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Masters Degrees (Visual Cultures)

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The MRes in Visual Cultures is ideal if you have already completed an advanced course of study in art history and theory but would like to further develop your thought and research projects before studying at MPhil/PhD level- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-visual-cultures/. Read more
The MRes in Visual Cultures is ideal if you have already completed an advanced course of study in art history and theory but would like to further develop your thought and research projects before studying at MPhil/PhD level- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-visual-cultures/

This programme is assessed primarily by a dissertation on a topic of your choice, with additional assessed taught modules in research methods.

It qualifies you to carry out higher research, but is also a degree in its own right and can be tailored to suit your requirements.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

*New programme: Subject to validation

Please note: 'subject to validation' means that we will be offering this degree providing it is approved by the Goldsmiths Academic Board.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Jorella Andrews.

Department

In the Department of Visual Cultures we explore and produce
new forms of art history and theory
Visual Cultures
Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

Our approach

Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

Our academics

Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

Our location

Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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OVERVIEW. The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree.

PLEASE NOTE: when making an application, please select Communication, Culture and Media MA and then state clearly your chosen routeway (specialism) within the personal statement from the options above.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

We are one of the founding departments in the field in the UK with over 25 years' experience. The course combines theoretical and practical elements with a flexible structure and diverse specialist option choices that students may tailor to their own needs.

The staff teaching on the Communication, Culture and Media Masters programme are all currently active in research and scholarly activity and/or professional practice, which informs and enhances their teaching.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Working at an advanced level, you will receive a firm grounding in Communication, Culture and Media studies.

You can choose a specialist module from:

Applied Communication MA degree;
Communication, Culture and Media MA degree;
Digital Media and Culture MA degree;
Film and Visual Cultures MA degree;
Global Media and Communications MA degree;
Photography MA degree.
Please state this chosen specialism within your personal statement when making an application.

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Our approach to Visual Cultures frames it in terms of what it can do alongside what it can know. Read more
Our approach to Visual Cultures frames it in terms of what it can do alongside what it can know. Be inspired by a team of world-renowned teaching and research staff, who will challenge you to explore existing paradigms, develop an individual approach to visual culture research, and articulate your thinking as you develop your 'manifesto' and portfolio.

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We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/. Read more
We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/

We usually accept research students into the Department of Visual Cultures on the basis of a match between your proposed research and the current research interests of the department as well as an assessment of your qualifications and suitability to undertake a research degree.

Research in the department is organised around the following thematic clusters:

Culture, Memory, Futurity
Environmental Humanities and Ecologies
Globalisation and Transcultural practices
Performance and Live Art
Philosophy, Critical and Visual Theory
Political Aesthetics
Sexes, Genders, Genres
Spatial Practice and Architecture
Technologies of Image and Sound
The Curatorial

In order to ascertain whether your project matches our research interests and meets the criteria for MPhil level study, please consult our MPhil in Visual Cultures Application Pack which also contains a proposal form.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Programme Leader, Professor Irit Rogoff.

Structure

In addition to regular tutorials with your supervisor, you will attend the MPhil Visual Cultures seminar in your first and second years of study. This is a weekly seminar dedicated to research questions and theoretical problems of study at MPhil level. It has the additional aim of fostering a supportive and participatory postgraduate research culture in the Department.

Other courses, seminars, workshops and events

As well as participating in the Seminar you are invited to audit an MA Special Subject of your choice should this be helpful. At key moments throughout the year, MPhil students on the Visual Culture programme join students on our MPhil Curatorial/Knowledge programme and there are also opportunities to benefit from seminars and workshops associated with our Centre for Research Architecture.

The Visual Cultures Public Programme

You are to attend the department’s Visual Cultures Public Programme. These events take place on Thursday evenings and are followed by an opportunity to socialize with staff, fellow students and other attendees.

Research training

The Department requires all students to attend the research student training programmes organised by ReSKIN (the Research Skills Intercollegiate Network). This is an organisation made up of various departments across the University of London, and the training is aimed specifically at students studying research in Art History, Visual Culture, Fine Art Practice and cognate disciplines. A college-wide programme of research training is also provided, which involves an induction course (which all students should attend), introduction to information technologies and the use of library and bibliographic resources, and sessions on research planning, presentation skills and ethics.

Department

In the Department of Visual Cultures we explore and produce new forms of art history and theory.

Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

Our approach

Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

Our academics

Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

Our location

Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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This Diploma has been designed as a conversion programme for graduates of other disciplines who wish to carry out research at higher levels in the fields of modern and contemporary art history and visual cultures. Read more
This Diploma has been designed as a conversion programme for graduates of other disciplines who wish to carry out research at higher levels in the fields of modern and contemporary art history and visual cultures. The programme sets out to be both introductory and experiential. Rather than provide conventional chronological surveys, the programme explores and addresses chosen themes within an interdisciplinary context- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/grad-dip-contemporary-art-history/

Modules & Structures

The programme comprises a number of taught modules and tutorial sessions. You are assigned a personal tutor who monitors your overall progress and advises you on the suitability of the various modules available.

