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The Master Victimology and Criminal Justice at Tilburg University is the only Master's program in Europe and one of a handful of programs worldwide, focusing on victimology. Read more
The Master Victimology and Criminal Justice at Tilburg University is the only Master's program in Europe and one of a handful of programs worldwide, focusing on victimology.

What is this master about?

Victimology can be considered the younger sister of criminology. Its object of study is the position of victims in society. Drawing upon the insights offered by law, psychology, criminology and other social sciences, victimologists look at the consequences of becoming of victim of crime, accidents or disasters with the ultimate aim of setting people on the path of recovery and restoration.

For whom is it meant?

Being the top-notch program in Victimology and Criminal Justice, this master is aimed at motivated students with educational backgrounds in criminology, law, psychology, sociology, anthropology and liberal arts.

Why study Victimology and Criminal Justice?

The Master aims at teaching students to academically analyze and professionally solve psychosocial, economic, political, and legal problems arising from victimization. It particularly focuses on the victim within the context of the criminal justice system.

Students can expect to acquire the necessary intellectual knowledge and skills to tackle victimological or related challenges in either a academic research or professional setting. With a growing need for employees with an academic background in victimology in international and national, governmental and non-governmental organizations in the field of criminal justice, health care, disaster relieve, human rights, etc. graduates of this program have a wide range of employment opportunities. The master also offers an excellent preparation for those who want to pursue a Ph D.

Career Perspective Victimology and Criminal Justice

Victim-related issues are of increasing interest within academia, policy-making, and the public and the private sectors at both the national and international levels.

Graduates of the Master in Victimology and Criminal Justice are in high demand by institutions and organizations dealing with victims of crime and/or human rights violations, such as:
•ministries
•local governments
•victim support or assistance bodies
•national, European and international public or private institutions dealing with victims of crime and/or human rights violations

Furthermore, with the growing importance of victims' rights in criminal justice systems, graduates of this Master's program can expect to embark on a rewarding career in victim-related services within judiciaries.

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From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc. Read more
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc.

Who is it for?

This degree is for independent, critical thinkers who want to work, or are working, within criminal justice or want to undertake further research. Many of our students have undergraduate criminology degrees, and come from universities across the world. Often they want to continue their learning or specialise within a specific subject area. Students also come from other science, humanities and legal backgrounds and from within the criminal justice system. Research methods form a key component of the programme so having an interest in data collection and analysis is valuable.

"To understand crime in the 21st century you have to have specialist criminological knowledge. We don’t just focus on the criminal act; we look at the societal reaction to crime and the cultural narratives that exist around it. At City we will encourage you to develop your criminological imagination but also to use it." - Professor Eugene McLaughlin

Objectives

At City we believe crime is multi-dimensional, which is why this MSc course brings the victim into focus, not just the offender. The criminal mind is complex and our understanding of it matters – not just to the individual, but also to their family, the community and wider society at large.

We live in a criminogenic global society; one that is producing new forms of crime, and new criminal opportunities. City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc course unpicks the power of the criminological imagination within this society.

This is not a Masters that focuses purely on criminal justice or crime control – instead we emphasise cutting-edge theoretical analysis and methodological training, so you can research the contemporary significance of crime and see how it can be a powerful marker of social and institutional change.

Originally part of City’s MA in Human Rights, this degree offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between criminology and human rights violations. It is global in outlook because, by its nature, crime is transnational and is taught by eminent criminologists who author the books that appear on reading lists across the country.

Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Why don’t more people commit criminal acts?
-What does crime tell us about the society in which we live?
-Why is crime considered abnormal but at the same time central to news, fiction and popular culture?
-What would a victim-centred justice system look like?

Academic facilities

When it comes to studying criminology, London is an amazing facility. It is one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories offering a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy, justice and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We will teach you through a combination of lectures, interactive workshops and seminars, in the first and second term (September-April). This is supplemented by insight from external visiting criminologists, criminal justice charities, research agencies and, in some cases, retired criminals. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions, debate your ideas and present your own evidence around particular arguments.

