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Masters Degrees (Voice)

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Voice Studies courses at Central are nationally and internationally renowned, giving a specialised education in the study and practice of the spoken voice. Read more

ABOUT MA/MFA VOICE STUDIES

Voice Studies courses at Central are nationally and internationally renowned, giving a specialised education in the study and practice of the spoken voice. They have a close relationship with the celebrated International Centre for Voice, based at Central.

These courses are for graduates of appropriate disciplines who wish to follow a career in voice teaching and who seek specialised study and practice in voice and speech. They are particularly likely to appeal to professionals who already have an interest in, and knowledge
of, the voice and for applying it to the fields of performance practice, performance training or other related pedagogies, for example actors, directors, drama teachers, trained singers and speech therapists.

The MFA offers a further embedding of skills and concepts learnt during its second year. In some countries, the MFA is more recognised, particularly for those interested in teaching, or research in a higher education environment.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

Workshops are provided with leading British, American, Swiss and New Zealand based voice practitioners, including Kristin Linklater, Catherine Fitzmaurice, Meribeth Bunch Dayme, Frankie Armstrong, Annie Ruth, and Jacob Lieberman.

For students studying the MFA Voice Studies, Central are delighted to announce our association with the University of Cincinnati, CCM Drama programmes under Professor Rocco Dal Vera and with the University of Minnesota’s Guthrie Theatre BFA Actor training programme, under D’Arcy Smith. Both of these influential and highly respected performance training organisations have offered on-going opportunities for Central students to engage with them during their second year MFA attachments in voice.

ASSESSMENT

During the first three terms of both courses, assessment is through written work, practical projects and teaching practice. In the fourth term of the MA, students complete a dissertation or portfolio focusing on their specialist area of enquiry arising from the work of the course. In the MFA second year, assessment is by means of documents based on field experience and related research.

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Students will gain highly specialised knowledge in a range of professional contexts and develop advanced expertise as a voice coach, teacher or performer. Read more

MA Professional Voice Practice

Students will gain highly specialised knowledge in a range of professional contexts and develop advanced expertise as a voice coach, teacher or performer. The course has been developed with the support of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

As an accredited Drama UK School, graduates have gone on to fulfil very exciting careers. Working professionally at prestigious organisations such as the RSC, The Royal Court, the Minack, The Cambridge Theatre, the Mountview Theatre Academy and ALRA.

You will explore in-depth the theory and practice of working with the voice. During your studies you will consider innovations in practice, and initiate research. You will be taught philosophical, ethical and aesthetic principles related to voice practice. Conducting private and self-directed study will widen your knowledge of the field and help you acquire a Master’s level understanding of professional voice practice.

Modules include:

• Practical Voice
• Phonetics and Voice Theory
• Singing
• Voice and Text
• Pedagogy
• Placement
• Research Methodology

The final research project may be either practice or dissertation based.

Employability

Graduates of the course will return to careers in the performance industry or in education with significantly enhanced skills in voice practice, which will increase employment opportunities and give graduates a competitive edge in a highly competitive field.

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The Master Of Music In Performance, Voice is designed for those who can demonstrate appropriate performing ability and possess an appropriate undergraduate degree. Read more
The Master Of Music In Performance, Voice is designed for those who can demonstrate appropriate performing ability and possess an appropriate undergraduate degree. If the degree is in an area other than the area of intended graduate study, no more than twelve hours of remediation will be required in vocal-related studies (diction, voice lessons, etc.).

All degree requirements must be completed within six years. A single one-year extension may be granted for cause.

Curriculum

Core modules:

• 3 credits in music history (MHL) 1
• 3 credits in music theory (MTC) 2

• VOI 541 Advanced Voice Private Lesson
• VOI 542 Advanced Voice Private Lesson
• VOI 543 Advanced Voice Private Lessons
• VOC 524 Musico-Dramatic Productions

Electives (4-6 credits) :

• VOC 511 Master Class Voice: Baroque Period
• VOC 512 Master Class Voice: German Lied
• VOC 513 Master Class Voice: French Melodie
• VOC 514 Master Class Voice: 20th Century Art Song
• VOC 516 French-German Diction
• VOC 526 Choral Literature
• VOC 529 Vocal Literature
• VOC 591 Vocal Pedagogy
• MHL 654 History of Opera

• Any 500-level courses selected under advisement.

