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Masters Degrees (Visual Science)

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The distance learning MSc in Clinical Visual Science has been developed to foster advanced theoretical knowledge in clinical issues within the field of vision science, with an emphasis on how research informs practice and the evolution of eye care services and capabilities. Read more
The distance learning MSc in Clinical Visual Science has been developed to foster advanced theoretical knowledge in clinical issues within the field of vision science, with an emphasis on how research informs practice and the evolution of eye care services and capabilities. The MSc course is organised and structured so you will have the opportunity to choose a particular area of study that interests you, with a balance of core modules to encourage scientific thinking and the critical review of concepts. Modules have been designed with contributions from guest experts from optometry, clinicians from hospital settings and other specialists. Self-motivation, independent learning, problem solving and developing and communicating scientific arguments are encouraged through a programme which emphasizes critical thinking. A research project will be undertaken by the student in an area of their choosing with support and guidance from an academic supervisor.

Graduates of this course will be equipped to evaluate and undertake research; they will have enhanced knowledge of aspects of advanced vision science. The graduate will be equipped with skills to undertake extended clinical roles, promote the development of eye care within their region and may provide a pathway for further research endeavours including doctoral research training.

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Data Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Data Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

MSc in Data Science aims to equip students with a solid grounding in data science concepts and technologies for extracting information and constructing knowledge from data. Students of the MSc Data Science will study the computational principles, methods, and systems for a variety of real world applications that require mathematical foundations, programming skills, critical thinking, and ingenuity. Development of research skills will be an essential element of the Data Science programme so that students can bring a critical perspective to current data science discipline and apply this to future developments in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Key Features of the MSc Data Science

The MSc Data Science programme focuses on three core technical themes: data mining, machine learning, and visualisation. Data mining is fundamental to data science and the students will learn how to mine both structured data and unstructured data. Students will gain practical data mining experience and will gain a systematic understanding of the fundamental concepts of analysing complex and heterogeneous data. They will be able to manipulate large heterogeneous datasets, from storage to processing, be able to extract information from large datasets, gain experience of data mining algorithms and techniques, and be able to apply them in real world applications. Machine learning has proven to be an effective and exciting technology for data and it is of high value when it comes to employment. Students of the Data Science programme will learn the fundamentals of both conventional and state-of-the-art machine learning techniques, be able to apply the methods and techniques to synthesise solutions using machine learning, and will have the necessary practical skills to apply their understanding to big data problems. We will train students to explore a variety visualisation concepts and techniques for data analysis. Students will be able to apply important concepts in data visualisation, information visualisation, and visual analytics to support data process and knowledge discovery. The students of the Data Science programme also learn important mathematical concepts and methods required by a data scientist. A specifically designed module that is accessible to students with different background will cover the basics of algebra, optimisation techniques, statistics, and so on. More advanced mathematical concepts are integrated in individual modules where necessary.

The MSc Data Science programme delivers the practical components using a number of programming languages and software packages, such as Hadoop, Python, Matlab, C++, OpenGL, OpenCV, and Spark. Students will also be exposed to a range of closely related subject areas, including pattern recognition, high performance computing, GPU processing, computer vision, human computer interaction, and software validation and verification. The delivery of both core and optional modules leverage on the research strength and capacity in the department. The modules are delivered by lecturers who are actively engaged in world leading researches in this field. Students of the Data Science programme will benefit from state-of-the-art materials and contents, and will work on individual degree projects that can be research-led or application driven.

