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Masters Degrees (Vertebrate)

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Within the Developmental Biology research area a number of model systems are being used to study various aspects of vertebrate development with a major focus being on the development of stem cells. Read more
Within the Developmental Biology research area a number of model systems are being used to study various aspects of vertebrate development with a major focus being on the development of stem cells. Specific projects include: the development of blood stem cells and vasculature in zebrafish; the development of neural stem cells in zebrafish and in mice; the properties of mesenchymal stem cells; primordial germ cells and gene networks that govern the development of vertebrate embryos.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/apply/apply-online.aspx

Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

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The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. Read more

The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. This structure allows students the maximum flexibility to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.

This course can be studied on a modular basis, as a PGCert, PGDip or MSc.

Highlights

  • Flexible modular e-learning allows students to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.
  • The course uses an online e-learning platform with tutorial support, direct contact with tutors, video steam and access to student bulletin boards.

Teaching format

Both PGDip and MSc students take taught modules covering all aspects of aquaculture both vertebrate and invertebrate over an 18-month period. MSc students then spend the next six months researching and writing a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words to be submitted on a specified date at the end of the course.

Classes are taught through a combination of weekly lectures and tutorials and are assessed through a combination of written examinations and coursework. The course consists of a series of compulsory core modules and a choice of five optional modules matched to students’ specific interests.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change.

Core modules

  • Aquaculture and Fisheries: the global importance of aquaculture and fisheries industries worldwide.
  • Biology for Aquaculture: the fundamental biology, anatomy and physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate aquaculture species. 
  • Nutrition for Aquaculture: the anatomy, physiology and nutritional requirements of key fish and invertebrate species.
  • Health and Disease: the factors that influence disease processes in cultured fish and invertebrates. 
  • Management, Husbandry and Sustainability: production management and business management of modern aquaculture practices.
  • Markets, Products, Processing and Food Safety: advanced knowledge of aquaculture markets, products, processing and food safety.
  • Local and Global Impacts of Aquaculture: the environmental impact of aquaculture practices on both local and global scales.

Optional modules

  • Advanced Welfare and Ethics
  • Breeding and Genetics
  • Larval Rearing
  • Ornamental and Aquaria Production
  • Recirculation Aquaculture Systems.

Research Dissertation

Students on the MSc programme complete a 15,000-word dissertation at the end of their studies. The dissertation involves the study of a defined problem within the field of sustainable aquaculture. Students are required to collate and analyse data and to discuss their results in the light of existing literature. In some cases, projects might also involve the design of experiments or the gathering of data. 

If students choose not to complete the dissertation requirement for the MSc, there is an exit award available that allows suitably qualified candidates to receive a Postgraduate Diploma. By choosing the exit award, you will finish your degree at the end of the taught portion of the programme and receive a PGDip instead of an MSc.

Careers

Graduates will typically pursue a career in higher level management, research and development or business development within the global aquaculture business.

The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.



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Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future. The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Read more
Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future

Why choose this course?

The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Any consideration of the human past is incomplete without examining the essential roles that animals have played in our economies and societies, and on this course you will study archaeological animal remains on a macro and micro scale to investigate what they tell us about how humans and other species have co-existed over the millennia.

Housed within BioArCh, York's world-leading centre for research into ancient biomolecules, the MSc in Zooarchaeology also draws heavily on the expertise of functional and comparative anatomists from the Centre for Anatomical and Human Sciences, part of the Hull York Medical School. We use the full range of available techniques, including advanced biomolecular methods and sophisticated morphometrics, to investigate and interpret animal bone data in a variety of cultural contexts.

