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Masters Degrees (Visual Culture)

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The MA in Visual Culture introduces students to the new and fast-growing intellectual field of visual culture, by examining the histories, theories and practices of cultural production and consumption of visual images/objects in the contemporary and modern world. Read more
The MA in Visual Culture introduces students to the new and fast-growing intellectual field of visual culture, by examining the histories, theories and practices of cultural production and consumption of visual images/objects in the contemporary and modern world. Western and, increasingly, global culture is dominated by visual images – whether material or virtual – and by visual experience.

The course encourages connections across visual arts, architecture, film, cultural studies and critical theory, cultural geography, and history. It gives students the opportunity to concentrate on the modern period, post-1750, while offering the option to choose their modules from a range of disciplines in which visual culture is a key research focus.

Though this MA is offered by the Department of Art History, besides the core module, 'Critical Approaches to Art History and Visual Culture', it is also compulsory for you to take one module in the Institute of Film and Television Studies.

The Department of Art History incorporates the Nottingham Institute for Research in Visual Culture (NIRVC), which is a forum for research in art-historical and visual culture studies, drawing on a range of disciplines, within and beyond the University.

The University’s custombuilt Lakeside Arts Centre provides an excellent environment to support postgraduate studies in visual culture, with contemporary and historic art exhibitions at the Djanogly Art Gallery, and the DH Lawrence Pavilion – a newlybuilt drama, film, and performance space.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Are you passionate about films and all things visual or on screen? Do you want to work in the arts or do you want to find a way to do this?  This programme gives you cultural contexts across a range of different genres and history of film to understand why films depicted what they did and how this contributed to the world around us and the way we live. It is well known that film has shaped other disciplines like fashion, the way we think, cultural identity, how we are able to express ourselves or understand something better we previously didn't know about. It is an opportunity to put the record straight on history and get to the root cause and effect of different periods in history through characters. Film is also about getting to the truth in documentary films.  Film also follows many other arts disciplines in interpreting them and bringing them to our attention in a way that theatre and performance cannot in terms of scale and reality. Much of what has been successful on the West End Stage, Opera, ballet, the life of a famous painter or other creative is often successfully depicted in film due to its ability to portray several art forms together successfully.

Film isn't the only art form to transform our lives but it probably reaches more people than any other art form around the world. It probably has more of a profound influence in people's lives around the world to change the course of their life in work, interests, style, imitation and more. Different ages of photography have been monumental in transforming our perceptions and getting us closer to reality such as old film and photography of the 19th century, war in the world and celebrities being the first fashion icons of the 50s, without the need for script.

You study and analyse film across the recent past and you look at animation and digital from the days of the Walt Disney team making up each frame to its evolution into digital animation and speed production. You also look at how changing tastes and cultural styles have changed the way in which we view film and by what method, plus you look at living overseas in the context of your own cultural identity.  From this you gain useful skills and knowledge to critique contemporary film, curate exhibitions work in museums, become and expert in a specific theme or age of film.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Introduction to Visual Culture and Theory
  • Introduction to Film Theory and Analysis
  • Psychoanalysis and Cinema
  • Cinema and Psychoanalysis

Semester 2

  • Media Archaeologies
  • The Animate
  • Minor Cinemas
  • Labour, Leisure and the Moving Image
  • Diaspora and Migration in Contemporary Visual Culture
  • Special Subject by Research
  • Narratives and Images of Deep Time in 19th Century
  • Curating and Exhibition

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/332/film-and-visual-culture/" target="_blank">programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are given advanced training in visual culture, engaging with wide ranging material in film and photography
  • You learn the key debates of the 20th Century whilst learning at a university dating from 1495
  • You can become an associate of the University Centre for Visual Culture
  • The city offers you wide ranging museums, theatres, garden and castle trails, architecture of note and a rural shire with some history

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September or January

International Student Fees 2017/2018

 Find out about https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php" target="_blank">fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/" target="_blank">funding database via the https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php " target="_blank">programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

Living costs

 



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This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. Read more
This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture.

