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Masters Degrees (Video Making)

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Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?. On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Read more
Do you have a desire to pursue a specific research project in film and video?

On this ResM you’ll receive a grounding in the research processes which are common to work generally in the arts, humanities, creative and cultural industrial fields. Explore research questions and methodologies specific to film and video and learn how these relate to both practice and/or theory.

Programme structure

You'll get to focus on practice or theory, in any combination of your choice, in one of the following areas:
-Artists’ film and video, experimental film and video (including fiction, documentary, drama documentary, animation)
-Histories of autobiographical, experimental, avant-garde film and video
-Contemporary theoretical discourses about independent film (including film practice as research, film as philosophy)
-The study and use of archive film (including home movies) in different contexts and practices; the relationship of film and video to new forms of dissemination (with particular reference to the digital)
-Collaborative projects involving different disciplines (for example, performance); and community-based and activist video.

Programme content

-Critical screenings: mapping out the interconnecting territories of independent film/video making
-Research in the arts and humanities: development of generic research skills and methods
-Masters thesis: presenting a substantial piece of work, either practice- or theory-based, chosen by you

The ResM in Film and Video leads to either a traditional written thesis or one that combines critical writing and creative/professional practice. You have the flexibility to submit your thesis any time between 24–36 months or, if you are making excellent progress, you may apply to transfer directly into our PhD programme after two years, rather than submitting a ResM thesis.

Choosing a ResM

The Research Masters (ResM) is classed as a postgraduate research programme – it enables you to engage in a focused, self-negotiated research project over the period of two years. As well as being a satisfying creative and professional endeavour in itself, it provides high-quality preparation for doctoral research, including practice as research, in the interdisciplinary field of independent film and video. You will study current debates and approaches, as well as the theories, skills and methodologies necessary for contemporary film and video research. Your thesis may be assessed entirely through written work or through written work in addition to a substantial practical project that addresses particular research questions.

The ResM is suitable for:
-People in employment in the cultural and creative industries or recent graduates who wish to proceed to doctoral (PhD) research
-Those in, or who wish to be employed in, the cultural and creative industries (such as publishing, teaching, design, the media, galleries and museums, the heritage industry, journalism, theatre, dance) who wish to gain a self-directed academic qualification to lead to further career enhancement
-Anybody who wishes to further develop academic skills, pursue particular subject enthusiasms, or carry out a cherished research project with specialist guidance.

Features of the ResM

-It focuses almost entirely on an individual research project of your own choice
-Largely self-directed with tutorial guidance and clear milestones and expectations
-Includes taught modules (60 credits) that must be passed to develop and evidence your research skills
-It prepares you specifically to be a researcher in the arts and humanities, to do an extended research project within a professional context, or to do a PhD.

What’s different about the ResM?

Because it’s classed as a postgraduate research programme:
-You’ll follow the same milestones and processes as MPhil/PhD candidates in the Doctoral Training Centre, including annual monitoring, the appointment of examiners, formal acceptance of your proposal by the University, and adherence to research ethics
-You’ll be able to attend any sessions within the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme
-You’ll have a supervisory team (Director of Studies plus a second supervisor) assigned once your proposal has been accepted
-You may have the option to apply to transfer straight into our PhD programme, subject to certain conditions, rather than submitting for a ResM award.

The final thesis is examined in a different way:
-There’s a flexible submission date - between 24-36 months
-It’s assessed by an internal examiner, who is not your supervisor, and an external examiner from another institution
-You’ll need to attend a viva voce. This is an oral examination where you’ll discuss your thesis with your examiners. It usually takes place between one to three months following the submission of written elements
-You won’t receive a percentage grade for the ResM degree
-You may be asked to make corrections to your thesis before being allowed to submit a final electronic version of it and being awarded your degree.

The award title will be a ResM and the certificate will include the title of your thesis, with no grade classification.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) is designed for students who want to focus their energy on the dynamic world of social media, develop their creative practice and professional writing skills or are looking to work in an entrepreneurial environment.

Key Features of Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR)

The MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) offers syllabus-based practice in professional, contemporary media skills, taught by industry professionals with academic backgrounds. The Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme includes modules in Professional Writing/Journalism, Visual Communications and Media Design, Video and Documentary Making and Public Relations (PR), Branding and Promotion. Other modules in communication, theory, film and history are also available.

The Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme allows graduates to add valuable and desirable professional media skills for careers in business, journalism, public and media relations, broadcasting, advertising and marketing and industry professionals to acquire new media skills and qualifications that will enhance their continuing professional development.

The full-time MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) course is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in part one) and then a dissertation or professional media practice project over the summer (part two).

