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Masters Degrees (Violence Against Women)

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Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches. Read more
Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches.

The course is ideal for those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence, in policymaking or delivery at local, regional or national levels, or are wishing to establish careers in these sectors.

More about this course

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in theoretical frameworks, research, policy and practice approaches to woman and child abuse.

The MA content covers all forms of violence against women and child abuse, including sexual violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking and harmful practices. Reflecting the work of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, a specialist research unit, the MA focuses on what we know about these forms of abuse, the contexts in which they occur and the connections between them. While the main focus will be on the UK, intellectual, policy and practice approaches from across the globe will be discussed.

The course content will be cross-disciplinary, mainly drawing on sociology and including social policy, criminology and psychology.

Assessment approaches vary according to the aims of each module and how it is delivered. Examples include essays or other written coursework and individual presentations.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Researching Communities (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Violence: Causes, Consequences and Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (core, 20 credits)
-Woman and Child Abuse Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Community Development (option, 20 credits)
-Crime and Offender Patterns (option, 20 credits)
-Doing Evaluation: Skills and Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-International Child and Human Rights Law (option, 20 credits)
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Social Research: Principles, Practice and Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Women, Gender and Human Rights (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence. It is also excellent preparation for those who are wishing to establish careers in this sector.

Our graduates have gone on to key roles in policymaking or service delivery at local, regional and national levels, and some pursue further studies to PhD level, including with the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. Read more
The MA degree can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years. In addition to the four compulsory modules (Difference, Diversity & Change; Interdisciplinary Methods in Women's Studies; Gender, Violence & Justice; Women, Citizenship & Conflict) and the 60 credit dissertation, students taking the MA Women Violence and Conflict will select a programme of research training modules to make up the remaining 40 credits, or opt to take Work, Politics & Culture and a further 20 credits of research training methods from the available selction. This programme should be agreed with the supervisor and submitted to Chair of Board of Studies. You will be allocated a supervisor for your dissertation which must be submitted towards the end of your final year.

Natalie, an MA Women, Violence and Conflict student writes:
'Welcome! I'd encourage students to take advantage of all the resources available to them - don't be shy! Everyone is the department is wonderful and more than willing to help. I'd encourage you to get to know your classmates - the beauty of this department is how amazingly interesting and diverse the students and professors are. I've learned more from my classmates than I ever anticipated. I'd say, frankly, READ. Read as much as you can on as many topics as you can - it's not often that you'll have the opportunity to engage these topics in depth in such a supportive environment with some of the greatest resources right in the department! Don't be afraid to not know, or to ask questions. Everyone is here to support you both academically and otherwise. Challenge yourself and appreciate the opportunity to feel uncomfortable sometimes! I'm sad my time here is almost over!!'

Programme aims

-To provide a solid grounding in interdisciplinary women's studies, emphasizing gendered aspects in relation to violence and conflict in inter/national contexts
-To expose students to an interdisciplinary range of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to and debates violence against women and in contexts of violent conflict
-To familiarize students with the epistemological and philosophical underpinnings of research methodologies, the politics and ethics of research, the principles of research design and to enable them to evaluate and apply a range of methodologies to research questions related to issues of violence against women
-To foster the development of a critical, self-reflexive and independent approach to research and scholarship, as well as the acquisition of transferable skills

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This course aims to provide you with a sound knowledge of psychology, having been developed to impart the advanced knowledge required to serve your interests and career aspirations. Read more
This course aims to provide you with a sound knowledge of psychology, having been developed to impart the advanced knowledge required to serve your interests and career aspirations. Based at our Hendon Campus in London, you will benefit from the experience of our dedicated and enthusiastic staff. You will have access to some of the best and most up-to-date psychology facilities for teaching and research in the UK.

Why study MSc Psychology Conversion at Middlesex?

This conversion course is for graduates intending to pursue a career in psychology who wish to acquire the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society. You may have a degree in another subject but you will need to have previously studied 60 credits in psychology. Students are introduced to the broad range of theoretical and methodological approaches to psychology and are encouraged to develop a critical approach to studies, evaluating theory and evidence accordingly.

By the end of this course, you will be able to perform quantitative and qualitative data analyses and use statistical software to analyse complex data. You will design, implement, analyse and communicate independent and group project work to an advanced level. You will also be familiar with experimental software to design and run experiments and use psycho-physiological equipment to gather and interpret data.