The scope of the course is global, equipping you with the knowledge and techniques to study the roles of animals in human societies from the Palaeolithic to the present, around the world. You will learn from leading academics in both traditional and biomolecular zooarchaeology, and from dedicated specialists in evolutionary anatomy, enabling you both to master the latest analytical techniques and to examine skeletal anatomy at a level of detail not possible elsewhere.
-Study past relations between people and other animals, through the archaeological record
-Examine zooarchaeology across the entire span of human prehistory and history, right around the world
-Develop advanced skills in bone taphonomy and understand its importance to osteoarchaeological studies
-Explore biomolecular techniques, including DNA analysis, proteomics and stable isotope analysis
-Investigate skeletal anatomy in intricate detail
-Work alongside leading academics in zooarchaeological research
-Receive career and research guidance from Department of Archaeology staff with significant experience of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?
This course covers the practical skills, analytical techniques, and interpretative frameworks necessary to study the roles of animals in past societies from the bones and other remains that we find on archaeological sites. Core modules and laboratory classes will provide you with a solid grounding in the essential tools of the zooarchaeologist's trade, while the option modules and dissertation allow you to explore and potentially specialise in a unique range of biomolecular and anatomical approaches.

Who is it for?
This course is aimed primarily at graduates in archaeology who want to specialise in the analysis and interpretation of animal remains, either as a basis for future research or as a practical specialism to further a career in archaeology. We are also happy to accept graduates of disciplines such as biology, zoology, ecology, and palaeontology who wish to focus on the study of animals in a human context.

What can it lead to?
The advanced skills and specialist knowledge gained on this course can provide the springboard for many varied careers or further study at PhD level. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to careers in museum services, universities, conservation organisations and commercial archaeology units around the world.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Zooarchaeology course you will have:
-Gained a thorough grounding in all aspects of vertebrate zooarchaeology, including general aspects that are applicable to invertebrate zooarchaeology
-Experienced the processes of data collection, analysis and interpretation, both in principle and in practice
-Developed a range of analytical abilities by studying and undertaking quantitative analysis of zooarchaeological data
-Gained essential critical skills through reviewing and assessing published work from throughout the world, including hunter-gatherer and agrarian sites, and socially complex societies
-Studied the vertebrate skeleton, its evolutionary origins and its adaptations
-Identified and recorded archaeological bone assemblages
-Reviewed the field of taphonomy and the practical recognition of the taphonomic ‘imprint’
-Developed independent research skills by completing a dissertation project

Many our MSc Zooarchaeology postgraduates go on to conduct further research at PhD level. Others progress into careers with archaeological units, museum services, conservation bodies and a range of other organisations.

Here’s a selection of possible destinations and careers for students of this course:
-Academia
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Museum outreach programmes and the heritage sector
-University/research technicians
-Commercial laboratory technicians
-US graduate school programmes

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The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. Read more

The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. This structure allows students the maximum flexibility to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.

Highlights

  • Flexible modular e-learning allows students to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.
  • The course uses an online e-learning platform with tutorial support, direct contact with tutors, video stream and access to student bulletin boards.

Teaching format

Classes are taught through a combination of weekly lectures and tutorials and are assessed through a combination of written examinations and coursework.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.

  • Aquaculture and Fisheries: the global importance of aquaculture and fisheries industries worldwide.
  • Biology for Aquaculture: the fundamental biology, anatomy and physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate aquaculture species. 
  • Biology for Aquaculture Vertebrates: the fundamental biology, anatomy and physiology of vertebrate aquaculture species.
  • Biology for Aquaculture Invertebrates: the fundamental biology, anatomy and physiology of either invertebrate aquaculture species. 
  • Nutrition for Aquaculture: the anatomy, physiology and nutritional requirements of key fish and invertebrate species.
  • Nutrition for Vertebrates: the anatomy, physiology and nutritional requirements of key fish.
  • Nutrition for Invertebrates: the anatomy, physiology and nutritional requirements of invertebrate species.
  • Management, Husbandry and Sustainability: production management and business management of modern aquaculture practices.
  • Health and Disease: the factors that influence disease processes in cultured fish and invertebrates. 
  • Health and Disease Vertebrates: the factors that influence disease processes in cultured fish.
  • Health and Disease Invertebrates: the factors that influence disease processes in invertebrates.
  • Markets, Products, Processing and Food Safety: advanced knowledge of aquaculture markets, products, processing and food safety.
  • Local and Global Impacts of Aquaculture: the environmental impact of aquaculture practices on both local and global scales.
  • Breeding and Genetics: selective breeding programmes and modern genetic techniques applied in aquaculture practices.
  • Advanced Welfare and Ethics: the welfare and ethical issues raised by current aquaculture practices.
  • Recirculation Aquaculture Systems: the use of recirculating aquaculture systems in modern aquaculture practices.
  • Ornamental and Aquaria Production: advanced knowledge of animals produced for the ornamental and aquaria section of the aquaculture business.
  • Larval Rearing: the larval production techniques used in the aquaculture business.