Central to the programme is the core course, a lecture and seminar series that introduces you to a range of critical perspectives that have shaped the history and theory of the discipline. As such, the course encourages you to develop a fuller awareness of art’s cultural and political significance in the past, and asks you to relate your historical understanding to current debates among artists, critics and historians.

This is accompanied by a laboratory module, which gives you the opportunity to process the taught materials further through strategies such as museum and gallery visits, film screenings, and experimental projects.

You also choose one option module and one special subject. These in-depth modules allow you to explore themes in art history or theory that are of particular interest to you.

* Options modules:
–Beckett and Aesthetics
–Cities of Modernity: Urban Space in the 20th Century
–Museums, Galleries, Exhibitions: Framing Art
–Postmodernities
–Patterns of Perception
–Post-Colonial Visual Culture
–The Moving Image

* Special subjects
–Animating Architecture
–Performance Matters
–Philosophy and…
–Sexual Poetics
–Sites of Memory
–The Truth in Painting

Assessment

Essays; written papers; research files; ‘creative journals’.

Department: Visual Cultures

Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

- Our approach
Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

- Our academics
Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

- Our location
Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Skills

You'll acquire a wide range of skills in research, critical thinking, visual analysis, writing and other modes of presentation.

Careers

Many of our students go on to carry out further postgraduate studies. These then lead into careers in museums and galleries, publishing, education, the media, journalism, and marketing.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Masters in Comparative Literature offers interdisciplinary study across linguistic cultures as well as academic fields. Read more
The Masters in Comparative Literature offers interdisciplinary study across linguistic cultures as well as academic fields. Benefitting from a strong and diverse School of Modern Languages and Cultures, you will be able to take courses in the comparative study of literatures, film, visual arts, or societies of two or more language areas OR across two or more disciplines. The high degree of flexibility means that you are able to design a unique programme of study suited to your interests.

Why this programme

-The School provides a wide range of languages, with a total of nine European languages from Western, Central and Eastern Europe (Catalan, Czech, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish) as well as Chinese (Mandarin).
-The programme is suitable whether or not you already have knowledge of one or more foreign languages; you may follow it entirely in English translation, or make use of your linguistic skills in our areas of expertise.
-If you wish to take up a new language, this can be part of your programme of study.
-You will be taught by world-leading researchers in these fields.
-We have courses not only in the languages, but in the literatures, films, and visual cultures of these linguistic areas, some of which are available to non-speakers of these languages.
-The School hosts a vibrant postgraduate community, with student-led research seminars and social activities.
-This Masters actively encourages you to take courses from across the College, creating a programme which is intensely interdisciplinary, and can be bespoke to your individual interests.
-Our MLitt is complemented within the SMLC by the MSc in Translation Studies and the MLitt in Modern Languages and Cultures.

Programme structure

The Programme is comprised of two core courses, a selection of optional courses, and an independent research project (dissertation), which provides an opportunity for you to identify an area of interest for an in-depth critical exploration.

The range of options on offer enables you to create your own Masters programme. It also allows you to work in an interdisciplinary capacity, selecting courses from across the College of Arts, according to personal interests. The Programme Convenor will work with you to construct a portfolio of courses according to your personal aims and objectives.

Teaching is almost entirely in small-group seminars, with student assessment based on presentations, essays and individual research diaries; any language classes you may take will have assessment as appropriate to that mode of learning.

Core courses
Semester one
-Core 1: Introduction to Comparative Literature [Comp Lit 5030] (20 credits)

Semester two
-Core 2: Comparative Literature in Practice (Comp Lit 5031] (20 credits)

Options
Options are subject to approval by Programme Convener. A sample list follows below, but not all these options will be available in a given year.
-Cinema of Communist and Post-Communist Europe
-European and Latin-American Cinema
-Narratives of Illness
-Reading the New Europe
-Text Cultures
-Visual Cultures
-Translation Studies in Theory and Practice
-Marketing and Translation across Media
-Literary Translation

Career prospects

Employers welcome our graduates’ abilities to 'think outside the box' in relation to cultures other than their own, as well as their ability to communicate in oral and written form in a logical, coherent, articulate and creative way.

Our graduates go into the workplace well-prepared to work in a global, international environment, as well as in any field requiring sophisticated communication skills. Some common careers include: publishing, editing, creative industries, and teaching.

The programme also provides an excellent preparation for further study in the fields of Comparative Literature and Modern Languages and Cultures.

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre to study in a historic corner of Montparnasse. This programme can also be studied in Paris only.

Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics pathway, which draws on the expertise of our Aesthetics Research Group.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and cognate subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/99/history-and-philosophy-of-art-paris

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics strand.