Course highlights:

- We have excellent employment results: over 90% of our psychology graduates are employed within six months of completing their degree.
- Our psychology teaching and research facilities are unrivalled. They include specialist laboratories and counselling practice rooms.
- Our academics are regularly and widely published - Professor Olga van den Akker, for example, is renowned for her research into psychology and human fertility and Dr Miranda Horvath is widely published for her groundbreaking research into violence against women from a feminist and forensic psychological perspective.
- As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module.

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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Open your mind to a global perspective on crime and justice and the impact it has on society today. University of Roehampton's MA Global Criminology will help you gain the skills required to explore and develop your own research. Read more

Summary

Open your mind to a global perspective on crime and justice and the impact it has on society today.

University of Roehampton's MA Global Criminology will help you gain the skills required to explore and develop your own research. The course content draws on a diverse range of Social Science disciplines such as criminology, law and socio-legal studies, psychology, sociology and human rights.

Our programme comprises three core modules and three optional modules. The core modules include: Introduction to Global Criminology, which introduces you to key criminological theories and their application to global problems of crime and justice; Researching Global Criminology, an advanced research methods module that teaches you the core skills required in conducting criminological fieldwork; and Dissertation (MA only), where you will lead your own empirical research project with the support of an expert supervisor. Optional modules offer a range of specialisms drawn from our experts’ research fields.

Content

This dynamic and outward-looking syllabus encourages fresh thinking in the study of global crime and justice. Our range of exciting new option modules will enable you to specialise in key criminological topics such as global policing, genocide, gender and violence, and media and popular culture.

You will gain a strong foundation of knowledge and be introduced to criminology within its historical and cultural context. You will also examine a range of contemporary global issues such as drug trafficking, violence against women and girls, mass incarceration, policing, organised crime, urban crime, political resistance and transitional justice.

The programme also offers a step-by-step theoretical and practical grounding in criminological research. You will gain key skills for your own research process, including research design, data collection, and data analysis. You will have the opportunity to specialise in a research project in which includes independently designing and analysing the project with the support of a supervisor.

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*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery. Read more
*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery.

Engage with human rights practice by linking the legal, theoretical and technical skills needed to work in international organisations, fighting injustice, oppression and persecution.

You will study contemporary debates in human rights promotion and protection, researching the stories of violations, asylum, surveillance, peacekeeping and torture that are behind many of today's news headlines. Working with your tutors and alongside industry professionals, you will have the opportunity to investigate claims of human rights abuses, gather evidence and build cases for legal proceedings.

Your course will also hone your research and project management skills and develop your ability to write compelling funding applications and construct budgets, which are essential requirements for a career in this area.

Created in collaboration with tutors from our Leeds Law School, your course will provide you with the expertise and practical skills to help protect human rights and tackle abuses.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalhumanrights_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Careers options include working for Non-Governmental Organisations, legal and security services and international organisations. Employers will value your critical and analytical skills and personal effectiveness. Our expert staff engage with many major organisations, which will benefit you when looking for a career in this field.

- Research & Project Manager
- Grant writer & Fundraiser
- Campaigner
- Human Rights Practitioner

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will learn from a highly-skilled and research-active teaching team who are experts in human rights law and practice, security, peace studies, evidence-gathering and crime investigation.

Our team of academics include Dr Steve Wright, an expert on torture technologies and surveillance employed by governments across the world, Dr Robin Redhead an expert on indigenous people and women's rights, Professor Eddie Halpin who is Chair of HURIDOCS, the Geneva-based human rights information and documentation centre and Dr Rachel Julian who was invited by the international NGO Nonviolent Peaceforce to evaluate their project in Georgia using unarmed civilian peace-keepers.

Other tutors have worked closely with organisations such as Amnesty International, CND, the UN and the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. Guest lectures will provide you with the chance to engage with professionals working in the field, ensuring your course is at the cutting-edge of human rights practice. Recent speakers include Andrew Gilligan, London Editor of The Sunday Telegraph, Tony Bunyan, Director of Statewatch and Stephen Bowen, Director of the British Institute of Human Rights.