The modules listed here are indicative, and there is no guarantee they will run for 2018 entry. Take a look at the most up-to-date modules in the module catalogue.



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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/healthsciences/graduate-programs/medical-illustration/. A medical illustrator is a professional artist with advanced education in the life sciences and visual communication. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/healthsciences/graduate-programs/medical-illustration/

A medical illustrator is a professional artist with advanced education in the life sciences and visual communication. Collaborating with scientists and physicians, medical illustrators transform complex information into visual images that are used in education, research, patient care, public relations, legal cases, and marketing efforts.

Plan of study

The MFA program provides training in the biomedical sciences, the principles of visual communication, and a variety of digital media including 2D illustration, 3D computer modeling, animation, and interactive media. Students produce a thesis, which involves independent research and visual problem-solving to communicate a complex scientific subject.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA in medical illustration, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of the arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited college. The undergraduate degree should include studio art courses, one year of general or introductory biology (for biology majors), and a minimum of three advanced biology courses, such as vertebrate anatomy, physiology, neurobiology, cell biology, molecular biology, immunology, microbiology, genetics, developmental biology, or pathology.

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Demonstrate, through the submission of a portfolio, outstanding drawing skills, particularly the ability to draw subjects from direct observation.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System may be submitted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Those applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

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This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Read more
This course combines theoretical and practical training in biology and control of disease vectors and the human pathogens they transmit. Students will gain specialised skills in the molecular biology of infectious diseases, and will cover all aspects of major vector-borne diseases. The course also offers a thorough grounding in the systematics of medically important arthropods, processes regulating vector populations, and the biology of vector–parasite and vector–vertebrate interactions.

Graduates enter operational control programmes, applied basic research and academic fields. Students benefit from close interaction with staff who have extensive international expertise.

The James Busvine Memorial Medal and Prize, donated by Professor James Busvine in 1987, is awarded each year for outstanding performance.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/medic_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of the biology of vectors and intermediate hosts of human pathogens together with methods for their control

- describe the biology, pathogenesis and diagnosis of parasitic infections in humans and relate these to human health and disease control strategies

- demonstrate a range of specialised technical and analytical skills relevant to vectors and vector-borne diseases

- design and carry out a research project on biology or control of disease vectors, analyse and interpret the results and prepare a report including a critical literature review

- design, undertake and evaluate vector control interventions, and show written and verbal competence in communicating scientific information

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by three compulsory core modules:

- Parasitology & Entomology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies
- Critical Skills for Tropical Medicine

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Some modules can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Molecular Biology & Recombinant Techniques

- Slot 2:
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination (compulsory)

- Slot 4:
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Population Dynamics & Projections

- Slot 5:
Integrated Vector Management (compulsory)

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tbcd.html

Residential Field Trip

There is a compulsory one week field course, after the Term 3 examinations, on vector and parasite sampling and identification methods. The cost of £630 is included in the field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a field or laboratory research project on an appropriate entomological topic, for submission by early September.

Titles of some of the recent summer projects completed by students on this MSc

Due to our collaborative networking, students are given the opportunity to conduct research projects overseas. This unique experience provides students with skills that are highly desirable to potential employers. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msbcdv.html#sixth

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Discover the science of the processes behind the growth and development of organisms. Develop specialist knowledge of cell and developmental biology. Read more

Discover the science of the processes behind the growth and development of organisms. Develop specialist knowledge of cell and developmental biology.

