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A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Read more

Masters in Sustainable Architecture

A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. It replaces the ARB Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2009

Surrounded by mountains and forest, this location fosters a unique learning experience, in a truly sustainable environment.
CAT’s 40 years of sustainable education experience has led to the development of courses that not only tackle environmental issues, but focus on sustainability at the core of every aspect of learning. Teaching is delivered in the WISE building - itself an example of recent developments in sustainable construction - and includes a mix of studio- based design work, lectures, seminars and practicals. The annual Summer School enables students to design, detail and build a structure at CAT using the local materials available.

Students are introduced to a range of skills that are increasingly in demand within the building industry. The focus is on designing buildings in their context, to allow for adaptation to the effects of climate change and to create healthy environments for all.

Masters Aims

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is aimed at the architecture student who understands that the world is in a time of transition and that building design plays an important role in environmental impact. Therefore there is great potential within the profession for environmental change and this is pivotal to the entire sustainability debate.
• Aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in architecture and wish to attain a highly credited Part II degree (note: the new M.Arch is currently seeking ARB Part II validation).
• Graduates of this course will understand built environment design in the context of adaptation to sustainability issues.
• Monthly intensive residential study weeks immerse students in their projects.
• Collaboration with external designers, architects and community projects add valuable practical experience to the students' resumes.
• Intensive twenty-two month course allows graduates to respond to the urgent need for a greater understanding of sustainability issues in the built environment.

Programme Content

The following modules are delivered via a lively mixture of practical workshops, studio-based design work, site visits, seminars and lectures.

Integrated Design Project 1
Integrated Design Project 2
Design & build Project
Final Design Project
Technical Report
Architectural Analysis through Writing 1
Architectural Analysis through Writing 2
Dissertation
Professional Studies

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Masters of Architecture (M.Arch) by the University of East London *subject to validation.

Methods of assessment

Students are continuously assessed via essays, reports, presentations and project design work.
There is a final exhibition of students’ designs exhibited in the prestigious WISE building and assessed by external examiners.

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is currently seeking prescription by the Architects Registration Board (ARB). The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture updates CAT’s existing Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2008 . On prescription by ARB it will offer a masters level Part II architecture course and will be subject to periodic reviews, for the purposes of entry onto the United Kingdom Register of Architects. Prescription is normally granted on a four-yearly basis subject to ARB being satisfied that standard requirements have been met.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector.

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Practical building and knowledge sharing

Alongside their design and academic work, students of the Master in Architecture also participate in a variety of building projects. This allows them to get practical experience and understanding of the complexities of what happens once their designs leave the architectural studio. During these projects architecture students work alongside MSc students who will go into complimentary building professions allowing for networking and a wealth of transferable knowledge.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Creating high standards of Sustainable Architecture

We pride ourselves on the high standard of work that our graduates continue to produce. To see for yourself, have a look at some of the projects our students produce: https://www.flickr.com/photos/catimages/sets/72157649961496950/

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to find out more come to our open day on the 14th July. To find out more go to https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/open-day or email Shereen Soliman to book on the open day:

Find out more about the course: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/march-sustainable-architecture

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This intensively taught MA is designed for artists using film, video and moving image who want to develop their practice and their networks to a level that enables them to work within the professional art world - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artists-film/. Read more
This intensively taught MA is designed for artists using film, video and moving image who want to develop their practice and their networks to a level that enables them to work within the professional art world - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artists-film/

Goldsmiths Art Department has the most accomplished and significant concentration of artist filmmakers of any Fine Art Programme in Europe. We also have a number of staff who publish theoretical and critical writings on film.

Staff teaching on the course will include Stephen Johnstone, Michael Newman, Janice Kerbel, Simon Martin, Lucy Clout, Bonnie Camplin, Gail Pickering, Saskia Olde Wolbers, Lindsay Seers, Nina Danino, Grace Schwindt, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Ros Gray and Rosalind Nashishibi

The College has a full compliment of technical resources: studios, editing suites, sound studios and film equipment, and first rate technical support.

Applicants should apply with a film or video or moving image project (as these are understood in a Fine Art context). The Programme will focus on the development of this project, together with an intensive critical studies course, technical skills training and a unique professional development programme. The purpose of the proposal at application stage is to ensure that the students are already capable of benefiting from a focused, practice-based and student-centred curriculum.

The Department intends to work with professional film and video organisations in London to provide a nuanced and integrated professional development component to the course. Students should expect to develop their professional skills, networks and opportunities while studying with us.