The part two component allows students in the Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme to either write a 16,000 word dissertation or undertake the professional media project which incorporates the practical elements of the course and a short unpaid work placement.

MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) Aims

To research and develop stories in an online, multi-media environment.

To present the principles, theories and techniques surrounding video making.

To develop practical skills and conceptual knowledge of digital publishing, visual communication and media design.

To provide a critical overview of the role of public relations (PR) and promotional practice.

To develop writing skills in a wide range of genres.

Modules

Modules on the MA in in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) typically include:

• Visual Communication and Media Design

• Video and Documentary Making

• Public Relations (PR), Branding and Promotion

• Reporting Terrorism

• Global Media

• Risk Reporting

• The Business and Politics of Digital Media

• Development Communications

• Online Journalism

• The Digital Edge

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) graduates. Media Companies, non-profit organisations, global business, government and the public sector value the fact that our Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) Graduates have developed a range of critical and theoretical abilities and a creative and innovative approach to media practice. Our Graduates go on to work in business, marketing and Public Relations (PR), journalism, broadcasting, web-design, advertising, publicity, arts and cultural bodies.



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This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture. Read more

This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture.

In over 3 decades there has been a creative surge in hybrid live performance worldwide. This has been the work of solo artists, ensembles, auteurs and performer-directors across creative fields, who have redefined boundaries and stretched the artistic and social imagination into new spaces, both literally and figuratively.

Within the vibrant environment of Goldsmiths, and with all the stimulus that London offers culturally, practising or emerging practitioners develop compositional, critical, technical and management skills and strategies for forging independent and self-motivated careers. Our graduates work as practitioners, teachers and cultural leaders worldwide.

On the programme you will conceive, research, construct and deliver your ideas and articulate what motivates these. Teaching is rigorous and interdisciplinary. You study with distinguished international artists as well as scholars within a praxis ethos where theory informs creativity and vice versa. The emphasis throughout is on encouraging collaboration across disciplines and cultures, and on contextualising practice within its social, political and architectural environment.

Physical training, scenographic/environmental exploration and hands-on introduction to technologies (lighting, video and sound) support composition and artistic experimentation. You identify your own practice within the historical and contemporary field, and write critically and creatively. You archive your practice digitally, and on graduation will have developed a portfolio of projects. You are guided on professional development by the Live Art Development Agency (LADA) and the Institute for Cultural and Creative Entrepreneurship (ICCE) at Goldsmiths.

The programme enjoys a wide international professional network of organisations, commissions, venues and festivals of benefit to students. You study both at Goldsmiths and ArtsAdminClick here for a full list of artists associated with the programme as permanent and guest tutors.

Modules & structure

This is a praxis programme on which you gain 180 CATS (credits).

Core modules

Skills

You will become conversant, confident and skilled in a range of methodological practices as well as compositional strategies for independent theatrical, dance theatre and live art creation.

Your critical and analytical skills in interpreting artistic practice will be tested in a range of verbal, written and oral ways. Your study of your own body as a creative instrument will be complemented by learning the principles of scenography and film narrative.

You will research intellectually and produce theoretically informed writing. You will learn to contextualise your own practice and interests in the contemporary field of performance both in the UK and internationally, and to articulate such practice.

Overall you will learn how to research, construct and deliver your ideas performatively and how to advocate your own projects to producers, venues, funders and other agencies.

Careers

Graduates work in a wide variety of professional contexts globally as commissioned performance makers, directors, project leaders, programmers, teachers and academic researchers.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA



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Why study at Roehampton. A unique programme that can be tailored to your interests, from performance to dramaturgy, from arts management or creative production to scholarship and cultural criticism. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • A unique programme that can be tailored to your interests, from performance to dramaturgy, from arts management or creative production to scholarship and cultural criticism.
  • You will attend a curated series of performances and cultural events at leading venues across London. 
  • Content driven by the varied research specialisms of staff and current developments in the field, e.g. spectatorship as a practice, live art and museum culture, feminism and performance and intercultural theatre.
  • 80% of our research ranked as "world leading" or "internationally excellent" in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. 
  • Roehampton is ranked Best Modern University in London (Complete University Guide 2016, the Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016 and the Guardian University Guide 2016).

Course summary

Taking the wealth and diversity of London’s unique artistic culture as its prime focus, this unique programme opens up a variety of pathways to students looking to focus their interests in the broad field of theatre and performance. Shaped around a series of thematic investigations of the city’s unparalleled theatrical and cultural resources, you will be able to pursue a range of projects matched to your professional aspirations.

The programme engages with three basic approaches to study: viewing, making and writing, with students given the freedom to interpret key assessment tasks in line with their developing research and professional interests.

