• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
OCAD University Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
"war"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (War)

We have 492 Masters Degrees (War)

  • "war" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 492
Order by 
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in War and Society is a unique degree that explores the most spectacular of historic events.

Key Features of MA in War and Society

War has been a catalyst for violent change throughout human history. It inflicts terrible suffering and degradation and yet evokes great bravery.

What is War? A simple, meaningful definition is not easily achieved. Simple explanations are insufficient. War needs to be analysed in political, social, cultural, technological, historical, military and media contexts.

War and Society is a collaborative, interdisciplinary MA Degree programme that utilises the range of research expertise in the College of Arts and Humanities.

The full-time War and Society course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study is available.

War and Society Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to war and society.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of study of war and society.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the course in War and Society typically include:

• War, Identity and Society

• War, Thecnology and Culture

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Critical Security

• Venice and the Sea

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Ghosts of the Confederacy

• State of Africa

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• Fascism and Culture

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in War and Society from a history, politics, media or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to war and society.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for war and society graduates. MA in War and Society degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as military organisations; diplomatic corps; the foreign office; humanitarian organisations; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions and the civil service.



Read less
The MA in War. History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years. Read more
The MA in War: History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years.

Looking at political, cultural and social history, this MA is for those who want to study war in all its multi-faceted complexity, from the everyday and the personal, to the national and the global. We offer expert teaching and supervision on British, European, American and Middle Eastern modern and contemporary history.

The main conflicts you will cover are: the First World War and the Second World War; the Balkan Wars of the 1910s and the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s; the wars of Decolonization and those of New Imperialism; the Cold War and its ‘side-wars’; the War on Terror and the current conflicts in the Middle East.

Why study with us?

Studying this degree you will acquire expertise on:

• War and conflict studies
• Modern international history
• Interdisciplinary learning and researching

You will be taught in a truly interdisciplinary manner, utilising a number of disciplines: cultural and social history, politics and international relations. You can build the degree structure that suits best your interests and future plans.

You can specialise in particular disciplines, or you can explore a wide range of new methods. You will also have the choice of three different types of elective work (e.g. extended essays or primary-source based seminars). Our students can also use the nearby world-famous Mass Observation archive. They also tend to be involved in the events and research projects run by the University of Brighton’s Understanding Conflict cluster, such as our latest initiative on ‘Contesting Britain at War’.

We offer flexible modes of study for those with personal or professional commitments. After finishing the MA you will be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

Areas of study

There are two Core Modules that you will have to take, one on the forms and one on the legacies of war. ‘Forms of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ examines the lead up to war and what is happening in wartime. It looks at: the political, ideological and wider structural causes of war; the human experience at the home-front and at the war-front; the politics and methods of warfare as they have evolved in time; the different modes of practical, political, and intellectual resistance against invasion and occupation. ‘Legacies of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ looks at the impact of war, at what is left after a conflict: the emotional and personal effects of war; how a conflict continues to exist on material and psychological landscapes; the multiple ways through which personal, collective and global memories of killing and sacrifice are constructed; the politics of what we decide to remember and what to forget; the activist, political and theoretical efforts to stop war from happening again.

Beyond the two Core Modules you can also pick a number of option courses that relate to you interests, for example: Public History and Heritage; Cultural Memory; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity; Globalisation and Global Politics; Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Genocide; International Relations theory; Aesthetics and Philosophy; Cultural Theory; Philosophy and Critical Theory. Alternatively you might want instead to research and write a stand-alone extended essay, or you may opt for a more practical-based unit on teaching and learning higher education, offering you the opportunity to learn more about undergraduate teaching.

You will also take a Research Methods module that will help you develop the academic skills necessary to engage in the 20,000-word Dissertation, for which you are guided by one of our faculty with subject expertise.

Careers and employability

Our graduates are particularly well-equipped to follow career paths in sectors that deal with violent conflicts, their consequences and resolution, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the Ministry of Defence, and international bodies (e.g. United Nations).

