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Masters Degrees (Visual Impairment)

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Designed to meet the professional development needs of teachers working with children and young people who have a visual impairment, this programme develops skills that will allow you to work in a variety of settings, ranging from specialised contexts to mainstream school placements. Read more

Programme description

Designed to meet the professional development needs of teachers working with children and young people who have a visual impairment, this programme develops skills that will allow you to work in a variety of settings, ranging from specialised contexts to mainstream school placements

Our Additional Support for Learning programmes are designed to meet the needs of practising teachers and other professionals.

You will learn to apply theory effectively and engage with and influence policy that relates to the role of a teacher of visually impaired children within an inclusive environment.

You will build on your existing skills, gaining knowledge and attitudes that you can apply in cooperation with colleagues, professionals, families and carers of learners, as well as the learners themselves.

On a more technical level, you will become familiar with the effects of a range of ocular and cerebral visual impairments and be able to apply structured observation or standardised tests to identify the thresholds of functional vision or blindness of pupils and plan and teach programmes appropriately.

Programme structure

Your learning will be in the form of lectures, seminars, small-group discussions and skill-development sessions.

Most courses are offered in e-learning or blended learning format, combining on-campus and online study.

All the courses are studied part time, and you can select individual courses for your CPD needs, complete 60 credits for a Postgraduate Certificate, or complete 120 credits for a Postgraduate Diploma.

Career opportunities



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Programme description. This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. Read more

Programme description

This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. You will compare inclusive educational practices in Scotland, the UK and across the world. You will study particular approaches to removing barriers to learning and including all children.

The programme has specific pathways for Postgraduate Diploma (visually impaired learners), Postgraduate Diploma (deaf learners) and Postgraduate Diploma (bilingual learners).

Programme structure

Compulsory courses:

Inclusive Pedagogy

Sources of knowledge

Conceptualising research

Option courses:

You will choose three option courses from this range:

Comparative approaches to inclusive and special education

Collaborative working in children’s services

Education for all

Teachers as agents of change

Foundations of international child protection

Issues and strategies for teaching and learning (VI)

Inclusion of pupils with visual impairment

Cerebral VI and profound and multiple learning difficulties

Audiology and audiometry

Language and communication (deaf children)

The developing bilingual learner

Specific learning difficulties: dyslexia

Assessing pupils with visual impairment

Bilingualism and other additional support needs

Promoting achievement and curriculum access to deaf / bilingual learners

Specific learning difficulties: co-occurring difficulties

Deaf Studies

an option course worth up to 40 credits from within the School or from elsewhere in the University (at SCQF level 11), subject to approval by the programme director

Dissertation (MSc)

Planning research

Research dissertation

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

develop and appropriately apply knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to inclusive education and the contexts in which it takes place

reflect critically on the relationships between theory and practice and explore issues in the implementation of educational and social principles and ideals

engage with and where appropriate influence policy issues and the practice of professionals in relation to the delivery of inclusive education

develop extended skills in research and enquiry, including the use of literature, reviewing evidence, gathering, organising and evaluating data, responding to evidence and providing critical comment

Career opportunities

Suiting newly qualified teachers and experienced practitioners alike, this programme provides a qualification that can open doors to a new career in inclusive and special education, or an advanced role in the field.

It can also provide the foundations for a career in policy formation and development, as well as a broad range of highly transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.



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The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. Read more
The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain is a truly interdisciplinary programme that attracts students from diverse backgrounds who want to complement their knowledge on music research, neuroscience or cognitive psychology. This unique programme combines music psychology with neuroscience, focusing on both the biological and cognitive aspects of musical behaviour- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-music-mind-brain/

The MSc in Music, Mind and Brain (MMB) is highly interdisciplinary and draws on expertise from leading figures in the field, in areas ranging from music cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modelling, music education and music therapy.

As a student on the MSc, you will learn about topics in music psychology (from perception to cognition) and the cognitive neuroscience of music, and will acquire all the necessary skills to pursue your own high-quality research.

The programme benefits from good links with institutions such as the Institute of Education, the Royal College of Music, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery.