This is a flexible MA with full-time and part-time attendance options and which provides a sound practical and theoretical basis from which to move on to professional practice and training or further study at MPhil/PhD level. 

You will join a welcoming and diverse postgraduate community in a well-established UK department of drama, theatre and performance which offers a range of opportunities to work on staff and student-led projects in addition to your own studies.

Content

Viewing is at the heart of the programme, with regular collective attendance at a curated programme of events in London, during the Autumn and Spring terms, selected by the tutor team and provided without charge to students. Making connections between these events, you will explore a range of themes, genres and contexts that shape the performing arts in the city. This experience is supported by a programme of guided reading and discussion-based seminar sessions. 

Making and Writing are the strands of the programme where you develop your own responses to these themed investigations, which act as the springboard for your own projects. You will have the freedom to choose from a variety of formats for your assessed work, which might include live performance, theatre criticism, photographic, video or sound-based work. You can choose to explore a variety of formats and approaches or focus your work on a particular type of practice. In the first term, you will be introduced to a range of creative and analytical research methods that are designed to support the development of your own interests, leading on to a proposal for a major project that you undertake during the second half of the year. Writing offers a pathway for students to explore forms of textual practice, including writing for performance, theatre criticism, performative writing, dramaturgical research and response. This approach also offers the possibility of developing new kinds of conversations between audiences, artists, producers and other constituencies in the performance cultures of the city.

Modules

The following are modules currently offered on the course:

  • Viewing, Making and Writing 1 
  • Research Methods in Theatre and Performance 
  • Viewing, Making and Writing 2
  • Major Project

Career options

This course develops students towards professional careers in the Arts as well as towards possible PhD or MFA study.

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This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. Read more

This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. The focus is placed firmly on developing clear and simple storytelling techniques that go beyond arbitrary formal categorisations of drama, documentary or genre. The course takes its inspiration from forms of cultural production that have challenged conformity, including the work of artists, musicians, painters and performers, and the movements of Italian neo-realism and the developing cinemas of Africa, Latin America, South Korea and Iran.

Key features

  • This course encourages you to synthesise your personal experience, critical knowledge and craft skills to express yourself through moving pictures.
  • Your studies will be split broadly into 75 per cent practice and 25 per cent theory.
  • As well as the personal tutor scheme, we also run a pioneering peer-mentoring scheme in which recent MA graduates provide one-to-one assistance in the use of equipment and software.
  • Staff on this course are practising filmmakers.
  • The course is informed by practice and research in black music and cinema, neo-realist cinema, experimental filmmaking, performance and dance, storytelling, participative documentary and ghetto cinema.

What will you study?

You will study the basic principles of filmmaking, develop an understanding of the nature and potential of visual storytelling, and discover the importance of sound, lighting and the screenplay. You will also gain a sound knowledge of theories and ideas that can help in the interpretation of your own work and that of other filmmakers. You will produce a portfolio of moving-image projects to illustrate your technical ability in cinematography, sound recording, editing and writing/direction.

You will be able to use high-definition digital video camcorders, DSLRs and Macs running Final Cut Pro and Adobe Creative Cloud to apply classical and independent principles with contemporary technology; 8mm, super8 and 16mm film cameras are also available to explore analogue forms of filmmaking (students who wish to use our analogue cameras will have to cover their own stock and processing costs).

Assessment

Film production projects, critical journal, essays, and seminar presentations.

Work placement scheme

Many postgraduate courses at Kingston University allow students to do a 12-month work placement as part of their course. The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student; we cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it. As the work placement is an assessed part of the course, the work placement is covered by a student's tier 4 visa. Find out more about the postgraduate work placement.

Core modules

  • Film Making 1
  • Film Making 2
  • Film Making 3 (Dissertation)
  • Film Writing
  • Sound and Vision


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IN BRIEF. Develop cutting-edge practices and approaches to contemporary performance-making in an interdisciplinary, laboratory environment, with a focus on creative exploration. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop cutting-edge practices and approaches to contemporary performance-making in an interdisciplinary, laboratory environment, with a focus on creative exploration
  • Make and research in world-class performance-making facilities at MediaCityUK and the New Adelphi Arts Centre
  • Immerse yourself in the vibrant arts and performance scene in Salford and Manchester.
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

The MA Contemporary Performance Practice is a practical, interdisciplinary course that will introduce you to a range of approaches and concepts, which are vital to the making of live performance in and in response to the world today. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge to function in contemporary  performance environments, as a performer, maker, collaborative practitioner and researcher.

Drawing upon the excellent facilities for making live performance at New Adelphi and MediaCityUK, this course also provides the entrepreneurial and employability skills you need to function as a practitioner in the wider creative industries.

