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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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This Masters programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Masters programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. As such, this programme is one of the few worldwide to offer students the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them. It is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The proposed programme will combine vocational and theoretical components. Students will study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

Students will also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. Students will also examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme will have strong connections to the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales, (CBCEW); Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs.

Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organized Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development. It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. It will also appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

Course Content

What you will study:
-Political Economy of Human Trafficking and Unfree Labour
-Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking: Policing, Policy and Practice
-Legal Responses to Transnational Crime and Terrorism
-Gender, Identity and Society
-Human Rights and Migration
-Advanced Research Methods
-Dissertation
-Professional Practice and Service Learning

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development. It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning. Read more
This course offers you the opportunity to combine the advanced study of terrorism, transnational crime and global security through flexible, distance learning.

This course will allow you to acquire specialist expertise as well as a critical understanding of current research, advanced scholarship and current problems regarding terrorism, transnational crime and global security.

Through the programme you will also acquire specialist knowledge which will provide you with opportunities for career and personal development. Currently, no other MA programme in the UK offers such a rigorous programme in distance learning format. This unique programme enables you to structure your learning, and the development of transferable vocational and research skills, into the demands of your work and domestic lives.

On-line learning provides you with the control over where and when you study. Our staff are highly experienced in the teaching and utilisation of knowledge from the fields of sociology and political science, as well as practised in the development and delivery of virtual teaching and learning. You will receive guidance and support through the virtual learning process as you gain confidence and knowledge.

Course content

-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, white collar and financial crime
-Crime against humanity: State crime, war crimes and transnational terrorism
-Terrorism
-International Security
-Terrorism, Crime and Global Security: Postgraduate Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims. Read more
This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)
•A contemporary Masters degree focusing on key issues in a global context
•Course recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
•Flexible entry points mean you can opt for either an LLM or MSc award
•Develops critical analysis and assesses legal frameworks from an international perspective
•Can be studied by professionals from a non-law background

Governments and authorities in the 21st century are facing major challenges as they deal with terrorism and complex organised crime which crosses borders and poses difficult issues for legal practitioners and organisations across a variety of sectors.

The MSc/Master of Laws programme in Global Crime, Justice and Security is designed to develop your advanced scholarship and research skills enabling you to progress, academically and intellectually, in a discreet area of international law.

You will critically analyse and understand the complexities of this highly specialist and complex field – both challenging and informing global and comparative perspectives. This course is underpinned by significant engagement with new and established research and advanced scholarship.

For those with a limited knowledge of law, there is a comprehensive induction in the first semester. ‘Law for Non-Lawyers’ covers the essential nature and sources of law and the necessary elements to prepare you for advanced study in this area.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Contemporary issues in global crime, justice and security

Introducing you to core concepts, processes and institutions of international law and how they relate to the programme’s themes of crime, justice and security in a global context

The option modules you will typically study include:

Legal research methods

You will be trained in the process of conducting and writing up research. This module serves as a preparatory stage for the dissertation module at the end of the course

Dissertation

You will undertake a 12,000 word written project on a topic agreed with the programme leader and/or module leader, relevant to the programme's curriculum. A supervisor will be assigned from the programme team to guide you in developing your work

International criminal law

Understand crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes, and explore how international law provides machinery to hold accountable those responsible for such crimes

Conflict and welfare in international law

Explore the legal rules which govern states' recourse to the use of force against one another, as well as the body of humanitarian law which regulates the manner by which armed conflict is conducted

Global crime and security

An in-depth study into the phenomena of cross-border criminal activity and terrorism, and collaborative responses to it

The United Nations international security and global justice

Understand the role of the United Nations in the maintenance of international peace and security. You will explore the UN's experiences in areas such as peacekeeping, military enforcement and the imposition of sanctions

EU foreign security and justice policy

Consider and explore the role of the European Union as an international actor, and understand how it has performed an increased security function on the global stage

Gender perspectives and international law

Consider various aspects of international law from perspectives that are informed by gender, using examples such as sexual violence during armed conflict to explore more theoretical debates about the role of gender in the operation of international law

Statehood, peoples and statelessness

What is the concept of the state and the phenomena of statelessness; how do states relate to their populations, and under which circumstances do states dissolve?

Democracy, rights and rule of law

Understand the theoretical aspects of human rights, and its relationship with democracy in the modern world

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers. Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. Read more
Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. With prestigious guest lecturers and visits to key organisations, you’ll gain all the experience you need for a role in global politics.