During the dissertation phase of the degree you also have the chance to visit the Central Criminal Court (otherwise known as the Old Bailey) and in some cases undertake a prison visit. One student is currently in New York, researching the New York Police Department, as part of her dissertation on the stresses of being a police officer in 2016.

The majority of postgraduate sociology modules are assessed by coursework. However, if you choose to study some modules outside of the department you may have different assessment methods so please check this carefully. You will need to gain a minimum pass mark of 50% in all assessment components.

The dissertation marks the point in the course where you begin to take hold of your research and let your criminological imagination come into play. The dissertation (of 15,000 words) accounts for one third of the total marks for the Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc degree. By the end of the first term you will have to start considering your dissertation topic. You may already know you area of focus, but we offer guidance and support through dissertation workshops.

Modules

You will take three 30-credit compulsory core modules and two 15-credit elective modules. You can then choose from two of four elective modules to hone your degree towards your own area of interest. In the final part of the course you take part in a dissertation workshop and produce a dissertation over the summer period.

The first module, ‘Analysing crime’ makes up the course’s theoretical base. You then research contemporary developments in criminal justice and penal policy within the second core module. At this point in the course you get to choose from a number of elective modules covering diverse topics including the dark side of media notoriety and celebrity, and the criminal mind. All these modules draw on the School’s research strengths making them unique to City.

Core modules
-Analysing crime
-Criminal justice policy and practice
-Research Workshop
-Dissertation

Elective modules
-The criminal mind
-Victims: policy and politics
-Developments in communication policy
-Celebrity

NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Career prospects

The Criminology and Criminal Justice course is taught by internationally recognised experts and prepares you for careers across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

From research to policy development and from the security services to the criminal justice system and victim support, you will have a wealth of employment options once you graduate. Previous graduates are now working in:
-The Metropolitan Police
-The National Probation service
-The UK Foreign Office
-The prison service
-Education
-Mental health
-Criminal justice charitable sector
-Doctoral research
-Prison Service

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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THE NEXT INTAKE FOR THIS COURSE IS SEPTEMBER 2013. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION. Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) is a rapidly growing area of study and employment opportunity, particularly in areas. Read more
THE NEXT INTAKE FOR THIS COURSE IS SEPTEMBER 2013. PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) is a rapidly growing area of study and employment opportunity, particularly in areas
of crime reduction, youth justice, community safety and restorative justice. Constant change in the justice sector requires practitioners to adopt and adapt to the latest thinking and legislative requirements.

This course offers advanced study of this subject area at masters level to both recent graduates and established criminal and
community justice practitioners. It will equip you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and values you require to engage with the complex issues presented by work within this sector. It is also an excellent opportunity for those wishing to advance their academic and research careers within this field as a progressive step towards a PhD and/or careers in academic and research institutions.

Course modules:

Core:
Critical Criminology, Policy and Practice (15 credits)
Diversity and Criminal Justice (15 credits)
Criminological Research (30 credits) (Completion of this module is a prerequisite for the masters dissertation)
Risk, Public Protection and High Risk offenders (15 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)

You will then also undertake three 15 credit option modules selected from the following:

Youth Justice
Rehabilitation and Reintegration
International and Comparative Policing
Victim Work and Restorative Justice
Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Offending

Professional practice 15 credit option modules (for those with relevant work experience only):

Managing the Practice of Risk
Managing Partner ships and Inter-Agency Work

Other professional practice module options are available in partnership with other Postgraduate courses within the Youth, Community and Education Division.

We also run modules that can be taken on an individual basis that offer a ‘taster’ for Postgraduate study. Contact us to find out more.

Teaching and Assessment:

Although categorised as distance learning, the realities of a “blended” approach combines a direct introductory teaching workshop and opportunities for supplementary teaching inputs with independent and distance learning strategies as
relevant to individual student needs and circumstances.

All students will be required to engage with the university’s virtual learning environment, undertaking online interactive tasks, seminars and discussion. A capacity to study independently will be essential. You will need internet access for the
duration of the course.

Assessments for the modules include a variety of assignments, case study exercises, online tasks, presentations, portfolios, group and individual projects. A 60 credit dissertation on a subject of individual interest completes the course.