This course will also allow you to extend and develop skill sets through interdisciplinary exchange and collaboration, mirroring working environments within the creative industries. You will develop the ability to think dynamically, act originally, collaborate and function effectively in creative workplaces,  integrating theoretical concepts, creative practice and real world skills. 

You will also, through the core modules and final project, develop your own contemporary performance practice, culminating in the presentation of a significant piece of work, which you can then go on to use in professional contexts.

COURSE DETAILS

MA Contemporary Performance Practice offers you the opportunity to develop and refine your current practices, learn about new skills and approaches and engage with the issues most relevant to making performance in the world now. 

Through the course you will:

  • Collaborate creatively to explore, experiment and create new performance work
  • Engage with key approaches and aspects of making contemporary performance, such as the use and influence of digital technologies, the role and positioning of the audience and the ways in which your practice can engage with both local and global issues
  • Explore the theories, frameworks and practices in the field and how these are developing and responding to the contemporary world

TEACHING

From the outset, you will work in an interdisciplinary fashion. Your induction will include a creative collaborative project, that will acclimatise you to the ways of working on the programme and other students.

Programme modules are delivered through practical workshops, keynote lectures, seminars, and artist-led residencies. Seminars and student-centred symposia initiate independent work, and foster and facilitate collaborative partnerships and small group work. Adaptability of graduates is considered a core vocational outcome that reflects the hybridity of global culture and is an essential strategy for learning on the programme.

The programme fosters an intensive laboratory research culture intended to explore practice, deconstruct ideas, identify needs and skillsets and apply acquired knowledge to the construction of new modes of practice. At the core of this culture is the encouragement to consistently triangulate theory and reflection with personal practice. Philosophically the programme embraces diversity, innovation and accessibility through these student-centred approaches.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is via a balanced combination of formative and summative opportunities for each module, which promotes and responds to a fluid and processual development of your practice. Formal opportunities to write are combined with oral presentations, a range of performance outcomes and online portfolios.

You will be assessed through:

  • Practical performances, combined with vivas/oral presentations (65%)
  • Written assignments (critical, reflective, analytical) (35%)

FACILITIES

Digital Performance Lab at MediaCity UK.

Theatre, studio and specialist rehearsal spaces and acting studios at New Adelphi.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates will be able to work in a range of environments from the cultural sector to future media, interactive design and production, small scale touring, venue based and independent production, theatre-making, performing and writing, community arts practices and applied theatre-making with defined sectors.

People who work in the field of contemporary performance are able to work across a wide range of applied areas of creative design and application. This ranges from traditional arts settings to the fields of interactive design, new media production and, as the use of digitally driven interfaces increases, into more commercially driven areas of work. Contemporary performance experts can have a broad set of skills from devising and composition, to technical design, production management, programming, script-development, video editing and post-production skills. 

Potential employers include arts venues and organisations, educational providers and film companies. Skills employed in the making of contemporary performance, such as independent and collaborative problem solving, gathering and synthesis of elements, understanding and integration of the needs of a range of stakeholders, can be used to address many areas of creative practice. Graduates will also be equipped through the programme to pursue careers as individual, self-employed practitioners working across forms and disciplines.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The programme has links with the following organisations and begins each year with a creative intensive, led by a key contemporary performance practitioner:

  • The Lowry Arts Centre
  • HOME
  • Z Arts
  • Blast Theory
  • Imitating the Dog
  • Station House Opera
  • Rimini Protokoll

FURTHER STUDY

Graduates of this programme will be well prepared, through its mix of theoretical and practical research, to pursue practice based MPhils/PhDs, which will build on and develop further practices established within the MA.



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The MA Making Performance is an exciting opportunity to discuss, explore and create performance in high standard professional facilities. Read more
The MA Making Performance is an exciting opportunity to discuss, explore and create performance in high standard professional facilities. The course examines practice as research, the development of creative projects, the creation of major work and the ways in which evaluation and analysis of performance can be undertaken.

The programme is ideal for graduates, teachers, professional and semi-professional artists and individuals with suitable levels of performance experience and academic skill.

What will I study?

You will study how performance can examine ideas and advance understanding whilst considering examples of contemporary performance and the major critical ideas and perspectives. You will have the chance to develop a chosen performance skill, and stage a major piece of work. The programme will be organised around the sharing of ideas and practice, and collaborative approaches.

The course comprises five modules. Three 20 credit modules are studied in the spring term. These are in the area of practice as research, an examination of contemporary performance through the development of a creative proposal, and development of a performance and practice portfolio. In the summer (May to September) you will use the departmental facilities for the development and presentation of a major piece of performance. This fourth module is followed in the autumn by a final module which is a dissertation analysing the summer practice project.