Modules

Modules for the MSc Data Science programme include:

- Visual Analytics
- Data Science Research Methods and Seminars
- Big Data and Data Mining
- Big Data and Machine Learning
- Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists
- Data Visualization
- Human Computer Interaction
- High Performance Computing in C/C++
- Graphics Processor Programming
- Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
- Modelling and Verification Techniques
- Operating Systems and Architectures

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Career Destinations

- Data Analyst
- Data mining Developer
- Machine Learning Developer
- Visual Analytics Developer
- Visualisation Developer
- Visual Computing Software Developer
- Database Developer
- Data Science Researcher
- Computer Vision Developer
- Medical Computing Developer
- Informatics Developer
- Software Engineer

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Advanced Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Advanced Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

On the MSc in Advanced Computer Science course you will be thoroughly prepared for a career in IT or related industries. The Advanced Computer Science course is for you if you are a Computer Science graduate or if you have gained experience of computing and programming in a different first degree. Willingness to work hard and an ability to problem solve are equally important for this MSc in Advanced Computer Science. The MSc in Advanced Computer Science course will develop the skills and knowledge you have gained from your first degree by broadening and deepening your knowledge of Computer Science through a variety of advanced modules and material. The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is accredited by the British Computer Society.

Key Features of Advanced Computer Science MSc

• We are top in the UK for career prospects*
• We are 3rd in the UK for teaching quality**
• 5th in the UK overall*
• 7th in the UK for student satisfaction with 98% [National Student Survey 2016]
• 7th in the UK overall and Top in Wales*
• High employability prospects - we are 8th in the UK for graduate prospects*
• 92% in graduate employment or further study six months after leaving University [HESA data 2014/15]
• UK TOP 20 for Research Excellence [Research Excellence Framework 2014]
• Our Project Fair allows students to present their work to local industry
• Strong links with industry
• £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)

*Guardian University Guide 2017
**Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2016

Modules of Advanced Computer Science MSc

Modules for the MSc in Advanced Computer Science include Computer Science Project Research Methods but please visit our course page for more information.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Graduates of Computer Science were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15]

Student Profile

Francesca Madeddu, originally from Italy, completed an outstanding Master’s thesis (which earned her a distinction) investigating interaction with augmented reality on mobile devices. More specifically, she investigated how to interact with virtual Egyptian artefacts placed in real scenes. The final game was deployed at Swansea's Egypt Centre last year and was evaluated by volunteers working at the museum. A Master’s thesis does not often lead to a publication. However, part of Francesca's research was written up as an extended abstract and presented at Computer Graphics and Visual Computing (CGVC), a Eurographics UK conference for visual computing last year. An exceptional achievement!

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Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains. Read more
Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains.

We offer a two-year Master of Science in Computer Science centered on this emerging field. The backbone of the program is constituted by three core units on advanced data management, machine learning, and high performance computing. Leveraging on the expertise of our faculty, the rest of the program is organised in four tracks, Business Intelligence, Health & Life Sciences, Pervasive Computing, and Visual Computing, each providing a solid grounding in data science and engineering as well as a firm grasp of the domain of interest.

By blending standard classes with recitations and lab sessions our program ensures that each student masters the theoretical foundations and acquires hands-on experience in each subject. In most units credit is obtained by working on a final project. Additional credit is also gained through short-term internship in the industry or in a research lab. The master thesis is worth 25% of the total credit.

TRACKS

• Business Intelligence. This track builds on first hand knowledge of business management and fundamentals of data warehousing, and focuses on data mining, graph analytics, information visualisation, and issues related to data protection and privacy.
• Health & Life Sciences. Starting from core knowledge of signal and image processing, bioinformatics and computational biology, this track covers methods for biomedical image reconstruction, computational neuroengineering, well-being technologies and data protection and privacy.
• Pervasive Computing. Security and ubiquitous computing set the scene for this track which deals with data semantics, large scale software engineering, graph analytics and data protection and privacy.
• Visual Computing. This track lays the basics of signal & image processing and of computer graphics & augmented reality, and covers human computer interaction, computational vision, data visualisation, and computer games.

PROSPECTIVE CAREER

Senior expert in Data Science and Engineering. You will be at the forefront of the high-tech job market since all big companies are investing on data driven approaches for decision making and planning. The Business Intelligence area is highly regarded by consulting companies and large enterprises, while the Health and Life Sciences track is mainly oriented toward biomedical industry and research institutes. Both the Pervasive and the Visual Computing tracks are close to the interests of software companies. For all tracks a job in a start-up company or a career on your own are always in order.