You’ll study the genes and molecules that control cell growth, differentiation and morphogenesis that create tissues, organs and individuals. You’ll learn in facilities with outstanding provision for experimental work, using a range of model, plant and vertebrate organisms. The course is ideal if you would like to specialise further in a particular field, or if you would like to change direction from your first science degree.

You’ll learn with some of the world’s leading academics in a welcoming and collaborative environment that has strong interdisciplinary links. You will be able to select from a diverse range of topics and projects to tailor your course.

You will have the opportunity to study as part of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine at Bath. The Centre enables work in regenerative medicine to be underpinned by an understanding of normal developmental organisms.

Your studies will help you develop the skills you need to move into a wide range of careers in the sciences or to take on further research. Our graduates have an excellent employment record with companies and academic institutions across the globe. Graduates have moved into roles with employers including the Institute of Cancer Research and Atlas Genetics.

Find out more: http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/msc-developmental-biology/

If you are interested in applying for one of our master's courses and you would like to find out more about your job prospects, then there is a webinar for you on Friday 24 November at 1pm GMT.

Join us from around the world without leaving your house.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

• the current job market

• what our graduates go to on to do after their master's

• how the careers service and the Faculty's careers adviser can help you with finding a job. You will also have the opportunity to put your questions to staff during a live question and answer session.

Find out more and register for the webinar.      

Why study Biology and Biochemistry with us?

- 90% of our research judged to be internationally recognised, excellent or world-leading

- Our current research funding portfolio stands at £14 million, supporting internationally excellent research in the biosciences

Career opportunities

Since graduating, our students have gone on to employment or further research at institutions in the US, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Recent employers include:

Morvus-Technology Ltd

Janssen-Cilag

Royal United Hospital, Bath

Ministry of Defence

State Intellectual Property Office, Beijing

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University

AbCam

Salisbury Foundation Trust Hospital

BBSRC

Lonza

Find more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines. Read more
This Masters programme in Ecology and Environmental Biology is mainly intended to provide training for students who hope to enter a PhD programme in the areas of ecology and environmental biology, and who wish training in transferable skills and in ecological and environmental disciplines.

Why this programme

-This Ecology and Evnvironmental Biology degree programme draws on the research expertise of a large number of University staff and allows you the chance to obtain experience in a wide range of modern research techniques.
-There is considerable expertise in this area of biology available at Glasgow, especially in ornithology, fish biology, aquatic ecosystems, and theoretical, physiological, molecular and evolutionary ecology.
-Excellent research and teaching facilities are available at the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment (SCENE) and Cochno Farm and Research Centre
-You will be encouraged to tailor the MSc Ecology and Environmental Biology programme to your own specific requirements and interests, within the limitations of the courses and projects offered.

Programme structure

The programme consists of a taught component, and two research projects in individual laboratories and/or field based.

The taught component consists of core research skills and specialist option in analytical and sampling techniques.

The main part of the degree, however, is devoted to experience of research techniques. You will carry out two 20-week research projects with individual placements chosen to reflect your interests and the skills you wish to acquire. After each project, you will write a scientific report.

Core and optional courses

Core Courses
-Key Research Skills
-Research Project (x 2)

Optional Courses
-Programming in R (prerequisite for all modelling and epidemiology)
-Infectious Disease Ecology & the Dynamics of Emerging Disease
-Single-species Models
-Conservation Genetics & Phylodynamics
-Freshwater Sampling Techniques
-Invertebrate Identification
-Molecular Analyses for DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Measurement
-Phyloinformatics
-Vertebrate Identification

Career prospects

The programme will provide an excellent training for those who want to undertake a PhD programme and enter ecological management or conservation businesses. It should also serve as an excellent introduction to research in the UK for overseas students intending to proceed to a PhD in this country.

Some of the Institutions/Organisations our M.Res students went on to:
-Bremen Institute for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT)
-Clyde River Foundation
-Dakshin Foundation, India
-Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand)
-University of Glasgow
-Warwick University

Some of the more exotic locations for MRes projects in recent years have included southern Brazil, Trinidad, Tobago, Kuwait, Egypt, Svalbard (Norway), Canada, the Azores (Portugal), Oman, Cayman Islands, and The Philippines.

