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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Read more

Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Consequently, there is a need to improve our ability to understand, predict and respond to patterns and dynamics of disease and to control outbreaks.

The R(D)SVS and SRUC partnership creates the greatest concentration of research power in veterinary and agricultural sciences in the UK. The MSc draws on this wealth of experience and research activity to provide scientific knowledge of the fundamental biological processes (e.g. behaviour, physiology, immunology, ecology) and environmental and farming management practices (e.g. husbandry, nutrition, livestock trade) driving disease transmission, persistence, prevalence and spread in livestock production systems. This enables in-depth understanding of complex environmental patterns of disease, which facilitates prediction of disease risk and control. This multidisciplinary systems approach will provide you with the skills to make significant contributions to tackling food security, climate change and disease control in your role as an animal health professional.

By the end of the programme you will not only have a detailed understanding of the biology driving disease persistence and prevalence, but also how the biology scales up from individuals to populations. You will understand how this interacts with agricultural management practices to determine the efficacy of disease control strategies and livestock production (i.e. interdisciplinary systems thinking and communication). Furthermore, the systems approach offers a way to frame disease challenges and problem solve disease risk at a range of scales (e.g. from veterinarians tackling specific outbreaks to the consequences of climate change on disease risk). To this end the programme provides training in methodological skills for the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies, disease surveillance and disease control in animal populations and wider host communities.

Courses are delivered by active researchers presenting their own research, which is placed into context with global grand challenges. As such, you will be exposed to and taught skills appropriate for developing a research career.

Online learning

The programme will use the University’s award winning online learning environments, which includes video podcasts, web-based discussion forums and expert tuition.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered part-time by online learning over period of 3-6 years.

You may undertake the programme by intermittent study (flexible progression route), accruing credits within a time limit of:

  • 1 years for the Certificate (maximum period 2 years)
  • 2 years for the Diploma (maximum period 4 years)
  • 3 years for the MSc (maximum period of 6 years including a maximum period of 12 months from the start of your written reflective element to it being completed)

The programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied; other than the three core courses required for the certificate, students may choose to study individual courses, to complete a sufficient number of credits to be awarded the:

  • Certificate (60 credits)
  • Diploma (120 credits)
  • MSc (180 credits)

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge about disease systems in livestock production environments and the interactions between the biological and livestock management processes driving disease dynamics.
  • Acquire specific skills to link individual farm environments and management practices to disease risk and production efficiency at farm and national scales.
  • Be able to interpret, be critical of and communicate scientific results and information in research.

Career opportunities

The courses and programme as a whole will provide:

  • general postgraduate training (e.g. for people in education, government, policy-making, agricultural and veterinary organisations) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment
  • general postgraduate training for people considering a career in research (e.g. a precursor to a PhD)
  • topic-specific postgraduate training (e.g. for veterinarians for continuing professional development) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment


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-Join a programme that is sharply tailored to respond to the current demand for creative professionals who are able to provide sound and music content for the film and video game industry. Read more
-Join a programme that is sharply tailored to respond to the current demand for creative professionals who are able to provide sound and music content for the film and video game industry
-Develop a showreel demonstrating your creative talent in composing music and designing sound for a wide range of media (video, film, video games), opening up a 360º horizon of possibilities and opportunities for work
-Collaborate with MA Film students in our School of Creative Arts
-Learn in the university’s top-class facilities, assisted by tutors who are themselves industry professionals

Why choose this course?

This course is conceived to meet the current industry’s demand for creative professionals who are equally versed in music composition as well as sound design, and can work effectively across a range of media – whether it’s video, narrative film or interactive games.

All aspects of the soundtrack are systematically explored in both linear and non-linear environments, leading to a fuller understanding of the discipline, of the industry, and of the production processes.

On this course, you will harness the whole gamut of sonic resources for your creative practice – from acoustic instruments to electroacoustic sound, utilising all the latest studio techniques and technologies.

You’ll study in the University’s top-class studios, supported by tutors who are experienced industry professionals, with potential to collaborate with students from our MA Film course.