Senior computer scientist.. By personalizing your plan of study you can keep open all the highly qualified job options in software companies.

Further graduate studies.. In all cases, you will be fully qualified to pursue your graduate studies toward a PhD in Computer Science.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in Computer Science course is for you if you are a graduate from one of a wide range of disciplines and are looking to change direction or because of the needs of your chosen career, require a solid foundation in Computer Science.

As the use of computers and computer based systems continues to grow in all aspects of life, at home and at work, it is apparent that there will be for years to come a need for many people who can combine a knowledge of Computer Science, the discipline that underlies Information Technology, and degree level knowledge in a wide variety of other disciplines.

Over the duration of the MSc Computer Science course you will study a variety of modules taught by academic staff that are part of internationally renowned research groups. The course is also regularly updated to ensure that it keeps pace with the rapid developments in Computer Science.

Key Features of Computer Science MSc

• We are top in the UK for career prospects*
• We are 3rd in the UK for teaching quality**
• 5th in the UK overall*
• 7th in the UK for student satisfaction with 98% [National Student Survey 2016]
• 7th in the UK overall and Top in Wales*
• High employability prospects - we are 8th in the UK for graduate prospects*
• 92% in graduate employment or further study six months after leaving University [HESA data 2014/15]
• UK TOP 20 for Research Excellence [Research Excellence Framework 2014]
• Our Project Fair allows students to present their work to local industry
• Strong links with industry
• £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)

*Guardian University Guide 2017
**Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2016

Modules of Computer Science MSc

Modules for the MSc in Computer Science include Computer Science Project Research Methods but please visit our course page for more information.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Graduates of Computer Science were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15].

Student Profile

“I chose the MSc Computer Science as a conversion from my previous War and Society degree, primarily employment opportunities. The course was by no means easy for me coming from an arts background, and the first few weeks I felt a little over my head, but thanks to the truly stimulating content from the syllabus and the high quality of the teaching within the department I soon caught up and began to thrive on the course. My project revolved around a comparative study of the Haskell Web-Framework Yesod and ASP.NET. During the completion of this I picked up many of the skills that I now use on an everyday basis in my role at Kinspeed (A Sheffield based Software House). Since starting work I have been able to apply many of the skills I obtained during my time at Swansea and have no doubt that choosing to study the MSc Computer Science at Swansea was one of the better decisions of my life.”

Chris Swires

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Swansea Computer Science ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Computer Science is at the cutting edge of modern technology, is developing rapidly, and Swansea Computer Science graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects.

Computer Science now plays a part in almost every aspect of our lives - science, engineering, the media, entertainment, travel, commerce and industry, public services and the home.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Computer Science enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The
Theoretical Computer Science programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Theoretical Computer Science MSc by Research programme, you will be fully integrated into one of our established computer science research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features of Theoretical Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science is amongst the top 25 in the UK, with a growing reputation in research both nationally and internationally in computer science. It is home to world class researchers, excellent teaching programmes and fine laboratory facilities.

All postgraduate Computer Science programmes will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

Links with Industry

Each spring, Computer Science students prepare and present a poster about their project at a project fair – usually together with a system or software demonstration. The Department of Computer Science also strongly encourages students to create CVs and business cards to take along to the fair, as businesses and employers visit to view the range of projects and make contact with the graduating students.

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Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights. Read more
Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students who have a numerate first degree or can demonstrate numerate skills. Students are often at the early stages of their careers in diverse professions including economics, statistics and computer science.

Students will have a curiosity about data, and will want to learn new techniques to boost their career and be part of exciting current industry developments. The MSc in Data Science includes some complex programming tasks because of the applied nature of the course, so many students have a mathematics or statistics background and enjoy working with algorithms.

Objectives

The demand for data scientists in the UK has grown more than ten-fold in the past five years *. The amount of data in the world is growing exponentially. From analysing tyre performance to detecting problem gamblers, wherever data exists, there are opportunities to apply it.

