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Masters Degrees (Visual)

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more

The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:

  • Critical Curatorship
  • History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
  • Representing Otherness
  • Negotiating the Human
  • Digital Imaging
  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
  • Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
  • Ethics of Cultural Heritage
  • Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
  • Art in Ecological Perspective
  • Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
  • Energy, Society and Energy Practices
  • German Reading Skills for Research
  • French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images. 

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

For further information on the Centre see http://www.durham.ac.uk/cvac



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Do you have an eye for design? Would you like to help influence the future of visual communications? Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communication programme is ideally suited to students who wish to better understand the academic theory that underpins a range of visual mediums. Read more

Overview

Do you have an eye for design? Would you like to help influence the future of visual communications? Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communication programme is ideally suited to students who wish to better understand the academic theory that underpins a range of visual mediums.

- Students study the essential academic theories that seek to explain how we understand visual messages.
- The teaching team maintain strong links with industry, providing students with the chance to participate in live briefs, networking events, and guest lectures.
- The course includes time to develop hands-on creative skills. Students are encouraged to create work for their professional portfolio.
- Visual communication at Southampton Solent is taught by a team of professional designers with strong ties to industry.
- Students will have access to a range of specialist facilities throughout their studies. These include Mac computers, professional creative software, digital printing facilities and traditional printing presses.
- Students are invited to pitch for freelance work at Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative agency. These projects involve real businesses and are perfect for portfolio development.
- Tutors encourage students to work in groups with those from other creative disciplines, mirroring industry practices.
- Students will work on competition briefs for organisations such as the Design & Art Directors Association (D&AD) and the Young Creative Network (YCN).

The industry -

Figures released in 2015 by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport suggest that the UK’s creative industries are now worth more than £76.9 billion per year to the UK economy – that’s more than £8.8m per hour. Businesses of all types and sizes make use of creative individuals to take corporate message and translate them into creative outputs that the public can enjoy and understand.

The programme -

This intensive master’s degree helps students to improve their creative skills and build a solid understanding of visual communications theory. The curriculum covers the latest innovations in visual practice, examining the way technological and cultural changes contributed to contemporary academic thinking.

Topics of study include editorial design; art direction; interactive multimedia; information design; image creation; illustration; typographic design; print-making and photographic technique. Students may have workshop sessions with the letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing facilities, as well as the wet darkroom and photo studio. Depending on their creative background, graduates will be well prepared for a range of careers in the creative industries.

Critical research papers and final master’s projects are supported by the University’s expanding research base, encouraging students to make an innovative contribution to visual communication academia.

To help with creative projects and portfolio documentation, Southampton Solent provides a comprehensive media loans scheme. This scheme gives students free access to high-end photographic equipment and accessories.

Visual communication students have the chance to enter major industry awards schemes including those from D&AD and the Royal Society of the Arts. Work-orientated assignments will be offered alongside appropriate live projects from local and national organisations. There will also be opportunities to visit museums, galleries and design studios both nationally and internationally (at additional expense).

Course Content

Units include:

- Visual Communication Practice: Visual communication practice and specialisms such as editorial design, interactive multimedia, information design, image creation, book design and typographic design. Print-making and photographic techniques including letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing, wet darkroom and photo studio practice.
- Web Design: The advantages and limitations of web design and its delivery across a range of devices, from desktop to mobile.
- Project Development: Developing the appropriate graphic design language to apply to your research findings.
- Research Methods:A précis of an article, a critical commentary of two book reviews, your own book review and a proposal for your critical research paper, with an annotated bibliography.
- Critical Research Paper: You’ll research and present an individual seminar, supported by a critical research paper which demonstrates an in-depth, comprehensive and detailed knowledge of your chosen area.
vMaster’s Project: On this final project you’ll bring all your skills together to design, execute and present an individually demanding piece of work that demonstrates systematic and in-depth understanding of your particular discipline of study.

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course draws on a variety of teaching methods, including group critiques, individual tutorials, seminars and lectures, peer-learning, live projects and competitions, self-directed study and the use of reflective journals or log-books to express personal and professional development.

Work experience:

You’ll be able to engage directly with employers by organising your own work placement or work-based project, supported and encouraged by the course team as required.

