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Masters Degrees (Visual Cognition)

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We live in a visual culture. In everything around us, from the workplace to public spaces and through our multiple forms of leisure and learning, the visual is instrumental and ubiquitous. Read more
We live in a visual culture. In everything around us, from the workplace to public spaces and through our multiple forms of leisure and learning, the visual is instrumental and ubiquitous. In this image saturated society, it is becoming increasingly essential to learn tools to negotiate the visual.

The MA in Art History and Visual Culture examines the production and consumption of images, objects, and spaces from varied cultures and historical periods. It challenges many ideas about cognition and perception, and includes the study of the ocular. Because the visual is crucial to our understandings of cultural difference, Art History and Visual Culture Studies is vitally concerned with the manner in which the interdependent elements of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class construct identity. It demands that we think across cultures and national boundaries, and within a global context. Intercultural visual analysis necessarily questions conceptions of “high” and “low” culture and requires that we substantially change the ways in which we practice the discipline of Art History.

Towards this end, the objectives of the MA program are:
1. To enable students to gain a command of visual literacy through global and critical understandings of art and its cultures and histories
2. To combine art historical methodology and visual and material culture perspectives in the study of objects – both past and present
3. To explore critically the assumptions underpinning writing about art and visual culture

[[Graduate Student Funding[[
Assistantships and scholarships will be awarded through an application protocol devised and supervised by the Graduate Studies Committee. All students are expected to apply for and to receive two Teaching Assistantships during his/her program of study. Students will be encouraged to apply for additional internal and external financial support.

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more
Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.
At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.
Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.
At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:
- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly
Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:
- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction
- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry
- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions
- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones
- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays
- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

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Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines. Read more

Research profile

Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines.

As technology focuses increasingly on language-based communication tools, research into the automation of language processing has become vital. ILCC offers you the broadest research scope in the UK, and a strong computational focus.

Our primary areas of research are:

natural language processing and computational linguistics
spoken language processing
dialogue and multimodal interaction
information extraction, retrieval, and presentation
computational theories of human cognition
educational and assistive technology
Much of our research is applied to software development, in areas as diverse as social media, assisted living, gaming and education.

You may find yourself working closely with other departments of the University, particularly the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences.

Many of our researchers are involved in two cross-disciplinary research centres:

Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR)

The Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR) is an interdisciplinary research centre linking Informatics and Linguistics. Founded in 1984, it is now one of the world's largest concentrations of researchers working in the field of language and speech processing.

CSTR is concerned with research in all areas of speech technology including speech recognition, synthesis, signal processing, acoustic phonetics, information access, multi-modal interaction and dialogue systems.

The Centre is home to state-of-the-art research facilities including specialised speech and language-orientated computer labs, a digital recording studio, perception labs and a meeting room instrumented with multiple synchronised video cameras and microphones. There is also access to high-performance computer clusters, the University storage area network, a specialist library, and many speech and language databases.

Human Communication Research Centre

The Human Communication Research Centre (HCRC) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow that brings together theories and methods from several formal and experimental disciplines to understand better how this happens.

We focus on spoken and written language; we also study communication in other visual, graphical and computer-based media.

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

While many of our graduates pursue an academic career, others find their skills are highly sought after in the technology industry. A number of our students serve internships with large UK and international software developers, while others take up positions with major social media companies.

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This respected programme provides advanced understanding of current research in psycholinguistics. the study of how the brain learns, uses and reacts with humanity’s most advanced and characteristic feature. Read more

Programme description

This respected programme provides advanced understanding of current research in psycholinguistics: the study of how the brain learns, uses and reacts with humanity’s most advanced and characteristic feature: language.

The programme is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of current research in psycholinguistics, and is aimed primarily at students who are considering advanced research in the area.

Students are actively encouraged to join in the activities of the Language, Cognition and Communication research group, and to collaborate with staff (many of whom are international experts in the field) and senior postgraduates.

You will gain perspectives on the latest developments, and gain the necessary statistical and methodological skills to conduct your own novel research.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

The taught component consists of a number of lecture- and tutorial-based courses, which are assessed by essay or exam.

