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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Beautiful architecture. Solid structure. What else do buildings need?. Try living in one without any heating, cooling, electrical power, lighting, water or drainage. Read more
Beautiful architecture. Solid structure. What else do buildings need?

Try living in one without any heating, cooling, electrical power, lighting, water or drainage. What would it be like to work in a tower without lifts? How would you manage without telephones, an IT system or an internet connection? All of these systems and many more are designed by building services engineers. Building Service Engineers turn buildings from empty shells into spaces fit for people to use.

From the very start of the building design, Building Services Engineers are involved helping architects and other members of the design team to get the size, shape and configuration of the building right. They determine strategies for designing energy efficient buildings, making them sustainable in the long term. Buildings are responsible for a large chunk of carbon emissions so this work makes a critical contribution to reducing a building's impact on climate change.

Of all the disciplines working in the built environment today, the building services engineer has the broadest reach and the deepest impact, affecting virtually every aspect of building design. In short, they make buildings work.

This Masters course provides a broad basis of advanced understanding in the technological areas of building services and energy engineering, with particular emphasis on those areas that are relevant to the interaction between the built and natural environments, modern industry, and the analysis of developing technologies.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/building-services-engineering-msc

Modules

The course provides a practitioner perspective with which we analyse building energy requirements in terms of the external environment and internal space, and the effect on energy resources. We consider the principles and analyse associated building engineering systems to understand control, simulation and modelling techniques.

As well as the core engineering skills, appropriate areas of management and research methods are studied to provide a balance foundation for the specialist units. The MSc dissertation provides an opportunity to develop further research skills by application to problems that require in-depth and innovative thinking.

Module descriptions

- Thermal environment, acoustics and lighting
The module provides an introduction to the processes and characteristics that determine the quality of the internal built thermal, acoustic and visual environment. The aims of this module are to examine the principal parameters that affect the thermal, acoustic and visual environment, and the theory and principles necessary for the design of the internal environment.

- Heating and energy in buildings
This module introduces the key components of building heating and cooling systems, and presents sizing methodologies of central plant and techniques for analysing energy consumption and carbon emissions. System configurations and controls are discussed that ensure optimum safe and efficient operation of the plant.

- Energy resource and use analysis
This module offers the opportunity to develop strategic and operational management skills in the fields of infrastructure asset management and project appraisal. It covers design life extensions, risk and asset management techniques for infrastructure, and techniques for physical appraisal of infrastructure, and their economic, environmental and social impacts.

- Electrical power
The module covers electrical power engineering as applied to the design of systems in buildings. In particular, this includes the connection of, and the effects of, small-scale embedded generation as might be employed to exploit renewable energy sources. The module aims to provide an appreciation and understanding of electrical services design in buildings with particular reference to safety requirements and the effects of embedded generation on the supplier and the consumer.

- Sustainable refrigeration
The module introduces the principles of thermodynamics, and applies them to the study and design of energy efficient refrigeration systems. Vapour compression, absorption and other novel cycles are analysed and modeled. Practical applications of sustainable refrigeration are investigated through case studies.

- Ventilation and air conditioning
This module introduces the theory and principles necessary for the evaluation of ventilation and cooling loads, the selection and design of ventilating and air conditioning systems. It examines the principles of operation and characteristics of contemporary systems and their associated controls and distribution systems with particular emphasis on energy use and heat recovery. It discusses the effect of system balancing and maintenance on the correct and energy efficient operation of the systems.

- Energy engineering project

Employability

Employment prospects are excellent. Construction and engineering activity is expected to accelerate in the UK, Europe and worldwide over the next 20 years and demand for building services engineers continues to outstrip supply.

Graduate success stories

Successful students enter various roles including building services design, management of construction projects, and operation of complex installations.

Professional accreditation

The course is fully accredited by Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) and the Energy Institute as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) undergraduate degree. Potential students are advised to check directly with the CIBSE or EI as to the validity of their first degree for a CEng route.

Accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The Master of Laws (LLM) programme, including the named awards in Criminal Law, Medical Law and International Law, has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content. Read more
The Master of Laws (LLM) programme, including the named awards in Criminal Law, Medical Law and International Law, has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

This is a contemporary programme designed to give you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest and, at the same time, distinguish you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary legal study relevant to policy and practice.If you are interested in more general practice, the LLM provides a choice of option modules and dissertation topics to allow you to actively follow a wide range of subject areas. The LLM with a named route in Criminal Law, Medical Law and International Law allows you to specialise in a particular area of law. Whichever route you choose will have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession, or in subject-related disciplines.
-LLM (Criminal Law)
-LLM (International Law)
-LLM (Medical Law)

What you study

Core modules
-Contemporary Legal Issues
-Dissertation
-Legal Theory in Context

And two optional modules
-Comparative Law and Criminal Justice
-Criminal Law
-European Responses to Crime
-International Law
-Medical Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University, particularly the Social Futures Institute (SoFI) in the School of Social Sciences & Law.

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Individual presentations
-Peer review and assessment
-Research proposal
-Reflective practice
-Written assignments
-Dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised subject-specific knowledge and understanding, cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession or in subject-related disciplines, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere.

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.

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The MA/MSc Computational Design opens up for the possibilities of computer programming within a research lead context for the creative industries. Read more
The MA/MSc Computational Design opens up for the possibilities of computer programming within a research lead context for the creative industries.

This postgraduate degree course is positioned and seeks to assist you to engage with the huge wave of interest in the open source communities surrounding the coding developments such as openFrameworks, Arduino, Processing and Cinder. These freely available libraries of code and hardware bring the power of computing and interaction to a much wider base of creative users and you will immediately see the imaginative potential that they offer. Instruction in visual programming with Max/Msp, Pure Data and VVV may also be offered.

You will be shown examples of projects that make use of such devices such as the Kinect, Leap Motion and motion capture. Project work will offer opportunities to put this knowledge into practice in order to propose inventive solutions that respond to the movement of the human figure. The combination of data drawn from the position of the figure and a three dimensional virtual environment has opened up a fascinating discussion about the nature of human choreographic gesture and the way it can have a simultaneous effect both in the digital and real world domains. Quadrocopters, robotics and the control of kinetic movements will come within the research focus of the course offering you a wide variety of possible outcomes.

Ravensbourne has a very well resourced rapid prototyping facility and students on the MA/MSC Computational Design will have the opportunity to combine programming, three dimensional design and electronics to as a basis for proposing innovative, responsive and exciting projects.

You will begin to work with user response and feedback and place your project work in exciting venues such as the Kinetica Art Fair and Level39 Canary Wharf. This will give you great ways to prove your concepts in response to user testing and feedback. The course will cover a variety of approaches to programming and encourage exploration into the nature of code as a medium in its own right. You will become familiar with generative, recursive and algorithmic concepts in problem solving and gain an understanding of the history of coding and its influence and scope.

With this kind of experience behind you, when you leave the course, you will be in a position to take responsible roles such as production supervisor, technical director, lead or assistant programmer, user experience designer, producer or freelance consultant.

Key study topics

1. Technology Issues - The Technology Issues Unit provides an opportunity to work collaboratively to solve problems, establish viable work patterns and look at the methodologies for utilising creative contributions from many sources.

2. Business and Innovation - this Unit helps students to become more adept at dealing with the issues that will ensure they can reach an intended market or publicly available outcome.

3. Research Process - this Unit helps students to develop the kind of research methodologies that will ensure that their practice can be related to an informed and multi layered knowledge of relevant contemporary and historical practice.

4. Concept and Prototyping - the key focus of this Unit is its emphasis on testing and proving an idea by creating a viable "first stage" - the results are used to develop the modified "second stage" in the Major Project Unit.

5. The Major Project represents the culmination of the student's investigation and final stage of their research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice based processes and methodologies.