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The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. Read more
The molecular approach to studying biological systems has underpinned huge advances in knowledge and promises much for the future in the understanding and application of biological principles. At Nottingham we are using molecular approaches to study a wide range of model as well as innovative biological systems. Currently projects are available in research groupings that are investigating eukaryotic gene expression and vertebrate embryogenesis, including aspects of the development of the nervous system, germ cells and stem cell maturation, and the behaviour of cellular systems with respect to the many interactions of macromolecules within cells and their membranes. In addition there are projects to study in microbes the systems responsible for maintaining genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea and yeast, as well as the basis of bacterial motility. There are also projects concerned with the biology of fungi in relation to their stress responses and to their interactions with their environment in general, as well as with the use of fungi as cell factories for the production of proteins and pharmaceuticals. Finally there are projects in research groups studying ion channels, receptor-mediated carcinogenesis and ecotoxicology that use natural and synthetic toxins to dissect the properties of signalling molecules in nervous and muscle tissues and employ cutting-edge techniques to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of toxins and the mechanisms of disease.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Read more
Molecular genetics is the study of genes at the molecular level. It focuses on the processes that underlie the expression of the genetic information from the DNA into the functional proteins that execute the genetic programme. Within the School of Life Sciences research in molecular genetics is concentrated in the Human Genetics, Fungal Biology, and Developmental Genetics and Gene Control groups. In the Human Genetics group research in this area includes studies of the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy and the identification of genes involved in cardiac development; the molecular genetics of muscle disease; mouse models of muscle disorders and molecular genetic approaches to anthropology and human population genetics. In the Fungal Biology group there are studies on the molecular events that determine stress responses during polarised growth, protein folding and secretion in yeasts and filamentous fungi; the molecular and cellular effects of stress on yeast cells and the genetic mechanisms that control sex in fungi. The Developmental Genetics and Gene Control group focuses on the mechanisms of eukaryotic gene expression and the genetics of vertebrate embryonic development. Developmental studies are focussed largely upon the mechanisms that control stem cell fate. Projects on the control of gene expression address the machinery used by cells to achieve appropriate levels of functional transcripts. These studies include control of transcription and the mechanisms of RNA maturation.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. Read more
This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. It examines quantitative aspects of the fossil record and the history of life. The research-oriented MSc bridges the biology-geology divide and will provide you with a strong background for independent research to PhD level or for a career in museums, libraries, management or the media.

This interdisciplinary programme is taught mainly in the School of Earth Sciences, along with some archaeology and biology units. You will engage in current debates in evolutionary biology, systematics and palaeobiology.

You will learn how to analyse problems quantitatively, and design experimental approaches to resolving questions in macroevolution and in the study of ancient organisms. First-hand training in research methods in palaeobiology involves laboratory techniques. In addition, you will learn a range of advanced skills throughout the programme, such as computer software use, numeracy, planning research, problem-solving and communication skills. You will learn multimedia techniques, including presentation of palaeontological data through talks, posters and formal written reports. A key aspect of the programme is preparing your projects for publication, and we provide continuing support to ensure as many projects as possible are published in leading international journals.

Programme structure

The first half of the programme consists of lectures, practical classes, tutorials and visiting speakers, designed to provide a firm foundation in the theory and methodology of the subject.

The programme comprises five core units which all students take, and a number of optional units of which students choose four. We recommend that biologists take some of the more geologically-orientated optional units, and that geologists take some of the biological optional units.