How will I study?

The course starts with seminars, workshops and master classes in the spring with a weekly performance laboratory where peer led experimentation and performance development is encouraged. In the summer you will move onto intensive rehearsal and performance development supported with tutorials. In the autumn the focus is upon one- to-one tutorials for the development of the dissertation. The whole programme is designed around a series of practitioner seminars where you are encouraged to discuss and share your approaches and ideas on performance.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through essay writing, creation of performance, and oral examination. You will also be encouraged to consider ways of presenting academic argument and analysis through media suitable for performance analysis including video, drawing and live events.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by staff in the department in the area of their professional or research expertise. The programme is also designed to include master classes and lectures from a wide range of professional artists.

What are my career prospects?

The programme will equip you with skills in research, analysis and complex and creative problem solving. You will also develop performance and practice skills. This will provide a number of possible future routes for employment including teaching, professional performance and research.

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This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. Read more

This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. The emphasis is firmly on practical film-making and television production work, underpinned with contextual theory throughout, engaging with contemporary issues and emerging trends in film and television production, as well as established film/television theories and practices.

The first two semesters of study provide a range of modules which will allow you to develop your film/television “craft skills” – this may include work with camera, lighting, sound, editing, directing and producing – while working on short film/TV projects of your own devising. There will be opportunities to collaborate with other students, and you will be encouraged to make contact with, and work with, contributors (e.g. interviewees, actors) from outside of the university. You will also develop your skills as an academic researcher by carrying out research which feeds directly into your film projects.

The course culminates in the Masters Project, where you will be the key creative leader of a film or television production, taking on the role of producer or director.

What happens on the course?

In a typical week, a full-time student on this course will have up to ten hours of class time which will be a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical workshop sessions. Most course modules will blend these different teaching methods within a given timetabled session, so there will be plenty of variety.

In lectures, you will typically be given ‘food for thought’ in relation to your own project ideas. In workshop sessions you will get to practice film-making techniques related to your own project work needs. In seminars you will share ideas and discuss with tutors and fellow students. In tutorials you will have one-to-one or small group discussion about your works in progress.

The general flow of the course for a full time student is to start with production skills, research skills and scriptwriting in the first semester. In the second semester you move on to a small personal project which will combine all that you have learned from these three areas. In the final semester, you bring it all together in a personal film/TV production project which is seen as the culmination of your studies.

Part-time students experience exactly the same course modules and course content, but necessarily broken down into smaller groups of modules.

Opportunities:

The course is built upon negotiated production work, which means you get to propose and develop your own ideas for film and television. The teaching staff are experienced with production across documentary, drama and social action production, and will guide you according to your ambitions, skills and needs.

There is always the opportunity to work on ‘live’ project briefs, which can be used as the basis of a module project, or alternatively as an extra-curricular experience which informs your development on the course and allows you to network with students on related courses.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course is taught in the School of Media, which houses a three-camera live television studio, fifteen editing suites with Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and other professional software packages, and a sound-recording/foley production suite. It also has an equipment store from which you can borrow all the camera, sound, lighting and other equipment you need to produce your work.

Who will teach you on this course?

The course teaching team includes four active doctoral or postdoctoral researchers – Adam Kossoff, Tracy McCoy, Phil Nichols and Gavin Wilson – whose interests include documentary film, social action video, screenwriting and adaptation, and cinematography. They are all qualified higher education teachers, and have many years of experience of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. They are also experienced film and programme makers.

Our students and graduates have a track-record of success in competitions and festivals, such as the prestigious Royal Television Society Student Awards, the Midland Movies awards, and the Business Disability Forum's Technology Taskforce Film Festival.

What our students think

Film-maker and editor Andrew Webber has had his films screened at international festivals in the UK, Jamaica and West Africa. He says, “The University has been extremely supportive, through my studies and after graduation.”

Niki Gandy has pursued a teaching career, and now teaches photography and art in a High School. Calling herself a “proud graduate” of our related undergraduate course, she says, “I chose it for its practical content and which helped furnish me with numerous transferable skills necessary to forge my career in teaching. Almost a decade on, my lecturers continue to provide me with support and guidance - I feel certain that my relationship with the university will continue for many years to come.”

Actor and director Brian Duffy, creator of TV series Small World – a comedy series about a group of deaf flatmates which has been shown on TV and online – says, “Studying at the University of Wolverhampton helped me with networking and organisation – especially as filmmakers came to Wolverhampton for Deaffest, the UK’s leading deaf film and arts festival. My lecturer could also sign which was a great help and a huge weight off my shoulders – I could talk to her one-to-one. That’s something I never had the pleasure of pre-university.”