With targeted sessions and expert guidance, you’ll develop a showreel demonstrating your creative talent in providing sound and music for a wide range of media (video, film, video games), opening up a 360º horizon of possibilities and opportunities for work.

What our students say

“The course is well structured, giving opportunities to explore the field of composition in a very broad way and also focus on particular areas of interest. I have genuinely found it exciting and inspiring to participate and I found the atmosphere just as I hoped: creative, relevant, stimulating, professional and fun.”
Nicola Hutchison, teacher at Hertfordshire College of Music and active multidisciplinary artist

"The MSc Composition course was a real eye-opener as to the many applications of composition, allowing me to produce work far beyond the realms of what I thought possible."
Chris Moorhead, freelance composer for media, and session player

"It has been a life changing experience for me, and that is no overstatement. Your particularly vigorous and passionate dedication to cracking open our own personal artistic consciousness underpinned a revelatory roller coaster ride from which I learned and will continue to learn a great deal."
Alex Simler, instrumental teacher at Hertfordshire Music Services

Careers

Graduates from this programme will be ideally positioned to pursue a career in the thriving field of acoustic/electroacoustic composition and sound design for film, television, and interactive games. You may, in addition, consider positions in music publishing, music journalism and criticism, teaching or you may continue your higher education at doctoral level.

Graduate successes

Sebastien Crossley graduated in 2010, and is currently composing for a new Channel 4 sitcom.

Nichola Hutchison graduated in 2011 and teaches composition at Hertfordshire College of Music. She is also active as a multidisciplinary artist creating A/V installations for galleries.

Chris Barn graduated in 2012 and is composing for the Channel 4 Random Acts series with renowned poet Benjamin Zephaniah.

Edward Abela graduated in 2013, and has composed for several short films for SABB productions, SMMusic Library, and Candie & Bell, amongst others.

2014 graduate Jamie Stonehouse is now working as an assistant composer and audio engineer at media company Urban Soul Orchestra, and has just been awarded a 3-year studentship for doctoral studies at Kent University.

Callum Judd graduated in 2015 and is working as a free lance composer for a variety of commercial projects, including a documentary on Japan.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance, recording, as necessary. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Major Study:Music Projects
-Music, Media and Production (Discourse/Reflection)
-Practice 1:Soundtrack and the Cinematic
-Practice 2: Soundtrack in Digital and Interactive Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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Computer vision and imaging is the exciting science and technology of machines that see, concerned with building artificial systems that obtain information from images that are derived from a range of sources. Read more
Computer vision and imaging is the exciting science and technology of machines that see, concerned with building artificial systems that obtain information from images that are derived from a range of sources. This MSc in Computing with Vision and Imaging teaches you the skills necessary to undertake work in this ever-evolving field.

Why study at Dundee?

Computer vision and imaging is a rapidly expanding field with plenty of real-life applications and opportunities. Here at Dundee, we encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to computer systems design and production.

Application areas include:
controlling processes - e.g. an industrial robot or an autonomous vehicle
detecting events - e.g. for visual surveillance or people counting
organising information - e.g. for indexing databases of images and image sequences
modelling objects or environments - e.g. for industrial inspection
medical image analysis
topographical modelling

You will acquire skills in computer vision, inference, algorithmic underpinnings of computer vision systems, how images and signals are formed, filter, compressed and analysed, and how multiple images can be combined.

Throughout this course, you will also develop the necessary skills to undertake independent research and participate in proposal development and innovation - an excellent grounding for many future careers.

What's Great about studying at Dundee?

Research-led teaching:
Teaching at Dundee is research-led, meaning that the MSc programme benefits from association with cutting-edge research of international standard and its commercial applications.

We also have an active Computer Vision and Image Processing research group. Our Vision and Imaging students are involved in a number of http://www.computing.dundee.ac.uk/projects/vision/projects.php, and have been involved with a number of completed research projects like ACTIVE, a project concerning adaptive interfaces for the operation of secondary controls in motor vehicles using pointing gestures and virtual dashboards.