Recital component:

• VOI 697 Recital

Completion of a comprehensive exit examination is required.

Please visit the website for detailed information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/school-of-music/applied-music/#coursestext

Further Study

Graduates have gone onto further their musical education at institutions including:

• Curtis Institute of Music
• Eastman School of Music
• Indiana University,
• The Juilliard School and others.

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On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. Read more
On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. You'll learn to see your work as an evolving practice rather than as a response to an already defined concept or brief, as you challenge and re-evaluate your work with the help of teaching staff who are experienced practitioners.

As your authorial voice develops and you learn to identify your audience, you'll also be encouraged to take an entrepreneurial approach, thinking creatively about the outlets and options for your work. This professionalism is aided by the course's close relationship with independent publisher Atlantic Press, offering you opportunities to gain direct experience in the many aspects of producing and publishing graphic literature.

At the heart of this studio-based course is a belief that there is a need to reassert the characteristics of personal origination, ownership, storytelling and literary ideas within the medium of illustration. We'll help you gain the confidence to take ownership of your work, you'll develop new ideas and concepts driven by your desire to create a distinct, original, authorial voice.

You'll explore narrative and storytelling as defined by your developing voice, working on longer-term projects across a variety of mediums that suit your interests – including children's books, graphic novels, digital work and screen-based production. The course will also engage you with current ideas and thinking related to notions of authorship, encouraging you to draw inspiration from a diverse range of influences, providing further personal insight and direction for your practice.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/illustrationma

Building professional experience

A unique feature of our MA is our relationship with Atlantic Press (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/). The specialist publishing house, based in Penryn, was founded 15 years ago by course leader Steve Braund. The partnership enables you to learn about the whole publishing process, from concept to realisation – as well as the practical aspects of printing, distribution and marketing. The close proximity of a publishing press also means that internships to students on the course are offered on a regular basis.

The course will give you a grounding in all aspects of professional practice related to the work of an authorial illustrator. You'll also be encouraged to consider entrepreneurial approaches to your practice. At the end of the course, you'll mount a professional presentation of work from your negotiated MA project.

How the course is taught

Teaching takes place in the form of lectures, seminars, group critiques and workshops, supported by high-profile guest speakers. The Illustration Discourses lecture series considers authorial positions, related theories and their contexts. Both lectures and seminars will help inform your negotiated practical projects, whilst recording your studio practice in a research journal will aid self-reflection.

- Typical workshops

Research Journals
Creative Writing
Screen Printing
Life Drawing
Listening to Images
Book Art
Printmaking & Collography
Etching
Composition
Professional Practice
Table Top Book Binding
Visual Thinking
InDesign I
What are Archives?
Professional Practice, Networking & Entrepreneurship
Visual Narrative
Perspective
Book Design, Layout & InDesign
Bookbinding
Graphic Design

Course outline

This is a one-year course delivered over 45 weeks and divided into three 15-week study blocks. Alternatively, you can study part-time over two years, totalling 90 weeks.

Over the course of the year you'll be required to produce a sequence of three negotiated practical projects based on personal authorial illustration work.

The lecture and seminar series Illustration Discourses supports the practical work, running concurrently with a research journal, which builds connections and the opportunity to reflect on practice. You'll be expected to demonstrate progression; indicating the research, analysis, reflection and investigation necessary for the development of a successful and distinctive authorial illustration practice.

You'll also produce two analytical essays and deliver a presentation exploring areas of personal interest within the authorial context relating to your practice. These will show a consideration of audience awareness and the processes and development of your practice. In order to develop self-reliance the course allows you a good deal of freedom to develop your projects.