You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks.

Course content

This Masters balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION, DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE
-VISUAL CULTURE: THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - Choose four from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-ENGAGING THE ARCHIVE
-EXHIBITING PHOTOGRAPHY
-INTERPRETING SPACE
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-URBAN CULTURES
-WORK PLACEMENTS IN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Associated careers

Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research.

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This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. Read more
This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture.

You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks.

Course content

This Master's balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION, DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE
-VISUAL CULTURE: THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - Choose four from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-ENGAGING THE ARCHIVE
-EXHIBITING PHOTOGRAPHY
-INTERPRETING SPACE
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-URBAN CULTURES
-WORK PLACEMENTS IN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Associated careers

Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research.

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more

The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:

  • Critical Curatorship
  • History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
  • Representing Otherness
  • Negotiating the Human
  • Digital Imaging
  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
  • Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
  • Ethics of Cultural Heritage
  • Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
  • Art in Ecological Perspective
  • Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
  • Energy, Society and Energy Practices
  • German Reading Skills for Research
  • French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images. 

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

For further information on the Centre see http://www.durham.ac.uk/cvac



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This interdisciplinary subject explores the meanings and effects of visual images and ways of looking. Read more
This interdisciplinary subject explores the meanings and effects of visual images and ways of looking. Through its core elements, options and route specific seminars, the course examines the ways images are used and perceived in a society that is becoming increasingly saturated with visual technologies, and it explores the ways that images contribute to the formation of identities and social environments. You will be encouraged to engage with the subject using a theoretical, methodological and creative approach. The course provides opportunities for the production of a wide variety of academic writing as well as possibilities to develop critical thinking through visual practice. The course encourages a high degree of independent research that will culminate in either a dissertation or a project combining written and visual material. This course will appeal to applicants from a variety of backgrounds including art history, fine art, sociology and visual anthropology, those engaged in a range of careers such as lecturing, working in the cultural and heritage industries, and those looking to further develop their academic interests.

Features

-The course is taught by practicing artists and maintains active links with an international network of art professionals and organisations.
-You will have your own spaces within communal studios, with full access to the School's workshops and other resources.
-The space allows opportunities to become involved in a wide range of live projects, publishing ventures and the chance to collaborate with other students, members of staff and outside institutions.
-Students have gone on to pursue careers in arts writing, curating and art practice. The course also provides the scope for opportunities to teach in Further or Higher Education in the arts.

Course Content

The MA Visual Culture is made up of five units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is practice driven and focussed on the development of your existing practice. It will enable you to identify and explore new concepts and approaches negotiated through an individual Working Synopsis.

You will establish key theories and issues relating to Contemporary Curating, Design Cultures and Visual Culture and then develop these into more complex approaches.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – what ever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Visual Culture award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This award is focussed on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Resources

We have developed a dedicated postgraduate area occupying an entire floor of the main School of Art building, offering an exciting space to be, both intellectually and practically. The centre is located in the newly refurbished Chatham Tower with studios, design laboratories, seminar rooms and extensive workshops that form the nucleus of this vibrant, cross-disciplinary learning environment.

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We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/. Read more
We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/

We usually accept research students into the Department of Visual Cultures on the basis of a match between your proposed research and the current research interests of the department as well as an assessment of your qualifications and suitability to undertake a research degree.

Research in the department is organised around the following thematic clusters:

Culture, Memory, Futurity
Environmental Humanities and Ecologies
Globalisation and Transcultural practices
Performance and Live Art
Philosophy, Critical and Visual Theory
Political Aesthetics
Sexes, Genders, Genres
Spatial Practice and Architecture
Technologies of Image and Sound
The Curatorial

In order to ascertain whether your project matches our research interests and meets the criteria for MPhil level study, please consult our MPhil in Visual Cultures Application Pack which also contains a proposal form.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Programme Leader, Professor Irit Rogoff.