Links with industry

The School of Computing collaborates with, and has links to, companies such as IBM, NCR and Oracle.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

Postgraduate culture

The School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

What you will study

You select seven taught modules, three per semester, during the period September-April. You will make module selections with your advisor.

Semester 1 (Sept-Dec):
Probabilistic Inference and Learning
Signals and Images

Plus two from:
Technology Innovation Management
Computer Graphics
Logical Inference & Symbolic Reasoning
Information Theory

Semester 2 (Jan-Mar):
Vision and Perception
Research Methods

Plus one from:
Computing Research Frontiers
Multi-agent Systems & Grid Computing

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the MSc project which runs from May to September, or to a Diploma project lasting 9 weeks.

Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme. These joint classes offer a valuable opportunity to learn from, and discuss the material with, other groups of students with different backgrounds and perspectives.

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Computing coursework is often very practical, e.g. writing computer programs, designing interfaces, writing reports, constructing web sites, testing software, implementing databases, analysing problems or presenting solutions to clients.

Careers

The knowledge, skills and understanding that you will gain in the areas of computer vision, inference and learning will enable you to work effectively in the application of video and image-based computing - whether you choose industry, commerce or research.

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. Read more
Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. We need to understand the conditions that make our daily lives vulnerable and to develop strategies to manage risk and mitigate the impact of crisis, whilst also fostering critical reflections on those very strategies and techniques which seek to keep us secure.

This course combines thematic elements which theorise geopolitics and security with specialist options, which allow you to follow your own interests, alongside a dissertation, which can be strongly connected to work-related/future career interests. Multiple methods of assessment and diverse research methods encourage skills development and employability. We will encourage students to network with relevant organizations and institutions, building on staff expertise and experience.

The course is designed for both ambitious young graduates and experienced professionals working in commercial or political organisations such as banking, energy, media, think tanks, NGOs and government, where risk (management), threat and insecurity are critical to strategic policy development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscgeopoliticsandsecurity.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Departments of Geography and Politics and International Relations are top-ranked research-led departments.

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research and experience outside the academy.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in geopolitics and security while allowing you to specialize in issues and themes of interest to you.

- There is a strong emphasis on skills development especially communication.

- Highly focused on employability – invited outside speakers will provide networking opportunities.

Department research and industry highlights

- Leading researchers and research groups (e.g. Politics, Development and Sustainability Group in Geography) with established track record in grant awards (e.g. from the ESRC, AHRC, Leverhulme Trust, EPSRC, British Academy, British Council, Falkland Island Government and the EU Marie-Curie fund).

- External networking and public engagement (e.g. working with UK government departments including MOD (British Antarctic Survey); Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Civil Contingencies Secretariat; the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology and the Canada-UK Colloquium.

- Networking and Knowledge Transfer (e.g. collaborative postgraduate projects with major institutions such as the British Library, Science Museum and Royal Geographical Society). We have also worked closely with the BBC and its world service contributing to programme development and televised broadcasting.

- Ongoing collaboration with leading think-tanks such as Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Chatham House.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- A sophisticated knowledge and critical understanding of geopolitics and security including core debates, and case studies.

- A detailed appreciation of methods and sources used to investigate geopolitical and security related issues and themes

- High-level skills development especially in communication (including social media), report writing, briefing papers, political debate and critical thinking

- Opportunities to enhance employability through practical experience and exposure to relevant individuals and organizations in the geopolitical/security-related field

Assessment

Formal and informal assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, oral and group work presentations, policy, briefing and media reports, video and documentary production, and a dissertation. Field visits to important sites and organisations, including RUSI, will also be available, supporting collegial interaction between students and staff. Emphasis is placed on informal assessment (especially through group work) so that students have plenty of opportunities to receive formative support and guidance.

Employability & career opportunities

Geography and PIR graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many careers including working in government, media, non-governmental organizations and public organizations both in the UK and the wider world. This new course is intended for both experienced professionals seeking further academic training/reflection and also younger graduates eager to gain further skills development and relevant experience through study. Assessment and presentation opportunities as well as strategic field visits will help develop these skills, while a programme of external speakers will provide insight into the field. There will also be the potential for internships and work placements. The course will act as an ideal stepping-stone for PhD progression should this be chosen as a career pathway.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This multidisciplinary course aims to promote an advanced level of knowledge and understanding underpinning practice in the area of Counselling with Children Young People and their families. Read more
This multidisciplinary course aims to promote an advanced level of knowledge and understanding underpinning practice in the area of Counselling with Children Young People and their families.