As a one year, professionally focused and practice based MA, this course is unique in the UK and Europe.

Subject to validation

Please note: 'subject to validation' means that we will be offering this degree providing it is approved by the Goldsmiths Academic Board.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Richard Noble.

Modules

The MA will consist of 2 summative modules and one formative module. Click on the module title below to find out more information.

Methodologies of Artists' Film (150 credits)
History and Theory of Artists' Film (30 credits)
Professional Development

Assessment

Students will be assessed by project presentations leading to an end of year degree show, annotated research journals, essays and a dissertation.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills and Careers

The MA in Artists’ Film will primarily support students who want to make careers as artists working in film, video and moving image. This includes developing their practice to a level that will enable them to get both public and private funding for their work, as well as networks and support systems that will enable them to get their work produced and distributed. This course also has a strong academic component, which will provide students interested in pursuing a practiced based research project in film with excellent preparation for PhD, as well as for teaching in art and film programmes in the HE sector.

There will be many opportunities for students to improve their employability skills as artist filmmakers with individual mentoring from professionals in film and video organisations in London, master classes with established artist filmmakers, workshops by film curators, Arts Council England and other supporters of film, grant writing seminars and seminars on film finance.

This course will also provide transferable skills for those who might wish to go on make narrative films, commercial videos or adverts, get involved in the gaming industry, make documentary films, curate or write about film or become film producers. The transferable skills they will acquire on the course will give them a strong platform for developing their careers in any of these areas.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of different energy technologies, exploring the subject through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work. Read more

Masters in Sustainable Food and Resources

A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of different energy technologies, exploring the subject through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work.

How is the course taught?

Taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), which pioneered sustainability practice and theory in the UK, this is the first MSc course to properly integrate the social, political, economic and practical aspects of sustainable food and natural resources production. This Masters degree tackles these themes through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work. Our MSc programme is taught either by distance learning or through residential blocks in one of the most innovative environmental buildings in the UK, or via a mixture of the two.

A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of transformational responses to the pervasive effects that economic structures and environmental change are having on diet, health, sustainability and community empowerment. The course will cover globalisation, corporate and economic control, increasing global population and the effects of industry-scale agriculture and materials production on ecosystems and our environment.

We give our MSc students the knowledge, skills and experience needed to develop a career in the environmental sector and make an impact. The programme draws on our expert staff (https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-in-energy-provision-and-demand-management/sepdm-staff-profiles) and a wide selection of academics and specialist guest lecturers – people who have made exceptional contributions to environmental thinking and action.

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme MSc Sustainable Food and Natural Resources at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Master of Science (MSc) by Liverpool John Moores University (subject to validation by Liverpool John Moores University).

Modules include

The programme uses the concepts of sustainability and transformational adaptation to frame an understanding of sustainable food and resources management across scales, including cities, communities, farms, industry and the individual.
You will study aspects of food and natural resource management in a broad sustainability context through focused, intensive module weeks that will help you understand:

• ecosystems and biodiversity;
• land and resources in cities;
• sustainable materials, supply chains and energy provision;
• the science of food and growing;
• political and economic aspects;
• sustainable food management, diet and health.

This course is subject to validation by the Liverpool John Moores University.

Who is the course for?

This Masters degree is aimed at graduates who want to effect change in the way our natural resources are managed, produced and distributed.

It will include key inputs from eminent practitioners such as Professor Tim Lang (Centre for Food Policy), Colin Tudge (Campaign for Real Farming) and Peter Harper (a pioneer of sustainable growing and resource management), and will empower you with the tools to find employment in environmental NGOs, government bodies, consultancy, forestry and land management, or to launch your own environmental enterprises.

The MSc programme provides the opportunity to develop deep understanding, confidence, aptitude and critical thinking in the management of nature and its resources. The course has a strong emphasis on the practical application of theoretical learning, with students given the opportunity to develop their own practical projects.

MSc Sustainable Food and Natural Resources students will develop into rounded, self-reflective learners who can work with others with confidence and clarity.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector. Find out more about our facilities here: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-and-adaptation/sa-site-and-facilities

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Flexibility

It is a flexible degree, taught in blocks taken either with an intensive residential stay of five or six nights at the centre, or by distance learning. MSc students are free to choose between these teaching modes for every module. There is a choice of modules, taken over one year or two – meaning the degree can be part time. It is a masters degree designed to give you the best possible experience whilst also meshing neatly with the pressures of modern professional and family life.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to visit for an overnight stay during a module, where you can attend lectures and workshops and meet staff and students, please contact Shereen Soliman:

Read less
A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of different energy technologies, exploring the subject through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work. Read more

Masters in Sustainable Food and Resources

A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of different energy technologies, exploring the subject through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work.