Much more broadly our degree opens the path to sectors that value critical research skills and a good knowledge of modern history and politics, such as media and journalism, politics and government, museums and archives, and publishing.

Working in schools and in academia are, of course, standard options. Alternatively, many of our students go on to study for Doctorates with one of the Research Centres in Brighton.

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active in the field of War and Society. Academic members of staff within War and Society have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of MA by Research in War and Society

An MA by Research in War and Society gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in War and Society, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in War and Society and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a War and Society research student you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled on the MA by Research in War and Society are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research in War and Society is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in War and Society for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project in War and Society with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

At any one time, the department has over forty research students who work together with their supervisors on their projects. Staff can offer their expertise to research students in the field of War and Society.



Read less
Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more

Based in the Department of War Studies, our MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, you can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

  • The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high-calibre training institution.
  • It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.
  • You are taught by experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies and institutions.
  • Situated close to the seat of government, the City, Imperial War Museum, National Maritime Museum, Royal Courts of Justice and Inns of Court, you have unique opportunities to network with key high-profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.
  • Our MA courses are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Description

Our course challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our course prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master’s degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

Course purpose

Our course offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have two hours per week over two 10-week terms. This can be split into one lecture + one seminar or combinations thereof, You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of training workshop/ supervision, to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3000-6000 words), presentation, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.



Read less
Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. Read more

Our War Studies MA explores the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. We have designed this course expressly to enhance your employability and support your professional career development

Key benefits

  • A unique opportunity to study war from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
  • Designed to provide a postgraduate-level introduction to War Studies for students who have little or no specialist background in the field.
  • A chance to develop a range of transferable skills that will enhance your employability, aid your professional-career development and help prepare you for postgraduate research.
  • You will be taught by some of the very best academics in the field. Departmental staff are internationally acknowledged experts in their areas of specialization; they are active researchers and routinely use their latest findings in their teaching.
  • An opportunity to study at a global centre of excellence that enjoys close relationships with other academic institutions, with think-tanks, non-governmental organizations and policy-making bodies around the world.
  • Opportunities to network with high-profile visitors, such as government ministers, ambassadors and generals, who frequently give talks in the Department.

Description

War is a key aspect of human experience, and people have long sought to understand it from a diverse range of perspectives. You will study alongside historians, social scientists, philosophers, jurists and artists, benefitting from their perspectives and those of the students around you.

We will provide you with an intellectual ‘toolbox’ composed of skills and techniques drawn from a range of disciplines associated with the humanities and social sciences. We will not train you as a specialist historian, philosopher, strategist, etc., but you will be introduced to elements of various disciplines that are relevant to the study of war. The challenge lies in combining them in order to achieve a sophisticated and rounded understanding of the subject.

The course will appeal if you are a student of politics, history or strategic studies or if you are a professional in defence, diplomacy or foreign affairs who wants to reflect on the broader implications of your experiences.

Course purpose

To introduce the field of war studies to graduate students and professionals who have an interest in deepening their understanding of war. You will gain an understanding of the phenomenon of war and conflict, along with its causes, conduct and consequences, from historical, political, philosophical, military and sociological viewpoints. The programme will appeal to students from a wide range of backgrounds including politics, history and strategic studies; and professionals in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs wanting to reflect on the broader implications of their experiences.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For lectures, seminars and feedback you will typically have 2 hours per week for two terms per 40-credit module. This can be split into 1 lecture + 1 seminar or other combinations thereof. You will also have 360 hours of self-study. Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have our central departmental workshops (2 hours each) and three to

four sessions with the supervisor during which you will develop your dissertation topic, identify a research question, an approach to answering it, including selection of appropriate methods for gathering and using evidence. The timing of these three to four sessions is up to the student and advisor to arrange. These will complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

  • Most 20 and 40 credit modules are assessed through a combination of essay, presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be 100% dissertation up to 15000 words.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.