Course content

This exciting course supports students in developing skills and theoretical knowledge of counselling with children, young people and their families. It is designed for individuals with a significant interest in counselling work with children, who may be practitioners from health, social or voluntary services who work in some capacity with children and young people, or who may be graduates of psychology and other cognate disciplines, social and behavioural sciences, education, health, social care and related fields.

The course is taught by experienced counsellors and therapists with a varied background, supported by some practitioners from allied professions (e.g. psychology, social work, nursing, psychiatric nursing, law and psychiatry).

Students of Counselling with Children and Young People can graduate with either a Postgraduate Diploma or an MSc.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Conference

The CAHMS Conference at the University of Northampton is a three day conference, and you have the option of either volunteering for a couple of hours and attending for free, or pay (last year it was about £15 per day) to cover the cost of lunches and printed materials.

Course modules (16/17)

-Understanding Mental Health in Children and Young People
-Core Skills for Working with Children and Young People
-Counselling with Children, Young People and Families
-Counselling Children, Young People and Families in Practice
-Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods
-Dissertation and Research Methods

Methods of Learning

Lectures, workshops, one-to-one, private study, online activities, group work, role play.

Schedule

Formal teaching takes place and on one to two full days per week for full-time students and on one full day per week in the first year and one full day approximately every other week in the second year for part-time students.

In addition, there is a three day taught intensive session for all students three times per year (first year only). In addition to this, students will be expected to attend one-to-one tutorials at least twice per trimester.

Assessments

The assessment strategy is designed to include a broad range of assessment methods, in order to ensure that students have the maximum opportunity to demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes for the programme. These include: essays, case studies, self-reflective log books, critical reviews, video recorded role plays and oral presentations. There are no examinations.

The Research Methods and Dissertation module supports the students in completing a supervised but original and independently undertaken research and it is assessed through a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-The MSc promotes an advanced theoretical understanding of Counselling with Children and Young People, integrating opportunities to develop practical and professional counselling skills.
-The programme equips students with a working knowledge of child development, psychological difficulties in children and young people in their contexts and counselling based skills for working with them and their carers within an an eco-systemic perspective integrating Systemic Family Therapy, CBT, and Creative therapies.
-This is developed through roleplays, small group process and other skill oriented taught sessions. Supervised placement in a counselling context is mandatory to the enhancement of skills.
-In addition, opportunities for students are structured into the programme to engage in personal development, self-awareness, reflective practice and to benefit from the supervisory relationship. Our CAMH conference (see highlight video below) is an excellent example of extra opportunities available as part of the course.
-Our experienced course team includes specific expertise in CBT, systemic family therapy, Creative therapies, Play therapy and Gestalt approaches, who are able to teach students and integrated approach to counselling with children and young people.

Careers

As a professional master programme, the MSc CCYP leads to a counselling qualification and opens a range of employment possibilities up for its graduates (e.g. private practice, educational and healthcare institutions, community and youth work services, third sector organizations, residential facilities). Graduates may take the MSc as a stepping stone towards further postgraduate study (e.g. Clinical Doctorate).

For students with a first degree in psychology (which is Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) accredited) further postgraduate training opportunities will include doctoral training on British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited courses in Counselling Psychology. Graduates of the programme will be able to work as a counsellor in a range of settings such as healthcare and educational institutions, residential facilities and community and youth work agencies.

For students with a professional background (such as teaching, nursing and social work) the programme will strengthen your skills and competencies and allow you to develop a strong specialism in children’s mental health. You will have the skills to appropriately position yourself as a counsellor and will have a good critical and in-depth understanding of professional practices when working with children, young people, families, parents and carers.

Work Experience - A supervised placement practice of a minimum of 100 hours is compulsory.