Expertise:

This course is run by the CCJ division, which has an excellent reputation for courses grounded in flourishing research which is
explicitly linked to teaching. The division has one of the largest groupings of applied CCJ academics in the country. The teaching staff are all highly experienced, the majority having practice backgrounds prior to moving into higher education as lecturers and researchers.

A number of high profile research staff within the division have been involved in developing modules on the masters course around their subject expertise.

Graduate careers:

Graduates can progress towards a PhD, or enhance their employability in a variety of roles and specialisms including; Policing, probation, youth justice, victim work and restorative justice, custody and security management services, prisons, community safety and prevention initiatives, voluntary, private and charity sector partnerships.

Experienced CCJ practitioners can enhance their knowledge and understanding of both their own role and wider debates on policy and practice. Completion of the course is likely to enhance the possibilities for new directions and promotion opportunities in professional practice.

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Read more
Forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological skills to the location and recovery of human remains and forensic evidence. Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity.

Our MSc Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology course provides students with training in both disciplines in dedicated laboratory areas. You will have exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID).

You will develop the skills and knowledge required by those who undertake searches for missing people and will be involved in the recovery of remains from clandestine burials. You will also gain the skills required to present evidence as an expert witness in court.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Our staff are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. We are regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. Staff are able to bring this experience into their teaching.

Our students and staff are also involved in forensic research which is informed by casework and is thus relevant and current to modern practice.

Our student feedback reflects the outstanding facilities and teaching collections that are available to support their learning experience.

You will be supervised by a research active member of staff and have the opportunity to pursue an area of research that is of specific interest to you.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Dundee

1 - Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
2 - Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
3 - Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
4 - Access to several unique skeletal collections
5 - Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
6 - We teach and train towards both the standards set by the RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
7 - Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
8 - Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
9 -Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
10 - Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

Content delivery will be by a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical based work, both in the lab and externally. All of the subjects taught have a practical component and the ability to apply theory to practice has always been a strong tradition for all CAHID courses, equipping those attending for the skills for future employment.

Expert witness experience is gained through involvement in a mock trial presided over by skilled legal practitioners.

- How you will be assessed

in-course essays
paper appraisal
practical exercises
final degree examinations
MSc research dissertation

What you'll study

The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to forensic archaeology and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Human Osteology (10 credits)
- Trauma and Taphonomy (10 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology I (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Archaeology 2 (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

Employability

There is a significant international requirement for forensic archaeologists and forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with body recovery and identification in order to fulfil the requirements of Disaster Victim Identification deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic archaeology or DVI.

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Past victimization, previous offending, psychopathology, aggression, being male. Read more
Past victimization, previous offending, psychopathology, aggression, being male: Which of these variables might be the best predictor of future violent (re)offending? Which variables might increase the chance of (re)victimization? How can interventions help to prevent crime? How can victims of violence and crime overcome their victimization?

If you are intrigued by questions about the psychology of violence and crime, and you are not satisfied with easy answers, consider entering the Master's degree programme 'Clinical Forensic Psychology and Victimology'. In this programme we aim to understand acts of violence and crime from both the victims' and the offenders' perspective. You will gain a theoretical insight into the correlates of violence and crime and their consequences. Moreover you will acquire practical skills to enable you to assess and intervene in both offender and victim contexts. Our unique integrative approach aims to highlight the many psychological nuances between the black-and-white of the victim and offender dichotomy.

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If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you. Read more

Why take this course?

If you want to examine how the science of psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour and how psychological knowledge is utilised in improving policing and victim services, as well as those working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending, this course will be of interest to you.

This degree is not accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The course can be studied through campus-based or distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Examine how psychology can further our understanding of offending behaviour
Study how psychological knowledge informs practice within a range of criminal justice agencies
Explore psychology's contribution to working with offenders in order to reduce re-offending

What opportunities might it lead to?