Core units
-Current Controversies in Palaeobiology and Macroevolution
-Scientific Communication
-Phylogenetic Methods in Palaeobiology
-Literature Review
-Research Methods in Palaeobiology

Optional units
-Biomechanics and Functional Morphology
-The Cambrian Explosion: the origin of animal body plans
-Early Human Origins
-Evolutionary Biology*
-Evolution of the Biosphere
-Geology for Research Palaeobiologists**
-Micropalaeontology
-Tree of Life
-Vertebrate Palaeobiology and Evolution

*Mandatory for non-biologists
**Mandatory for non-geologists

Careers

The degree is research-based, and about half the graduates go on to academic careers, usually starting with a PhD. The MSc is focused on methods, and you will learn the latest techniques in phylogenetics, biomechanics, and macroevolution training, which is highly sought after by PhD supervisors across the world.

The training in professional skills, including writing scientific papers, is also highly regarded. Some students have used the MSc as a means to go on to careers in museums, the media and education and now hold senior positions as curators and collection managers in national and regional museums. Graduates also work in making scientific documentaries, or are involved in science education at all levels.

Finally, some graduates have gone into commercial work in marketing, the oil industry and computing, where their practical skills in palaeobiology and communication have proved invaluable.

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Discover the science of the processes behind the growth and development of organisms. Develop specialist knowledge of cell and developmental biology. Read more

Discover the science of the processes behind the growth and development of organisms. Develop specialist knowledge of cell and developmental biology.

This course is ideal for you if you want to go into a research career or study for a PhD in the field of Developmental Biology. You’ll study the genes and molecules that control cell growth, differentiation and morphogenesis that create tissues, organs and individuals. You’ll learn in facilities with outstanding provision for experimental work, using a range of model, plant and vertebrate organisms.

The MRes provides a unique mix of taught components, extended laboratory projects, literature reviews and preparation of a grant proposal based on a research dissertation. You’ll gain an insight into a range of research activities and techniques, gaining the transferrable skills training needed for all early stage researchers. You’ll also address the scientific, ethical and commercial context within which the research takes place. You will have the opportunity to study as part of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine at Bath. The Centre enables work in regenerative medicine to be underpinned by an understanding of normal developmental organisms.

All of the MRes courses can be studied as the first year of our Integrated PhD course.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/mres-developmental-biology/

If you are interested in applying for one of our master's courses and you would like to find out more about your job prospects, then there is a webinar for you on Friday 24 November at 1pm GMT.

Join us from around the world without leaving your house.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

• the current job market

• what our graduates go to on to do after their master's

• how the careers service and the Faculty's careers adviser can help you with finding a job. You will also have the opportunity to put your questions to staff during a live question and answer session.

Find out more and register for the webinar.      

Why study Biology and Biochemistry with us?

- 90% of our research judged to be internationally recognised, excellent or world-leading

- Our current research funding portfolio stands at £14 million, supporting internationally excellent research in the biosciences

What will I learn?

MRes degree programmes are designed for graduates who are contemplating a research career and who may go on to study for a PhD or to a position in industry involving interaction with research scientists.

If these do not apply, you might consider an MSc programme (http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/).

For further details please visit our department pages (http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/)

Career opportunities

Since graduating, our students have gone on to employment or further research at institutions in the US, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Recent employers include:

Morvus-Technology Ltd

Janssen-Cilag

Royal United Hospital, Bath

Ministry of Defence

State Intellectual Property Office, Beijing

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University

AbCam

Salisbury Foundation Trust Hospital

BBSRC

Lonza

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/bio-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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This programme currently has a 100% employment rate in the ecology and ecological consultancy sectors. The only UK programme to have over half of its modules overseen by consultants. Read more
  • This programme currently has a 100% employment rate in the ecology and ecological consultancy sectors
  • The only UK programme to have over half of its modules overseen by consultants
  • Designed in partnership with RSK Group consultancy to provide the skills and knowledge demanded by consultants
  • Focuses on hands-on and field-based training
  • Offers the opportunity for a six-month placement (with bursary) with an ecological consultant

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Vegetation survey and assessment
  • Invertebrate survey and assessment
  • Vertebrate survey and assessment
  • Professional skills
  • Field trips

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

All our master’s programmes emphasise the practical skills that employers need, whether that is the ability to identify plants, carry out environmental assessments or use the latest cutting-edge molecular techniques. As a University of Reading MSc graduate, you will be well equipped to work in the field or the lab, and in the private or public sector. Many of our graduates go on to study for a PhD and pursue a career in research either in industry or in universities.