How is the course taught?

Taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), which pioneered sustainability practice and theory in the UK, this is the first MSc course to properly integrate the social, political, economic and practical aspects of sustainable food and natural resources production. This Masters degree tackles these themes through a combination of academic study, discussion and hands-on practical work. Our MSc programme is taught either by distance learning or through residential blocks in one of the most innovative environmental buildings in the UK, or via a mixture of the two.

A flexible Masters degree designed to develop a rigorous understanding of transformational responses to the pervasive effects that economic structures and environmental change are having on diet, health, sustainability and community empowerment. The course will cover globalisation, corporate and economic control, increasing global population and the effects of industry-scale agriculture and materials production on ecosystems and our environment.

We give our MSc students the knowledge, skills and experience needed to develop a career in the environmental sector and make an impact. The programme draws on our expert staff (https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-in-energy-provision-and-demand-management/sepdm-staff-profiles) and a wide selection of academics and specialist guest lecturers – people who have made exceptional contributions to environmental thinking and action.

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme MSc Sustainable Food and Natural Resources at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Master of Science (MSc) by Liverpool John Moores University (subject to validation by Liverpool John Moores University).

Modules include

The programme uses the concepts of sustainability and transformational adaptation to frame an understanding of sustainable food and resources management across scales, including cities, communities, farms, industry and the individual.
You will study aspects of food and natural resource management in a broad sustainability context through focused, intensive module weeks that will help you understand:

• ecosystems and biodiversity;
• land and resources in cities;
• sustainable materials, supply chains and energy provision;
• the science of food and growing;
• political and economic aspects;
• sustainable food management, diet and health.

This course is subject to validation by the Liverpool John Moores University.

Who is the course for?

This Masters degree is aimed at graduates who want to effect change in the way our natural resources are managed, produced and distributed.
It will include key inputs from eminent practitioners such as Professor Tim Lang (Centre for Food Policy), Colin Tudge (Campaign for Real Farming) and Peter Harper (a pioneer of sustainable growing and resource management), and will empower you with the tools to find employment in environmental NGOs, government bodies, consultancy, forestry and land management, or to launch your own environmental enterprises.
The MSc programme provides the opportunity to develop deep understanding, confidence, aptitude and critical thinking in the management of nature and its resources. The course has a strong emphasis on the practical application of theoretical learning, with students given the opportunity to develop their own practical projects.
MSc Sustainable Food and Natural Resources students will develop into rounded, self-reflective learners who can work with others with confidence and clarity.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector. Find out more about our facilities here: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-and-adaptation/sa-site-and-facilities

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Flexibility

It is a flexible degree, taught in blocks taken either with an intensive residential stay of five or six nights at the centre, or by distance learning. MSc students are free to choose between these teaching modes for every module. There is a choice of modules, taken over one year or two – meaning the degree can be part time. It is a masters degree designed to give you the best possible experience whilst also meshing neatly with the pressures of modern professional and family life.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to visit for an overnight stay during a module, where you can attend lectures and workshops and meet staff and students, please contact Shereen Soliman:

Read less
*subject to validation. The course. Read more
*subject to validation

The course

The course is designed to equip practitioners with the higher level skills and knowledge to apply recent developments in nutritional science, technology and legislation to support sustainable expansion and intensification of ruminant production systems and meet consumer demands for ruminant products both within the UK and globally. It is primarily aimed at UK graduates, veterinary surgeons and specialists within the animal feeds industry, but may also be of interest to overseas applicants.

Entry requirements

Candidates will be expected to have obtained a 2:1 honours degree in an appropriate agricultural, veterinary or scientific subject. Alternatively, candidates with a good UK-based HND or foundation degree in an appropriate agricultural or scientific subject, together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years will be considered. For all candidates evidence of qualifications and experience will be required.

How will it benefit me?

