. There will be a detailed case study of the legal prohibition of incitement to genocide and associated racism demonstrating the challenges to regional and international security.

Transnational police and security cooperation such as Interpol, Europol and Eurojust will be considered as well as the transnational legal dimensions to “national security” including within the context of the European and international human rights law and policy.

Students will develop an understanding of how international law functions in the maintenance of maritime security and peaceful uses of the oceans. The general legal framework, the UN Law of the Sea Convention and IMO Regulations will all be considered. Piracy and maritime terrorism and the freedom of the seas and navigational rights will be examined as well as the proliferation of security initiatives, maritime interdiction and maritime boundary disputes.

Terrorism has been a significant challenge to international peace and security for many years: especially since the advent of Islamist terror groups such as Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the late 1990s, culminating in the “9/11” atrocities of 2001. The train bombings in Madrid in 2004 and in London in 2005 and more recently the rise of Islamist terror groups in the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa serve only to remind us of the serious threat terrorism poses to international security.

This LLM examines incidents of international terrorism and the obligations states have to protect themselves from acts and threats of terrorism. Transnational legal responses to terrorism will also be considered together with an assessment of the rights of individuals suspected of terrorism in the pursuit of protecting human security.

The programme will provide students with expertise, analytical and reflective skills. The programme aims to provide a learning experience that will enable students to develop their academic ability, to further develop their careers and to assist them in making a positive contribution to the wider, global and national community.

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This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims. Read more
This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)
•A contemporary Masters degree focusing on key issues in a global context
•Course recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
•Flexible entry points mean you can opt for either an LLM or MSc award
•Develops critical analysis and assesses legal frameworks from an international perspective
•Can be studied by professionals from a non-law background

Governments and authorities in the 21st century are facing major challenges as they deal with terrorism and complex organised crime which crosses borders and poses difficult issues for legal practitioners and organisations across a variety of sectors.

The MSc/Master of Laws programme in Global Crime, Justice and Security is designed to develop your advanced scholarship and research skills enabling you to progress, academically and intellectually, in a discreet area of international law.

You will critically analyse and understand the complexities of this highly specialist and complex field – both challenging and informing global and comparative perspectives. This course is underpinned by significant engagement with new and established research and advanced scholarship.

For those with a limited knowledge of law, there is a comprehensive induction in the first semester. ‘Law for Non-Lawyers’ covers the essential nature and sources of law and the necessary elements to prepare you for advanced study in this area.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Contemporary issues in global crime, justice and security

Introducing you to core concepts, processes and institutions of international law and how they relate to the programme’s themes of crime, justice and security in a global context

The option modules you will typically study include:

Legal research methods

You will be trained in the process of conducting and writing up research. This module serves as a preparatory stage for the dissertation module at the end of the course

Dissertation

You will undertake a 12,000 word written project on a topic agreed with the programme leader and/or module leader, relevant to the programme's curriculum. A supervisor will be assigned from the programme team to guide you in developing your work

International criminal law

Understand crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes, and explore how international law provides machinery to hold accountable those responsible for such crimes

Conflict and welfare in international law

Explore the legal rules which govern states' recourse to the use of force against one another, as well as the body of humanitarian law which regulates the manner by which armed conflict is conducted

Global crime and security

An in-depth study into the phenomena of cross-border criminal activity and terrorism, and collaborative responses to it

The United Nations international security and global justice

Understand the role of the United Nations in the maintenance of international peace and security. You will explore the UN's experiences in areas such as peacekeeping, military enforcement and the imposition of sanctions

EU foreign security and justice policy

Consider and explore the role of the European Union as an international actor, and understand how it has performed an increased security function on the global stage

Gender perspectives and international law

Consider various aspects of international law from perspectives that are informed by gender, using examples such as sexual violence during armed conflict to explore more theoretical debates about the role of gender in the operation of international law

Statehood, peoples and statelessness

What is the concept of the state and the phenomena of statelessness; how do states relate to their populations, and under which circumstances do states dissolve?