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This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society. Read more
This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society.

Whether you prefer ancient Greek dramas, medieval Dutch poetry, contemporary American literature, or general literary theory, this Master’s is suited to students wishing to contribute to textual research. The Master’s in Literary Studies will teach you how to approach historical and contemporary texts from an international perspective, as well as to examine the current societal significance of literature. By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to discuss literary texts and scholarly approaches with other scholars at the highest academic level.

At Radboud University, we believe that to fully understand literature, you need to broaden your scope. You will gain insight into methods and theories in both literary studies and the humanities in general. You’ll become familiar with a wide range of literary traditions, critical approaches and theoretical debates. This will enhance your own research. In order to expand your horizon as a literary scholar, you’ll spend a semester conducting research and taking courses abroad.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Europe and its worlds

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of literary studies, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including the ways Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Literary Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on textual scholarship and methods of literary interpretation. The programme studies all forms of literary texts and written records from all historical periods.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s as Historical Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of other disciplines within the humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic world.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Literary Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups
There is a literary scientist in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a literary researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Literary Studies students:

- European Literary History
This group explores the various forms, functions, agents, media, infrastructures, traditions and theories of literature that, now or then, have been involved in relating ‘Europe’ to a certain space, tradition, or identity.

- Studying Criticism And Reception Across Borders
This group researches literary reception in its broadest sense, from analysing the practice of book reviewers and literary criticism, to studying all sorts of literary institutions like publishers, literary magazines.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Literary Studies:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Classicism under Justinian. A study of Justinian's classicising policies in the fields of literature, legislation and military conquest.
- The early transmission of Sappho's songs reflected in the ancient sources.
- Performing the Past, Staging the Future: Memory, Modernity, and (Inter)nationalist Identities at the Dublin Gate Theatre.
- Austen: The Next Generation. Modern reworkings of Pride and Prejudice and the Quest for New Audiences.
- De naam van de schrijver. Auteur, lezer en pseudoniem.
- Lolita - ethiek, lezer & effect. Een cognitief narratologische analyse van Vladimir Nabokovs Lolita (1955).

Academia and beyond

This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also do well and often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

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The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​. Read more

Course Overview

The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​

The degree focuses on historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural representations and practices of location, space, history and textuality, and the effect of these on constructions of identity. Where possible, the modules encourage you to explore interdisciplinary boundaries and texts.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical writing and research skills, particularly in relation to literature that addresses history, place and space. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your employability in the arts and heritage sectors. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Representing ‘the Past’
In Representing 'the Past', you will consider how we interpret 'the past' within a cultural context. Looking at both textual and extra-textual appropriations, and by showing how meanings of 'the past' are contested at any one time, you will consider how certain interpretations are naturalised and legitimated within culture.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it (Representing ‘the Past’).

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in the arts or heritage sectors. The programme is suitable for those who are teachers of English Literature at ‘A’ Level or GCSE and would like to enhance their expertise for professional development purposes.

The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace. A Master's degree in English Literature may lead to a variety of careers which include the particularly relevant areas of teaching, research, journalism, public relations, the Civil Service, publishing, the media, and employment in the public or voluntary sectors.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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Do you want to become an outstanding teacher? Our specialist PGCE in Secondary Education with Art and Design is a direct route to a career of which you can be proud. Read more
Do you want to become an outstanding teacher? Our specialist PGCE in Secondary Education with Art and Design is a direct route to a career of which you can be proud.

Art and Design develops a passion for visual knowledge and understanding and the use of technology. This course develops a range of teaching styles appropriate to the delivery of Art and Design within the National Curriculum and GCSE/A Level specifications. Art and Design impacts on our lives and this course aims to produce dynamic, confident, and innovative teachers who are committed to developing life skills.