Overview

This course will give you an understanding of how international relations theory is applied to real-world policy and strategy, and the practical problems involved in this.

You’ll examine the theory and definition of the ‘state’ and relations between different states, and the roles of other institutions and organisations, like multinational companies and transnational crime organisations. All your studies will contain a strong vocational element, with a focus on how theory affects, and is affected, by real events on the ground.

As well as this foundation in general international relations theory and practice, you’ll also have the chance to focus on your own areas of interest. Our optional modules will let you choose from subjects like the global risk society, policing and security, corruption and cross-border crime, war reporting, and terrorism.

To develop your decision-making, planning and debating skills, you’ll take part in interactive sessions, respond to specific scenarios and briefs, and undertake critical analysis. You’ll also receive advanced instruction in research methods, a vital skill both for your studies and your future career.

With a supporting team of lecturers who have academic and professional backgrounds in international relations, you can be sure you’re receiving the latest theory and careers advice.

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in many roles relating to international relations, such as diplomacy and the diplomatic services, strategy and strategic planning, public services, the Foreign Office, the UN and other international bodies, local government, NGOs, charities, education, journalism and press agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
International Relations Theory in Context
International Institutions and Policy
Major Project

Optional modules:
War, Peacekeeping and Military Intervention
Policing Transnational Crime
Communication and Conflict
Terror as Crime
Postgraduate Research Methods
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

We offer a range of core and optional modules, with optional modules sometimes changing depending on staff availability.

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of role-play scenarios, briefs, written reports, poster presentations, group projects, dissertation, longer essays, case studies, research proposal, short analyses of global events, short review papers, practical data gathering exercises, and short abstracts of core course readings.

Events and activities

You’ll have the chance to attend cutting-edge lectures and seminars from prestigious guest speakers, practitioners and diplomats, and to visit organisations like the Ecole de Guerre in Paris, UN seminars, EU, UK government bodies, think tanks and media agencies.

Work placements

We’ll help you to arrange internships and placements.

Specialist facilities

Our campus in Cambridge features a mock courtroom for debates and role-playing.

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This programme allows you to explore the links between history and current affairs, and discover how the recent past has shaped today’s world. Read more

Programme description

This programme allows you to explore the links between history and current affairs, and discover how the recent past has shaped today’s world. It aims to provide excellent preparation for graduate research on most recent history in a global context.

It is designed to serve as a springboard for more graduate work at the PhD level or as a stand alone graduate degree that also benefits the individual graduate in a non-academic career.

The programme makes use of the city of Edinburgh’s unique archival and bibliographical resources (The National Archives of Scotland, The National Library of Scotland, the University’s library and archives), as well as of its role in current British politics. Contact with Scottish politicians and with foreign representatives in Scotland is envisioned as a supplementary part of the programme.

Programme structure

The programme combines methodological and substantive courses with intensive participation by the students. The analysis of diverse primary source material is essential, as is situating any research findings within an established historiographical tradition. You will also complete a substantial dissertation under expert supervision.

Compulsory courses:
Historical Methodology
Historical Research: Skills and Sources
Introduction to Contemporary History

Optional courses:
Anglo-Spanish Relations, 1936–1950
A Political Economy of Britain since 1945
Cinema and Society in Britain
Conservatism in the United States, c1930–c1990
Contemporary Scotland
Ethnicity, Class and Power in 20th Century Africa
Gender, Crime and Deviancy: Britain c1860–1960
History as Romance, Profession, Critique: Theory and Scholarship in the West, 1835–1985
Home Rule in Ireland and Britain, 1800–2000
Making War, Making Peace: European International History, 1914–1945
The British at War, 1939–1945
Themes in African Social History
Themes in Modern British and Irish Historiography
Unionism in Ireland and Britain, c1800–2000
The Civil Rights Movement
Armed Struggle: The Northern Ireland Troubles and their Origins
The Politics of Historiography in Post-Colonial South Asia
The United States and the Cold War
The United States and the Vietnam War: Origins and Repercussions
Thinking the 20th Century
Hannah Arendt and the Breakdown of European Civilization
Topics in Post-1945 European History

Career opportunities

This programme provides a suitable foundation for advanced study, or a number of careers, for example politics or journalism.