Given the broad range of issues considered and the skills acquired throughout the degree programme, you will graduate with a portfolio of knowledge and abilities that will support a diverse range of career development opportunities in this field. Most of our students are in full-time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes, etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

Module Details

You will study the following units:

Criminology Past and Present (30 credits)
Psychology and Offending Behaviour (30 credits)
Investigation and Psychology (30 credits)
Research Methods and Research Management (30 credits)
15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)

Please note that the course structure may vary from year to year; course content and learning opportunities will not be diminished by this.

Programme Assessment

All ICJS campus-based students will be assigned a personal tutor, responsible for pastoral support and guidance, and have access to university support services including careers, financial advice, housing and counselling etc.

Assessment is based upon a range of written assignments including essays, case study, a literature review and research proposal focused on your chosen project, and finally a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with academic supervisor once you have identified your dissertation subject area.

Student Destinations

Most of our students are in full time employment in areas such as police, probation, law and youth programmes etc. Their career prospects involve transfers to other units or advancing to more senior levels of management.

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Designed for those with a background in criminology/social science, socio-legal studies or policy studies, this course will develop the knowledge and practical skills necessary to enhance your employability in the field of criminal justice practice, policy formation and advocacy. Read more
Designed for those with a background in criminology/social science, socio-legal studies or policy studies, this course will develop the knowledge and practical skills necessary to enhance your employability in the field of criminal justice practice, policy formation and advocacy. The University is well placed for you to enhance your academic learning through field visits to the crown courts, central criminal court and the extensive network of non-government organisations (NGOs) and charities whose work connects to criminal justice/crime prevention and social justice. You will be taught by staff who have published in their specialised research areas and staff with hands-on professional experience. You will have a personal tutor with whom you will work to develop your academic potential and plan your future career strategies.

Key features
-This course provides in-depth knowledge of contemporary criminal justice policy, practice and politics in local, national and global contexts.
-The course will enable you to develop a critical appreciation of the dynamics between criminological theory and criminal justice policymaking. On completion you will be conversant with the current global trends in the exploration of criminological issues.
-Due to its location, Kingston University is well placed to allow numerous opportunities to see, at first hand, the criminal justice system in operation in the extensive London network of courts, custodial institutions and community-based crime-reduction programmes.

What will you study?

You will explore a wide range of crime control policies in local, national and globalised contexts. You will engage critically with the concepts of 'crime', 'offender' and, 'victim', and develop a critical awareness of their theoretical underpinnings, and the role of power in defining and enforcing crime. Criminologists draw upon a range of social science theoretical frameworks and social research techniques in order to question and explore criminological phenomenon and you will develop methodological knowledge and skills through this course in order to prepare for your own criminological enquiry. Criminology is multi-disciplinary and so by studying this course you can also venture into the fields of forensic psychology and politics and human rights.

Assessment

Essays, case study and research proposals, short exercise portfolios, examinations, oral presentations, briefing papers, extended projects and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.
Core modules
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Criminological Research in Practice
-Criminology Dissertation

Optional modules
-Global Terrorism and Transnational Crime
-Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Politics of Crime in the Black Atlantic

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Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. Read more

Overview

Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. We welcome applications from recent graduates, mature students, and professionals in criminal justice or related fields. We tailor teaching content to your individual educational and professional background and interests. Our teaching format provides you with many opportunities to develop your own intellectual interests or professional experience. You will attend four, three-day long blocks of intensive teaching and discussion between September and May, plus an additional half day dissertation workshop. This format allows you to combine your studies with either part-time or full time employment should you wish to do so.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/criminologyandcriminaljustice/

Course Aims

- To introduce students to recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies

- To show students how recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies has attempted to describe, analyse and interpret contemporary developments in criminal justice, transnational justice, international justice, and governance more broadly

- To enable students to think through methodological problems and choose appropriate methods for the study of crime, criminal justice, and governance

- To enable students to critically assess research in a number of fields within criminology, criminal justice, and governance studies more broadly

- To enable students to design and complete a research project and understand the importance of the research process in the social sciences

Course Content

Our taught master’s programme comprises four 30 credit module blocks and one 60 credit dissertation. Each taught module is assessed by a 5,000 word written assignment. The pass mark is 50% and you must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words under the supervision of an individual member of the teaching team. Each module block comprises three days of intensive face to face contact between staff and students. Students are also supported by online content and access to staff throughout the academic year. The programme is taught by criminologists who all have considerable research and teaching expertise in criminology, criminal justice and related subjects. Each three-day long module block is divided into four thematically linked sessions:

Indicative Modules
• Contemporary Criminology: Theory and Practice
• Researching Crime and Criminal Justice
• Contemporary Challenges in Criminal Justice

You will study an elective module (subject to change) in:
• Advanced Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

You will also be offered full advice and support to undertake your dissertation.