Teaching staff

Programme director Dr Daniel Müllensiefen and deputy directors Prof Lauren Stewart and Dr Maria Herrojo-Ruiz are joined by an expert teaching faculty, all of whom have international profiles within the fields of music psychology and/or the neuroscience of music.

Our Eminent Invited Speaker Series brings world-leading researchers to Goldsmiths to present their latest research to our students.

What kind of project can I do?

We offer a range of research projects, drawing on a variety of approaches: behavioural, computational, neuroscientific. Students are also invited to propose a project of their own choice, providing appropriate supervision can be offered.

If a student has a contact with an external supervisor, it may be possible to arrange for project supervision outside Goldsmiths with the involvement of a faculty member as co-supervisor. Examples of previous projects include:

Exploring Absolute Pitch in Children and Young People with Visual Impairment
An fMRI Study Investigating how Music Impacts on the Perception of Emotion
The Influence of Native Language on Rhythmic Grouping
Neural Correlates of Melodic Expectancy

Further information

This journal article from Psychomusicology outlines the focus and contents of the programme.

Keep up to date with our research via our facebook page.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Val West.

Research Skills (15 credits)

This module provides you with the core skills needed to become a successful researcher. This is achieved via two complementary strands; the first strand covers fundamental research skills: seminars on bibliographic searching, essay writing, research report writing, oral presentation skills and career planning and lab sessions in which students conduct, analyse and write up an experiment from the field of music psychology. The second strand exposes students to cutting edge research in the field of music cognition and neuroscience via the Eminent Speaker Series and involves the opportunity to produce a collaborative report from the series for the Music, Mind and brain blog.

Research Project (60 credits)

This module provides you with the chance to design and pursue a substantial, independent research project on a topic of their choosing, with expert input from a nominated supervisor. You will be offered a selection of possible projects but are also encouraged to generate their own ideas. External supervision may also possible, in cases where students have links to outside institutions. As well as producing a written dissertation, you will have take produce and present a poster of your work to classmates and teachers from the programme.

Assessment

Written examinations; written coursework (essays); oral presentations; research dissertation.

Careers

The programme will appeal to you if you are interested in pursuing doctoral research in this area or if you are already a music professional wishing to approach music scientifically.

Graduates from the Music, Mind and Brain programme have gone on to work in one of the following areas:

-Academia: Either pursuing a PhD, working in research position or engaged with university-level teaching
-Music and media industry
-Music practitioner or performer
-Music teacher

Other careers that would be informed by this programme include music therapy, neuro-rehabilitation, music consultancy and music and advertising.

Other entry requirements

IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum of 6.5 in the written test and no individual test lower than 6.0).

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course has been designed to fulfil the learning needs of the postgraduate eye care professional in practice; to provide advanced knowledge and facilitate understanding in this rapidly expanding field of healthcare. Read more
This course has been designed to fulfil the learning needs of the postgraduate eye care professional in practice; to provide advanced knowledge and facilitate understanding in this rapidly expanding field of healthcare.

The flexibility of the programme allows you to simply enrol for a module that interests you (what we refer to as non-degree), or aim for a specific Cardiff University Award

The MSc/PgDip/PgCert provides the opportunity for you to learn with one of the leading Optometry Schools in the UK, rated excellent for teaching and research, and amongst the highest ranked for overall undergraduate student satisfaction.  In 2015-16 we had 100% satisfaction in the Postgraduate Taught Education Survey.

We have designed this programme with you in mind - a busy professional who needs postgraduate studies to be flexible, to fit in with work, home and family life, to fulfil CET requirements and to achieve something worthwhile.  Many of the modules available are accredited by the College of Optometrists to provide Professional Certificates, Higher Certificates and Diplomas.

WOPEC (the Wales Optometry Postgraduate Education Centre) based at Cardiff University, already has an excellent reputation for delivering quality continuing education in an accessible format. If you have already completed a WOPEC course you may find you have already achieved some credits towards a University Award on this programme.

A deliberately wide portfolio of modules is offered in order to recognise the increasing desire for specialist training within optometry, including glaucoma, visual impairment, acute eye care, paediatrics, dry eye, medical retina, clinical teaching and leadership, amongst others. Specific programme pathways are suggested for optometrists wishing to focus on certain areas of practice, and there is a recommended programme pathway for those returning to work after a career break.