Democracy, rights and rule of law

Understand the theoretical aspects of human rights, and its relationship with democracy in the modern world

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers. Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

Modules

International criminal law
International criminal procedure and practice
International law and human rights
Research methods
Dissertation

Plus two options from:

International humanitarian law
International human rights and development
Terrorism
Case management
Advocacy
Migration and development

Assessment

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

Coursework

Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:

• Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
• Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
• Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
• Imran Khan, Solicitor;
• Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Employability

New international criminal law:

This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations:

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance. Read more
International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance.

At the core of the subject are legal institutions such as the International Criminal Court that have been established to realise the ideal of holding to account those responsible for offences such as war crimes and genocide.

Our LLM combines a study of the legal doctrine underpinning the investigation and prosecution of international crimes with a critical analysis of the political context in which such prosecutions are undertaken.

How will I study?

You’ll study two core modules in the autumn term and choose two options in the spring term. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation. You will be assessed through coursework, an unseen examination, essays and a dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Law at Sussex has active research groups in its primary research fields, exploring legal conceptualisations of responsibility and issues of citizenship and governance.

These groups meet regularly for the presentation of work in progress, as reading groups, to host external speakers and to plan the organisation of research seminars, workshops and conferences.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you want to work in any area of criminal law – from practising as a lawyer to policy review and reform – but particularly if you wish to pursue a career with an international angle.

Our graduates have progressed to work and research with human rights NGOs, in education, as legal professionals, with several working and interning at the international criminal tribunals in The Hague.

Several have also chosen to continue with doctoral-level study in the fields of human rights and international criminal law.

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The MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations (GMC) programme is designed for those engaged in, or aspiring to, professional careers in the public, corporate or not-for-profit sectors related to the political and economic management and regulation of multinational corporations. Read more
The MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations (GMC) programme is designed for those engaged in, or aspiring to, professional careers in the public, corporate or not-for-profit sectors related to the political and economic management and regulation of multinational corporations.

GMC specifically addresses the requirements of those seeking a comprehensive theoretical and practical understanding of the role and dynamics of large corporations in the global economy and international affairs. The programme aims to prepare students for a variety of roles in government departments, regulatory agencies, international organisations (such as the OECD or WTO) industry bodies, NGOs, as advisors, managers, researchers or project professionals with multinational corporations, trade unions and advocacy organisations.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In addition to the three core modules of Multinational Enterprises, Global Public Policy and Project Management, students choose other modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Key benefits

• A week long study trip to Geneva and Paris
• Study trips to major multinational enterprises
• Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
• Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
• Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes

Course detail

You will develop a comprehensive understanding of the role and dynamics of large corporations in the global economy and international affairs, enabling you to critically analyse and design solutions to regulatory and public policy changes related to Multinational Enterprise activities globally.

As well as gaining skills in policy analysis, project management, advocacy, negotiation and strategic communication, you will have the opportunity to take a European Study Tour of international organisations, a media internship with SOAS Radio or volunteering roles, addressing themes such as global disarmament, war crimes, and corporate accountability.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective through analysis of economic, legal and public policy approaches to researching Multinational Enterprise organisation, impact and regulation in the global economy.

Expert at where the world is changing

Drawing on SOAS teaching and research strengths in International Studies, Diplomacy, Law, Politics, and Economics, and leveraging distinctive global academic expertise, this programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and seeks to look beyond the traditional Western-centric approach.

Programme objectives

On the course, you will develop:

• Excellent understanding of the development and activities of Multinational Enterprises (MNE) and their regulation from economic and legal perspectives.

• Excellent knowledge of economic, legal and public policy approaches to researching MNE organisation, impact and regulation in the global economy.

• Ability to critically analyse and design solutions to regulatory and public policy challenges related to MNE activities in both the global North and South.

• Development of practical skills including policy analysis, project management, advocacy, negotiation and strategic communication.

Attendance

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

Lectures for GMC modules usually take place in the evening (18.00-20.00) and associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots starting as early as 14.00 for some modules, with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GMC module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning. Read more
This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning.

This course will allow you to acquire specialist expertise as well as a critical understanding of current research, advanced scholarship and current problems regarding terrorism, transnational crime and global security.