On-course requirements

To count towards a professional body accreditation, such as UKCP or BACP, the course require students to undertake a supervised placement practice of a minimum of 100 hours and a minimum 40 hours of personal therapy with an approved and BACP or UKCP accredited counsellor or therapist. A student membership of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), a professional indemnity insurance and a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check are also mandatory. These requirements imply additional costs on the top of the fee.

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Traditional news outlets are moving towards online products at an accelerated pace. Digital technology is profoundly changing journalism, with innovations like hyperlocal news and mobile media reporting becoming increasingly prevalent. Read more

Why this course?

Traditional news outlets are moving towards online products at an accelerated pace.

Digital technology is profoundly changing journalism, with innovations like hyperlocal news and mobile media reporting becoming increasingly prevalent.

This course is designed to equip you with the necessary skills to produce multimedia news and features. You’ll develop sound analytical, ethical and entrepreneurial skills in order to perform at a high level in the digital media world.

We aim to produce high quality, fresh-thinking graduates who have a passion to communicate and can articulate their ideas through effective story-telling.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/digitaljournalism/

You’ll study

You’ll work in the University’s simulated news environment and also report externally using mobile media. You’ll also:
- pursue real-life stories
- produce your own journalism packages
- experiment with entrepreneurial projects
- report, write and edit using text, pictures, video and audio to tell multimedia stories effectively

In Semester 2, you devise, launch, produce and market your own online publication.

In the Entrepreneurial Journalism class, which is run in collaboration with the University’s Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, you’ll learn about developing a portfolio career, personal branding and creating new ventures.

Throughout the course, there are opportunities to work on various projects with organisations from journalism and the creative industries.

Core classes

Core classes are as follows:
- Multimedia Journalism
- Entrepreneurial Journalism
- Producing Media
- Scots Law for Journalists
- Media Ethics

Optional classes

You'll choose from:
- Investigative Journalism: History & Theory
- Journalism & Society

Academic Dissertation : you will choose to undertake either an academic dissertation or a production dissertation.

Work placement

You’ll gain professional work experience by undertaking a placement at a newspaper, news agency or broadcast organisation.

You’re expected to arrange your own placement. This is normally for a period of up to four weeks during December/January or March/April.

Previous students have completed placements at the Herald and Times Group, the BBC, STV, the Independent, various local newspapers, company press offices and NGOs, such as the Scottish Refugee Council.

Facilities

You'll work in the University's simulated news environment.
You'll report externally using mobile media and digital recorders and cameras. You'll have access to industry standard audio and video editing software.

Student competitions

In 2013, the MLitt Digital Journalism students won the Multimedia Publication of the Year award, sponsored by the Herald, at the Scottish Student Journalism Awards. The award was for their online news site, the Inner Circle.
The class of 2014 also won with their publication, The Wee G, which offers readers an alternative insight into news and current affairs in Glasgow.

Scottish Student Journalism Awards 2014:
- Sam Shedden won Student Journalist of the Year and Feature of the Year
- Luciano Graca won Sport Story of the Year
- Mark Simpson won Scoop of the Year and a commendation in the Feature of the Year category
- Gillian Furmage, Christopher Morton and Stewart Ross were all nominated in various categories

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

[[Learning & teaching]
The course is delivered by lectures and seminars, during which a range of teaching and learning strategies are used.
These include formal talks, discussions, presentations, role-playing exercises and discussion of recorded material.
You'll also pursue real-life stories, produce your own journalism packages and experiment with entrepreneurial projects in extended workshops. You'll devise, launch and produce your own online publications predominantly through independent learning.

Guest lectures

We've a programme of visiting speakers including:
- Calum Macdonald- Herald digital editor
- Matt Roper- STV online editor

The Literary Lunch series is run by our own Literary Fellow, Keith Wright. The series showcases the best in Scottish writing and features poets and novelists such as Liz Lochhead, James Robertson and Andrew Greig.