Assessment:

You’ll have access to a full range of print-making facilities, including letterpress, screen-printing, etching and relief printing, alongside digital resources

Our facilities -

You’ll have access to a full range of print-making facilities including letterpress, screen-printing equipment, etching and relief printing, and digital resources.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

This master’s degree delivers the skills you’ll need for a wide range of visual design fields including animation, art direction, web design, publishing, branding and typography.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Design consultancy
- Publishing industry
- Advertising – agency side
- Multidisciplinary design
- Web design
- Television
- Film and multimedia
- Freelance practice
- App design.

Links with industry -

Through this course you’ll develop valuable and appropriate skillsets through engagement with the wider profession, design community and industry.

You’ll have the chance to enter major industry awards schemes, including those from D&AD and the Royal Society of the Arts. Work-orientated assignments will be offered alongside appropriate ‘live’ projects from local and national organisations. There will be opportunities to visit museums, galleries and design studios, both nationally and internationally, as part of the course.

Transferable skills -

Decision-making under pressure; visual, written and verbal communication skills; critical thinking; and presentation to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Further study -

There’s a chance of progression to further study, including a PhD, on successful completion of the course.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £6,695 per year

International full-time fees: £11,260 per year

UK and EU part-time fees: £3,350 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think a career as a visual communicator might be for you? With expert teaching teams, regularly revised curriculums and strong links to industry, Southampton Solent University’s MA Visual Communications programme is the ideal next step towards a broad range of creative careers.

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/

The MPhil in Visual Anthropology can be achieved through two main strands:

research projects that centre on the study of visual cultures, such as various forms of media representation or art
the use of specific visual methodologies as a central feature of the research project itself

The programme focuses on the visual as a vital and defining factor in the research project as a whole.

Additional practical training can be provided, alongside some access to department audio-visual equipment and facilities, but we generally expect MPhil candidates to have an appropriate level of practical visual production skills and to be largely self-sufficient in this area.

MPhil students are currently carrying out visual projects in Mexico, India, Argentina, Lebanon, Israel, and the UK.

How to choose between MRes and MPhil

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

This programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

Structure

First year
In the first year, the emphasis of the visual anthropology training is on key themes and issues within the sub-field, particularly in relation to your own work. You develop your own research project over the year through the production of several small-scale visual projects. Guidance and feedback on visual and academic work will be provided in the weekly visual practice seminars and through supervision meetings.

In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

MPhil students present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point. An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Assessment

Thesis (including film or photographic portfolio) and viva voce.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

Our students have taken up academic posts in anthropology as well as related fields all over the world; some have joined NGOs or GOs and taken employment as researchers, teachers and in broadcasting.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 2-5 page statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/. Read more
We welcome applicants wishing to explore visual culture understood as a meeting ground between creative practices, the philosophical and the political- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-culture/

We usually accept research students into the Department of Visual Cultures on the basis of a match between your proposed research and the current research interests of the department as well as an assessment of your qualifications and suitability to undertake a research degree.

Research in the department is organised around the following thematic clusters:

Culture, Memory, Futurity
Environmental Humanities and Ecologies
Globalisation and Transcultural practices
Performance and Live Art
Philosophy, Critical and Visual Theory
Political Aesthetics
Sexes, Genders, Genres
Spatial Practice and Architecture
Technologies of Image and Sound
The Curatorial

In order to ascertain whether your project matches our research interests and meets the criteria for MPhil level study, please consult our MPhil in Visual Cultures Application Pack which also contains a proposal form.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Programme Leader, Professor Irit Rogoff.

Structure

In addition to regular tutorials with your supervisor, you will attend the MPhil Visual Cultures seminar in your first and second years of study. This is a weekly seminar dedicated to research questions and theoretical problems of study at MPhil level. It has the additional aim of fostering a supportive and participatory postgraduate research culture in the Department.

Other courses, seminars, workshops and events

As well as participating in the Seminar you are invited to audit an MA Special Subject of your choice should this be helpful. At key moments throughout the year, MPhil students on the Visual Culture programme join students on our MPhil Curatorial/Knowledge programme and there are also opportunities to benefit from seminars and workshops associated with our Centre for Research Architecture.

The Visual Cultures Public Programme

You are to attend the department’s Visual Cultures Public Programme. These events take place on Thursday evenings and are followed by an opportunity to socialize with staff, fellow students and other attendees.