Lauren Shinner has been working in media production ever since graduating. She says, “My time at the University was invaluable, I wouldn't be where I am today without it. The tutors were always helpful and push students to do their best with plenty of support and understanding and the course prepares you well for your prospective career. I've gone on to work as a video editor in education, ran my own media business and have done videos for high end charities and new bands, and am now working in media in another area. Without my degree, none of this would have been possible.”



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Want to bring your sports knowledge to radio, the internet or television screens? Southampton Solent’s Sports Broadcast Journalism master’s degree is an advanced course designed to help bring you closer to a career working in video or audio production in the world of sport. Read more

Want to bring your sports knowledge to radio, the internet or television screens? Southampton Solent’s Sports Broadcast Journalism master’s degree is an advanced course designed to help bring you closer to a career working in video or audio production in the world of sport. Taught by industry professionals and academics, this is a challenging course where teaching is led by professional standards and industry practices.

On this advanced-level course, students learn how to source, gather and deliver professional sports content on numerous different video and audio platforms across a wide variety of sports. The course also encourages students to develop their editorial and technical skills and build relationships with external clients, whilst creating a portfolio of video, audio and academic material to showcase their abilities to potential employers. 

With an increasing demand from sports audiences for innovative approaches to storytelling and high-quality production, broadcasters must constantly update their practices and utilise social media to research and promote their work. Understanding and adapting to changes within this fast-moving industry is core to the teaching on this master’s degree.

Regular ‘news days’, where students will need to respond, gather and produce stories for a same-day news and radio output, are built into the course programme to further increase students’ exposure to a realistic broadcast environment and prepare them for the deadlines and quick-thinking they’ll need to demonstrate to become a sports broadcaster. This element of the course is regarded by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council as good teaching practice.

What does this course lead to?

Recent BA (Hons) Sports Journalism graduates gained full-time employment at Daily Mail Online, The Guardian, Sky Sports, BBC Local Radio, M&Y Media, Inside the Games, Southend United FC, plus a variety of Freelance Journalist roles. Some students have moved into Public Relations, with one in an Account Manager role that earns £50,000 straight out of university. 

Who is this course for?

This course is well-suited to those with a sport or journalism background who wish to move into sports broadcasting across traditional and digital platforms.

The course content is ideal for students wishing to gain a deep understanding of the technical and practical aspects of broadcasting. 

Facilities

Students on this course have full access to the University’s industry-standard broadcast facilities, which include four television studios, eight radio studios and extensive editing and production facilities which are configured to industry standard. High definition camera equipment is also available to all video production students.

Students also have access to camera equipment and professional recording devices, plus radio and TV studios. Use of computers with Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Audition plus the use of normal Solent resources: library and IT centres.

Your future

Suitable roles for graduates include sports journalists or editors at TV stations, radio stations, productions companies or live TV units; newspaper or magazine content production; online presenter/producer; freelance broadcasting; public relations; digital and social media communications; crisis management. 

Graduates would be advised to gain the Diploma in Journalism or National Qualification in Journalism which is offered by the National Centre for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ).

MPhil/PhD options are open to those wishing to pursue academic research and teaching.

Industry links

The course team themselves are current industry professionals engaged in regular broadcast practice with television and radio channels such as Sky Sports, Sky Sports News, BT Sport, ITV, BBC, BBC Radio Solent. 

The course also builds on Solent’s current relationships with professional and amateur sports clubs in the South, including Hampshire County Cricket Club, for whom the University is an official provider of video content, and Southampton Football Club. Previous students on our sports journalism courses have benefitted from guest lectures and workshops by industry speakers. 

The MA course is new but the BA (Hons) Sports Journalism course is taught by lecturers who are all still working in the industry (Sky Sports, ITV, BT Sport, BBC Radio Solent) which means that getting high-profile guests in to talk is very easy. The guest lecturers have come down to do Q&A's, Mock Interviews, critique work and offer career advice. 

Recent broadcast guests include: Sarah Gomme and Fred Dinenage (ITV Meridian); Tom Hepworth (BBC South Today); Nigel Dean (Sky Sports); Chris Eldergill (CNN World Sport); Jeff Freeman (IMG); Paul Belverstone (Premier League Productions)

Assignments in several units to suit the needs of their employers, including:

  • Dissertation/Final Project 
  • Sports Broadcast Production 
  • Sports Documentary-making  
  • Professional Practice

Placements

Half of the Professional Practice unit involves an extended work placement within the Broadcast Industry. The course has links with industry and will provide an extended work placement (up to 15 weeks) with a broadcaster. That's Solent is the first partner but there are also conversations happening with BT Sport, Eurosport and Perform. The placement will take place in Period Two of the course but will include one day of university work each week to attend Sports Broadcast Production.