Read less
This new MA programme explores the military, cultural, political and social history of the First World War, introducing you to advanced concepts of historiography and cultural theory. Read more
This new MA programme explores the military, cultural, political and social history of the First World War, introducing you to advanced concepts of historiography and cultural theory.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/765/first-world-war-studies

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI915 - Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)
HI932 - Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)
HI823 - Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
HI828 - Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)
HI860 - The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)
HI815 - War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is dependent on module choice, but is typically by coursework and a dissertation of 15-18,000 words.

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War. Read more

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has seen interest in the Great War reach unprecedented heights, and the University of Wolverhampton is very pleased to announce a new Part Time Masters programme exploring the History of Britain and the First World War.

Our team of academics

This is an exciting programme delivered by a truly world-class team of scholars. Led by Professor Gary Sheffield, it includes Professor Stephen Badsey and Dr Spencer Jones, Professor Peter Simkins, Dr John Bourne, Professor John Buckley and Dr Laura Ugolini. This is the strongest cluster of scholars specialising in the military history of the First World War to be found in any conventional UK university, and the team will be supported by a number of prestigious guest speakers. A particular strength of the programme is the quality of the teaching.

The University of Wolverhampton's cluster of First World War historians have excellent links within the wider historical community at home and overseas. Links with the military are very strong. The emphasis of the programme is on the military and political history of Britain and the British Empire in the 1914-18 war.

Modules include:

  • Major Debates in the Historiography of the First World War: Historical Methods
  • The British Empire at War
  • The Western Front: Core Concepts and Controversies
  • The Western Front: The Evolution of the British Expeditionary Force
  • Total War: The British Experience 1914-18


Read less
The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. Read more

The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. This programme will enable you to study the subject in detail, to update your knowledge, and to become familiar with the use of personal accounts, including interviews and testimonies. You will be taught by experts in the field, and you will carry out your own research in your favourite area.

You will study in depth some of the key issues in the military, political, and social history of the Second World War, such as strategy, diplomacy and politics of Axis and Allied forces, the war in the air, the victory campaign in the West, and the war in the East, including life under German occupation, the fate of societies under the conditions of total war, and last but not least, the Holocaust.

Typical Modules Include

  • Axis and Allies: Strategy, Diplomacy and Politics at War
  • The Ostfront and German occupation policy in Eastern Europe
  • Societies and Total War
  • The Air War
  • The Holocaust: Historiography, sources, controversies
  • The Victory Campaign: The War in the West, June 1944 to May 1945


Read less
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences..

Why this programme

◾This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
◾The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
◾All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include
◾Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
◾The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
◾Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
◾Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include
◾Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
◾The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.

Read less
The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates. Read more
The MA in Post-war Recovery Studies brings together experienced humanitarian professionals and less experienced students, thus creating opportunities for students to share wisdom while being challenged by more theoretically-minded, technologically savvy and idealistic coursemates.

Why York?

Our students choose to study with the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit at the University of York for many reasons. Here at the PRDU, we're proud of our location. The University is situated within acres of beautiful parkland, and is only a short walk away from the centre of the historic city of York. Whether it's hustle of the city, or the calmness of campus that you are searching for, it can all be found at the University of York. Here are some of the reasons why our students chose us:
-York is consistently among the top UK universities for the quality of its teaching and research.
-York ranked 1st in the UK and 7th in the world in the Times Higher Education World Rankings of Universities less than 50 years old.
-The PRDU is an internationally recognised teaching and research faculty, with links to other universities and organisations worldwide.
-Eligible students from outside the EU are guaranteed accomodation on or near campus.
-York is easily accessible by air, rail, and road. The city is well connected by major UK railway lines, meaning a travel time of only two hours to London, and two hours fifteen minutes to Edinburgh.
-The cost of living in York is considerably lower than other cities in the UK.