The aim of the course is to prepare trainee teachers for a first appointment as a teacher of Art and Design in a secondary school and assess current developments in the subject and their possible effect on teaching in schools. To develop as a teacher, you will be learning about how pupils develop their art and design skills and knowledge, and how they can be helped to a better understanding of themselves and the world through Art and Design. Furthermore, our PGCE Art and Design trainees can take up ‘enhancements’ linked to other curriculum subjects e.g. English, primary phase or Special Education Needs and Diversity.

We acknowledge that the trainees themselves are the most valuable resource on the course and we will be giving you the opportunity you to share your specialisms with the other trainees, and you will develop essential components of creativity and imagination such as determination, hard work, observing, thinking, experimenting, investigating, making, evaluation.

At the University of St Mark & St John, we pride ourselves on the quality of our teaching programmes. PGCE External examiners commented “The work across the Partnership results in excellent relationship building with staff and pupils as well as creative and forward thinking pedagogical ideas.” If the idea of joining these trainees inspires and motivates you, it’s time to start the application process.

General Entry Requirements

In addition to the specific course entry requirements, all PGCE applicants will need to meet the following:

- Recent secondary school classroom observation experience.
- To be able to clearly and accurately communicate both spoken and written English.
- Candidates must take part in individual and group interviews with representatives from schools as well as University tutors.

Suitability Clearance

You will be required to:

- Provide a satisfactory DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service), Enhanced Disclosure, related to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and the Joint Circular ‘Protection of Children’.

- Meet the Secretary of State’s requirements for physical and mental fitness to teach as detailed in ‘Fit to Teach’ by completing an on-line medical questionnaire.

Career Opportunities

The University of St Mark & St John is widely renowned for producing excellent teachers. We have superb links with our partnership schools throughout the South West, London and overseas. You will find our graduates teaching in schools across the country.

- Over 95% of secondary trained teachers employed in teaching jobs – above the sector and region average.

- High quality training and outcomes – 100% of Secondary PGCE trainees completing in 2014 were graded good or outstanding.

- Long and established history of teacher education – 175 years of experience.

- Partnership – wide and diverse – praised by Ofsted (2014) – ‘effective use of local diversity and wider links which ensures trainees have breadth and variety in their training, so making them highly employable’.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.marjon.ac.uk/courses/applying/

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The LLM (Medical Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in medico-legal issues. Read more
The LLM (Medical Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in medico-legal issues. The programme has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

The programme gives you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest within the area of medical law. At the same time it distinguishes you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary medico-legal study relevant to policy and practice.

What you study

Core modules
-Contemporary Legal Issues
-Dissertation
-Legal Theory in Context
-Medical Law

And one optional module
-Comparative Law and Criminal Justice
-Criminal Law
-European Responses to Crime
-International Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions will enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University.

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Individual presentations
-Peer review and assessment
-Research proposal
-Reflective practice
-Written assignments
-Dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised knowledge and understanding of the theory and application of medical law. You also develop cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession or in your subject-related discipline, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere.

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.

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The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. Read more
The LLM (Criminal Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in criminal law. The programme has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

The programme gives you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest within the area of criminal law. At the same time it distinguishes you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary legal study relevant to criminal policy and practice.

What you study

Core modules
-Contemporary Legal Issues
-Criminal Law
-Dissertation
-Legal Theory in Context
And one optional module
-Comparative Law and Criminal Justice
-European Responses to Crime
-International Law
-Medical Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University, particularly the Social Futures Institute (SoFI) in the School of Social Sciences & Law.

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Individual presentations
-Peer review and assessment
-Research proposal
-Reflective practice
-Written assignments
-Dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised knowledge and understanding of the theory and application of criminal law. You will also develop cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession or in subject-related disciplines, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere.

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.

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The LLM (International Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in international legal issues. Read more
The LLM (International Law) is one of the named routes through our LLM programme and allows you to specialise and develop expertise in international legal issues. The programme has been designed by a team of highly motivated academic staff at Teesside University who have particular research interests that have informed its content.