Through the programme you will also acquire specialist knowledge which will provide you with opportunities for career and personal development. Currently, no other MA programme in the UK offers such a rigorous programme in distance learning format. This unique programme enables you to structure your learning, and the development of transferable vocational and research skills, into the demands of your work and domestic lives.

On-line learning provides you with the control over where and when you study. Our staff are highly experienced in the teaching and utilisation of knowledge from the fields of sociology and political science, as well as practised in the development and delivery of virtual teaching and learning. You will receive guidance and support through the virtual learning process as you gain confidence and knowledge.

Course content

-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, white collar and financial crime
-Crime against humanity: State crime, war crimes and transnational terrorism
-Terrorism
-International Security
-Terrorism, Crime and Global Security: Postgraduate Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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Interested in criminal law? Want to focus your legal skills towards working at an international level? Then LLM International Criminal Law is perfect for you! We cover the key concepts in enforcing international criminal law, looking particularly at crimes falling under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals. Read more
Interested in criminal law? Want to focus your legal skills towards working at an international level? Then LLM International Criminal Law is perfect for you! We cover the key concepts in enforcing international criminal law, looking particularly at crimes falling under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals. This includes genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression. You'll learn valuable practical skills to become a specialist international lawyer, including conducting mediation and negotiation in an international law setting and acting as an advocate presenting legal arguments before an international forum.

As well as focusing on a specialist area, we will also help you develop an awareness and critical understanding of commercialism in the legal sector, understanding the law in practice and legal ethics. You'll gain everything you need to work in international law, opening your career options and enhancing your skills for future employment. Take your love of law to the next level by gaining expertise in international criminal law.

Course outline

All students will begin by engaging in a critical appraisal of relevant research methods to achieve competence in project planning and academic writing, an awareness and critical understanding of commercialism in the legal sector, understanding the law in practice and legal ethics. Students will be trained on how to prepare written advice to clients, how to draft court pleadings, conduct mediation and negotiation in an international law setting, and act as an advocate and present legal argument before an international forum.

There are no exams to worry about - assessments are made through essays, presentations, advocacy exercises and professional portfolios. The research project is a significant piece of research which students will undertake with support from supervisors. The focus of this project must be on an area of their specialisation and must be completed within 15,000 words.

Graduate destinations

The LLM qualification can help career development in the legal sector (including for those practicing law in commercial and business fields) as well as the Business and Management industry, helping promotion to middle and senior management. To meet the constant evolution of global business law development, we offer the opportunity to gain the qualification in one year.

Other admission requirements

For non UK degree programmes, the University will utilise the NARIC database to determine its equivalence to a UK honours degree. Applicants presenting non-standard qualifications with substantial legal practice and law related experience may be invited for an interview to present their experiential learning. If an applicant's first language is not English, he or she must be able to demonstrate oral and written fluency in English. Working or studying in an English-speaking environment will usually be sufficient to demonstrate an acceptable competence. Otherwise applications for admission must be accompanied by a certificate of competency in the English language from a recognised institution or programme. English language requirements for non-English-speaking students are a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 or a minimum TOEFL score of 600, or equivalent.

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Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations… Read more
Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940s, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

Staff have expertise for postgraduate supervision in Criminology including: crime control, policing, the penal system, comparative criminology, penology, philosophy of punishment, miscarriages of justice, sex work, domestic violence and sadomasochism.

How You Study

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become an independent researcher. You are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which your progress can be monitored and encouraged. You are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training you may require.

As a research student you usually have two internal supervisors with specialist knowledge of their subject areas and you can attend regular meetings with them for advice, monitoring and other support. Where appropriate, additional advisors may also be utilised. You also have the opportunity to contribute to the School’s internal seminar series and may also be able to contribute to teaching.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to successfully defend that thesis to your examiners.

Career and Personal Development

Graduates may go on to take positions as researchers or academics in institutes of higher education. Others may choose to use the experience for personal development and go on to careers in related sectors.