Facilities

- Individual studio space
- Full IT facilities
- Print room
- Comprehensive library facilities
- Access to specialist equipment

Assessment

- Assessment takes place at the end of each module
- Combination of visual, verbal and written assignments
- Final assessment takes place in September

Careers

Potential careers include:

- Commissioned or self-published illustrator
- Art director or creative director
- Illustration residencies
- Curatorial roles
- Teaching
- Further study

Interview and selection process

When you apply to join the course, we'll ask you to send us a study proposal and either samples of work or a link to your website or blog, if you have one. At interview we'll look for authorial illustration potential or capabilities, illustration ability, graphic skills, drawing skills, creative writing/storytelling potential, ideas and concepts. We really value meeting you in person but we can hold a telephone or Skype interview if this is not possible.

Falmouth Illustration Forum

Our respected annual Falmouth Illustration Forum recently celebrated its tenth anniversary with the publication of the world's first book devoted to the subject, The Authorial Illustrator (available from atlanticpressbooks.com (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/)). Each annual forum explores different aspects of authorial illustration and includes internationally renowned guest speakers.

View information about our forums here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/content/ma-illustration-open-forum-2014-witness-reportage-documentary

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Read more
The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it so that it might operate in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer reduced and simplified accounts of learning. We intend to bring to the fore your ethical sensibilities and intellectual capacities. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative and considered practices which make real differences to the experiences of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. Practice is a form of expertise, and it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

About the Course

The programme is founded on a philosophical principle that teaching is an intellectual activity, and, as such, that teachers are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it in operating amongst the more general principles of academic practice so that it might do so in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer a reduced and simplified account of classrooms. We intend to bring to fore the ethical sensibilities of teachers, and their intellectual capacities as sense- and judgement-makers. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative, considered and innovative practice which can make real differences to the experiences and outcomes of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. On one level, this is about application. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. This will occur both informally through the sessions, and formally in practice-based 'projects'.

This principle, however, also works in reverse. We hold firm the notion that practice is a form of expertise, and that it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

Assessment details

Assessment is by coursework for each unit and a full assignment brief is available for each unit. Assessment tasks always allow you to pursue your own thinking and interests within the parameters of the unit and award. Formative feedback is available and built in for every unit.

For taught units (30 credits) the assessment is 5000 words equivalent. The final (60 credit) dissertation is 12-14,000 words.

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Why Surrey?. Our new and innovative MFA Acting will train future generations of internationally renowned performers and teachers. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our new and innovative MFA Acting will train future generations of internationally renowned performers and teachers.

Delivered by Guildford School of Acting (GSA), one of the most highly regarded theatre schools in the UK, this programme provides world-class training alongside a sterling reputation and excellent industry links.

Programme Overview

Our new and innovative MFA Acting builds on the success of GSA’s current postgraduate programme by extending the high-quality, intensive training currently offered on our one year MA Acting programme. The MFA Acting programme is highly selective and intensive: students train for four semesters over two years, taking classes in acting, voice, movement and professional development, exploring a wide range of theatre traditions and performance styles in rehearsal projects and public productions.

This unique programme is delivered by expert teachers with extensive first-hand experience in the professional theatre sector in both the UK and the US.

Our beautiful campus boasts strong transport links to London, meaning our students can easily benefit from GSA’s proximity to the heart of UK theatre; London’s West End. This means our students not only receive world-class training, but are also heavily exposed to London theatre, cultural activities and highly beneficial industry networks.

Programme Structure

This programme is studied full-time over four consecutive semesters and two academic years.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational Aims of the Programme

Our MFA in Acting will provide graduates with:

  • The ability to employ a broad range of acting knowledge and skills in the creation and presentation of roles
  • The ability to perform in plays of various types and from various periods
  • The acquisition of advanced understanding and capabilities in voice and speech, movement, and play analysis
  • A working knowledge of historical, critical, and theoretical content and the ways they inform playwriting and dramatic writing, the creation of roles, and other aspects of production

Program Learning Outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
  • Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
  • Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
  • Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
  • Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
  • Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

Global Opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. Read more
MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. On another level, it is a thought-provoking, life-changing reflection on the function and art of the actor – exploring techniques from some of Europe’s most influential practitioners as well as innovative professional practice from the UK and internationally.