Assessment

Assessment is via various means depending on the nature of the class.
Academic subjects are generally assessed by written essays, case studies and presentations.
In the Media Ethics class, students complete an innovative assessment, which requires them to work together in groups to research, create and produce a short video that explores a journalism ethics topic.
In practical journalism classes, students produce individual multimedia journalism packages, portfolios of their own work and a group online news site.
Peer assessment is also used in some of these classes.

Careers

Graduates of the course are employed at organisations such as:
- the Herald and Times Group
- the Press and Journal (Aberdeen)
- BBC
- STV
- DC Thomson
- the Daily Record

as well as running their own entrepreneurial ventures such as JournoWave.

Job titles include:
- content producers
- social media managers
- editorial offers
- communications officers

How much will I earn?

- the average starting salary for a broadcast journalist is around £15,000 - £20,000. Starting salaries vary significantly between local and national broadcasters.*
- according to the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) 's 2013 survey, Journalists at Work, the average salary for a newspaper journalist is £22,250.*

*information is intended only as a guide. Figures taken from Prospects.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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At the nexus of creativity, technology and business, this postgraduate degree is designed for graduates who want to further develop their music engineering and production skills, to establish a career as a professional producer in the music industry or related fields. Read more
At the nexus of creativity, technology and business, this postgraduate degree is designed for graduates who want to further develop their music engineering and production skills, to establish a career as a professional producer in the music industry or related fields.

As the music industry is constantly evolving, students on this course are equipped to deal with an ever-changing commercial landscape, while developing their personal potential. Key areas of the industry are studied from a wide variety of angles, but without losing sight of the primary goal to develop a sustainable career within music production.

An important element of the course is the practical application of your knowledge to generate highly creative work. Allied areas are also examined, which allows graduates to apply their skills in many other media-related fields, including film and animation. Such a strategic approach to your higher-level study engenders responsibility, critical thinking, problem-solving, and the highly creative generation of musical and visual tangibles.

In addition, our graduates will be trained in the use of Apple Logic Pro and Avid Pro Tools.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/131-msc-music-engineering-and-production

What you will study

The MSc Music Engineering and Production includes:
- Recording or Professional Music Production
- Music Post-Production
- Sequencing/Synthesis/Sampling
- History, Analysis, Repertoire and Theory
- Remixing Production
- Major Individual Research Project (or Learning Through Employment Research Project)

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

NOTE: Modules are subject to change.

Learning and teaching methods

The MSc Music Engineering and Production degree is taught through lectures, seminars and workshops, with emphasis on the practical application of your knowledge.

All assessments are coursework-based, allowing a detailed application of your knowledge and experience. Assessment is through continuous assignments, seminars and a dissertation based on real-life scenarios. The final major project is presented through written submission alongside an oral examination.

The Masters project may be in any area derived from, or related to, the course or the general discipline of music engineering and production, e.g, sound design in animation, music video, album recording and release, and sound synthesis. There are also opportunities to work on academic staff research projects, or with one of several PhD researchers in the Faculty’s Division of Music and Sound.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Engineering and production professionals work as music producers, sound engineers, writers and arrangers, sound designers and mixers/remixers in surround. Career opportunities will vary according to an individual’s capabilities and passion, but it is expected that graduates of USW’s MSc Music Engineering and Production should play a full role in shaping the future of music and sound in the UK and further afield.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills. As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that final projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

The MSc project may be in any area derived from, or related to, the course or general discipline of Music Engineering and Production. For example, sound design in animation, music video, album recording and release, and sound synthesis. There are also opportunities to work on academic staff research projects, or with one of several PhD researchers in the Division of Music and Sound.

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This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Read more

This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Students spend year one in London, primarily based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families and year two at Yale.

About this degree

The programme provides students with an excellent foundation in developmental psychopathology and neuroscience, with a focus on:

  • The emergence of childhood clinical disorders (e.g. autism, depression and PTSD)
  • Multiple theoretical frameworks of disorder
  • Research practice, including science communication
  • The translational issues around research and psychological treatments

This two-year MRes has a total value of 330 credits. 135 credits of taught modules are taken in the first year and in the second year, the research portfolio, comprising an oral presentation, proposal, dissertation and research poster, comprises a total of 195 credits.