City’s MSc Data Science programme covers the intersection of computer science and statistics, machine learning and practical applications. We explore areas such as visualisation because we believe that data science is about generating insight into data as well as its communication in practice.

The programme focuses on machine learning as the most exciting technology for data and we have learned from our own graduates that this is of high value when it comes to employment within the field. At City, we have excellent expertise in machine learning and the facilities students need to learn the technical aspects of data analysis. We also have a world-leading centre for data visualisation, where students get exposed to the latest developments on presenting and communicating their results – a highly sought after skill.

Placements

There is the opportunity to do an internship as part of the programme. The final project, which is normally three months for a full-time student, can be extended to six months if you want to study within a specific organisation. When it comes to the big data and data science area, we have established relationships with organisations including the BBC, Microsoft and The British Library so you can be confident that with City, your access to professional experience is unparalleled. One recent student undertook an internship with Google and has since secured a job within the company.

Academic facilities

The School's computer science laboratories are equipped with the latest up-to-date hardware and software. From Oracle’s leading commercial object-relational database server to PCs with state-of-the-art NVidia GPUs for computer graphics, you will have access to an array of tools to support your learning.

The MSc Data Science programme offers two (three by mid 2016) dedicated computer servers for the Big Data module, which you can also use for your final project to analyse large data sets. We give you the opportunity to undertake training in MATLAB, the most popular numerical and technical programming environment, while you study.

Scholarships

A scholarship for the full fees of the MSc will be offered to an outstanding applicant. The scholarship is available to UK/EU and overseas students, studying full-time. To be considered for the scholarship, please include with your full application a one-page essay with your answer to the question:

'What are the challenges that Data Science faces and how would you address those challenges?'

The submission deadline for anyone wishing to be considered for the scholarship is: 1 MAY 2017

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that students’ specialist knowledge and autonomy increase as they progress through each module. Active researchers guide your progress in the areas of machine learning, data visualization, and high-performance computing, which culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently and, where appropriate, in collaboration with industrial partners.

Taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions. Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

Tutorials help you develop the skills to apply the concepts we have covered in the lectures. We normally achieve this through practical problem solving contexts.

Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques using state-of-the-art software, environments and development tools.

In addition to lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules from lecture notes and lab materials, to coursework feedback, model answers, and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through a combination of written examination and coursework, where you will need to answer theoretical and practical questions to demonstrate that you can analyse and apply data science methods and techniques.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem using large datasets from industry, academia or government and use your knowledge of collecting and processing real data, designing and implementing big data methods and applying and evaluating data analysis, visualisation and prediction techniques. At the end of the project you submit a substantial MSc project report, which becomes the mode of assessment for this part of the programme.

Course content

Data science is the area of study concerned with the extraction of insight from large collections of data.

The course covers the study, integration and application of advanced methods and techniques from:
-Data analysis and machine learning
-Data visualisation and visual analytics
-High-performance, parallel and distributed computing
-Knowledge representation and reasoning
-Neural computation
-Signal processing
-Data management and information retrieval.

It gives you the opportunity to specialise so, once you graduate, you can apply data science to any sector from health to retail. By engaging with researchers and industrial partners during the programme, you can develop your knowledge and skills within a real-world context in each of the above areas.

Core modules
-Principles of data science (15 credits)
-Machine learning (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Neural computing (15 credits)
-Visual analytics (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Advanced programming: concurrency (15 credits)
-Readings in computer science (15 credits)
-Advanced databases (15 credits)
-Information retrieval (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Digital signal processing and audio programming (15 credits)
-Cloud computing (15 credits)
-Computer vision (15 credits)
-Software agents (15 credits)

Individual project - (60 credits)

Career prospects

From health to retail, and from the IT industry to government, the Data Science MSc will prepare you for a successful career as a data scientist. You will graduate with specialist skills in data acquisition, information extraction, aggregation and representation, data analysis, knowledge extraction and explanation, which are in high demand.