This programme is designed to fit around your work and personal commitments. The taught content is delivered in twelve days and the extensive online supporting materials allow you to complete your personal study at times that suit you.

Teaching & Assessment

Each of the taught modules is assessed by written, summative coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words (essay, case-study, research proposal, and empirical research report). The pass mark is 50% and students must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words. There are no exams.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-Library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post-graduate programme.

Careers

Graduates from our course have found employment in a variety of occupations including: the accelerated police and prison graduate training programmes; the probation service; in other criminal justice agencies; in the voluntary sector with organisations such as Victim Support and NACRO; and in a variety of other graduate level jobs. In addition, a number of graduates have gone on to take postgraduate courses at Keele and elsewhere.

As part of your Criminology degree you will have gained a set of Distinctive Graduate Attributes that put you in a unique position in an uncertain labour market that demands graduate employees to be skilled, yet flexible, workers.

For further help and advice about how to put yourself in the best position upon graduation explore the Careers and Employability web pages or drop in to see them. They can help with all aspects of the transition into employment, from drawing up a CV to preparing for job interviews.

TUITION BREAKS, GRANTS AND BURSARIES:
All students from North America (USA and Canada) are eligible for tuition breaks of 10%. Students from universities that are among Keele University's partner institutions are eligible for tuition breaks of up to 25% of the tuition fee.
Further information can be found at: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesfornastudents/

All students are eligible for an ERASMUS grant for the period spent at an EU partner institution. For further information on Erasmus grants and tuition breaks, please contact

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment. Read more

Overview

Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment.

- The course is delivered by an experienced course team with established links to criminal justice agencies, private businesses and charities.
- The teaching team are active researchers and have contributed internationally renowned research projects.
- Students study contemporary and comparative criminology, criminal justice and essential human science research skills.
- Students can also tailor the degree to their own unique career ambitions, picking from optional units in penology, international policing, historic crime, drugs and terror security.
- Optional study trips are available throughout the year, including an unfunded visit to the USA.
- The course concludes with a final research project, where students will research and write a unique dissertation under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.
- Many students focus their dissertation on the area of criminology in which they would like to work, using it to demonstrate their knowledge to employers after graduation.
- Students benefit from small class sizes and regular one-to-one support.

The industry -

Whether you want to work in the social support and welfare sector, in the justice system or with relevant charities - your understanding of criminology and criminal justice will give you the opportunity to make a positive impact on people’s lives.

This is an essential degree for many careers in these sectors, but can also help with a range of roles in other industries. These include various applied and research-based roles that focus on helping people with social or personal issues and supporting the rehabilitation of offenders.

The programme -

Students on Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme study the core curriculum alongside a choice of two specialist units. This chance to specialise is important, helping students to orient their knowledge towards specific roles in the criminal justice sector.

This programme also encourages students to develop a range of transferable interpersonal and verbal communication skills through presentations, role-plays, debates, interviews and group work. These competencies are valued in a wide range of industries.

To find out more about the content of each specific unit, please see the ‘course content’ tab.
Enrichment activities and learning opportunities are available alongside the core curriculum, giving students the chance to learn from guest speakers, visit criminal justice organisations and network at industry events. These additional activities help to provide detailed insights into the criminal justice system and the careers it offers. Past speakers have come from the police, courts, prisons, probation services, youth justice services and cyber security firms.

The course team themselves have had extensive experience of the criminal justice system and its related disciplines, providing students with unique personal insights. The ties they have with the professional world have helped past students secure volunteer placements, temporary paid work, work shadowing weeks and internships.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through lectures, group work and projects, and supervision for independent writing and research.