The programme is primarily aimed at eye care professionals in practice, studying part-time, at a distance from the University, with internet access to our virtual learning environment (VLE). Two thirds of the modules available on this programme also contain advanced practical training, which will normally be provided over a 1-2 day period.

Successful students on this programme will have an advanced standing both clinically and academically, taking them to the forefront of the profession, and enhancing their personal and professional development.

Several modules are aligned with nationally agreed competency standards – for example, the Low Vision Service Wales and the MECS scheme among others.

Students who have evidence of achieving such standards within the last three years can present this to the Director of the programme for consideration for approved prior learning (APL) accreditation, where module credits would be given to the student in recognition of their prior achievements.

Structure

The majority of the course will be delivered via Learning Central, the University's e-Learning system. You will have access to multimedia lecture presentations, supporting resources and discussions led by course tutors. On many of the modules leading educators in the field also provide practical skills workshops and tutorials directly relevant to everyday practice. These workshops are delivered by our staff within our custom-designed building. These sessions are an integral part of the course so attendance is compulsory.

Formative and summative assessment is via online multiple choice questions, submitted written coursework and assignments (including group wikis and blogs) plus practical exams where appropriate.

The course is designed to be flexible and so you pick and mix the modules you want to take from over twenty five 10 or 20 credit modules. All modules are optional, but some modules have pre-requisite partner modules. You can choose the modules you want to take to fit in with your home and work or we can suggest bundles that would work for your professional or personal circumstances.

Each 10 credits at postgraduate level equates to typically 25-30 hours of guided learning from your tutor(s), for example, lectures, discussions, practical workshops, tutorials, etc. You are expected to spend approximately 3-4 hours on self-directed study and reading to accompany each hour of guided learning, as directed by your tutor(s).

Please see the website for more details about the structure and content of each course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/group/clinical-optometry

Teaching

Modules may differ, but you can expect to be taught online (via lectures and webinars), and by attending workshops for clinical modules.

Lectures are supported by the appropriate references and resources, and accompanied by assessment exercises. Participation in moderated online discussions is a feature in almost all modules.  Practical workshops for skills training will be held at locations convenient to either the module content or the student cohort enrolled at that time, and instructed by educational leaders in that discipline.

Assessment

The assessment activities have been specifically designed to facilitate participants’ learning and achievement. All assessment elements are compulsory.

Assessment varies across the modules, but includes:

Written reports.
Coursework assessment.
Multiple choice questions (MCQ).
Practical examinations.
Key Features Scenarios (used in medical education to test clinical reasoning, problem-solving ability and the ability to apply given knowledge).
OSCEs – Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.
Group wikis.
Blogs.
Written research project report.

Feedback from assessments will be provided in written format for written reports and coursework, and written and/or oral for practical examinations and presentations. Scientific discussion via online forums will be moderated by module leaders, allowing them immediate input and opportunity to offer feedback. Students will need to pass each individual component in order to pass the module.

The pass mark for the course is 50%, and a distinction is awarded for marks >70%.

Career Prospects

Successful students on this programme will have an advanced standing both clinically and academically, taking them to the forefront of the profession, and enhancing their personal and professional development.

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The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. Read more
The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. It is an innovative biomedical and translational sciences programme intended for students aiming to pursue a career in academia or to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industrial sectors.

Degree information

Through a major year-long research project and supplemental coursework, students will learn to conduct cutting-edge research aimed at understanding fundamental principles of sensory systems function and/or developing novel technologies and therapies for sensory disorders, such as deafness and blindness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project with dissertation/report (120 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies
-Research in Practice
-Translating Science into the Clinic

Optional modules - one optional module can be chosen from a group of appropriate modules currently offered at the UCL Ear Institute or at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, to provide more in-depth knowledge and understanding of particular issues in sensory systems research. Examples include:
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Auditory Biophysics and Electroacoustics
-Ocular Cell Biology, Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
-Ocular Development in Health and Disease
-Visual Neuroscience

Students may choose an alternative optional module from across UCL with prior approval of the Programme Director, provided that it aligns with the topic of the extended research project.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a year-long independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practicals, seminars, workshops, journal clubs, and an extended research project. Assessment is through coursework, oral presentations, essays, practicals, unseen written examinations, and research dissertation.