Course details

The programme gives you flexibility and autonomy to allow you to develop your own areas of interest within the area of international law. At the same time it distinguishes you in the eyes of employers in ways that show that you have specialised in a substantive and applied area of contemporary legal study relevant to international policy and practice.

What you study

Core modules
-Contemporary Legal Issues
-Dissertation
-International Law
-Legal Theory in Context
And one optional module
-Comparative Law and Criminal Justice
-Criminal Law
-European Responses to Crime
-Medical Law

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The link between legal theory and practice is the central theme of the programme and is incorporated into the teaching through a blend of directed and student-centred learning to develop an understanding of methodology, practice and presentation. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, debates, audio-visual presentations, guided reading and research exercises.

We want you to become an effective autonomous learner. The research and academic writing skills you develop in taught sessions will enable you to prepare and contribute to seminars and group discussions, and to produce the required assessed work appropriate to postgraduate study. You are also encouraged to attend and participate in relevant research seminars offered by the research institutes of the University, particularly the Social Futures Institute (SoFI) in the School of Social Sciences & Law.

Our assessments help you develop essential skills to work successfully at postgraduate level, as well as for continuing professional roles and lifelong learning. Your work is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Individual presentations
-Peer review and assessment
-Research proposal
-Reflective practice
-Written assignments
-Dissertation

Employability

By completing the course you will develop and have recognised knowledge and understanding of the theory and application of international law. You will also develop cognitive, intellectual, practical, professional and generic key skills and qualities, which have a directly beneficial effect on future employability, whether in the legal profession, or in your subject-related discipline, including academia. You will be equipped to contribute to and inform policy-making decisions in your chosen sphere.

A number of our previous students have published work in academic journals.

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The international business environment is rapidly changing and a different market reality is emerging. As a student of today and manager of the future, you need to adapt and adopt flexible patterns of thinking and behaviour to succeed as global manager of tomorrow. Read more
The international business environment is rapidly changing and a different market reality is emerging. As a student of today and manager of the future, you need to adapt and adopt flexible patterns of thinking and behaviour to succeed as global manager of tomorrow.

The International Masters in Business Administration (IMBA) has been designed with this in mind, as it explores in detail the nature and implications of the changes in the business environment and provides you with the skills and mindset that will allow you to operate effectively within such an unstable and unpredictable environment. You’ll also be taught to successfully lead the organisations of the future, regardless of sector or country.

What's covered in the course?

The programme is designed to meet the needs of contemporary international businesses and blends academic excellence and professional skills, equipping you with marketable skills to operate and excel at strategic level across different sectors and in different countries. The course has a strong emphasis on employability and enhancing employability skills, and will help you develop general communication and inter-personal skills.

You will emerge from our International MBA with well-developed powers of analysis, clear perspectives on strategy and strategic thinking, creative problem solving, an entrepreneurial mindset and highly effective communication and research skills - all of which are demanded by employers around the world.

Should you wish to start your own business, you will have the opportunity to explore and test your ideas in a supportive environment. The programme has been designed to provide graduates with expertise in strategy, marketing, leadership, finance, global human resource management, international business, entrepreneurship, operations and project management, and research skills.

You become part of the international community while on the programme, as you will study with students from different parts of the globe. Through our links with industry, the learning experience takes you from the classroom to the factory floor, through sponsored study/field trips to companies in the region, and with our organised internship programme, you have the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while you study.

Why Choose Us?

-You have the opportunity to gain invaluable practical work experience by completing an ‘In-company’ internship project, an 8-week project based in a UK company.
-You have opportunities to go on field trips to world renowned companies as part of your learning experience.
-You will learn from highly experienced lecturers who have industry experience and are specialists in their fields.
-We will help you with your future employability by offering essential training in key areas such as CV writing, presentation skills, interview technique and other essential skills demanded by employers.
-You will develop a global perspective of management as you study and share experiences with students from different parts of the world.