John Willott

Senior Lecturer

"I love working with students from across the globe - seeing them learning from each other and sharing experiences is a big part of our course. Our involvement in international research, consultancy and advocacy, and links to key organisations means we know the kinds of knowledge and skills graduates need to develop their careers and make a difference."

John has recently been working on a UN-funded project to combat violence against women in Uganda, Cambodia and Nepal. He authored 'Acid Violence in Uganda: A Situational Analysis', helping develop a co-ordinated action plan to address the problem, which was presented to the government and legal, health and social services.

Facilities

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Study areas
Our City Campus has plenty of dedicated social areas for you to work with your peers. You will have modern spaces and the latest IT equipment which will allow you to debate and discuss ideas with fellow students.

- Teaching spaces
Our classrooms and lecture theatres offer the ideal space to learn about the experiences and opinions of expert academics and visiting industry speakers.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences. Read more
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences.

More about this course

Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. Theoretically, we are confronted with the issue of how to reconcile unconditional rights with consequentialist ethics of political responsibility and rival ideologies of social order. Practically, we are confronted with particular powers, interests and conflicts demanding judgement and action that is at once moral and pragmatic. The MA in Human Rights and International Conflict will explore such issues and attempt to cultivate such judgement. The course provides both a solid academic grounding in human rights and international relations and a wide choice of optional modules. Students are trained in research methodology, before completing a 12-15,000 word dissertation dealing in depth with a subject of their choice.

Taught by published experts in human rights, peace and conflict studies, international relations, politics, history, philosophy, women's studies and other subjects, this multidisciplinary course equips students with the kind of understanding necessary to work for peace, justice and human rights in the real world.

Assessment is largely by coursework. Core modules also involve two assessed presentations and two unseen examinations. One third of the assessment for the MA is by dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-History and Theory of Human Rights (core, 20 credits)
-Human Rights and International Conflict Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Human Rights and the International Order (core, 20 credits)
-International Conflict Resolution (core, 20 credits)
-Theory and Research Methods in International Relations (core, 20 credits)
-American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century (option, 20 credits)
-Citizenship and Social Justice (option, 20 credits)
-Human Security (option, 20 credits)
-International Relations and the Legal Regulation of Conflict (option, 20 credits)
-Religion and International Relations (option, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (option, 20 credits)
-The New Europe in the New International Order (option, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (option, 20 credits)
-Work Placement Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will be trained in the kind of research and analytical skills that will qualify them to take a wide range of opportunities for both further study and for employment in the private, public and third sectors. Most especially, an academic training in human rights and conflict management will qualify its recipients to take opportunities in a range of exciting, international non-governmental organizations. Graduates of our previous courses in human rights or international security have gone on to work in such organizations.

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Applied Social Psychology focuses on the investigation of social processes and problems of significance to the general population and to specific groups. Read more
Applied Social Psychology focuses on the investigation of social processes and problems of significance to the general population and to specific groups. Our faculty members and graduate students employ diverse research strategies to answer questions and develop interventions related to issues in areas such as health, interpersonal relationships, violence against women, immigration, culture and community engagement.

Multiple Career Avenues

Our program of study is designed to be comprehensive and, at the same time, to provide the flexibility for students to select a set of courses suited to their career goals. Students have the flexibility to emphasize and receive training directed toward the pursuit of: (1) research in practical or applied settings (e.g., working with community organizations and consulting firms) and/or (2) research in academic settings (e.g., working in universities and colleges). As each student's desired emphasis is unique, our program provides the opportunity for students to select a balance of courses, applied work, and publication opportunities in the service of facilitating students' ultimate research and career goals.

Diverse methods

Faculty members and graduate students employ diverse research strategies to answer questions related to various social issues. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses are valued as modes of inquiry, and emphasis is often placed on research conducted using community samples. Faculty and student research is conducted using multiple methods, including community surveys, archival research, interviews, observation, recordings of natural interactions, program evaluation, and experimental studies.

Practical Experience

Our graduate students have the opportunity to gain practical experience in a number of settings of their choosing where they conduct research, design and evaluate programs, participate in community-based research, and take part in consulting work. These experiences allow students to acquire new skills and to refine those previously acquired, to develop professional contacts, and to engage in knowledge translation and knowledge transfer activities.

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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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