Careers

The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes was devised in consultation not only with academic scientists pursuing cutting-edge research in sensory systems and therapies, but also with representatives from industries interested in developing new treatments for sensory disorders. The programme has therefore been designed with the intention of ensuring that successful graduates will be attractive candidates either for further PhD research or for jobs in the commercial sector (for example, in companies developing or marketing novel treatments for visual impairment or hearing loss).

Employability
Students will graduate with interdisciplinary training in sensory systems science; a good understanding of the clinical and commercial context for development of sensory systems technologies and therapies; and substantive experience with a cutting-edge research project.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is among the world's top universities for biomedical research, with particular strength in neuroscience, sensory systems research, and translational studies. Students taking the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will be based at the UCL Ear Institute, an internationally recognised centre for auditory research, and will also take core modules at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, one of the world's major centres for vision research.

MRes students will have access to potential research supervisors from across all UCL, and will benefit from interaction with students on the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MPhil/PhD introduced in 2014. The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will therefore provide students with outstanding opportunities to learn from and network with scientists, engineers, clinicians and students throughout the UCL community.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions. Read more
The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions.

Degree information

The programme provides students with the opportunity to benefit from our links with Habilitation VIUK (formerly MISE UK), obtaining a qualification that matches the initial quality standards-based registration requirements for habilitation practitioners in the UK. Students work with eminent practitioners in the field of visual impairment, gaining experience of working in a variety of habilitation settings and environments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (45 credits).

Students are able to exit with a Graduate Certificate on successful completion of modules one and two (taken in this order and worth 90 credits) and all other first-year assessment elements. No optional modules are available.

Core modules - passes in all four core modules, taken in order, and successful completion of all the various assessment elements of the programme are required for an overall pass for the programme.
-Policy and Practice in Habilitation Studies
-Habilitation in Educational Contexts and the Extended Curriculum
-Habilitation at Home, In Public Contexts and During Transitions
-Habilitation, Professional Practices and the Service Setting: The Extended Assessed Placement

Teaching and learning
Both face-to-face and virtual learning environment elements will inform the pattern of teaching on the programme. It is assessed by written assessments, coursework assignments, practical skill assessments, skill observations, self-videoed practical assessment activities, presentations, placements, and a portfolio which is matched against the Quality Standards for Habilitation Work with Children and Young People (2011).

Placement
Modules three and four involve an extended training/teaching placement.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as habilitation specialists and assistants in local authorities for sensory services, consortia or sensory impairment services for national and local visual and sensory impairment-related charities.

Employability
Graduates of this programme work across agencies such as local authorities, schools, and charities to support and develop the habilitation (mobility and independence) of children and young people who are blind or partially sighted.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme has been matched against the National Occupational Standards for Sensory Services of the CWDC (2009) and has been developed with the support of the DfE, RNIB and Habilitation VIUK. It takes trainees from the basics of habilitation up to the standard needed for registration as an Habilitation Specilaisit with HabilitationVIUK.

Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma, followed by a probationary year, is a registration requirement of the UK Habilitation Professional Body, Habilitation VI UK.

Introductory Braille sessions are available for those not already qualified.

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A flexible distance learning Master’s programme that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline. Read more
A flexible distance learning Master’s programme that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline.

Course outline

Flexible credit accumulation
New students initially register as LHS postgraduate students within a framework of flexible credit accumulation (FCA). Within this framework it is possible to graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in Optometry (60 taught credits); Postgraduate Diploma in Optometry (120 taught credits); M.Sc. in Optometry/ Ophthalmic Science (180 credits: 120 taught, 60 dissertation) or the Doctor of Optometry (DOptom)/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (DOphSc). The MSc requires the completion of 6 taught modules (120 credits) and a 60 credit narrative research review (dissertation). As part of the flexible programme, UK optometrists may complete the theoretical element of the GOC-approved Independent Prescribing for Optometrists. Further information is available here.