The PRDU offers students the unique chance to study within a research department that is a leader in its field, alongside internationally acclaimed academics and lecturers. The PRDU, like the city of York, is expansive and wide reaching, yet remains personable and friendly despite its cosmopolitan activities.

Teaching

Classes are taught by world renowned academics, policy makers & practitioners. There are five separate class-taught modules, and students are supported throughout the year by the academic staff at the PRDU.

Field Trip

Every year students of the MA in Post-war Recovery Studies undertake a field trip to a post-war region. Led by field-experienced faculty and staff, students gain first hand, ground-level, understandings of recovery and reconstruction in the aftermath of war.

Work Placement

All students undertake a 6-8 week work placement. They are based within an international or national organisation working on an aspect of post-war recovery, humanitarian action or development in a war-affected context.

Read less
This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda. Read more

This programme explores how conflict occurs across a variety of countries and landscapes in the late 19th and 20th centuries, and how such conflict is managed and presented through media and propaganda.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/84/war-media-and-society

Course detail

This course takes in different types of conflict, from conventional trench warfare and geopolitical stand-offs to guerrilla tactics and civil defense initiatives. It also examines the application of technology, the impact of the media on public opinion, along with the increasing importance of the home front in 20th-century warfare. The core module provides a strong interpretative and conceptual backbone and introduces you to the demands of postgraduate study in history.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year:

- Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)

- War, Propaganda and the Media (30 credits)

- Testimonies of War: Oral History in Theory and Practice (30 credits)

- Ireland and the First World War (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Interpretations and Representations (30 credits)

- Landscapes of the Great War: Public Histories (30 credits)

- Work Placement (30 credits)

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)

- The British Army and the Great War (30 credits)

- Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html



Read less
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. Read more
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. You’ll analyse the role of war in human history from its early beginnings to the present day in a core module which focuses on historiographical debates about warfare. You can then choose to study optional modules about a broad range of topics in the history of war, from medieval and early modern times to today.

You’ll have opportunities to use internationally-renowned collections in your studies, including the Liddle Collection of artefacts and private papers from the First World War in our Brotherton Library, the holdings of the Royal Armouries Museum, Leeds, and material from the Imperial War museum North at Salford. The Second World War experience museum in nearby Wetherby provides a huge collection of private papers from the Second World War.

Course Content

As well as the three compulsory modules, you also choose two optional modules from a selection, for example:

- Making History: Archive Collaborations

- Warfare in the Age of the Crusades

- Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815

- Medicine and Warfare in the19th and 20th Centuries

- The War on Terror

- Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

- Guns and Global Security

Read less
Our International Relations & Contemporary War MA offers you an opportunity to study international relations in a multi-disciplinary department devoted to the study of all aspects of contemporary war. Read more

Our International Relations & Contemporary War MA offers you an opportunity to study international relations in a multi-disciplinary department devoted to the study of all aspects of contemporary war. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • An academically rigorous course on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis, and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, video, audio, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

Our International Relations & Contemporary War MA will give you an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of the international system and of contemporary war, including changes that are currently taking place. Processes of globalisation, including the movement of monies and peoples, the impact of new technologies, the rise of identity politics, the rise of transnational or nonstate actors and transformations in the character of contemporary war all pose direct challenges to the state, the international system and global politics. These themes are considered in depth.

Course purpose

To equip you with the capacity to engage critically with literature in the discipline of international relations and the capacity to think theoretically about problems and issues in contemporary war.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King's College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

Typically per 20 credit module, you will have five hours per week of 'seminars' (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks as wel as 180 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

The Dissertation typically consists of 2 hours per week online discussion time, for four weeks, to complement 592 hours of self-study.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500-word short essay (25%), one 3,000-word long essay (70%) and student participation in the discussions (5%). The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation (100%).

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD, one teaches part-time at King’s.