Structure

In addition to regular tutorials with your supervisor, you will attend the MPhil Visual Cultures seminar in your first and second years of study. This is a weekly seminar dedicated to research questions and theoretical problems of study at MPhil level. It has the additional aim of fostering a supportive and participatory postgraduate research culture in the Department.

Other courses, seminars, workshops and events

As well as participating in the Seminar you are invited to audit an MA Special Subject of your choice should this be helpful. At key moments throughout the year, MPhil students on the Visual Culture programme join students on our MPhil Curatorial/Knowledge programme and there are also opportunities to benefit from seminars and workshops associated with our Centre for Research Architecture.

The Visual Cultures Public Programme

You are to attend the department’s Visual Cultures Public Programme. These events take place on Thursday evenings and are followed by an opportunity to socialize with staff, fellow students and other attendees.

Research training

The Department requires all students to attend the research student training programmes organised by ReSKIN (the Research Skills Intercollegiate Network). This is an organisation made up of various departments across the University of London, and the training is aimed specifically at students studying research in Art History, Visual Culture, Fine Art Practice and cognate disciplines. A college-wide programme of research training is also provided, which involves an induction course (which all students should attend), introduction to information technologies and the use of library and bibliographic resources, and sessions on research planning, presentation skills and ethics.

Department

In the Department of Visual Cultures we explore and produce new forms of art history and theory.

Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

Our approach

Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

Our academics

Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

Our location

Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This innovative degree course is concerned with the visual culture of classical antiquity and modern theories of its study – Greek and Roman sculpture, architecture, mosaics, painting, urbanism. Read more
This innovative degree course is concerned with the visual culture of classical antiquity and modern theories of its study – Greek and Roman sculpture, architecture, mosaics, painting, urbanism. It brings together archaeological, art historical and historical approaches to examine how visual material was treated and understood in antiquity and reinvented for centuries to come.

As well as learning how to look at ancient visual evidence and to use it to construct art-historical and historical arguments, students also study a range of responses to and theories around it – from various periods of classicism in antiquity to modern advertising; from stylistic analysis to modern media studies.

This course will enable you to develop your understanding of the visual culture of classical antiquity. It combines iconographical, theoretical and cultural approaches to a wide range of visual material to examine both its functions and resonances in antiquity, and its restoration, decontextualisation and reinvention in the modern world. This MA is a fulfilling experience for those interested in the art and architecture of the classical past as well as excellent training for anyone considering doctoral research.

Visit http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics for information about the Department, programmes, and funding opportunities.

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MA Art History and Visual Culture focuses on intercultural issues in the visual arts, preparing graduate students for careers in the arts and creative cultural industries. Read more

Programme Overview

MA Art History and Visual Culture focuses on intercultural issues in the visual arts, preparing graduate students for careers in the arts and creative cultural industries. The programme is distinctive in two ways. Firstly, engaging students with an academic curriculum in tune with current interdisciplinary trends in visual culture, exploring a variety of visual art across cultures and through time, particularly in terms of what is happening on the contemporary global art scene. Secondly, giving students the skills and experience, including classes on professional practice and an accredited internship, for successful career placements in the arts and creative cultural industries. The programme is offered at Richmond's Kensington Campus in the centre of London.

Core Modules

Research Methods
Art and its Histories
World Arts
Contemporary Art
Visual Cultures
Professional Practices in Visual Arts
Grad Internship Art History Visual Cult
Extended Thesis Research

Internship

Richmond University MA students secured internships at a number of leading galleries, museums and arts organisations including Barbican Art Gallery, Saatchi Gallery, Sarah Myerscough Gallery, Art in the Underground among others.

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP. UK

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This programme aims to introduce students to research in the History of Art at the highest level and develop research interests in Scottish Art and Visual Culture. Read more

Programme description

This programme aims to introduce students to research in the History of Art at the highest level and develop research interests in Scottish Art and Visual Culture.