Year one core modules

  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory
  • The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis
  • Research Methods I: Research Skills
  • Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical Analysis
  • Research Methods III: Evaluating Research Literature (formative)
  • Introduction to Neuroscience Methods
  • Affective Neuroscience
  • Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology I
  • Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology II

Year two core modules

  • Series of formative workshops (e.g. fMRI; EEG; Advanced Research Design; Integrating Cross-disciplinary Models)
  • Research Portfolio (see below)

Dissertation/research project

The research portfolio comprises a project presentation – made up of an oral presentation, slides and a written proposal, a written dissertation and a research poster. All students undertake a research project supervised by a faculty member while at Yale, completing a dissertation of 15,000–17,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme comprises lectures, research classes, tutorials, small-group seminars, and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is predominantly through essays, statistical assignments, a piece of science communication and unseen examinations. In the second year assessment will be based on the research portfolio - comprising an oral presentation, written research proposal, the dissertation and a poster. Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology MRes

Careers

Typically our students are interested in pursuing a research or clinical career. Of students who graduated within the last two years, 23% are now enrolled on PhD programmes; 38% are employed as research associates, 23% are undertaking further training and the remaining 16% are undertaking clinical work.

Employability

The two-year structure allows students to not only develop in-depth theoretical knowledge and research skills but also provides the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of research under the mentorship of a leading Yale academic and their research lab. A grounding in quantitative analysis and fMRI/EEG skills combined with a focus on clinical disorders during childhood make students particularly attractive as prospective PhD candidates and doctoral Clinical Psychology applicants. Students are encouraged to publish their research where possible.

Some students seek voluntary clinically relevant experience across both years, which is particularly helpful for those considering applications to Clinical Psychology doctoral programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Students acquire excellent research skills in statistical analysis and a grounding in neuroimaging methods, including fMRI and EEG, and expertise in critical evaluation of research.

The programme is based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in London, a world-renowned centre for research, training and clinical practice in the field of child mental health. Please note: during the course of the academic year 2018/19, the centre will relocate from Hampstead to a new, purpose-built campus near King's Cross Station.

UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. The division has excellent links with other universities including Yale, providing unique research and networking opportunities for postgraduate students.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources, including state-of-the art neuroimaging equipment.

The division offers an extremely supportive environment with opportunities to attend numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

You can view video testimonials from previous students on The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families webpage

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA



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Gain specialist insight into the technology behind digital entertainment. Become immersed in everything from computer animation to visual effects and games. Read more

Gain specialist insight into the technology behind digital entertainment. Become immersed in everything from computer animation to visual effects and games.

You will study a range of modules including computer graphics and visual effects, and computer vision.

You’ll explore different approaches for creating visual effects and the relationship between the segmentation, classification and identification of images and video.

You’ll learn about modern visual effects tools, programming techniques and physics-based animation, and have the opportunity to apply them and to adapt algorithms to typical problems in an advanced visual effects R&D environment.

This course is for you if you’ve gained mathematics or computer science skills in your first degree and are interested in the technology behind computer games and other digital entertainment.

The course will give you the opportunity to undertake research in our leading centres, including the highly regarded Centre for Digital Entertainment. Our facilities also include the £5 million Centre for the Analysis of Motion, Entertainment Research and Applications (CAMERA).

You’ll complete your course with the knowledge and transferable skills to prepare you for a career in the visual effects, computer animation and computer games industries. You’ll gain an understanding of the how to put together a project from scratch, rather than simply use commercial packages, so that your career can take you to a senior position more quickly.

As we involve our industry partners throughout your course, you’ll receive help in getting your CV to our partner companies. When you graduate, you will have already started to build your own industry network.

Recent graduates have gone on to work with companies such as Imagination Technologies, Electronic Arts and Nokia.

Watch a short video on our new Centre for the Analysis of Motion, Entertainment Research & Applications (CAMERA) (https://vimeo.com/133344283).

You can either study the MSc full-time, for one year, or take an optional professional placement and complete the course in two years. The placement offers paid, practical experience in an industrial or commercial environment. Here you’ll have the chance to apply the knowledge and skills you have gained so far, improving your understanding of digital entertainment in practice as you look to build a successful career in this field.