Globally the demand for animal products is expected to increase by 85% by 2050 and this increase in demand can only be satisfied by increases in production efficiency and sustainable intensification of ruminant production systems. Within the UK, ruminant production systems are under increasing pressure to maintain profitability and improve product quality, whilst maintaining animal welfare and reducing any detrimental effects on the environment. As animal feed represents over 80% of the variable costs associated with production, an understanding of the science and technology associated with digestion, metabolism, growth and lactation will be essential in order to increase the efficiency and maintain the profitability of ruminant production systems in the future. These awards will provide a recognised higher education qualification for graduates intending intending to work in the ruminant sector, and contribute towards the continued professional development of veterinary surgeons and specialists already in full time employment.

Careers

There are many career opportunities for those with a post-graduate qualification in ruminant nutrition including teaching and research positions at academic institutions and advisory work as subject specialists in the animal production or animal feed industries.

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New to LJMU, this cutting edge programme aims to train scientists, engineers and mathematicians in the new field of Data Science. Read more
New to LJMU, this cutting edge programme aims to train scientists, engineers and mathematicians in the new field of Data Science. It combines lectures, hands-on practical experience and an extended research project, delivered by experts from two university departments.

•Study a ground-breaking curriculum linked to industry needs
•Use industry standard tools and methodologies
•Undertake an extended project using real world data science problems
•Learn from academics who are world-leading researchers
•Use the programme as a basis for PhD study


SUBJECT TO VALIDATION

The programme comprises six core modules covering statistical and computing techniques plus an extended research project.

​This MSc is designed to give you the knowledge to move into the world of work as a qualified Data Scientist or to carry out further research through a PhD or equivalent. It is delivered via a combination of lectures, tutorials and and hands-on computer laboratory sessions.

A major component of the MSc programme is the research project module, which will give you the opportunity to work on a high-level original research topic, with guidance from an experienced researcher and supervisor.

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Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in Plant Nematology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. Read more
Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in Plant Nematology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. By successfully completing this course you will develop a range of abilities that will prepare for an interesting and fulfilling career in an area with considerable opportunities.

Although food production has tripled in the last 40 years, approximately one billion people still go hungry, with an average of 30 per cent of all available food being wasted during production, processing and distribution. Crop losses through nematode infestations are an important component of these losses. To date, over 4100 species of nematodes have been recorded to be plant parasites and have been estimated to cause £73.4b annual losses to world crops.

The aim of the course is to provide students with specialised training in nematology.

The course will:
◾ prepare students for a career in nematology
◾ offer vocational training in the area of applied nematology
◾ prepare students for PhD studies

The course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of basic and applied nematology and the issues associated with current production systems and control strategies. The course is underpinned by an extensive programme of agri-environment research at Harper Adams and longstanding collaborations with research institutes and other organisations in the UK and overseas.

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The postgraduate programme offers a solid and effective way of studying forestry with a strong applied focus. Read more
The postgraduate programme offers a solid and effective way of studying forestry with a strong applied focus. Input from industry professionals, many of them Chartered Foresters, will ensure that curriculum is relevant and current and that students benefit from the experience and insight of managers with real-world responsibilities. Industry visits and assignments based on professional projects and case studies reinforce this approach and help build links and networks. The central UK location of Harper Adams enables access to a wide range of forest resource types for teaching and study.

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This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. Read more
This Masters is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. It is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the core of what Goldsmiths is all about.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

What you study

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.

Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork placements, each of which is supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (22 days practice)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (25 days practice)

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (30 days practice plus five days observations)

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation.

All three modules are assessed by a fieldwork report written by the student and a report by the placement supervisor. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

The dissertation presents the culmination of your work, in that it is here that you apply anthropological methods and theories to a specific issue relevant to youth work that you are interested in. It is taught jointly by both departments.

Please note that it is possible to exit with a postgraduate diploma, also fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency, if you do not wish to move onto the dissertation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. Read more
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. By bringing together Community Development and Youth Work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of Anthropology, it offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines. The MA fits the spirit of the academic profile of Goldsmiths both in its interdisciplinary and multi-cultural character, and by bringing together academic and practical fields of study.

This Master’s degree is aimed at graduates interested in working in Community Development and Youth Work. We offer two alternative pathways:

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work (this programme) results in a qualification in the fields of Community and Youth Work and Anthropology that is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community Development is aimed at applicants who don't have the required level of work experience to apply for the professionally validated programme, and offers students an opportunity to develop community-based theoretical interests and practice

What you study

The MA reflects the common concerns of Social Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, and offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. It consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience. Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students). Please note that all modules are compulsory.