Example structure

We offer dynamic and unique course for actors, directors, technical theatre specialists and students of theatre practice. Training at East 15 draws upon 50 years of tradition combined with a keen sense of the world of stage and screen today.

First Term
In the first term, there are classes in movement, voice and singing, as well as contextual studies. The entire programme of teaching across the course coheres to lead the actor from an exploration of personal self to that of the body in time and space and from there to the creation of character and the realisation of text.

Acting classes promote the development of intuitive, creative responses which are then framed by the introduction of techniques to build character and play actions. Showings of short naturalistic scenes give opportunity to integrate and apply technical voice and movement work in the context of an acting exercise.

Second Term
In the second term, skills classes continue. The acting work begins with an intensive Shakespeare module which develops and strengthens the integration of technical skills with acting technique. This is followed by the Research Performance Project in which you engage with specific time in history and experience East 15’s distinctive Living History Project.

This signature project is a non-performed improvisation in which the actor can, through rigorous ‘actor-centric’ research and a residential period away from the campus environment, experience and identify with the practical and visceral realities, as well as the psychological and emotional attributes of the character.

Subsequent to this you devise a studio performance based on your intellectual, emotional and sensory experience. You are also given responsibilities in stage management and production to enhance your overall understanding of what it is to make theatre and to prepare you for the realities of the industry.

Towards the end of term two participants begin to research and develop their MA project.

Third Term
The first part of Term Three focuses on media. The film project teaches skills of acting for the camera and provides material for the actor’s show reel. The radio drama project teaches radio skills and microphone technique and provides material usable in a voice reel. At the same time, you begin work on your MA Projects. The MA Projects involve working in small groups on self-generated projects, in which participants are given independence and autonomy as company members. These are performed in East 15’s Corbett Theatre or in other venues as appropriate.

The second half of term 3 sees a full production of a text-based play usually in our on-campus Corbett Theatre.

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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

medium/large format cameras
portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
film technology
cinematography
digital imaging
output systems and processes
and/or in electronic arts:

computer and video graphics
post-production
computer-aided design
digital publishing
animation
animatics
2D and 3D computer animation
still and durational image production and manipulation
web construction
interactivity
There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the convenor Nigel Perkins.

Modules & Structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

You will study

Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive
The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

Art Director
Artist
Animator
Senior Interactive Designer
Head of Creative Department
Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
Director (commercial narrative)
Director Of Photography
Installation Artist
Interactive Artist
Producer
Curator

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING FOR SCREEN

MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. The course is primarily for those who have had previous training or professional experience in theatre, film or television. It will build on the existing
skills of students and focus on the specific needs of the year group. Drawing on the expertise of Central’s permanent staff team and specialist professionals from the industry, the programme aims to encourage the development of creative artists with the flexibility to work across performance mediums.

Across the first two terms, students will follow rigorous training in acting, which will concentrate on core skills: voice, body and creative interpretation. The principles of the study derive from psychophysical methods, particularly the techniques of Michael Chekhov and Stanislavski. The emphasis of the training is on producing actors who have a high level of creative skills and have developed flexible
and adaptable bodies and voices, with the necessary technique to apply to a screen context.

The range of classes across these terms will include screen technique; this will essentially examine the distinction between screen and live performance. It will also cover visual storytelling, working in, and adapting to, shot size, cheating, hitting the mark, shooting contemporary scenes from television and film, and the preparation of different styles of work, including soap, drama and comedy.

Acting classes will interrogate the body and provide students with a toolbox of exercises. There is a specific focus on relaxing the body and working with ease, developing the imagination, unpicking habits, creating character, and investigating the inner life. Voice and dialect classes will encourage an understanding of the voice as an instrument and will work with a variety of text including poetry, verbatim,
classical and contemporary material. In the area of movement, there is exposure to forms, which may include jazz and historical forms of dance, physical acting approaches including Suzuki, Lecoq, yoga, and chi kung. Other classes include sight-reading, textual analysis, casting, and mock auditions led by casting directors, actors and directors. Professional preparation will involve guidance on selecting photographs, writing CVs, self-marketing and online promotion.