Typical roles of graduates from our ecology and wildlife-based MSc programmes include conservation officers, project managers, field ecologists and environmental consultants. Graduates from our biomedical MSc programme typically go on to pursue PhD studies or work in the pharmaceutical industry.



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Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more
Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

◾Top 100 University
◾This Animal Welfare Degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM); a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health
◾When studying Animal Welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
◾In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
◾A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
◾The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
◾You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
◾You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture
◾We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
◾We have currently the following partners involved in this programme: ◾Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA)
◾Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie
◾BlairDrummondSafari Park
◾ChesterZoo
◾The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne)
◾National Museum Scotland

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
◾Ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
◾Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
◾Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

Core courses
◾Key research skills: Scientific communication; Introduction to R; Advanced linear models; Experimental design and power analysis
◾Animal ethics
◾Animal welfare science
◾Legislation related to animal welfare
◾Independent research project.

Optional courses
◾Enrichment of animals in captive environments
◾Care of captive animals
◾Biology of suffering
◾Assessment of physiological state
◾Freshwater sampling techniques
◾Marine sampling techniques
◾Invertebrate identification
◾Vertebrate identification
◾Molecular analyses for DNA barcoding and biodiversity measurement
◾Phyloinformatics
◾Conservation genetics and phylodynamics
◾Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
◾Single-species population models
◾Multi-species models
◾Spatial processes
◾Introduction to Bayesian statistics.

Animal Welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.

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The programme includes the following profiles. This profile introduces students into the study of animal and plant development, microbiology, cell signaling pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, cancer biology, virology and immunology. Read more
The programme includes the following profiles:

Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology

This profile introduces students into the study of animal and plant development, microbiology, cell signaling pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, cancer biology, virology and immunology. Courses of this profile span multiple levels of biological organization, from whole organisms down to the molecular level. Students choosing this profile not only receive up-to-date knowledge on these topics but also acquire the laboratory skills required to engage in cutting-edge research.

Environment, Biodiversity and Ecosystems

This profile allows students to gain experience in the research methods used to study the evolution and ecology of organisms found in terrestrial, freshwater and coastal ecosystems. A staff of experts teaches up-to-date knowledge on individual organisms, populations, species communities and ecosystems, backed up by their active research experience in taxonomy and phylogeny, vertebrate and invertebrate ecology, evolutionary ecology, biogeography, plant ecology, plant-animal interactions, and nature management. In addition, students are introduced into ecological research by means of practical field training and excursions in Belgium and abroad.

Herpetology

This unique profile addresses biology students with a passion for amphibians and reptiles. An international team of visiting scientists organizes lectures on diversity, ecology, physiology, behavior, evolution and conservation biology and prepares students for a professional career in herpetology. Ecological and herpetological field courses in European and tropical countries form an important part of this programme. As a student, you will be in a stimulating environment, with fellow students and top-experts sharing your passion. For more information, have a look at http://www.herpetology.be.

Human Ecology

This profile focuses on the interaction between humans and their natural environment. The increasing impact of the human population on ecosystems worldwide stresses the urgent need for researchers with a multidisciplinary background, that engage in developmental plans for a durable use and management of natural resources. The profile Human Ecology addresses an international audience of students and offers a course programme that, besides scientific topics, also addresses technological, socio-economical and political aspects. For more information, have a look at http://www.humanecology.be.

EMMC Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems

The world faces a crisis risking extinction of species through global warming. Due to impact of e.g., changes in land use and destruction of habitats, tropical rain forests, mangrove forests and coral reefs are disappearing and with them ecosystem functions, goods and services on which human populations are dependent. In order to conserve nature, to manage or even to restore tropical biodiversity and ecosystems, we must understand patterns of tropical biodiversity, study how organisms interact with their environment and how they respond to perturbations and change. Next to research, this is dealt with in this unique masters programme. http://www.tropimundo.eu

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