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The School of Social and Political Sciences benefits from an active research base ensuring that staff are involved in current debates and that you are made aware of relevant developments and issues. Read more
The School of Social and Political Sciences benefits from an active research base ensuring that staff are involved in current debates and that you are made aware of relevant developments and issues. Each research student is supported by a programme of research training. You will be expected to identify an original area of academically relevant research and agree an approved programme of research with a tutor.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940s, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

How You Study

Research students can enrol for MPhil or PhD awards. These degrees are normally undertaken wholly by thesis and can be carried out either on a full-time or a part-time basis.

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become a independent researcher. Students are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which their progress can be monitored and encouraged. You are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training you require. Students are asked to contribute to the Department's research seminar series, are able to apply for funding to attend conferences and are encouraged to publish including in the department's Social Research Paper series and in journals.

Research students normally have two internal supervisors with specialist knowledge of the International Relations subject area and have regular meetings with them for advice, monitoring and other support. Students can engage with external experts and advisors and can contribute to the School’s internal seminar series. You may also have the opportunity to contribute to teaching.

Staff have expertise for postgraduate supervision in the following: international relations, minority rights, human rights, women in politics, policy making, nationalism, political economy, post-colonial studies, construction of sexual identities, global citizenship, conflict resolution and the United Nations.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to successfully defend that thesis to your examiners.

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Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector. Read more
Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector.

Opportunities for research are available across a range of topics in social and political sciences. Current research projects include the politics of anti-social behaviour, quality physical education, transforming higher education, new social movements in the Middle East, support for people with HIV/AIDS, the 1984/5 miners’ strike, gender and violence, the Gambling Act 2005, and democracy and human rights in Africa.

You can benefit from a structured programme of training which aims to develop the research competencies and professional practice skills that can enhance both your postgraduate study and future career. There are opportunities for collaborative working across disciplines and you will be supported in applying for funding, attending conferences and publishing your work.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Examples of current research projects include:
-Collaborative Governance
-The Case of Mass Transportation in Lagos and London
-Steiner Education
-Machiavelli and New Labour
-Public Houses in Rural Communities
-The Politics of Anti-Social Behaviour
-Rural Community Engagement
-Preventive Diplomacy
-Quality Physical Education
-The Learning Motivation of Older People.

How You Study

Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940's, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become an independent researcher. Students are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which their progress can be monitored and encouraged. Throughout their studies students are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training students require. Students are asked to contribute to the department's research seminar series, are able to apply for funding to attend conferences and are encouraged to publish their work, including in the department's Social Research Paper series and in journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

This programme may help to develop the high-level research skills and knowledge required to establish careers in fields related to your research. Some graduates may pursue roles in research, government, the criminal justice system, local authorities and other public services, as well as academia.

Read less
Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector. Read more
Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector.

Opportunities for research are available across a range of topics in social and political sciences. Current research projects include the politics of anti-social behaviour, quality physical education, transforming higher education, new social movements in the Middle East, support for people with HIV/AIDS, the 1984/5 miners’ strike, gender and violence, the Gambling Act 2005, and democracy and human rights in Africa.

You can benefit from a structured programme of training which aims to develop the research competencies and professional practice skills that can enhance both your postgraduate study and future career. There are opportunities for collaborative working across disciplines and you will be supported in applying for funding, attending conferences and publishing your work.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Examples of current research projects include:
-Collaborative Governance
-The Case of Mass Transportation in Lagos and London
-Steiner Education
-Machiavelli and New Labour
-Public Houses in Rural Communities
-The Politics of Anti-Social Behaviour
-Rural Community Engagement
-Preventive Diplomacy
-Quality Physical Education
-The Learning Motivation of Older People.

How You Study

Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940's, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become an independent researcher. Students are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which their progress can be monitored and encouraged. Throughout their studies students are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training students require. Students are asked to contribute to the department's research seminar series, are able to apply for funding to attend conferences and are encouraged to publish their work, including in the department's Social Research Paper series and in journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

This programme may help to develop the high-level research skills and knowledge required to establish careers in fields related to your research. Some graduates may pursue roles in research, government, the criminal justice system, local authorities and other public services, as well as academia.

Read less

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