For the dissertation (which centres on original research) you will work in close collaboration with members of staff and senior postgraduates engaged in research in similar areas.

You will take two compulsory courses:

Psychological Research Skills
Univariate Statistics and Methodology using R
You will also choose six from the following:

Dialogue
Discourse Comprehension
Disorders of Language Functions
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
Language Production
Multivariate Statistics and Methodology Using R
Sentence Comprehension

Under exceptional circumstances, alternative courses may be substituted with the permission of the programme director.

You will choose further courses that may be taken from the compulsory course list or from option courses in related areas such as philosophy, language sciences and informatics. These include:

Concepts and Categorisation
Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
First Language Acquisition
Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
Introduction to Semantics
Introduction to Syntax
Origins and Evolution of Language
Second Language Acquisition
Simulating Language

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme you will have developed an up-to-date knowledge of a broad range of areas relating to the psychology of language. The programme is also designed to help you acquire the statistical and methodological skills that allow you to conduct novel research in the field.

Many MSc dissertations lead to conference presentations or journal publications and typically over half of the students proceed to study for PhDs at Edinburgh or elsewhere.

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you progress your research career and offers a firm basis for further postgraduate study.

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This programme provides an opportunity to undertake intensive training in human cognitive neuropsychology by working closely with our Human Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, a group of internationally recognised cognitive psychologists, clinical and academic neuropsychologists including Dr Sharon Abrahams and Professors Sergio Della Sala and Robert Logie. Read more

Programme description

This programme provides an opportunity to undertake intensive training in human cognitive neuropsychology by working closely with our Human Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, a group of internationally recognised cognitive psychologists, clinical and academic neuropsychologists including Dr Sharon Abrahams and Professors Sergio Della Sala and Robert Logie.

Teaching follows an integrated approach with courses on neuropsychology, cognitive psychology, clinical neuropsychology and brain imaging. You will also receive training in generic research methods within psychology.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught compulsory and optional courses, followed by a dissertation. Optional courses within the area of human cognitive neuroscience can be selected to tailor the programme to your interests. You may also choose your optional courses from a range in associated disciplines, such as individual differences, informatics and psycholinguistics, with permission from the programme director.

Compulsory courses

Psychological Research Skills
Univariate and Multivariate Statistics and Methodology using R
Specialist techniques in psychological research
Current topics in psychological research

Option courses

Brain Imaging in Cognitive Neuroscience
Clinical Neuropsychology
Consciousness and Perceptual Awareness
Disorders of Language Functions
Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
Frontal Lobe Functions
Human Cognitive Neuroscience
Multisensory Integration
Working Memory
Imaging Mind and Brain
Dissertation

The dissertation involves conducting a research project under staff supervision. You will produce a written report, which describes your research and interprets your findings.

If you are looking to complete a research dissertation in clinical based environments (interacting with NHS patients) or schools / nurseries, you may be asked to apply for a Research Passport by your supervisor, or you may select a clinical research project that is already in progress within the University.

Research Passports

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, you will have gained:

specialist knowledge within the fields of human cognitive neuropsychology and integrated areas of study, in addition to training in psychological research methods
an understanding of clinical neuropsychology (assessment and rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders), brain imaging, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology and critical awareness of cognitive and neuropsychological research and its application to clinical practice
a foundation for advanced research within human cognitive neuropsychology
a comprehensive understanding of the basic principles of research design and application
competency in applying a range of methods and research tools
skills in research management, including managing data and conducting and disseminating research in ways consistent with both professional practice and the normal principles of research ethics

Career opportunities

The programme is suitable for graduate psychologists or those who have studied or worked in related disciplines who wish to pursue a research-oriented career within cognitive neuropsychology (providing the foundations for later application to a doctoral training programme) or a clinically oriented career in neuropsychology.