Research training

The Department requires all students to attend the research student training programmes organised by ReSKIN (the Research Skills Intercollegiate Network). This is an organisation made up of various departments across the University of London, and the training is aimed specifically at students studying research in Art History, Visual Culture, Fine Art Practice and cognate disciplines. A college-wide programme of research training is also provided, which involves an induction course (which all students should attend), introduction to information technologies and the use of library and bibliographic resources, and sessions on research planning, presentation skills and ethics.

Department

In the Department of Visual Cultures we explore and produce new forms of art history and theory.

Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

Our approach

Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

Our academics

Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

Our location

Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in Visual Anthropology offers a unique combination of anthropological theory and visual practice. It provides you with a strong foundation for producing visual work informed by anthropology. Read more
The MA in Visual Anthropology offers a unique combination of anthropological theory and visual practice. It provides you with a strong foundation for producing visual work informed by anthropology. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-anthropology/

This programme takes an inclusive approach to the definition of visual anthropology – it approaches the sub-field through the study of the politics and aesthetics of representation, documentary and ethnographic film, and anthropological perspectives on art. As a practice-oriented MA, there is a clear emphasis on applying anthropological knowledge to the actual making of visual artefacts, and not just their analysis.

The MA is open to students with a range of backgrounds in anthropology and related fields. As a graduate, you will be well-placed to pursue a career in visual anthropology (be it research- or practice-oriented) as well as to bring an anthropological sensibility to the visual to other disciplines.

You will be taught through lectures, seminars and hands-on training in the use of digital camcorders, sound recording equipment and video editing. Assessment includes written essays for the theory modules, practical assignments, and a final visual project in the form of a 20-minute film.

The programme is currently taught by Dr Ricardo Leizaola, Dr Isaac Marrero-Guillamón, Dr Mao Mollona, Professor Stephen Nugent, and Dr Chris Wright.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Isaac Marrero-Guillamón.

Modules & Structure

You will study:

-Four core modules:

-Anthropology of Art I- 30 credits
-Anthropology Video Production- 60 credits
-Critique, Theory and Representation- 30 credits
-Ethnographic Film and Cinema Studies- 30 credits

-Option modules to the value of 30 credits

Careers

The unique combination of theory, research and practice that structures the MA in Visual Anthropology will prepare you for a diverse range of employment opportunities. Past graduates have gone on to work in:

Video production, both commercial and independent
Film editing and videography
Production and programming of film festivals
Ethnographic and visual research in both academic and commercial settings
Teaching
In addition, you can use this programme as a springboard for further study, either vocational or intellectual (including entry into MPhil/PhD programmes).

In short, the multiple skills – intellectual, critical and creative – developed by the MA in Visual Anthropology will provide you with the flexibility of thought and approach necessary for creative insertion into the global job market.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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MA Illustration and Visual Media explores the creation and production of images at a time of unparalleled possibilities for skilled visual communicators. Read more

Introduction

MA Illustration and Visual Media explores the creation and production of images at a time of unparalleled possibilities for skilled visual communicators. Specifically investigating the opportunities for image-makers to work with time-based, sequential, interactive and narrative forms, students on the course will develop an experimental illustration practice that reflects the integrated nature of the design, communication and media industries.

Content

This is a practice-led course that explores both the theory and practice of illustration across a broad range of visual media. MA Illustration and Visual Media aims to develop your visual voice with an emphasis on critical engagement with both the discipline and the world at large. This may take the form of investigating abstract concepts from domains such as science, technology and philosophy by developing bespoke visual languages to translate these ideas to diverse audiences. Other approaches may also include using critical ideas to produce self-directed visual authorship. Practical projects and technical workshops are run in tandem with theoretical and critical seminars in order to support the relationship between critical and practice based learning.

This approach provides you with a unique platform from which to produce relevant and engaging work within the discipline of illustration that has resonance and value to the world at large. Through the development of a portfolio of work the course places graduates in a position to work across sectors as diverse as visual communication, art direction, information communication, branding, news, current affairs, entertainment, art and design as well as encouraging visual authorship.

The course supports progression to research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.
Building on LCC's resources, in digital, time-based and interactive media alongside printmaking, graphic design and visual communication, the course encourages experimental and reflective practice that echoes the cross media nature of the design, communication and media industries.