Timescales for study
Taught credits are valid for 5 years, so students studying for an MSc/ PG Diploma/ PG Certificate must complete their studies within 5 years of enrolment on the programme.

Subject guide and modules

20 credit taught modules include:
-Accommodation and Presbyopia (OP4AAP)
-Advanced Contact Lenses (OP4ACL)
-Advanced Visual Science (OP4AVS)
-General Ocular Therapeutics (OP4GOT)
-Glaucoma (OP4GL1)
-Investigative Ophthalmic Science (OP4IOS)
-Myopia (OP4MY1)
-Nutrition and the Eye (OP4NE1)
-Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (OP4OT1) - GOC-approved Independent Prescribing module
-Prescribing for disorders of the eye (OP4OT2) - GOC-approved Independent Prescribing module
-Refractive Surgery (OP4RS1)
-Research Methods (OP4RM1)
-Retinal and Macular Disorders (OP4RMD)
-Visual Impairment (OP4VI1)

For the MSc, you will also undertake a 60 credit research review dissertation module, supervised by a member of Aston academic staff.

Learning, teaching & assessment

Online lectures are used to support your learning; these are available on our virtual learning environment whenever you chose to view them, and are accompanied by short formative tests throughout the module. Each module includes a substantial piece of coursework, e.g. a scientific literature review or portfolio of case records. The pass mark for all forms of taught module assessment is 50%.

The dissertation module involves exploring an area relevant to contemporary practice in an extended literature review or short practical project. You will be supervised by an experienced member of academic staff.

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A professional doctorate that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements. Read more
A professional doctorate that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements.

Course outline

The Doctor of Optometry/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (previously known as the Aston “Ophthalmic Doctorate”) is a unique qualification - a professional doctorate - that enables eye care professionals to enhance their knowledge, and critical awareness of current issues, and to be at the forefront of their academic discipline through taught and research elements.

Taught modules are 20 credits each, nominally equivalent to 200 hours of student learning. Modules consist of remote access lectures with electronic formative assessments and a module coursework assignment such as reflective case records, or an essay/literature review related to the module. There are two study periods per year to complete taught modules; 1st October -31st January and 1st March - 30th June. Module results are ratified at Examination Boards held shortly after the end of each study period.

The research project is the major component of the doctorate, supervised by members of the Optometry Subject Group academic staff. Students will develop their research proposals based upon their own clinical interests, or may opt to select a project nominated by an Aston academic. Because this is a distance-learning programme, the research is not normally carried out on the University campus, and it is essential that the student has access to the facilities and resources needed to carry out the research, usually in the student's place of work.

The research stage requires a significant long-term commitment, as it is equivalent to around 2 years of full-time work (i.e. 4 years part-time). Candidates ultimately submit a thesis which is examined in a viva voce examination.

The Doctor of Optometry programme is aimed at practising optometrists, who will complete case records where required for taught module coursework, and will undertake a practice- based research project. The Doctor of Ophthalmic Science programme is for eye care professionals who may not be practising optometrists, e.g. medics/ orthoptists/ product designers; these students may complete scientific essays to fulfil the coursework requirements, and undertake a non-clinical research project.

This degree is only available as part-time distance learning, so it is vital that the student has access to a good broadband internet connection.

Flexible credit accumulation

New students initially register as LHS postgraduate students within a framework of flexible credit accumulation (FCA). Within this framework it is possible to graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in Optometry (60 taught credits); Postgraduate Diploma in Optometry (120 taught credits); M.Sc. in Optometry/ Ophthalmic Science (180 credits: 120 taught, 60 dissertation) or the Doctor of Optometry (DOptom)/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (DOphSc).

As part of the flexible programme, UK optometrists may complete the theoretical element of the GOC-approved Independent Prescribing for Optometrists. Further information is available here: http://www1.aston.ac.uk/lhs/cpd/courses/optometry/independent-prescribing-for-optometrists/

The MSc requires the completion of 6 taught modules (120 credits) and a 60 credit narrative research review (dissertation).