There will be one assessment in Period 1 which will be on the lecture-based teaching and then a Period 2 assessment will be a reflection on their 15-week work placement.

Students are able to gain vital hands-on experience in relevant environments such as local or national television and radio stations.

The course is aligned with and has been written in consultation with the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC), who also accredit the University’s Sports Journalism undergraduate degree. BJTC partners include the BBC News, ITV News, Sky News, Reuters.



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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology. Read more

The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology.

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you can explore transformations in media, culture and society through the practice of contemporary digital communication. You will work with one or more of the following to create installations, apps and single- and multi-screen work that's responsive to the continually changing digital landscape:

  • Animation
  • Photography
  • Video and other forms of moving image
  • Software and web design
  • Hybrid forms of image making

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. The programme is co-convened by Professor Joanna Zylinska and Daniel Rourke, and you will be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. In the past these have come from GoogleThe Science Museum and N1creative.com. There is also £6,000 bursary available for UK students studying this course. Find out more about the Stationers' Postgraduate Bursary Scheme on our departmental awards page.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

  • the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
  • the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
  • multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary 

MA Digital Media students have access to the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, currently a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As well as accessing a series of podcasts, students are offered reading groups and a masterclass with Professor Sarah Kember co-author of the book Life After New Media on which the course is based.

Modules & structure

Overview

The programme consists of:

  • Two compulsory core modules
  • Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
  • Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
  • The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Core modules

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work for image-making.

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

  • media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
  • research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
  • media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)


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This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. Read more

This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. The programme draws on the research of outstanding academic staff working in the areas of social cognition, social endocrinology, socio-cognitive neuroscience, and judgement and decision-making to provide unique, cutting-edge perspectives on humans as social beings.

About this degree

The programme provides an understanding of how the human emotional, cognitive and neural systems have evolved to sustain social co-ordination and adaptation to the environment. Key topics include: social perception, motivation, attitudes, embodiment, emotion, social judgement and decision-making, and social neuroscience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Cognition, Affect, and Motivation
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Social Neuroscience
  • Research Statistics
  • Social Cognition: Research Methods

Optional modules

Options may include the following:

  • Knowledge, Learning, and Inference
  • Applied Decision-making
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Human Learning and Memory
  • Social Psychology
  • The Psychology of Health
  • Organisational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Consulting Psychology
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive Processes
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational Research
  • The Brain in Action
  • Programming for Cognitive Science
  • Judgement and Decision-making
  • Talent Management
  • Evolution and Social Behaviour

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences has advanced technology for the study of socio-cognitive processes, including fMRI, eye-, speech- and motion tracking equipment for dyadic and group settings, as well as a 360ovideo camera. Assessment is through coursework, online assessment and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Cognition: Research and Applications MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have taken up positions in research, marketing, teaching, and management consultancy. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Behaviour Change Adviser, Bupa
  • PhD in Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin
  • Research Consultant, Behaviour Change Partners
  • Business Director, Mindshare
  • University Lecturer, Northumbria University and studying PhD in Self-perception, Northumbria University

Employability

On completion of this programme students will have acquired an understanding of the processes involved in the construction of the social reality, in particular how cognitive and affective processes guide social judgement and behaviour, and how these processes are implemented in the brain. The students will have acquired methodological skills to design and carry out socio-cognitive research which will enable them to address real-world social problems and/or pursue an academic career. In addition, they will have acquired knowledge related to theoretical and philosophical issues underlying psychological research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.



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The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. Read more
The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. As a student with a first degree in a discipline other than a technically-based media subject, you will learn to operate digital equipment and manipulate data to produce finished products for the creative industries.

This course covers video and audio production, computer graphics and animation, and the making of interactive products for distribution via new media platforms, as well as the longer established media of television, video and audio. You will work on the award-winning Brookes TV, making and producing broadcasts. There are also opportunities to work on live projects for external clients, producing promotional materials, a fast expanding area of employment.

Why choose this course?

This course will enhance your career prospects and offer you the opportunity to acquire the skills needed to work in the media industry. We have excellent facilities to support your learning and use the latest industry standard tools, such as Avid, Maya, After Effects, DaVinci Resolve and ProTools.

You will learn practical skills that will enhance your portfolio and improve your employment prospects. You have the opportunity to be part of the award-winning Brookes TV and learn the art of news production. You will benefit from being part of a large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industrial experience and connections.

This course is open to students from any academic background. Students join us from first studies in areas such as arts, literature, business, computing and engineering, among others.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period runs through until the end of September.