Structure

Phase 1

Units 1.1 Illustrative Practice and Visual Media (40 Credits)
Unit 1.2 Critical Practice and Research Methods (20 Credits)

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 Expanded Practice and Personal Voice (60 Credits)
(Exceptional Postgraduate Diploma exit point after 120 credits)

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Final Major Research Project (60 Credits)
(Weighted 50% written component and 50% practical component)

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The MA in Visual Culture introduces students to the new and fast-growing intellectual field of visual culture, by examining the histories, theories and practices of cultural production and consumption of visual images/objects in the contemporary and modern world. Read more
The MA in Visual Culture introduces students to the new and fast-growing intellectual field of visual culture, by examining the histories, theories and practices of cultural production and consumption of visual images/objects in the contemporary and modern world. Western and, increasingly, global culture is dominated by visual images – whether material or virtual – and by visual experience.

The course encourages connections across visual arts, architecture, film, cultural studies and critical theory, cultural geography, and history. It gives students the opportunity to concentrate on the modern period, post-1750, while offering the option to choose their modules from a range of disciplines in which visual culture is a key research focus.

Though this MA is offered by the Department of Art History, besides the core module, 'Critical Approaches to Art History and Visual Culture', it is also compulsory for you to take one module in the Institute of Film and Television Studies.

The Department of Art History incorporates the Nottingham Institute for Research in Visual Culture (NIRVC), which is a forum for research in art-historical and visual culture studies, drawing on a range of disciplines, within and beyond the University.

The University’s custombuilt Lakeside Arts Centre provides an excellent environment to support postgraduate studies in visual culture, with contemporary and historic art exhibitions at the Djanogly Art Gallery, and the DH Lawrence Pavilion – a newlybuilt drama, film, and performance space.

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-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media. Read more
-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media
-The course combines anthropology with practical training in film-making, editing, visual methods, photography, sensory ethnography and sound
-Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe

We welcome students from across the social sciences and humanities. The MA in Visual Anthropology is tailored to meet the needs of different levels of anthropological and film-making experience, whether you have little or no background in formal anthropology, film-production, visual methods and photography, or if you have substantial experience in one or more of these areas.

For nearly 30 years, the University's Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology has been widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology. Our graduates have produced more than 400 ethnographic films seen around the world and it is now at the forefront of the emergent dialogue between art and anthropology, including sensory ethnography and sound, experimental and practice-based methods, photographic and digital media, museum and gallery installations.

Our MA and MPhil courses combine anthropology with training in film-making and editing, visual methods, photography sensory ethnography and sound. Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internationally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe.

The Granada Centre's teaching and research continues to set the standard of excellence in the social sciences as well as arts. This was formally recognised by the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council), and by the AHRC, awarding the master's programme the status of a Professional Preparation masters, something awarded to no other visual anthropology programme in the UK.

Teaching and learning

The course combines conventional lectures and seminars with practical 'hands-on' instruction and workshops. Students work in teams and individually. Their final piece is an individual production, however throughout the year they will spend time working in teams so as to develop team-working & presentational skills as well as technical and artistic expertise. Work is presented to the class and receives feedback from fellow students as well as instructors. In this way, students learn to analyse their own and others works and through each other's successes and failures, generating a strong range of intellectual, practical and aesthetic resources as well as a sense of camaraderie and cooperation.

Coursework and assessment

During both semesters, students take 1 x 30-credit or 2 x 15 credit practical film or media courses and 2 x 15-credit lecture- or seminar-based modules on more theoretical, methodological or substantive ethnographic topics. The latter are each assessed by means of a 4000-word essay. The practical modules are assessed by various combinations of a portfolio of project work and an accompanying written text.

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This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. Read more
This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture.

You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks.

Course content

This Masters balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION, DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE
-VISUAL CULTURE: THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - Choose four from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-ENGAGING THE ARCHIVE
-EXHIBITING PHOTOGRAPHY
-INTERPRETING SPACE
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-URBAN CULTURES
-WORK PLACEMENTS IN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Associated careers

Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research.

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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

London College of Communication’s vocationally-focussed Postgraduate Certificate will help you to build practice-based and professional skills in the highly diverse field of design for visual communication.

Visual communication is a process by which ideas are made visible and conveyed through media to enhance meaning, experience and understanding. This one-year intensive course re-examines the relationship between design principles, research methodologies and the related theoretical contexts.

The programme is ideal for those from diverse academic backgrounds who wish to extend and develop their prior experiences through visual communication. Students on the course have previously studied subjects from molecular genetics to English, architecture to textiles, micro-biology to fine art and product design to geography. The course is a confidence-building bridge to Masters study as well as providing the foundations for professional career development.