This is the only masters programme in Scottish Art in the UK. It combines close academic study with an internship in a local institution. Edinburgh is without doubt the best city for studies in Scottish Art. Our art collections in this area are world-class.

Programme structure

The first two semesters are based around small-group teaching, and an internship. From April to September, students are engaged full-time, researching and writing their dissertations.

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete the programme will:

have valuable work experience in a field related to art history, including writing art criticism;
have completed a major piece of original, independent art-historical research;
have shown themselves to be capable of further research in the History of Art.

Career opportunities

The unique nature of this programme means potential employers, both in academia and the cultural heritage sector, hold the degree in very high regard. Furthermore, the experience and contacts you gain through your internship could provide a solid foundation for an eventual career in a museum or gallery environment. Throughout the programme you will also acquire a number of highly transferable skills (communication and analysis, for example) that will be an asset to any career path you choose.

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The taught masters (MA) programme in art history considers works of art and visual material in the broadest sense. Read more
The taught masters (MA) programme in art history considers works of art and visual material in the broadest sense. We encourage the examination of the social and material histories of objects and images; explorations of the processes of cultural production, circulation, and consumption; and the development of original theoretical approaches to understanding works of art and associated cultural phenomena.

The Department of Art History offers two pathways for the MA in Art History: 'Renaissance to the Present Day' and 'Modern Art, Criticism' and Display'. Students of both pathways study the core module 'Critical Approaches to Art History and Visual Culture'.

Your choice of pathway will almost certainly relate to your present interests in art history or visual culture. All MA pathways are modular and the choice of pathway affects the modules available to you. With the help of a knowledgeable and supportive teaching staff, the pathway programme is designed to offer necessary flexibility to help you make important decisions about modules and dissertation topics.

Students on the 'Modern Art, Criticism and Display' pathway use a virtual 3D gallery software system to produce their own projects in which they are able to virtually 'curate' art exhibitions in virtual three-dimensional gallery spaces.

Studying art history gives students valuable transferable skills, an advanced qualification in the discipline and a rigorous foundation for further research and progression to PhD research, all of which are ideal for a range of careers.

Our MA programmes are particularly suited for those wishing to work in the contemporary art world. Our students have an excellent record of obtaining internships in major UK-based international galleries while they study, which is ideal preparation for future employment.

The Department of Art History incorporates the Nottingham Institute for Research in Visual Culture (NIRVC), which is a forum for research in art-historical and visual culture studies, drawing on a range of disciplines, within and beyond the University.

The University’s custombuilt Lakeside Arts Centre provides an excellent environment to support postgraduate studies in visual culture, with contemporary and historic art exhibitions at the Djanogly Art Gallery, and the DH Lawrence Pavilion – a newlybuilt drama, film, and performance space.

Visit http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/art-history for information about the Department, programmes, and funding opportunities.

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Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Read more

Overview

Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Indeed, the diversity of interests of our teaching and research staff will allow you to specialize in almost any subject, and the space we offer within the Master's specialization for research and studies at home and abroad allows you to put together a training programme that perfectly meets your wishes.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

Specialisations

Within the Master's programme in Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies, you can choose between three English-taught Master's specializations:

1. Historical Studies
Students can specialize in any historical theme from antiquity to the present day. Many students specialize in Ancient History, Medieval History, Cultural History from 1500 to the present, the History of Dutch Catholicism, Gender studies, Modern Political History, Globalisation and Presented History. Students, working in small numbers, will pursue their own specialty and discuss developments in contemporary historiography, debate research ideas and critique other's writings and research.

2. Literary Studies
If you have completed your Bachelor's degree in one of the classical or modern languages and have strong ambitions to conduct international research, this programme is your springboard to an academic career in literary studies. The specialization admits students of various languages and literatures, including German, French, Spanish, English (both American and British), Dutch, Ancient Greek and Latin as well as other languages and literary studies. Central to this programme is the attention paid to methods of textual interpretation and New Philology. Students select courses to fit the needs of their specialism and discuss contemporary developments and research ideas. Whether you prefer ancient Greek tragedy, contemporary American literature or Dutch poetry, the new Literary Studies Research Master's is very well suited for talented students wishing to contribute to (inter)national research in this field.