The Research Methods in Anthropology module covers the research methods of anthropology, the collection of different types of data including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research, its uses by subjects, and conflicts of interest. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

Contemporary Social Issues consists of four themes:

* First World/Third World Anthropological Perspectives
* Gender, Race and Class
* Community
* Youth Cultures

It is taught through lectures/seminars, and assessment is by one three-hour examination paper.

Two supervised community and youth work fieldwork placements (totaling 47 days). These are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. Both fieldwork assignments are assessed by your 5,000 word report on each and your agency supervisor's reports. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

Block fieldwork. For all students there is a six-week block fieldwork assignment (30 working days) focused on any aspect of management in a community and youth work agency, negotiable with your tutor. Assessment is based on your agency supervisor's report and a 5,000 word report on the placement submitted by you.

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10.00am to 4.00pm and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies. Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Assessment: Essay; individual project; take-home paper; fieldwork evaluation and reports; dissertation.

Careers:

Our graduates have gone on to develop their professional careers in community and youth work - for example as Connexions personal advisors, youth officers, community development workers, substance misuse workers, youth workers in a range of settings, and some have gone on to work with people who have disabilities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Taught by leaders in their field, this Masters programme provides you with the opportunity to investigate all proponents of fine art and its practice in production, material intervention, media and curation. Read more
Taught by leaders in their field, this Masters programme provides you with the opportunity to investigate all proponents of fine art and its practice in production, material intervention, media and curation.

-Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years, day study)
-Develop your work in state-of-the-art workspaces and facilities within the modern, purpose-built and RIBA award-winning John Lennon -Art and Design Building
-Direct links with Liverpool’s most significant arts organisations, such as TATE Liverpool, Biennial, Bluecoat and FACT
-Career opportunities through networking and collaboration in professional fields
-Studio space provided for full-time students

LJMU’s Masters in Fine Art provides an opportunity for a small group of students, from a diverse range of backgrounds, to develop their practice in relation to a global context that is filtered through the rich artistic infrastructure of Liverpool.
The programme is open to those wishing to develop a broad range of practices, including the production of objects and material interventions, the development of media-based projects and those wishing to pursue critical, theoretical and curatorially-based approaches. Taking Liverpool as a starting point, the programme explores wider questions of art production, distribution and reflection in an age of globalisation.

The course encourages artistic research and the development of new ways of working which challenge our assumptions around culture, identity and ecology. Taught in consultation with significant international institutions such as Liverpool Biennial, Tate Liverpool and FACT, the MA Fine Art offers unique access to specialist knowledge and experience of working in the public realm, museums and galleries and with technology.

The course is offered full (1 year) and part time (2 years). As a full-time student you will be offered studio space at the School’s John Lennon Art and Design Building.

You will have around nine hours guided learning each week, although we would expect your self-directed input to be substantially more. There will also be blocks of time scheduled for concentrated research activity, critique and symposium throughout the programme.

Master projects will be realised within curated events held in and around Liverpool. 2016 MA students recently held a show at The Royal Standard, titled Fantastic Rubbish

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Studio practice

This will help you to develop your practice in relation to your own concerns and locate it within the broader context of Contemporary Fine Art practice

Collaborative practice

You will be introduced to various strategies, examples and processes in the planning and delivery of art project initiatives. Through collaborative practice you will test and develop a relevant working process within the safe environment of the Fine Art peer group

Research and Practice 1 and 2

You will select topics relevant to your practice and overall concerns in consultation with tutors. These could be particular artists, biennial and survey themes, arts policy and infrastructure, or your own work. Research and writing will be supported by tutorials and writing workshop

Major project

Develop an initial proposal through to an exhibition or equivalent, developing a body of work and reflection along the way

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in weed science. Weeds cause significant losses in crop production despite the continued development of cultural, mechanical, biological and chemical controls. Read more
Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in weed science. Weeds cause significant losses in crop production despite the continued development of cultural, mechanical, biological and chemical controls. In addition they reduce crop quality, cause cultivation and harvest problems and act as hosts for crop pests and pathogens. Only by understanding weed life cycles and their interactions with crops and the environment can truly integrated controls be developed. By successfully completing this course you will develop a range of abilities that will prepare you for an interesting and fulfilling career that addresses the development and implementation of weed management in the 21st century.

Although food production has tripled in the last 40 years, approximately 1 billion people still go hungry, with an average of 30 per cent of all available food being wasted during production, processing and distribution. Crop losses through weed interactions are estimated to be on average 13% worldwide, although in certain cases this figure is significantly higher. The cost of weed management is estimated to be nearly half of the total amount spent on crop protection in many situations.