Course structure

Each module is delivered weekly over a period of 12 weeks. Each weekly session typically consists of a one-hour knowledge cast session led by the tutor, a one-hour seminar session, where the topic will be explored in-depth, and two hours of various other activities such as group activities and/or workshop sessions, directed self-study and presentations.

You will be assigned a personal tutor, who will be able to review and discuss your progress and offer advice throughout your studies.

We use audio visual materials in a range of ways to bring the curriculum to life. Learning and assessment reflect an action learning approach focused on team work, case studies, simulated real-business projects, all of which are underpinned by analysis, evaluation and synthesis. With our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), you are able to access lecture notes and other resources from anywhere and anytime via Moodle.

Each learning outcome is only assessed once and a variety of assessment methods are used throughout the MBA. These include coursework, portfolios, group work, presentations, projects and exams. In addition to summative assessments, we use a variety of ways throughout each semester to provide formative assessments, all meant to support your development and prepare you for formal assessment.

Employability

Unlike undergraduate degrees, which are designed to get students into industry, our International MBA is aimed at both existing industry professionals looking to climb further up the career ladder and aspiring managers with little or no experience.

Companies around the world are now looking for a different kind of manager. They need people with different skillsets that can look at situations and opportunities in unique ways. Our International MBA will give you the tools to stand out from the rest.

Upon completion, you will be able to effect positive change, both in your own professional practice, and within your organisation. On a personal level, you’ll be able to utilise new skills and methods to improve your efficiency, your critical engagement, and your ability to instigate change.

Successful improvements in your personal professional practice will then benefit your organisation. The MBA degree alone can open doors, but the possibilities opened to you by utilising your skills to improve your organisation are even more impressive.

Already a managing director, in charge of your own company? The MBA degree can still benefit you internally and externally. The knowledge and skills you will pick up over the course of your degree can allow you to become an industry leader, growing your company’s reputation through innovation. The accompanying benefits of this could help cement your company’s industry position for years to come.

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If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal. Read more

Why take this course?

If you have a passion and enthusiasm for the heritage of historic buildings and structures, and wish to specialise in this area, this course is ideal.

You can explore why it is important to retain such heritage sites, the financial constraints and consequences of doing so, the methods available to restore them and how heritage can be managed to best effect.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Get involved with some of our regional regeneration projects to test and develop your ideas
Undertake studio-based design projects and engage with our other collaborative projects with academic institutions in a range of countries including Turkey, Spain and Australia
Have the opportunity to ‘earn and learn’ by working on real-life contracts through our Projects Office

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is also professionally accredited and follows the education guidelines of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS ), UNESCO and Council of Europe requirements. It is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and covers its areas of competence. It is also accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), and prepares architects and surveyors to accreditation standards (AABC and RICS Building Conservation Forum), facilitating work on English Heritage and Heritage Lottery Fund-funded projects. Students can also apply for full IHBC membership after two years of professional experience, as opposed to five years.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Conservation work
Consultancy
Regeneration projects
Heritage management

Module Details

This course uses the experience and skills of teaching staff with a proven track record in interior historic building and conservation studies, practice and research. You will also benefit from an inter-disciplinary learning environment where more than 100 postgraduate students in architecture, interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation can meet and work.

Here are the units you will study:

Practice: In this unit you will focus mainly on the practical aspects of the conservation, with an emphasis on raising awareness in conservation skills. It is delivered in collaboration with regional, national and internationals bodies specialising in conservation and is mainly fieldwork based, enabling you to analyse practical aspects and skills in different situations. Assessment is by means of submission of a number of different projects and reports related to practice.

Theory: You will learn the theoretical aspects of historic building conservation, such as historical aspects related to built heritage and relevant legislative frameworks to ensure their protection for future generations. You will look at the international historic preservation principles based on UNESCO/ICOMOS criteria.