Completion of the DOptom/ DOphSc requires 180 taught module credits and successful completion of a substantial personal research project, with submission of a thesis/ portfolio of work and a viva voce examination with an internal and external examiner. Up to 60 credits may be awarded in respect of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL), whether experiential or certificated (e.g. previous completion of the Aston MOptom). To progress to full doctoral registration requires a minimum of 120 taught module credits including the compulsory 20 credit Research Methods module, an approved project proposal, and successful completion of the qualifying report stage, assessed by viva voce examination with an internal examiner. The report and the viva voce examination will be used to assess suitability for progression to the full doctoral project.

Timescales for study

Taught credits are valid for 5 years, so students studying for an MSc/PG Diploma/PG Certificate must complete their studies within 5 years of enrolment on the programme.

Students undertaking the DOptom/DOphSc. programme must complete their taught module requirement and complete the research stage within 6 years of registration. Note that in accordance with University Regulations for part-time research students, the earliest date for completion of the doctoral programme (i.e. submission of thesis/ portfolio) is 4 years following registration.

Subject guide and modules

Taught modules include:
-Accommodation and Presbyopia (OP4AAP)
-Advanced Contact Lenses (OP4ACL)
-Advanced Visual Science (OP4AVS)
-General Ocular Therapeutics (OP4GOT)
-Glaucoma (OP4GL1)
-Investigative Ophthalmic Science (OP4IOS)
-Myopia (OP4MY1)
-Nutrition and the Eye (OP4NE1)
-Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (OP4OT1)
-Prescribing for disorders of the eye (OP4OT2)
-Refractive Surgery (OP4RS1)
-Research Methods (OP4RM1)
-Research Review (Dissertation modules OP4OPR and OP40SR)
-Retinal and Macular Disorders (OP4RMD)
-Visual Impairment (OP4VI1)

Learning, teaching & assessment

For taught modules, online lectures, available on our virtual environment whenever you chose to view them are accompanied by short tests throughout the module. Each module includes a substantial piece of coursework, e.g. a scientific literature review or portfolio of case records. The pass mark for all forms of taught module assessment is 50%.

For the main element of the doctorate, the research project, candidates submit a report and undergo a qualifying report stage within one year of becoming research active. Once this stage has been passed, candidates continue their research, culminating in the submission of a thesis (up to 80, 000 words) which is examined in a viva examination by experts in the chosen field. The degree of Doctor of Optometry or Doctor of Ophthalmic Science is awarded to candidates who successfully defend their thesis.

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This distance learning course is aimed at teachers with Qualified Teacher Status who work with children and young people with vision impairments. Read more
This distance learning course is aimed at teachers with Qualified Teacher Status who work with children and young people with vision impairments.

The aims of the programme are:

To develop knowledge, understanding and skills to enable professionals to work confidently and effectively with children and young people who have vision impairments in a variety of settings, their families and other professionals who support them.
To develop critical and analytical enquiry-based learning skills to prepare professionals to work in range of contexts where children and young people with vision impairments are educated.
To provide a conceptual framework which has reference to relevant literature as well as government legislation and guidance pertaining to the education of children and young people with vision impairments at a national and international level.
Students will be required to attend University based study-weekends and regional tutorials as specified throughout the programme. The programme includes an assessed Braille component, a teaching placement and a negotiated programme of visits to specialist provision. Most of the module content will be delivered online and as such students will require suitable internet access prior to commencing their studies.

On successful completion of the PG Diploma students may transfer to the MEd programme (Education of Children and Young People with Vision Impairments). This is usually undertaken as an additional year of study and requires completion of a research methods module (4000 words) and a dissertation (15,000 words). An additional fee is payable for this period of study.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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The MSc Applied Child Psychology combines an in-depth critical evaluation of current theory pertaining to psychological development in children and adolescents with advanced training in relevant research methods. Read more
The MSc Applied Child Psychology combines an in-depth critical evaluation of current theory pertaining to psychological development in children and adolescents with advanced training in relevant research methods.

The implications of psychological theory for policy and practice in various areas, including education, clinical and social contexts are also considered. This an ideal course for anyone wanting a career that involves working with children or for those interested in securing a doctoral training place in educational psychology.