To qualify for a master’s degree you must pass all taught modules and the dissertation, together with the research and study methods module. The modules are as follows:
-Video Production
-Web Media
-Creating Character Models
-Creating Digital Animation and Visual Effects
-Newsroom Operation
-Professional Media Production
-Research and Study Methods
-The Dissertation

The course benefits from the rigorous validation and review processes at the University, and the external examiners are very positive about the course.

Please note, as courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the module lists you choose from may vary from the ones shown here.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, presentations, seminars, and practical and project work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through a weekly three-hour teaching block over a 12-week period.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, class tests, project work, design and oral presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Teaching and learning also draws on the diverse professional backgrounds, experience and knowledge of academics and visiting lecturers from industry.

Careers and professional development

Students graduate from the course with a broad skill set that equips them to move into a career in film and television post production, the computer games industry or live television production. Our graduates may work as freelance movie producers, graphic or games designers, but also find successful careers in international companies, such as Google, Microsoft, Discovery Channel and the BBC.

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Learn how to produce innovative and creative content for the web and digital multi-platforms for film, television and games. -Delivered in partnership with Sky. Read more
Learn how to produce innovative and creative content for the web and digital multi-platforms for film, television and games.

-Delivered in partnership with Sky.
-Learn how to generate ideas that grow audiences around films, television programmes and games online.
-Students work across original online and social video production, 360 Video and VR, digital products, apps and game development, multiplatform TV production and social media including creating great content for Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube.
-Work on live briefs for content. This year the students have worked on VR brief for Sky, a awareness campaign for Comic Relief, an interactive factual video for BBC Taster, a digital arts brief for Tate Britain, an entertainment brief for Warner Brothers Television and a digital/physical storytelling product for a high profile kids publisher.
-Regular high level industry speakers.
-Work with students from other award-winning NFTS departments including TV Entertainment, Documentary and Games.
-Students will do placements at leading media companies like Sky, and work with top-flight industry mentors for their graduation projects.
-Attend NFTS masterclasses from world leading content makers who have included in the last 18 months directors Christopher Nolan, Danny Boyle and Steve McQueen
-We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

Creative Producing for Digital Platforms Diploma teaches you the skills to build amazing experiences that audiences love, around films and television programmes online. We want to get you pitching ideas for game-changing formats that will be a hit on both TV and YouTube, creating content for new platforms from Snapchat to Facebook Live and inventing new ways to play and experience the world through VR, augmented reality and apps.

The film and television industry – along with the wider creative industries and the independent arts sector - needs people who understand what makes good digital content, how people behave online, and who have interactive, transmedia and digital production skills in order to maximise the potential of films, television programmes and creative content across new platforms. As audiences turn into users, players and creators, film and tv production and games companies need people who can maximise their presence online. This means you'll not only be involved in the production of content, you'll also be designing new forms of media, and understanding how those forms fit their market and find their audience.

Students will be taught by leading industry tutors responsible for some of the UK’s most cutting edge channels including BBC Three, All4, Nowness and Vice; and multi-platform projects like Got to Dance, The Voice, X Factor, Humans, Utopia, Misfits, Big Brother and Embarrassing Bodies.

The course advisory board includes:
-Matt Locke - Storythings
-Rosie Allimonos - YouTube
-Martin Trickey - Head of Group Digital, Warner Bros TV Production
-Jody Smith – Head of Digital, youngest media
-Justin Gayner- Channel Flip
-Kat Hebden – Fremantle
-Jon Aird – Comic Relief
-Will Saunders - BBC Creative Director, Digital

The course will be full-time over twelve months (starting in January each year) and will be delivered at the NFTS in its historic studios with regular visits to London-based production companies, and some aspects of the curriculum delivered at Sky Studios. Students will create standalone digital projects and may also work alongside students from Documentary, Comedy, Animation, Producing and Television Entertainment to create digital content for more ‘traditional’ linear programmes.

Specifically you will learn about:
-Harnessing digital technologies to support Film and Television
-The industry and market for digital content
-Creative problem solving, developing and pitching ideas
-Audience behaviour across genres and technologies
-Social Media – content, sharing, visibility and discoverability
-Lightweight video production for online
-Making projects better through rapid prototyping and wireframes
-User Experience: human interaction, research, design and user testing
-Project Management and end-to-end digital project workflow
-Understanding Data and Metrics

Students graduate able to:
-Develop ideas and pitch projects to industry professionals
-Build and manage cross platform teams
-Produce and lead multi-platform production projects
-Understand how audience behaviour will make or break a project
-Embrace the fast changes that digital innovation causes in production
-Exploit the opportunities presented by digital media

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