ASSESSMENT

Modes of assessment include practical assignments, reflective writing, presentation, written and practice-based research. For the
independent project there is an option to make a film, write a dissertation or compile a portfolio, which would include a case study
of a filmmaker and an extended research enquiry.

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The MA/MFA Actor Training and Coaching course offers specialists of appropriate disciplines – actors or other performers, movement or voice teachers, directors or emerging directors in film, theatre and television – the opportunity to diversify by following a specialised study in the education and support of professional actors. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTOR TRAINING AND COACHING

The MA/MFA Actor Training and Coaching course offers specialists of appropriate disciplines – actors or other performers, movement or voice teachers, directors or emerging directors in film, theatre and television – the opportunity to diversify by following a specialised study in the education and support of professional actors.

The course joins Central’s MA Voice Studies and MA Movement Studies to create a cluster of postgraduate degrees aimed at high-level training practices for theatre and performance. Please note the course does not offer training to become an actor, but enables students to work effectively as an educator, coach or director of actors.

Students are introduced to the principles and practices behind the training, education and support of actors. The course addresses various practice and theory interfaces of contemporary acting and brings a variety of methods into creative fusion.

Students may expect to encounter work associated with, for example, Chekhov, Lecoq, Grotowski, Meisner, Stanislavski, Meyerhold, Suzuki, Viewpoints and some methodologies appropriate for acting for screen. Students will also explore ways of developing aptitude in the fundamentals of performance and relate these to a range of production contexts.

Teaching methods include tutorials, group seminars and workshops. Practical sessions are designed to enhance understanding of acting processes and skills in pedagogy, together with associated study of acting techniques and issues of performance including theatre, film and television.

Students will develop advanced interpersonal, facilitation, coaching and pedagogy skills. These include: how to research, plan and deliver courses; knowledge of a wide-range of acting methodologies and practices, as well as some movement and voice; education and support of actors; research skills – both as an individual and through group research; presentation skills; and an ability to plan, conduct and critically reflect on their own practice as an actor trainer.

Students undertake a teaching/coaching placement whilst on the course, as well as placements to engage with different acting and production contexts, with duration ranging from eight hours to three months. Placements are a vital part of the course and enable students to develop pedagogic experience and hone their skills as an educator.

ASSESSMENT

This includes practical assignments, essay, and presentation and submission of a Practitioner Portfolio addressing specialist development and understanding, or a dissertation.

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Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?. Read more
Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?

Our MA in Creative Writing at Northumbria offers you the opportunity to explore your writing craft at an advanced level. You’ll gain a solid grounding in the techniques and skills of writing fiction, learn how to critique your own work and experiment with your writing voice.

A combination of core and option modules gives you the chance to develop your critical and analytical thinking. This course builds on your passion for creative writing, enhancing your career prospects as you develop a portfolio that reflects a broad range of genres.

You’ll graduate as a critical thinker with skills that will help you make a big difference in your chosen area of work and creative practice.

This course can also be taken part time, for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-writing-dtpcwr6/

Learn From The Best

Creative Writing at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our publications in Creative Writing and English Studies are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Our Creative Writing team is made up of award-winning novelist and poets, who are major figures in their field. Furthermore, through our partnership with New Writing North, the foremost literary promotion agency in the north of England, we give you opportunities to meet and learn from agents, publishers, and writers from across the country.

Teaching And Assessment

We aim to challenge you, to offer new insights and ways of thinking, while providing a firm grounding in creative writing techniques. You’re encouraged to experiment with and develop your own writing voice while being aware of the demands of the writing industry.

Workshops, seminars, critiquing sessions and small groups led by writers and editors provide an intellectually stimulating environment within which you can develop confidence in literary forms and techniques.