3. Art and Visual Culture
If you are interested in visual and material culture from Antiquity to the present and aspire a career in international scientific research in the fields of art, visual culture or classical archaeology, Radboud University Nijmegen is pleased to offer a two-year research Master's specialisation which offers exactly that. This programme is based on the unique cooperation of the departments of Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History, allowing a broad perspective on the visual heritage of western culture from classical antiquity to the present as well as specialist training.

The Research Master's in Art and Visual Culture is designed for highly motivated students who are interested in the art and visual culture of Europe from classical antiquity to the present, and have ambitions for an international career in these fields.

HLCS institute

The HLCS institute greatly values the close interaction between students and top researchers, which is why our courses are open only to small numbers of students working under the supervision of experienced professors. At the start of the first year, you will choose a tutor (always an excellent researcher with relevant expertise) who will personally guide your development as a specialist in your field. Regular meetings with your tutor will ensure the steady increase of your academic skills. They will also offer the opportunity to exchange research ideas at an advanced level. Your tutor will help you apply for international funding to support research trips and the attendance of conferences, as well as guide the preparation of your PhD proposal, which is an integral part of the course programme.

Career prospects

During the Master’s programme you will gain a broad perspective on the humanities in general because of the collaboration between the programmes of Historical Studies, Literary Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. Through your personal Master’s research, you will also have concentrated on a very specific phenomenon in your own field. This combination of broad and specific focus will open a lot of doors for you. Our research programme has produced graduates that are appreciated by employees for their research skills as well as their insightfulness and analytical skills, and who have not only learned how to delve into large quantity of data and master it but also how to place their results in a larger context.

In short, at the end of the programme you’ll:
- Have acquired heuristic research skills at an advanced level.
- Have gained general knowledge of leading perspectives, theories, concepts, and paradigm shifts in the humanities and advanced knowledge specifically for own field.
- Be able to engage in the public debates regarding issues in the humanities.
- Have acquired English academic writing skills and have practiced writing a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- Have started to build up a professional international network.

Academia and beyond
This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also obtain academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

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The Master of Arts programme in Semiotics of Texts and Culture conveys competences in linguistics, literary studies, visual culture and media semiotics. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Arts programme in Semiotics of Texts and Culture conveys competences in linguistics, literary studies, visual culture and media semiotics. This is done under the aspect of general cultural semiotics, as the systems of signs – the shared basis of the above branches of science – require deciphering both as a singular phenomenon and in terms of their complex interrelationships. As a student, you can select subjects to create a study focus including only subjects from the field of linguistics, literary studies or semiotics, as well as specialising in the philology of a language (e.g. German or English). Moreover you will acquire additional application-oriented communication, intercultural and IT skills.

Features

– Research-oriented
– Core subjects: linguistics, literature and visual culture in their semiotic form, as well as media semiotics
– Individual focus combinations in German Studies, English Studies, Romance Studies, Slavic Studies, Literary Studies

Syllabus

The degree programme consists of three module groups and a thesis:
A) Core modules
B) Skills modules
C) Expansion modules
A) The core modules pick up on the competences in linguistics, literary studies, visual culture and media semiotics gained over the course of related Bachelor's degree studies while at the same time providing a framework for advanced scientific analysis of the research subjects of the semiotics of texts and culture. In addition, these modules impart the necessary methodological and theoretical skills for scientific research.
B) The skills modules give you the opportunity to specialise in two freely chosen subjects from:
– Language and Signs (Linguistics)
– Texts and Signs (Literary Studies)
– Signs and Symbols (Visual Culture/Art History and Media Semiotics)
C) The expansion modules allow you to develop practical skills in the area of communication studies, intercultural communication and computer science with a view to your future occupation
At the end of the Master's programme, you will write a Master's thesis on a topic derived from module group B.

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