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The LLM in Legal Theory programme draws on the expertise of Queen Mary to offer advanced training in legal theory. The modules offered allow students the chance to explore a variety of theoretical approaches to law. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Legal Theory programme draws on the expertise of Queen Mary to offer advanced training in legal theory. The modules offered allow students the chance to explore a variety of theoretical approaches to law.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context (CLSGC)

The Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context (CLSGC) at Queen Mary is a home for multidisciplinary research into the global dimensions of law and society. The CLSGC aims to work towards a better theorisation of law in its changing social contexts, exploring the challenges posed for this endeavour by law’s increasingly important global dimensions. As well as undertaking collaborative research, we supervise postgraduate research, and regularly host workshops, seminars and conferences.


]]Modules:]]

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Legal Theory (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM035 Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM038 Human Rights of Women (45 credits)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM077 Medical Jurisprudence (45 credits)
◦ QLLM112 Jurisprudence A (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM113 Jurisprudence B (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM169 Punishment in England 1750-1950 (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM171 Asian and African Legal Systems (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM325 Visual Cognition and Legal Theory (sem 2)
◦ QLLM399 Imagination and Legal Cognition (Sem 1)

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This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research. Read more

Programme description

This programme provides an intensive grounding in the philosophy of embodied cognitive science, its methodologies, research questions and techniques of research.

You will study among one of the world’s largest and most vibrant postgraduate communities in philosophy, alongside internationally recognised leaders in the study of mind, of language, and of situated and embodied cognition. By choosing this programme, you will be entering an increasingly popular field in which many large unsolved problems remain.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words written at the end of the second semester. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor with whom you meet to plan your reading and discuss your work.

Compulsory courses:

Introduction to Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
Advanced Topics in Mind, Language and Embodied Cognition
Introduction to Philosophical Method (for students without a strong philosophy background)
A wide range of optional courses is offered in the philosophy, psychology, language sciences, informatics and music subject areas.
Options may include:

Advanced Philosophical Methods
Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
Critical Social Psychology
Evolutionary Psychology
Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
Foundations of Evolution
Human-Computer Interaction
Intelligent Autonomous Robots
Irrational Animals
Metaphysics of Mind
Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy
Music, Mind and Body: Psychology and Sociology
Music, Mind and Body: Physiology and Neuroscience
Neuropsychology of Perception and Action
Origins and Evolution of Language
Philosophy of Psychology
The Philosophy of Wittgenstein
Psychology of Language Learning
Self, Agency and Will
Social Cognition
Theories of Mind Philosophy
Topics in Cognitive Modelling

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the training necessary to undertake research in philosophy of cognitive science, and ultimately to pursue a career in academic philosophy. You will also acquire an understanding of the central debates in the sciences of the mind today.

If you do not intend to follow an academic route, the study of philosophy helps to develop general intellectual abilities and enhance analytical, critical, interpretive and problem-solving abilities.

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This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited conversion programme is designed to provide you with a broad and critical awareness of psychological theory and practice. Read more
This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited conversion programme is designed to provide you with a broad and critical awareness of psychological theory and practice. You will be provided with opportunities which allow you to focus on aspects of psychology with particular relevance to your own experience and interests.

Why this programme

-If you are considering a change in direction, to pursue a career, either academic or professional, in psychology, successful completion of this programme will confer eligibility for BPS Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC).
-You will develop a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills which are easily adaptable to the labour market and attractive to employers.
-Through engaging in a wide range of stimulating learning activities, you will develop an enquiring and analytical approach to research literature and the practical applications of psychology.
-The programme is designed to support your subsequent successful pursuit of a career in psychology and related disciplines.

Programme structure

You will take eight core and two optional courses, followed by a research project/dissertation. Additional programme elements include attendance research project sessions designed to support you in your dissertation throughout. You will also be allocated an academic supervisor to advise you on your individual research project.

Core courses
-Cognitive psychology
-Conceptual and historical issues in psychology
-Developmental psychology
-Individual differences
-Physiological psychology
-Research methods 1
-Research methods 2
-Social psychology

Optional courses
-Applied qualitative methods
-Atypical development
-Clinical health psychology
-Current issues in psychology
-Educational psychology
-Perception and visual cognition
-Professional skills

Career prospects

As this programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society, successful graduates from the programme are eligible for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the Society (GBC). Our graduates have successfully progressed to further professional training in the field of psychology.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. Read more

Course Overview

Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. We have PhDs funded by UK research councils and charities and we welcome self-funding applicants interested in doing postgraduate research in psychology.