You’ll produce a portfolio of creative writing, including an accompanying commentary for assessment for each module. This is a substantial body of work that demonstrates your ability to develop your own writing voice and edit your own work.

You will build up your skills through core and option modules assessed by formative (non-graded) and summative (graded) assignments. A virtual learning platform (Blackboard) offers you space to share ideas, engage with interactive tasks and access online resources including reading lists.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7010 - Approaches to Writing (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7011 - Creativity (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7012 - Experiments in Form (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7020 - Professional Practice: Writing in an Industry Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7023 - Writing Research 1 (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7024 - Writing Portfolio (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7025 - Writing Research 2 (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Humanities at Northumbria is composed of three subject teams: History, Literature & Creative Writing, and English Language & Linguistics, and is also developing strengths in the fields of American Studies and Heritage Studies.

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department. Our Creative Writing team are all published and highly acclaimed for their work.

Creative Writing students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources. You’ll also get the chance to work with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, who provide unique opportunities for creative writers.

The research of the Institute brings together the disciplines of Art History, American Studies, Creative Writing, English Language and Linguistics, English Literature, History and Media Studies.

Research-Rich Learning

We are recognised for world-leading research in all our Humanities’ disciplines. Our staff have attracted major funding from Research Councils UK as well as the British Academy, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

The Creative Writing team work across a range of genres and their interests encompass everything from identity, displacement and narratives of cultural difference to astronomy and visual perception, and how we represent animals in language.

You will join a lively community that regularly gives public readings and, through our association with the regional writing agency New Writing North, is formally involved with the Durham Book Festival and the Northern Writers' Awards.

Furthermore, you will have the opportunity to engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

Employability, in the form of critical and creative skills, presentation skills and reflective and evaluative abilities, is embedded into your course. You will be able to demonstrate that you are self-motivated, show initiative and personal responsibility, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

During your course, you’ll be in constant contact with a range of professionals working in the arts and creative industries, helping you to build up networks and gain relevant experience.

All modules play a crucial role in developing the advanced skills and attributes necessary for employment, including effective time and workload management, oral and written communication, teamwork and creative analysis of complex problems. The core module, Professional Practice, is designed to give you insight into the world of literary publishing.

You will graduate with a qualification which may enhance your promotion prospects in professions such as the literary industries, partnerships and agencies, marketing and advertising.

Your Future

Given the postgraduate nature of this course the tutors (all published writers themselves) will be looking for signs of the ability to write at a professional level.

MA graduates have achieved notable success. Dan Smith publishes novels for adults and younger readers, most recently Boy X. Celia Bryce is an acclaimed novelist whose book Anthem for Jackson Dawes was nominated for the Carnegie Medal in 2014.

Helen Laws is a highly successful TV scriptwriter who originated 32 Brinkburn Street for BBC TV and has written for Casualty, Eastenders, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, Shameless and Doctors. She says the MA taught her the importance of story and gave her the confidence to keep trying.

There are also opportunities for you to advance your studies further with advice in writing PhD and funding applications available.

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Why Surrey?. This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills. Read more

Why Surrey?

This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

Programme overview

The MA Acting programme is specifically designed for those seeking a career in the performing arts, and who already have an undergraduate degree or have a minimum of five years’ professional experience.

This intensive programme offers practical training which focusses on the acquisition of technical skills in acting, voice and movement.

These support a range of rehearsal projects, screen acting projects and public performances. Students also take professional development workshops and classes in audition technique.

Cohorts are kept small to ensure that students receive the maximum amount of personal attention and contact.

Performance opportunities include a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Advanced Practice module.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To deepen experiential knowledge and critical understanding of the practice of acting
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and methodologies that constitute a personally evolved rehearsal process
  • To develop an integrated technical approach to the practice of acting in rehearsal and performance
  • To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional acting skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
  • Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
  • Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
  • Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
  • Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
  • Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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MA Acting is an intensive 45 week conservatoire Actor training course. Eight weeks of the course are spent studying in Moscow. Read more

Introduction

MA Acting is an intensive 45 week conservatoire Actor training course. Eight weeks of the course are spent studying in Moscow. Skills classes in Voice, Movement, Neutral Mask, Ballet, Period Dance, Speech and Acting underpin a programme embracing the Greeks to Contemporary drama, with particular emphasis on Shakespeare and Chekhov.