The MA gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art, and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

The programme is also available at split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA898 - Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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OVERVIEW. The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree.

PLEASE NOTE: when making an application, please select Communication, Culture and Media MA and then state clearly your chosen routeway (specialism) within the personal statement from the options above.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

We are one of the founding departments in the field in the UK with over 25 years' experience. The course combines theoretical and practical elements with a flexible structure and diverse specialist option choices that students may tailor to their own needs.

The staff teaching on the Communication, Culture and Media Masters programme are all currently active in research and scholarly activity and/or professional practice, which informs and enhances their teaching.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Working at an advanced level, you will receive a firm grounding in Communication, Culture and Media studies.

You can choose a specialist module from:

Applied Communication MA degree;
Communication, Culture and Media MA degree;
Digital Media and Culture MA degree;
Film and Visual Cultures MA degree;
Global Media and Communications MA degree;
Photography MA degree.
Please state this chosen specialism within your personal statement when making an application.

Read less
OVERVIEW. The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree.

PLEASE NOTE: when making an application, please select Communication, Culture and Media MA and then state clearly your chosen routeway (specialism) within the personal statement from the options above.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

We are one of the founding departments in the field in the UK with over 25 years' experience. The course combines theoretical and practical elements with a flexible structure and diverse specialist option choices that students may tailor to their own needs.

The staff teaching on the Communication, Culture and Media Masters programme are all currently active in research and scholarly activity and/or professional practice, which informs and enhances their teaching.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Working at an advanced level, you will receive a firm grounding in Communication, Culture and Media studies.

You can choose a specialist module from:

Applied Communication MA degree;
Communication, Culture and Media MA degree;
Digital Media and Culture MA degree;
Film and Visual Cultures MA degree;
Global Media and Communications MA degree;
Photography MA degree.
Please state this chosen specialism within your personal statement when making an application.

Read less
OVERVIEW. The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Communication, Culture and Media programme of courses includes Applied Communication MA degree, Communication, Culture and Media MA degree, Digital Media and Culture MA degree, Film and Visual Cultures MA degree, Global Media and Communications MA degree and Photography MA degree.

PLEASE NOTE: when making an application, please select Communication, Culture and Media MA and then state clearly your chosen routeway (specialism) within the personal statement from the options above.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

We are one of the founding departments in the field in the UK with over 25 years' experience. The course combines theoretical and practical elements with a flexible structure and diverse specialist option choices that students may tailor to their own needs.

The staff teaching on the Communication, Culture and Media Masters programme are all currently active in research and scholarly activity and/or professional practice, which informs and enhances their teaching.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Working at an advanced level, you will receive a firm grounding in Communication, Culture and Media studies.

You can choose a specialist module from:

Applied Communication MA degree;
Communication, Culture and Media MA degree;
Digital Media and Culture MA degree;
Film and Visual Cultures MA degree;
Global Media and Communications MA degree;
Photography MA degree.
Please state this chosen specialism within your personal statement when making an application.

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We live in a visual culture. In everything around us, from the workplace to public spaces and through our multiple forms of leisure and learning, the visual is instrumental and ubiquitous. Read more
We live in a visual culture. In everything around us, from the workplace to public spaces and through our multiple forms of leisure and learning, the visual is instrumental and ubiquitous. In this image saturated society, it is becoming increasingly essential to learn tools to negotiate the visual.

The MA in Art History and Visual Culture examines the production and consumption of images, objects, and spaces from varied cultures and historical periods. It challenges many ideas about cognition and perception, and includes the study of the ocular. Because the visual is crucial to our understandings of cultural difference, Art History and Visual Culture Studies is vitally concerned with the manner in which the interdependent elements of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class construct identity. It demands that we think across cultures and national boundaries, and within a global context. Intercultural visual analysis necessarily questions conceptions of “high” and “low” culture and requires that we substantially change the ways in which we practice the discipline of Art History.

Towards this end, the objectives of the MA program are:
1. To enable students to gain a command of visual literacy through global and critical understandings of art and its cultures and histories
2. To combine art historical methodology and visual and material culture perspectives in the study of objects – both past and present
3. To explore critically the assumptions underpinning writing about art and visual culture

[[Graduate Student Funding[[
Assistantships and scholarships will be awarded through an application protocol devised and supervised by the Graduate Studies Committee. All students are expected to apply for and to receive two Teaching Assistantships during his/her program of study. Students will be encouraged to apply for additional internal and external financial support.

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This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. Read more
This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture.

You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks.

Course content

This Master's balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION, DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE
-VISUAL CULTURE: THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - Choose four from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-ENGAGING THE ARCHIVE
-EXHIBITING PHOTOGRAPHY
-INTERPRETING SPACE
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-URBAN CULTURES
-WORK PLACEMENTS IN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Associated careers

Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research.

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