We offer MPhil supervision in the areas of psychology covering Newcastle's research strengths:

Clinical and health psychology

We research developmental disorders of perception and cognition, and the development and assessment of cognitive models of, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for: bipolar disorder; psychosis; anxiety; developmental disorders

Behaviour and evolution

We carry out studies of animal and human behaviour including: the evolutionary psychology of mate choice; attractiveness and co-operation; evolutionary approaches to personality

Visual perception and human cognition

Our research includes: perception of natural scenes; psychophysics and attention; visual social cognition and face processing; advertising and consumer behaviour

Development psychology

We focus on how different cognitive skills develop in children, from memory systems to learning in school. We have particular strength in developmental disorders such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Forensic psychology

Our research includes: investigative interviewing of victims; witnesses and suspected offenders of crime, including eye-witness testimony; sexual offending, including historical allegations of sexual abuse; communication in legal contexts

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and support elements to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/psychology-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/psychology-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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Our mission is to inspire, engage and provoke educators to understand, inquire into, and model curricular and pedagogical possibilities of deep involvement with the visual arts in culture and society. Read more

Program Overview

Our mission is to inspire, engage and provoke educators to understand, inquire into, and model curricular and pedagogical possibilities of deep involvement with the visual arts in culture and society. Within a large research orientated university situated on traditional Musqueam land, the Art Education Program strives to:
Stimulate and conduct research within a vibrant and collaborative research community that focuses on methodologies and content relevant to the visual arts in culture and society.
Provide for, model, and develop socially responsible and ecologically aware exemplary teaching practices in and across contexts with a focus on the visual arts in culture and society.
Provide leadership, and engage with local, national, and international arts and culture organizations and professionals.
The research interests of faculty in Art Education are diverse. They encourage a wide spectrum of student inquiry: art based research, a/r/tography, art curriculum, early childhood, teacher education, First Nations art and education, histories of art education, multiculturalism, museum and gallery education, perception and cognition, studio practices, technology and visual culture, theory/practice relationships, and gender studies.

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy offers a PhD concentration and MA and MEd specializations in Art Education, along with a secondary Teacher Education (BEd) major, Diploma and Certificate in Art Education.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Art Education
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Our mission is to inspire, engage and provoke educators to understand, inquire into, and model curricular and pedagogical possibilities of deep involvement with the visual arts in culture and society. Read more

Program Overview

Our mission is to inspire, engage and provoke educators to understand, inquire into, and model curricular and pedagogical possibilities of deep involvement with the visual arts in culture and society. Within a large research orientated university situated on traditional Musqueam land, the Art Education Program strives to:

Stimulate and conduct research within a vibrant and collaborative research community that focuses on methodologies and content relevant to the visual arts in culture and society.
Provide for, model, and develop socially responsible and ecologically aware exemplary teaching practices in and across contexts with a focus on the visual arts in culture and society.
Provide leadership, and engage with local, national, and international arts and culture organizations and professionals.
The research interests of faculty in Art Education are diverse. They encourage a wide spectrum of student inquiry: art based research, a/r/tography, art curriculum, early childhood, teacher education, First Nations art and education, histories of art education, multiculturalism, museum and gallery education, perception and cognition, studio practices, technology and visual culture, theory/practice relationships, and gender studies.

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy offers a PhD concentration and MA and MEd specializations in Art Education, along with a secondary Teacher Education (BEd) major, Diploma and Certificate in Art Education.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Art Education
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Psychological Science is the use of scientific methods in in the study of mind and behaviour. The programme is designed to give you a thorough and advanced grounding in a wide variety of current psychological research areas and the research methods that underlie them. Read more

Summary

Psychological Science is the use of scientific methods in in the study of mind and behaviour. The programme is designed to give you a thorough and advanced grounding in a wide variety of current psychological research areas and the research methods that underlie them.

You will take your knowledge and research to the next level to explore cognition and cognitive neuroscience and how it can be applied to areas like mental health. The programme is designed to help you explore advanced research in many aspects of experimental psychology. You will hone your research skills and scientific knowledge in topics such as neuroimaging, brain stimulation, memory, language and biopsychology.