Content

MA Acting is primarily a stage acting course which focuses on the techniques developed to address the demands posed by the great European classics.

MA Acting is a rewarding route to the general training of actors, offering a solid grounding in acting technique, rooted in the long-established traditions of England and Russia, which are widely considered to be the foremost exponents of the art of the actor.

Throughout, the postgraduate course emphasises theatrical approaches, in particular those relating to narrative structures, movement expression and the conveyance of complex texts by means of a rich, well-trained voice. Questions of text and subtext are explored in detail.

MA Acting approaches performance in ways specifically addressing the needs of the Jacobean stage: focusing on vocal accuracy with speed, expressivity on a large scale, engagement with the audience. In addition, the postgraduate course encourages you to develop skills required by the realist style: multi-layered characterisation, recognising the subtle rapport between text and sub-text, being ‘private in public’.

Structure

MA Acting is structured in 2 units over 45 weeks:

Unit 1 (weeks 1-15) "Skills and techniques of Acting"

Unit 2 (weeks 16-45) "The practice of Acting".

8 weeks are spent at the Boris Shchukin Theatre Institute, known as the Vakhtangov Institute, in Moscow - one of the foremost conservatoire Drama schools in Russia.

A typical week for MA Acting students will be:

3 hours Voice
3 hours Movement
1.5 hours Ballet
1.5 hours Speech
1.5 hours Period Dance
3 hours Neutral Mask
7 hours Acting Technique
12 hours Rehearsal.

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Introduction. This postgraduate course prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic disciplines and skills needed to make high quality filmed drama. Read more

Introduction

This postgraduate course prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic disciplines and skills needed to make high quality filmed drama. You will explore in detail Stanilavisky's unique scene study methodology which lies at the heart of Drama Centre’s conservatoire training. From storyboard to working on the subtext with the actors on set you will be enabled to develop your own distinct artistic voice.

Content

At the heart of MA Screen: Directing is the growth of individual creativity, achieved through constant opportunities for working on camera-based projects with colleagues from other pathways. You will work on two filmed productions, in our film studio and on location. Supported by a professional producer, director of photography and editor. You will take an active part in a Mike Leigh type devising project where you will help shape the story's stimulated by the characters that the actors develop over nine weeks of intense rehearsal. You will understand the rhythm of a working film set and develop the confidence to use your own voice on future projects, confident in the knowledge that you know how to work creatively with actors. You will be given in depth preparation for the profession including interview technics and wide range of lectures from visiting professionals, such as agents, casting directors, working producers and directors.

Structure

MA Screen: Directing lasts 45 weeks over 12 months and is structured as units - class-based to begin with, but increasingly project-geared over time. This postgraduate course is intensive. You'll be expected to commit 35 hours per week to classes, rehearsals and shoots, and to your own independent preparation and learning.

Students who come to MA Screen: Directing expect a focused experience with a high level of autonomous learning. The MA course's practical elements contribute to the intensity of the experience, sharpening your professional ability to deliver on time, on budget and at an appropriate level.

MA Screen: Directing has a small intake. It collaborates closely with MA Screen: Acting to give you a broader understanding of the needs of the actor. Because we believe empathy with acting and actors is an integral part of directing, the early part of the MA course in particular engages with the discipline of acting.

Traditionally, screen director training fails to address the challenges of working with performers. Our Directing Pathway confronts that challenge while developing your individual approach and creative voice. The pathway features a programme of acting skills, an extended programme of directing skills, two filmed drama projects, a devised project, and an extended programme of professional preparation.

The MA course culminates in a series of short film projects produced in collaboration with the student actors. Projects are screened for an invited industry audience that includes agents and casting directors



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