The aim of the course is to provide students with specialized training in weed science.

The course will:
◾ prepare students for a career involving weed science, including agronomy
◾ offer vocational training in the area of applied weed science
◾ prepare students for PhD studies

The course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of basic and applied weed science and the issues associated with current production systems and control strategies. The course is underpinned by an extensive programme of agri-environment research at Harper Adams and longstanding collaborations with research institutes and other organisations in the UK and overseas.

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Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in plant pathology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. Read more
Harper Adams is the UK’s only provider of a postgraduate course in plant pathology. There is currently a shortage of expertise in this important topic, which is a key element in the effort to ensure global food security and mitigating the effects of climate change. By successfully completing this course you will develop a range of abilities that will prepare for an interesting and fulfilling career in an area with considerable opportunities.

Although food production has tripled in the last 40 years, approximately 1 billion people still go hungry, with an average of 30 per cent of all available food being wasted during production, processing and distribution. Crop losses through plant disease either pre- or post-harvest are an important component of these losses.

The aim of the course is to provide students with specialized training in plant pathology.

The course will:
◾ prepare students for a career in plant pathology
◾ offer vocational training in the area of applied plant pathology
◾ prepare students for PhD studies

The course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of basic and applied plant pathology and the issues associated with current production systems and control strategies. The course is underpinned by an extensive programme of agri-environment research at Harper Adams and longstanding collaborations with research institutes and other organisations in the UK and overseas.

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Study Policing Port and Maritime Security at LJMU and explore the threats posed by piracy, trafficking and terrorism in contemporary policing. Read more
Study Policing Port and Maritime Security at LJMU and explore the threats posed by piracy, trafficking and terrorism in contemporary policing.

-Launching 2017
-Collaborative programme with the Faculty of Engineering and Technology
-Explore port security and the threats posed by piracy and terrorism
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent employment opportunities in port and maritime security management and policing, ship safety and supply chain security
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

This MSc enables you to pursue your interest in policing from a Port and Maritime perspective.
The Policing, Port and Maritime Security MSc combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping you to become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline. ​Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in the field of policing studies and given the skills necessary to producing a successful postgraduate research project. You will be working individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part on taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and depending on your choices, students who may be from other disciplines or Faculties. In addition, you will become a part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.Under the guidance of specialist supervision and amongst a diverse community of fellow researchers you will be provided with a valuable foundation that allows you to develop the skills of research, analysis, conceptualisation, argument and presentation – all highly prized competencies in many areas of employment.

​You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

-Policing in Context
-Advanced Research Skills
-Port and Maritime Security
-Terrorism
-Maritime Law
-Marine Insurance
-Port Administration
-Dissertation

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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A dynamic and practical documentary programme to develop your creative storytelling and multi-media production skills. The programme will include lectures, workshops and opportunities to learn from professional media experts. Read more
A dynamic and practical documentary programme to develop your creative storytelling and multi-media production skills. The programme will include lectures, workshops and opportunities to learn from professional media experts. You will also be encouraged to forge contacts with media companies and undertake a professional placement to enhance your employability in this creative sector

-Explore practical documentary making on a variety of media platforms
-Work with award-winning documentary makers and experienced journalists
-Study in the £38 million Redmonds Building and enjoy full access to Liverpool Screen School's state-of-the-art facilities
-Undertake a placement with a professional media company

This new practice-led masters degree focuses on documentary making on a variety of platforms, enabling you to develop the core skills required to become a successful documentary maker.
​Through the exploration of practical camerawork skills, including sound recording, editing and interviewing, you will become confident in your craft, while the journalism modules will develop your skills in storytelling, interviewing and the various journalistic principles.

You will also study and understand the laws which impact responsible journalism, including the latest media law and ethics.

​The degree is taught by two departments in Liverpool Screen School; Media Production runs a popular and highly successful undergraduate degree which develops students to become confident and independent media developers. The Journalism department has offered undergraduate and postgraduate degrees for many years and continues to produce well-skilled graduates ready for the workplace. The collaborative nature of this degree means you will receive the best learning support, access to the latest techniques, academic research and opportunities to engage with key external partners.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

-Practical craft skills in camerawork, sound recording and editing
-Core journalism skills including storytelling, interview technique, media law and ethics
-Core documentary production skills
-Interactive story-telling
-Tools for interactive documentary-making

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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