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This programme provides a critical appreciation of the new legal regime emerging between international law and criminal justice symbolised by the creation of the International Criminal Court. Read more
This programme provides a critical appreciation of the new legal regime emerging between international law and criminal justice symbolised by the creation of the International Criminal Court.
Through a strong foundation in both international law and international criminal law, the programme offers the opportunity to develop expertise in terrorism studies, international policing, international organised crime, the laws of war and armed conflict, human rights and Islamic law.

Programme structure

In addition to the two core modules, Current Issues and Research in International Law and International Criminal Law, candidates take at least one module from the following: Terrorism Studies, War and Human Rights, International Policing, International Organized Crime, Contemporary Islamic Legal Issues, law of Armed Conflict, Feminist Legal Studies. Candidates may chose another of the above or one module form any other LLM programme. . The Dissertation must be deemed by the Dissertation committee to be substantially related to the area of International Law and Criminal Justice.

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This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. Read more
This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. It will engage with both the war on terror, but also the response to terrorism, militarily, as well as in the intelligence world.

Why study International Security at Dundee?

This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

[What's so good about International Security at Dundee?]]
This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules.

Choose from:
Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Teaching & Assessment

The teaching team are based in Politics at Dundee, in the School of Humanities. Politics is big enough to have a real international presence, but is still small and intimate enough to offer a friendly and responsive home for students from all backgrounds. This is more than a mere claim - independent surveys consistently rate Politics at Dundee as among the best-received programmes in the country.

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in January or September. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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Security is one of the fastest growing areas of concern in the academic, corporate and public domains, due not only to the threats of war and terrorism but also issues related to crime, safety, global strategy and political upheaval. Read more
Security is one of the fastest growing areas of concern in the academic, corporate and public domains, due not only to the threats of war and terrorism but also issues related to crime, safety, global strategy and political upheaval. This distance learning programme is delivered by Informa and will give you a solid grasp of the of problems facing the international community today.

More about this course

More than ever before, national governments, international agencies and major corporations recognise the need for personnel with a strong grasp of intelligence and security issues who can also demonstrate exceptional skills of research and analysis.

We'll not only equip you to analyse these types of issues but will also help you place them in the context of broader military, strategic and political considerations.

This distance learning course is taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platorm. It will give you a solid academic grounding in the fields of criminology, terrorism and intelligence, which will provide you with the critical thinking skills needed to make sense of the ever-changing global security agenda. Thsi expertise will enable you engage with institutions and individuals central to this area.

To successfully complete the course you must pass each module. Assessment will incorporate coursework, online examinations, research assignments and essays. You'll be expected to participate in the virtual learning environment with tutors and fellow students.

For more information on the PGCert portion of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/security-studies---pg-cert/

For more information on the PGDip portion of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/security-studies---pg-dip/

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Contemporary Issues in Crime, Safety and Security (core, 20 credits)
-Intelligence Analysis (core, 20 credits)
-International Financial Crime and Security (core, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (core, 20 credits)
-Security Studies Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Strategic Change in the Global Environment (core, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The distance learning course will benefit anyone wishing to work for a public, private or international organisation.

Typical career destinations include education, marketing, local and public services, journalism or positions within institutions such as the European Union or the United Nations. The course is also particularly valuable if you're interested in policy issues or if you career plans involve dealing with international security affairs and you'd benefit from a solid academic grounding in the field.

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Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. Read more

About the course

This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. As well as specific research training in history, you’ll also gain a broad range of transferable skills that will be of value to employers outside academia.

If you’re already focused on taking a PhD in history, this intensive course improves your chances of getting funding from the AHRC, ESRC and others.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Dissertation; Research Presentation and a choice of research skills modules including Research Skills for Historians; Directed Reading; Palaeography; Latin and modern languages.

Examples of optional modules

Order and Disorder Around theYear 1000; Prisoners of War in the Twentieth Century; Crime and Punishment in Late Antiquity; City Life in Jacksonian America, 1828-1850; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Cold War Histories; Debating Cultural Imperialism in the Nineteenth-Century British Empire; Stories of Activism, 1960 to the Present.

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There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Read more
There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

This programme provides students with a theoretical and empirical understanding of the international security environment of the post-Cold War era, including the origins of conflicts and peace, the emergence of new security threats and the many different agencies involved in conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peacemaking today.

The MSc aims to be empirically relevant by teaching students how to apply theoretical concepts to contemporary conflicts and current affairs.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-International Security
-Security Governance
-Theories of Securitisation

Optional units - You will choose no more than three optional units from the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Units can vary from year to year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and Militarisation
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender: International Policy Development
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

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