You will be allocated a personal tutor and a dissertation research supervisor.

Work experience -

Past students have completed a wide range of interesting and informative placements with:

- the Association of Chief Police Officers Criminal Records Office
- the criminal justice sector (paid work)
- witness and victim services
- probation services
- youth offending teams
- voluntary positions in the criminal justice field.

Assessment -

You will participate in group work, independent writing and research, group projects and discussions. You will be assessed via a number of 3,500-word assignments and individual and group presentations, in addition to a 20,000-word dissertation.
Study abroad
We run an optional ten-day study trip to the USA during the Christmas break, with visits to the FBI and New Jersey State Police.

There will be opportunities to attend lectures and share views and ideas with students at Ocean County College and Monmouth University. Please note this trip is not included in your tuition fees, and you’ll need to cover your travel and living costs.

Other study trip opportunities may also be available.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

With this internationally respected qualification, you’ll be well placed to pursue a variety of career opportunities.

Past graduates have pursued careers in police management, international law enforcement, the National Offender Management Service, financial security and academia.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Prison service
- Police
- Probation
- Courts
- Drugs services
- Security
- Public and private sector security and investigation
- Local government community safety

Links with industry -

We welcome regular guest lecturers who provide a detailed insight into working in the criminal justice sector and prospective career opportunities.

Recent speakers have included:

- serving and former police detectives in the Metropolitan and Hampshire Police
- serving chief officers from Hampshire and Dorset Police
- judges and magistrates
- staff from the National Crime Agency, the Association of Chief Police Officers, the National Offender Management Service and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Transferable skills -

You will gain a detailed understanding of criminological issues, which can be applied to many different careers. You will also develop your research and critical analysis skills and gain experience in communication, teamwork and leadership.

Further study -

The MSc provides a solid foundation for subsequent research at MPhil and PhD level.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £5,665

International full-time fees: £12,380

UK and EU part-time fees, year one: £1,895

UK and EU part-time fees, year two: £3,790

International part-time fees: £6,190 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Would you like to improve your career prospects within the criminal justice sector? With an expert teaching team, strong links with industry and a curriculum, tailored to suit your ambitions, Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme could be the ideal next step towards your dream career.

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Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes. The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'. Read more

Why this course?

Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'.

Blending a rigorous understanding of fundamental theory with evidence about real world problems you’ll analyse recent innovations in theory, policy and practice.

Drawing on a range of disciplinary approaches, the course will enable you to develop a rational and just response to crime.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change is unique in both its approach and its flexibility.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/criminaljusticepenalchange/

Study mode and duration:
- LLM/MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 21 months part-time
- PgCert: 8 months part-time

Key features

- our focus is on pressing contemporary national and international issues of policy and practice
- you can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc
- study full-time or part-time
- learn from a world-class teaching team
- students are from a range of nationalities and disciplinary backgrounds
- you'll benefit from the work of the Centre for Law, Crime and Justice

Who is the course suitable for?

- practitioners working in a wide range of law, justice and welfare areas
- professionals developing justice policy
- members of the third /voluntary sector
- recent graduates in law, social sciences and humanities

Flexible study options

You can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc or complete the course early with a PGDip/Cert.
You'll have the option of studying full or part-time and attending classes in the early evening.

Centre for Law, Crime and Justice (CLCJ)

You’ll benefit from the work of the CLCJ, which brings together expertise in the study of law, crime, criminal justice as well as interdisciplinary areas between law, sociology, social work, psychology and computer and information science.

As well as providing distinctive postgraduate courses and research opportunities, it conducts internationally leading research and helps to shape public policy, discourse and practice.

Teaching staff

You'll be taught by some of the world’s foremost experts not only in academic research but also from the fields of policy and practice.
The course is run by Strathclyde Law School’s Centre for Law, Crime and Justice. It brings together world leading research expertise with some of the most accomplished practitioners and policy officials.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As well as seminars, you’ll be asked to take part in role play exercises, presentations and other forms of learning.
We've an active programme of public lectures from eminent visiting speakers on contemporary topics. There'll be a programme of visits to local justice agencies designed to stimulate your academic learning.