You can expect to become part of a unique learning community made up of staff, guest speakers and fellow students from a diverse range of creative disciplines and cultures. Through tutorials, set and self-initiated projects, workshops and group discussions, you will gain a deeper understanding of the design process that will enhance your practice. Visual language and grammar, typographic hierarchy, symbol design, graphic representation, identity and information visualisation are just some of the areas you will explore.
Personal projects will provide you with a foundation in the principles of visual communication whilst engaging with postgraduate level research methods and conceptual development. Examples of personal projects include: mapping directional devices in the city; the promotion of a typeface; visual analysis of people flow and visual surveys of lettering. Graduates from this course have found employment within high profile international creative agencies, design management, teaching and professional practice. Some have established their own design studios, while others have gone on to achieve highly at Master’s level.

Structure

The Postgraduate Certificate Design for Visual Communication has three components:

Research and Development
Design Resolution
Professional and Academic Context

The course includes: visual language and grammar; typographic hierarchy; narrative and sequential design; symbol design; graphic representation; identity; information visualisation; as well as opportunities to pursue projects of individual interest.

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Why choose this course?. The. MA Digital and Visual Communication. offers study in a broad range of digital and visual communication theory and practice. Read more

Why choose this course?

The MA Digital and Visual Communication offers study in a broad range of digital and visual communication theory and practice.

The Course attracts students from a wide range of disciplines and from all over the world, giving it a strong international flavour. The current cohort comes from as far afield as China, Nigeria, India, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Poland, Greece and Germany, as well as the UK.

The course gives you the opportunity to develop your creative design abilities but also equips you with marketing and branding skills and knowledge essential for a career in the competitive market place that is International Visual Communications.

Subject specialisms:

- Animation

- Computer Games Design

- Design for Advertising

- Graphic Communication

- Illustration

- Multimedia Design

- Photography

- Video and Film Production

What happens on the course?

- Creative approaches to digital & visual communications research and practice

- Understanding and defining Digital and Visual Communication Practice

- Critical, contextual and theoretical enquiry

- Critical, contextual and theoretical frameworks

- Masters Project in Digital and Visual Communications

Why Wolverhampton?

This course is designed to develop your creative and intellectual abilities through the investigation of a bespoke project aligned to your own particular interests and aspirations. The course is intended to promote ‘Thinking practitioners’ who will be well positioned to take advantage of the opportunities available within the growing global industry of Digital and Visual Communication.

The course attracts students from all over the world as well as from the UK. Current students hail from China, India, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Germany and Greece. This course has a truly international perspective reflecting the global nature of the visual communications sector.

What our students think

"Studying in an artistic environment where different design disciplines are working close together and the well-balanced level of guidance and independency really helped me to investigate and improve my work in graphic communications." Yvonne John

"As an Illustrator studying for my Master degree, The MA Digital and Visual Communications course and its layout has allowed me to further develop my work and to get it out there and more importantly noticed whilst giving me a greater knowledge and understanding of professional Illustration. As well as offering me excellent opportunities to communicate with those in the world of commercial publishing, This is largely down to the expert experience and brilliance of the staff and how they run the course." Matt Jones

“The course is Interesting and it broadens the mind of any MA student, especially to those who are involve in Advertising programme.” Mohammed Abba Aliyu

Career path

Employment opportunities include:

- Self-employment: Establishing yourself in your own business, or as a sole trader or freelance designer.

- A career in design, practice and/or industry in the UK and internationally.

- Advancement in current employment: education, public sector or the creative industries.

What skills will you gain?

You will gain the intellectual and creative confidence to enable you to embrace the challenges and rewards of the Global Digital & Visual Communications industry. Through the investigation of a personally designed project you will have the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge to a Masters Level, culminating in a showcase exhibition and portfolio. Opportunities exist to further develop your portfolio through PhD study within the department. From the 2010 cohort three students have progressed successfully to our PhD programme.



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This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. Read more
This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture.

You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks.

Course content

This Master's balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION, DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE
-VISUAL CULTURE: THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Option modules - Choose four from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-ENGAGING THE ARCHIVE
-EXHIBITING PHOTOGRAPHY
-INTERPRETING SPACE
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-URBAN CULTURES
-WORK PLACEMENTS IN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Associated careers

Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research.