Read less
With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies and Contemporary Military History based at a central London Club. Read more

Course outline

With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies and Contemporary Military History based at a central London Club. The course commences in October with a ‘Research Skills Study Day’ and after a year of supervised independent research, culminates with the student’s submission of a dissertation. During the first six months, candidates are encouraged to attend a series of guest seminars and dinners (set out in detail under Teaching & Assessment) at which some of the most eminent names in the field present papers. This series of talks examines why and how modern wars are fought, and the principal influences that will affect the conduct of war – and Britain’s role – in the future. This seminar programme will also be attended by Associate Students who are not degree candidates but wish to attend the talks and enjoy the ensuing discussion.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching methods

For Master’s degree candidates the core of the programme is the writing, under supervision, of the dissertation on a subject chosen by the student in the field of Modern War Studies. Subject to approval by the Course Director, the topic to be examined in the dissertation can address any aspect of warfare since 1945, and the precise topic is usually formulated in a process of discussion with the Course Director and/or the student’s supervisor. The length of the dissertation is not more than 40,000 words and usually not less than 20,000. Research does not have to be confined to British-related subjects. Some of the themes which students may wish to examine include: political decision making; alliances; warfare and faith; the impact of critical strategic thinkers; intelligence gathering; the impact of technology on the battlefield; the development of doctrine; military-media relations; leadership; command and control; the application of force at the strategic, operational and tactical levels of war on land, sea and air; and the influence of war on non-combatants, politics, society, economies and cultures.

Where will you study?

This is a London-based course. The seminars will be held at a central London Club. Seminars begin at 19:00 and are followed by a formal post-seminar dinner at which students can engage in a general discussion with the speaker.

Seminars

There will be a programme of three research skills sessions and ten guest seminars, directed by Professor Lloyd Clark. Running approximately every other week from October ]to March, seminar speakers will include recently serving generals and some of the most distinguished scholars and commentators in the field of modern war studies.

How is the programme assessed?

Examination is by a research dissertation on an approved topic of not less than 20,000 words.

Associate students

For those who wish to attend the seminars and dinners, but do not have time to complete the coursework involved in the MA programme, it is possible to register for the course as an Associate Student. This status enables Associate Students to attend the seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, but not to proceed to the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/warstudies.

Read less
Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. Read more

Our War in the Modern World MA offers a comprehensive examination of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. You will study this course online, meaning that you can access our high standard of teaching and expert staff from anywhere in the world without disrupting your personal and professional life.

Key benefits

  • An entirely web-delivered degree course that is available anytime, anywhere.
  • Be part of a world-leading department, a vibrant research community and an international student body, drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Academically rigorous course on which lecturers provide support and guidance.
  • You will develop the skills of in-depth and critical analysis and become familiar with the latest research in the discipline.
  • Course materials include specially-written content, images, maps, intensively used discussion forums and full access to the resources of our library’s extensive electronic holdings.
  • Maximum flexibility for you: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Description

Our War in the Modern World MA will give you an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of warfare and international security since the end of the Second World War. You will examine contemporary warfare and security issues in the light of the wide-ranging political, technological, economic and social changes since 1945. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare, and to understand the contexts in which modern conflicts take place.

The course is structured so that you will first develop an understanding of warfare, security issues and geo-political changes. You can then choose optional modules and write your dissertation, giving you the opportunity to concentrate on those aspects of contemporary war and international relations that interest you most.

Course purpose

Our course is designed to offer you an engaging, well designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

The course is delivered online, via the King’s College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS). You will study through lively online seminars, where everyone will participate in their own time, guided by one of our expert staff.

You will typically have five hours per week of ‘seminars’ (asynchronous online discussions) per week for 10 weeks per 20-credit module, as well as 160 hours of self-study. 

For the dissertation module, you will typically have two hours per week online discussion time for four weeks to complement the 592 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

All 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 1,500 word short essay (25%), one 3,000 word long essay (70%) and student participation in the seminar discussions (5%).

The dissertation module assessment will be on the 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Past students from this course have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD while one teaches part time at King’s.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X