Visit the Department of Computer Science (http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/) for further information on the department.

Why study Digital Entertainment at Bath?

The programme exists in partnership with our highly regarded Centre for Digital Entertainment, the UK’s premier doctoral training centre for the digital entertainment sector. With established experience in training for this economically important sector, we’ve been able to develop the MSc with 35 of our most innovative partner companies (for example Double Negative Visual Effects, EA Games, Disney Research), as well as existing students.

The MSc in Digital Entertainment is designed to equip you with a wide range of specialist knowledge and transferable skills, so that you can build a successful career within any number of areas in digital entertainment. We involve industry partners in the provision of our course to ensure we provide relevant, timely and current experience to improve your career prospects.

During your studies you’ll also have the chance to study alongside our doctoral students, and enhance your knowledge and understanding with specialist classes taught by company experts.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/msc-digital-entertainment/

Career opportunities

The MSc in Digital Entertainment will equip students with the knowledge and transferable skills for a career in the Visual Effects, Computer Animation and Computer Games industries. It provides a solid understanding across all of these sectors, narrowing down over the year to the part that interests you most. It explains how it is done, rather than how to use commercial packages, so that your career can take you to a senior position more quickly. We involve our industry partners, to make sure you are getting the right kind of experience.

At graduation you will have the breadth which all of these industries require but the deeper specialised knowledge and ability to think for yourself which lead to a high-end career. We can help you get your CV to our supporter companies and you will have already started to build your own industry network during the year.

The Department has active collaborations with academics in leading universities in Europe, Australasia, the USA and Japan. Strong links with industry, e.g. HP labs, Airbus, Qinetiq, Westland, Toshiba and Vodafone.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice. You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy. Read more

Why choose this course?

• Opportunities to see live demonstrations and attend practical workshops will help you apply theory to practice
• You'll gain an understanding of how developmental theory and research is integrated into psychological/non-psychological organisational practice, documentation and policy
• Our research-active teaching team are experts in applied developmental psychology - their research informs the content of this course and ranges from topics such as maternity and the newborn through to the role of emotion in recognising words
• Our specialist facilities include a video observation suite, EEG, eye-tracking equipment, and a psychology test bank
• Studying this course will equip you with an excellent basis to pursue PhD study or bridge the gap between further training in developmental, educational or clinical psychology
• The combination of contemporary and applied study ensure that you'll be equipped to consider global opportunities when you graduate

About this course:

Developmental psychology is a dynamic and evolving subject area with an increasing emphasis on the application of knowledge to real-life settings. Our course focuses on the application of theory to various settings which have real world implications, and is consistent with a more impactful relationship between academic and professional psychology in a range of employment contexts.

An expert teaching team

Dr Christopher Barnes: Special research interests include Developmental/Health Psychology: Maternity and the Newborn; Cognitive, Motor and Social Development; Maternal Mental Health; Parenting; Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Attachment

Dr Simon Bignell: Special research interests include Developmental Disorders (e.g. ADHD; Autism; Behavioural Disorders); Children’s Language and Literacy; Cyberpsychology (e.g. Technology-Enhanced Learning, Multi-User Virtual Worlds & Gaming); Psychology of Vegetarianism & Veganism

Dr Jenny Hallam: Special research interests include Exploring children's experiences of art in the classroom and how children would like to see art taught, Designing, implementing and evaluating art interventions designed to enable primary teachers to teach art more effectively

Dr Sigrid Lipka: Special research interests include Language processing in adults: sentence & text comprehension; the role of emotion in recognising words; sentence comprehension strategies across different language; individual differences in language processing; dyslexia

Strong career focus

The content of the course has been developed to ensure that graduates have an up-to-date understanding of the role of psychological theory, research and methodology in the context of applied developmental psychology, as well as developing a range of transferable skills. In order to help you decide on a career pathway, and to facilitate employer links, modules will include lectures from guest speakers across a variety of developmental psychology careers, for example working within the NHS, mental health, teaching, research and consultancy.

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