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The concept of branding is moving away from the traditional idea of creating an "image" to represent the name and the values of a company, by exploring… Read more

Overview

The concept of branding is moving away from the traditional idea of creating an "image" to represent the name and the values of a company, by exploring a broader view, that incorporates several disciplines, from visual design to sound design, from storytelling to consumers' psychology and marketing techniques, thus addressing a strongly integrated approach whose aim is to identify the core assets and to orchestrate them into a consistent brand identity.

Branding is now much more than the definition of a visual image: it's the creation of a rich and attractive environment, to catch the consumer's attention and bring him into the brand world, to share the brand values and to become an informal sponsor of the brand. The Master in Visual Brand Design is a unique opportunity to acquire hands-on competencies and in-depth knowledge on how to design the identity of a company and/or organization, by integrating graphic design skills with strategic thinking. The program includes an internship in a company working in the disciplinary field. Careers

The Master Program in Visual Brand Design is aimed at giving the participants the skills to become visual brand designers with a complex and rich approach, or brand managers capable of orienting the company needs towards an innovative direction, working as freelances or inside medium/big sized companies in the fields of Fashion, Design, Events and Expos Management, Digital Media and Services, or in Public Administrations.

Audience

Candidates holding a first-level academic diploma or BA degree, or about to graduate and with a knowledge of the English language (IELTS 5.0 academic or equivalent certificate).
The program is addressed to candidates with a curriculum in Visual and Graphic Design, Design, Communication and Marketing, or other disciplines related to the program’s field of study.

Job Opportunities

The Master in Visual Brand Design aims to form Visual Brand Designers and dynamic Brand Managers figures open to innovations, that are visionary and versatile, direct and effective. Designers who have a rich and complex approach that can guide the needs of the company in a new direction, either as freelancers or as employees of medium to large companies operating in the fields of fashion, design, events, trade shows, services, digital media or in public administration.

Companies

A network of professionals and leaders of different areas of interest are in constant and proficient interaction and collaboration with the Master in Visual Brand Design of Domus Academy, actively participating in educational programming, workshops and international competitions organized by the department.

The Master has worked with:

Bastard, Danone, Forevermark, Fundacion Escultor Berrocal, Glamour, Mondadori, Park Hyatt, Royal Rose, Smartbox, Unieuro.
For more information please visit http://www.domusacademy.com

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This program in Visual Arts and Curatorial Studies is the only study program in Europe associating the education in production of visual arts with a highly specialized curatorial program. Read more

Overview

This program in Visual Arts and Curatorial Studies is the only study program in Europe associating the education in production of visual arts with a highly specialized curatorial program.

The two-year MA in Visual Arts and Curatorial Studies aims to build the skills of artists and curators starting from the same shared exhibition environment, where the role and the talents of both are open frameworks to be redefined.

The program provides a range of interdisciplinary activities developed through lectures, workshops, seminars and exhibitions in order to create new educational and practical models in the field of contemporary art.

Graduates from this MA program enjoy professional careers as curators, editors of specialized magazines and books, journalists, and exhibition designers. Visual culture, visual and performing arts, curatorial studies and exhibition design are included in the research and analysis fields.

Among the main areas of studying there are visual culture, visual and performing arts, curatorial studies, exhibition design.

Language: Italian
Credits: 120 CF
Placement rate: 81%

Audience

Candidates holding a first-level academic diploma or BA degree, or about to graduate and with a knowledge of the Italian language (according to the medium of instruction of the program) equal to a B2 Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
The program is open to young artists searching for a solid education in the field of visual arts production with a highly specialized curatorial program, with the aim of building the skills of artists and curators starting from the same shared exhibition environment.

Career

The two-year MA in Visual Arts and Curatorial Studies equips students with the necessary fundamentals to continue their studies or to enter the world of professional design and creative industries. Graduates may find employment as: Artists, Curators, Editors of specialized magazines and books, Art critics and journalists, Exhibition designers, Gallery and museum directors, Consultants at auction houses, Art dealers, Directors of public institutions.

Companies

NABA has developed strong relationships with leading companies which provide internships for NABA students. Among them are: Fondazione La Triennale di Milano, Fondazione Museion - Museo d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea Bolzano, Form Content Londra, BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Oliviero Toscani Studio, Sotheby's Italia, Skira Editore, Associazione Viafarini, Artshow Edizioni, Careof Organization for Contemporary Art,Open Care.

Admission

Discover how to apply: http://www.naba.it/admission-postgraduate-programs/processo-di-ammissione/?lang=en

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