City's unique internships, our emphasis on machine learning and visual analytics, together with our links with the industry and Tech City, should help you gain employment as a specialist in data analysis and visualization. Graduates starting a new business can benefit from City's London City Incubator and City's links with Tech City, providing support for start-up businesses.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Computer Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

As an MSc by Research Computer Science student you will be guided by internationally leading researchers in the field of computer science and will carry out a large individual research project. Computer Science is at the cutting edge of modern technology, and is developing rapidly and Swansea Computer Science graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects.

Computer Science now plays a part in almost every aspect of our lives - science, engineering, the media, entertainment, travel, commerce and industry, public services and the home.

The MSc by Research Computer Science degree enables you to pursue a one year individual programme of research in the field of computer science and would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

The MSc by Research programmes including Computer Science MSc by Research all have a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in biosciences or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research Computer Science programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

Links with Industry

Each spring, Computer Science students prepare and present a poster about their project at a project fair – usually together with a system or software demonstration. We also strongly encourage students to create CVs and business cards to take along to the fair, as businesses and employers visit to view the range of projects and make contact with the graduating students.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Visual and Interactive Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Visual and Interactive Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Computer Science is at the cutting edge of modern technology, is developing rapidly and Swansea Computer Science graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects.

Computer Science now plays a part in almost every aspect of our lives - science, engineering, the media, entertainment, travel, commerce and industry, public services and the home.

The MSc by Research Visual and Interactive Computing enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Visual and Interactive Computing programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research Visual and Interactive Computing programme, you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features of the Visual and Interactive Computing

The Department of Computer Science is amongst the top 25 in the UK, with a growing reputation in research both nationally and internationally. It is home to world class researchers, excellent teaching programmes and fine laboratory facilities.

All postgraduate Computer Science programmes including Visual and Interactive Computing, MSc by Research will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to 'A' level and beyond. Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to 'A' level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three compulsory subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is a M-level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval.

The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science and the ability to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of science (Physics) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in physics
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus Sessions

Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher.

Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory.

Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors. They experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

Facilities

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well-resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Master's level. You will also benefit from extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

Learning Atmosphere

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/423902/PGCert-Secondary-Education-with-QTS.pdf

For more information on the Special Features of the course and Teaching and Assesment, please follow this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-secondary-education-science-with-physics

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Visual Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Visual Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MRes Visual Computing is an ideal preparation for following a career of research or specialism within the area of study. In particular the MRes in Visual Computing seeks to prepare you for further research in the areas of Computer Graphics, Computer Vision, Medical Imaging, and Scientific Visualisation.

We seek strongly motivated students who are able to carry out substantial individual study. Such students are likely to want to control their own time, carry out curiosity driven research to an advanced level, and follow self-study material in advanced topics.

You will decide upon your topic of research in discussion with your supervisor in an exciting and recent area of Visual Computing. In collaboration with your supervisor you will evaluate current research and carry your own research programme based on the contribution you will make. The research programme is supported by taught courses covering useful literature and skills.

Course Content

Research Component

The main part of the MRes in Visual Computing is a substantial and challenging project involving cutting edge research. The project is an exciting opportunity for you to carry out research in the area of Visual Computing. You will produce an abstract of your work, a scientific paper, carry out a presentation and produce your final dissertation.

Taught Component

In addition to the research project, you can choose from a range of modules that provide skills and development training in different areas.

Modules available currently include:

Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (compulsory)
Data Visualisation (compulsory)
Graphics Processor Programming (compulsory)
Research Methodology (compulsory)
Visual Computing Project Development (compulsory)
Distributed Object-Oriented Programming
Interaction Technologies: Information Retrieval
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Interaction Technologies: Hardware and Devices

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Graduates of Computer Science were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15]

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three core subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is an M level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval. The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science such that you are able to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people;
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status;
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people;
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners;
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area;
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the science (Biology) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school;
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression;
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses;
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum;
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils;
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in biology;
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons;
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning;Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area;
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning;
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times;
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher. Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory. Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors who are experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Masters level – plus extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel:http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure

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