Modules may include:

Social and Cognitive Development in Children
The Child in Context
Research Skills for Working with Children
Observational Methods
Understanding Atypical Development
Clinical Aspects of Behavioural Disorders
Child Psychology Specialist Essay
Child Psychology Research Project.

For more information about the modules you may study on this course visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/childpsych

Facilities

The University has made significant financial investment in the Psychology Division over recent years upgrading accommodation, facilities and equipment used exclusively for the provision of our psychology courses and for research. We have a first class undergraduate teaching laboratory suite and a second teaching laboratory specifically catering for postgraduate students.

In addition there are specialist suites dedicated to particular areas of interest in psychology, including:

social interaction, group work and interviewing
computer gaming and cyberpsychology
eye-tracking
cognitive modelling and visual analysis
psychophysiology.

Alongside these are new flexible cubicles for student project work, a psychometric test bank library, and a technical workshop.

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered through lectures, interactive workshops, small group teaching and one-on-one supervision. There will also be an expectation that students will engage in independent study during the course. All staff teaching on the course is research-active in their field of interest which includes members from the Communication for Inclusion Research Unit (CIRU) and the Specific Language Impairment Research Unit (SLIRU). Students will also have access to the extensive new facilities within the Division of Psychology and the University's Virtual Learning Environment.

International students in psychology can also access additional language and study skills support, as well as help in acclimatising, via our own International Student Support Officer.

You will be assessed in a variety of ways and on a modular basis through:

examinations
coursework
essays
laboratory reports
literature reviews
research project.

Career opportunities

Students generally choose the MSc Applied Child Psychology because they wish to pursue a career working with children (as a teacher, support worker, and so on).

Many already work with children and complete the course in order to improve their prospects of promotion and career progression. Others see the qualification as a means of helping to secure a path to teacher training or a doctoral training place in educational psychology. It is also possible to pursue an academic and / or research career in child / developmental psychology following graduation (by working as a research assistant or associate, for example, or by studying for a PhD).

Your qualification in psychology is likely to be popular with a whole range of potential employers because you will have demonstrated an ability to write essays and reports, to master advanced statistics and to talk and present in front of other people (amongst other transferable skills).

Careers and job application advice is available to all our postgraduate students and is provided on a one-to-one basis by a subject specialist within the Division, supported by the university wide careers service.

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time and part-time Masters courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evenings. For further details please visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events

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Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history. Read more

Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history.

Bioarchaeology (the study of archaeological human remains) is an exciting field that draws on a variety of techniques, ranging from visual examination of the whole skeleton to the biomolecular analysis of small bone samples. Demographic shifts, environmental changes, migrations, the spread of diseases and the impact of violence and conflict all leave traces on the skeleton.

This MSc provides the skills required to understand skeletal biographies and interpret them in their cultural context at the individual and the population level. Combining theoretical learning with hands-on practice, we will provide you with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills essential to your handling and analysis of specimens recovered from archaeological sites.

Programme structure

Throughout the programme, you’ll take part in lectures, seminars and practical work with archaeological skeletal assemblages and reference collections. You will complete six courses that are assessed through reports, lab exams, oral and poster presentations and essays.

Drawing on Edinburgh’s long history in the study of the human body, you will also have the opportunity to visit Surgeons’ Hall Museum and the Anatomy Department, which provide unique collections of pathological and anatomical study specimens.

You will also submit a dissertation on a research topic of your choosing. Past dissertations have ranged from experimental projects on violence in prehistory to dietary studies of Chalcolithic Turkey and considerations of disease and impairment in post-Medieval England.

The courses on this programme are:

  • Analytical Methods in Human Osteology
  • Bioarchaeological Interpretation
  • Human Musculoskeletal Anatomy
  • Practical Osteology
  • Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
  • Skeletal Pathology

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

  • identify and interpret human skeletal remains from archaeological sites
  • develop hypothesis testing skills
  • carry out relevant scientific analyses, often in cooperation with experts in other disciplines
  • engage in theoretical and methodological discussions relevant to osteoarchaeology
  • design research strategies based on transferable skills providing a basis for advanced studies (PhD and beyond)

Career opportunities

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. The programme also equips you for advanced study.



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