Careers

Students on the Strathclyde Masters (LLM or MSc) in Criminal Justice and Penal Change come from a range of backgrounds.
Some are recent graduates in law, humanities and the social sciences from around the world. Many are current practitioners, policy-makers in different fields of criminal justice. They find the course of invaluable assistance in gaining a step up the career ladder.

Where are they now?

Occupations which criminal justice students may (and do) take up include:
- Advocacy
- Central Government Criminal Justice Research Manager
- Council of Europe Analyst
- Criminal Barrister
- Defence law
- European Union Policy Analyst
- Forensic Services
- Judiciary
- Local Government Criminal Justice Policy Manager
- Lecturer in Criminal Justice
- Parliamentary Advisors on Criminal Justice
- Prosecution Service
- Prison Management
- Prison Psychologist
- Prison-based Social Work
- Victim Support

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology
• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system
• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills
• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research
• Quantitative Methods
• Qualitative Methods
• Case Studies in Applied Social Research
• Data Visualisation
• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol
• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice
• Applied Criminal Justice
• Understanding Policing
• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice
• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales
• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children
• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”

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Forensic dentists are required in all countries to provide dental expertise to courts and legal systems. Dentists wishing to work in this field often find it difficult to gain the necessary skills. Read more
Forensic dentists are required in all countries to provide dental expertise to courts and legal systems. Dentists wishing to work in this field often find it difficult to gain the necessary skills.

This course addresses those aspects of forensic odontology which are most frequently the subject of expert testimony in courts and have the most relevance to forensic odontology internationally.

Why study Forensic Odontology at Dundee?

Internationally, there are few opportunities for dentists to gain expertise in forensic odontology in a structured manner from a University with a dental school and an active forensic medicine department.

As a student in Forensic Odontology you will work closely with other postgraduate students in Forensic Medicine, Forensic Science and Forensic Toxicology. You will develop a deep understanding of the role of other forensic disciplines and identify when, where and how forensic odontology links with the wider forensic community. This provides a unique multi-disciplinary nature to the course.

What's so good about Forensic Odontology at Dundee?

Acquiring this qualification will be a key step in the development of professional expertise in forensic odontology. The programme will enable graduates to acquire knowledge, understanding and skills in forensic odontology and research. Uniquely, they will learn interdisciplinary skills that are essential for dealing with forensic issues in real life.

Aims of the course?

The aim of the course is to provide dentists with a professional qualification that delivers core knowledge, experience and intellectual skills in forensic odontology, forensic medicine, science and research.

Teaching & Assessment

The course will be taught by experienced practitioners based at Centre for Forensic & Legal Medicine at the University of Dundee with guest tutors further enhancing the student experience. Research projects will be supervised by experienced researchers.

How you will be taught

A blended approach to teaching is adopted to enable you to learn in a variety of ways. Methods of teaching include small group seminars, virtual learning environment (Blackboard) based case scenarios, lectures, guided self-directed learning, demonstrations and observation in a working forensic mortuary.

What you will study

The course consists of four taught modules:

Forensic Odontology (taught module) - topics include:
Dental Identification
Disaster Victim Identification
Age estimation from dental sources
Dental report writing and giving evidence
Detailed anatomy and development of teeth and oral structures
Bite mark identification
Critical appraisal of literature
Practical experience in mortuary
Bite mark analysis
Research dissertation

You will study 5 modules:

Forensic Odontology
Forensic Odontology Research Project
Bite Mark Analysis
Forensic Medicine
Forensic Science

How you will be assessed

There are a wide range of assessment methods within each module including: written assignments, oral presentations and computer aided assessment exercises.

Careers

Acquiring this qualification will be a key step in the development of professional expertise in forensic odontology.

The programme will enable graduates to acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills in those aspects of forensic odontology which are most frequently the subject of expert testimony in courts and have the most relevance to forensic odontology internationally.

The interdisciplinary aspect, and the focus on the important aspects of forensic odontology will ensure that students are in a position to contribute to forensic service provision in their region/country.

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