Research Methods and Research Proposal: In this unit you will develop research skills, which will aid you throughout your course and particularly in producing your thesis. You will be asked to establish a critical position within an Outline Research Proposal. You will develop techniques, which will allow you to engage proactively within your area of study. You will be encouraged to explore methods of investigation that are responsive to, as well as inquisitive of, the conditions presented and which therefore speculate around possible critical scenarios. Implicit within these explorations is the need to investigate diverse means of representation and depiction through a variety of possible media and discourse.

Integration: This unit allows you to work in a multi-disciplinary context through groups within your own subject area and across the areas of interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation, as well as explore the interrelationships of all disciplines. You will need to work collectively on given projects or problems related to staff run studios, which explore a range of given themes. You will be introduced to these themes at the start of the course and connect to research areas within the School.

Work-Based Learning: This unit gives you the opportunity to replace a 30-credit core unit with a work-based version of that unit. Not all units can be replaced and you will need to discuss the appropriateness of a unit with tutors. Work-based learning requires you to engage in critical and reflective learning in the workplace. This will be developed through a learning contract, negotiated by you, your employer and School.

Thesis: Your thesis is a substantial research-based project that enables you to carry out an in-depth investigation into a subject area of personal interest, which is related to or developed from a theme studied during the course. The proposed research theme should have a clearly defined focus to allow for in-depth theoretical, contextual and visual research. An initial seminar programme will help you develop your research proposal, define a research question and locate suitable primary and secondary sources. You will be allocated an appropriate supervisor on the basis of this proposal, who will work with you toward the final submission.

Programme Assessment

This course is lecture and studio-based, culminating in a research-based thesis project. It will involve case study investigations, group work, discussion and planning of conservation environments, as well as independent study to develop design or research-based responses to conservation problems.

Design assessment is through studio review and taught courses are assessed by various forms of evidence-based conservation design decisions and proposals. You will also carry out an in-depth research project into an area of your choice.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be equipped with specialist skills to find careers within the architectural and planning professions. You will obtain professional, legal, craft, management and administration skills relevant to historic building conservation. In addition, you’ll develop historical and technical knowledge, and understand research methodologies applicable to conservation.

The creative skills, professional competencies and expansive learning environment that we provide has also led graduates into a range of careers in marketing, advertising, journalism, virtual design and modelling through to people-centred careers such as project management.

Alternatively, you can choose to continue your studies to PhD level.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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The MSc Diabetes Care and Management programme equips Healthcare Professionals (HCPs) from all backgrounds with the in-depth knowledge and understanding required to deliver the best care to patients with diabetes. Read more
The MSc Diabetes Care and Management programme equips Healthcare Professionals (HCPs) from all backgrounds with the in-depth knowledge and understanding required to deliver the best care to patients with diabetes.

Diabetes is a disease that is on the increase worldwide. The demands on HCPs are rising at an alarming rate and HCPs need the education basis to provide competent appropriate care.

The programme takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of diabetes, allowing integration of key discipline areas in the understanding of the biology of the disease, its diagnosis and the understanding of the complications of diabetes, their prevention and management. It emphasises the importance of research and development in the subject area and exposes you to the latest advances in the understanding of health and disease; equipping you with the competencies to take part in active research.

Many of our graduates go on to work in the field of diabetes – in general practice, in hospitals and in industry. Some with a suitable medical background choose to study for the UK General Medical Council exams (PLAB 1 and 2) and go on to work in the NHS.

This programme has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
SEPTEMBER 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/hls/study/courses/details/index.php/P02663-1PTA-1718/Diabetes_Care_and_Management_(Part-time)?utm_source=XXXX&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2017 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/hls/study/courses/details/index.php/P02638-1FTAB-1617/Diabetes_Care_and_Management_(Jan)?utm_source=XXXX&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/hls/study/courses/details/index.php/P02638-1FTAB-1718/Diabetes_Care_and_Management?utm_source=XXXX&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Clinical Placements

Our top six students undertake a short clinical attachment at a local hospital.