This course is taught in small groups where you will have the opportunity to present your research in seminars. You will be taught by leading experts in Psychology and be able to take part in current research projects in the department relating to cognitive neuroscience.

By the end of the programme, you will have acquired a broad knowledge and understanding of current research in psychological science with a particular focus on normal cognition, abnormal cognition, cognitive neuroscience and biological psychology. You will also have the ability to interpret a wide range of current primary literature (journal articles) in psychological science and to address the relevant ethical issues and potential societal impact.

Content

Key areas of study include a wide range of topics. You will be able to use experimental and cognitive neuroscientific techniques to both understand psychosis and suggest new treatments. You can have the opportunity to study the links between cognition and emotion, visual attention and the ways in which cognitive biases are involved in mental illness. You may be able to work in the area of understanding the possible underlying causes of autism and the ways in which people live with autism. You could also study depression and its treatment using cross-cultural comparisons, developmental studies and brain imaging. Finally, you could examine the underlying structure of language, how humans make use of it and what happens when language processing is compromised during development.

You will study in cutting-edge research facilities using equipment such as:
•Neuroimaging such as EEG, ERPs, high-density EEG, structural MRI, functional MRI, MRI spectroscopy, and MR neurofeedback.
•Brain stimulation such as TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation), tDCS, tACS, and tRNS
•Eye-tracking using static and head-mounted gaze-tracking equipment.
•Computer Controlled experiments using software such as SONA (for participant management), ePrime (time-sensitive measures), and Qualtrics (surveys).

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Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?. Read more
Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?

Our MSc Psychology is an advanced fast-track conversion course for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than psychology, or for those whose undergraduate Psychology degree was not accredited by the British Psychological Society.

This course combines the award of a Masters with eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society. The GBC is the minimum academic qualification required to work as a professional psychologist, so passing our course demonstrates that you have studied and acquired an advanced understanding in Masters-level study in psychology. With this qualification you will also be eligible to apply for professional training in any branch of professional psychology.

Our staff have a wide range of research interests, so you gain a critical and detailed understanding of the core areas of psychology, plus some specialisation, and learn research methods to an extent which will enable you to devise, carry out and analyse an empirical research project. Topics studied include:
-Visual and auditory perception and cognition
-Language, concepts, memory and attention
-The relation between brain and behaviour
-Developmental psychology
-Social psychology

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both graduates who have recently completed their studies, and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Recent graduates of MSc Psychology have found employment as a research assistant at the Anna Freud Centre, a clinical psychologist for the NHS, a child psychologist for Children First and a lecturer at the University of Surrey. Other graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Brain and Behaviour
-Personality and Individual Differences
-Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology I
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology II
-Advanced Social Psychology
-Advanced Developmental Psychology
-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)

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Cognitive neuropsychology is a branch of cognitive psychology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relates to specific psychological processes. Read more
Cognitive neuropsychology is a branch of cognitive psychology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relates to specific psychological processes. It places a particular emphasis on studying the cognitive effects of brain injury and neurological illness with a view to inferring models of normal cognitive functioning.

Evidence is based on case studies of individual brain damaged patients who show deficits in specific brain areas and from patients who exhibit double dissociations between cognitive impairments. From these studies, and from studies of functional brain imaging, researchers can infer the components of the cognitive system that are responsible for our ability to remember, perceive and communicate.

Our MSc Cognitive Neuropsychology provides you with an advanced education in the core areas of cognitive neuropsychological research, plus knowledge of appropriate statistical methodology and neuropsychological research methods. You study topics including:
-Brain structure and function at the molecular and cellular levels
-The cognitive processing of words
-Psychology in the real world
-Visual attention

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both recent graduates of psychology (or a related subject), and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Our graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology
-Research Methods and Statistics in Cognitive Neuropsychology
-The Social Voice (Advanced) (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Research Management (optional)
-Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience (optional)
-Psychology at Work and in the Real World (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Visual Attention: From lab to life (Advanced) (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)

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