Research Expertise

Examples of research in diabetes underpinning the MSc programme include:
-Obesity and vascular changes in type 2 diabetes
-Adypocyte pathophysiology in diabetes
-Diabetes and the feto-placental circulation
-Novel in-vitro methods of assessing vascular function in health and disease
-The efficacy of urea cream in the control of anhidrosis in diabetic autonomic neuropathy
-Alteration of vascular reactivity by insulin and cortisol
-Effect of glucose concentration on blood vessel contractibility
-Visual testing and testing of eye disease

CPD Option

It is possible to undertake Diabetes Care: A Multi Professional Approach, as a stand alone CPD certificate and gain credits towards a future Masters level degree.

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The world of fashion is one of the globe’s fastest growing industries, as well as one of the most competitive. Our Fashion Management MA course equips you with the skills and knowledge to succeed as a manager in this exciting industry. Read more
The world of fashion is one of the globe’s fastest growing industries, as well as one of the most competitive. Our Fashion Management MA course equips you with the skills and knowledge to succeed as a manager in this exciting industry.

You will gain a technical understanding of the sector, combined with a solid foundation of management principles. Both of these qualities will help give you a winning edge that employers really value.

What's covered in the course?

We will help develop your overall understanding of the modern fashion industry, as well as the necessary skills for working in the sector.

The industry looks for passionate, knowledgeable people when it comes to employment, so with this in mind, we will give you valuable insights into the subject. You will look at the fashion supply chain, global fashion perspectives, ethical fashion and how brands are promoted, established and maintained, amongst others.

You will also be trained in marketing and communications, learning how to maximise market penetration and consumer value. You’ll sharpen your research skills to enable you to apply them to different product strategies, evaluating visual merchandising and how to product different fashions effectively.

Alongside gaining intricate knowledge of the fashion industry as a whole, you’ll also have the opportunity to specialise in a topic or subject of your choice.

Our course covers all the topics you’d need to become successful in the fashion business, from strategies that inform fashion marketing and branding, right up to articulating trend forecasting. This broad approach ensures when you will graduate you’ll be able to perform a number of roles in a competitive, worldwide industry.

Why Choose Us?

-The University is an active research centre, and the latest Research Excellence Framework 2014 report found we have doubled the amount of staff producing internationally recognised research.
-With our accreditations, excellent industry links and practice-based approach, Birmingham City Business School is one of the UK’s most respected schools.
-You get the chance to study alongside people from other countries, helping you gain knowledge of the cultural implications of business practice.
-Our graduates move on to successful careers where they apply their knowledge to full effect.
-Our engaged, informative study sessions ensure you learn a range of vital skills needed for managerial positions.
-Study at our new, cutting-edge facility, The Curzon Building, which opened its doors in September 2015 and is a hub for our students, boasting state-of-the-art facilities, including a richly stocked library, a new Students’ Union and student support facilities.

Course Structure

Subject specific modules for this course include a lecture and seminar programme, a portfolio of concepts and treatments, research strategy, portfolio – short projects (management), and a major project / dissertation, where you can write about a subject you enjoy in much greater depth.

Theoretical concepts will be delivered in a lecture, followed by smaller group seminars based on case study analysis. Short, post-lesson ‘fact’ tests will be made available over Moodle, with discussion and interactive sessions will encourage you to critically examine key elements of business and management.

You will study the course full-time for one year. Assessments are an integral part of the learning process, and it’ll take on various forms within the modules, including coursework assignments, reports, controlled assessments, exams and your final dissertation. Formative feedback will be provided by students through a combination of self-reflection and tutor and peer feedback.

Employability

The course generates career opportunities in fashion manufacturing and production, fashion studio management, fashion brand management, fashion supply chain management and research.

Postgraduates earn an average £9,000 more per year than those with just undergraduate degrees*. A postgraduate qualification can really help you stand out from the crowd in today’s competitive job market. By becoming a specialist in your field, you will have the chance to advance thinking in that subject and lead, rather than follow, the latest developments.

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