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Masters Degrees (Utopian Studies)

We have 6 Masters Degrees (Utopian Studies)

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subjects of English and Creative Writing. Read more
The School of English and Journalism offers advanced research opportunities within the subjects of English and Creative Writing.

As a research student, you can benefit from a dedicated doctoral training programme designed for English students, which gives you the opportunity to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Expert and experienced direction will be available from your supervisory team and you can benefit from the School’s research expertise in areas including contemporary literature, 18-19th century literature, early modern literature, women’s writing, Gothic literature, utopianism and American fiction.

Regular research seminars, symposia and conferences provide a lively research environment, in which students are encouraged to participate. An interdisciplinary research culture facilitates collaboration with colleagues across topics and strong links exist with the Schools of Film and Media, History and Heritage, and Fine and Performing Arts.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-21st Century literature and drama
-19th Century literature
-Life writing/testimony/memory studies
-Women’s writing 18-21st Centuries
-American literature 19-21st Centuries
-Renaissance literature
-Utopian studies
-Ecocriticism
-Gothic literature
-Postcolonial literature
-Trauma studies

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at this level of study takes the form of an 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

A doctoral qualification may be regarded as the capstone of academic achievement and may mark the beginning of a career in academia or research.

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Study literature and culture through an exciting variety of thematically conceived modules on the MA English Literature. Drawing on staff expertise, the programme covers a broad range of periods from the early modern period to the present. Read more
Study literature and culture through an exciting variety of thematically conceived modules on the MA English Literature. Drawing on staff expertise, the programme covers a broad range of periods from the early modern period to the present. On this diverse and challenging degree you’ll gain advanced research skills, which you’ll apply throughout your studies and beyond. Learn more about an existing area of interest, or discover something new on our highly adaptable and varied MA.

This course is also available to study part-time.

Key features

-Develop your research interests in literature and culture across the ‘long Modern’ period.
-Define your own programme with modules which rotate yearly, offering a fresh choice each year.
-Choose from modules closely integrated with staff research interests, while being able to pursue your own ideas.
-Benefit from small tutorial groups across all modules, providing you with invaluable face-to-face contact with your tutors.
-Hone your skills with a compulsory initial module which shows you how to carry out postgraduate research.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying which fits around your other commitments.
-Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours, 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
-Engage closely with unique local resources such as the nationally designated eighteenth-century Cottonian Collection, or the University’s own rare books collection stocked with 19th century and 20th century periodicals.
-Build on your experience - some of our students have been involved in curating exhibitions and organising conferences.
-Make the most of a rich cultural environment with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.
-Tailor your time at university to meet your needs by fitting your study around work and personal commitments. Our part-time route allows you to study over two years, giving you the flexibility to study at a pace which suits you.

Course details

In your first semester, you’ll take our compulsory research methods module, plus one other elective module from the list below. In your second semester, you’ll take two elective modules. The summer period will see you take the dissertation module in a subject of your choice, involving one-to-one supervision and support. This will be a chance to work independently on a project which interests and excites you. On a part-time route, you can complete the programme over two years. After completing research methods in the first term, you’ll usually study one module per term for two years (although other arrangements are possible). You’ll then do your dissertation in the spring and summer of the second year, finishing the MA in two years, or defer the dissertation to the following year and complete in three years.

Core modules
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-MAEL701 MA English Literature Dissertation

Optional modules
-MAEL708 Poetry and the Modern Self
-MAEL706 The Utopian Novel and Modernity
-MAEL707 Ocean Modernity: Literatures of the sea, 1850- the present
-MAEL710 Independent Research Project

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This Master’s programme is informed by the thriving 21st Century research community at the University of Lincoln. MA 21st Century Literature provides you with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of current developments in literature by sampling a diverse variety of postmillennial texts. Read more
This Master’s programme is informed by the thriving 21st Century research community at the University of Lincoln.

MA 21st Century Literature provides you with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of current developments in literature by sampling a diverse variety of postmillennial texts. You will have the opportunity to develop a thorough knowledge of literary genres and advance your research, communication and writing skills.

You can also benefit from engagement with the University’s 21st Century Research Group, which includes strengths in Gothic literature, contemporary theatre, women’s writing, American fiction, and utopian literature, and the School’s close relationship with the British Association for Contemporary Literary Studies (BACLS).

Presenting papers twice a year at the MA symposium will also provide an opportunity to develop your skills in independent research, public speaking and presentation.

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This course involves exploring the development of philosophy from Antiquity to early modern and modern times, with a particular emphasis on the genesis of modern scientific disciplines such as psychology, physics or chemistry, out of the traditional body of Aristotelian natural philosophy. Read more

Master's specialisation in History of Philosophy (Research)

This course involves exploring the development of philosophy from Antiquity to early modern and modern times, with a particular emphasis on the genesis of modern scientific disciplines such as psychology, physics or chemistry, out of the traditional body of Aristotelian natural philosophy.
There is no other academic discipline in which the past is so important as in philosophy: today's philosophers are still engaging with the pioneers of the field: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Wittgenstein. For this reason, the philosophy curriculum at Radboud University consists of a number of historical courses. The specialisation History of Philosophy covers the entire history of philosophy from the Presocratic philosophers up to today, divided into four periods: ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary.
Key authors for this specialisation are, in alphabetical order, Aristotle, Descartes, Epicurus, Galileo, German idealists, Hegel, Hobbes, Hume, Leibniz, Lucretius, Merleau-Ponty, Plato, Pomponazzi, Sartre, and Thomas Aquinas.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

Why study History of Philosophy at Radboud University?

- We offer a large choice of research courses in the history of philosophy.
- Our programme emphasises the importance of developing and using research skills.
- You will have a personal supervisor who will guide you during the entire programme.
- As a Research Master’s student, you’ll be affiliated with the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science, which has received top rankings in the field in past national evaluations (2006 and 2013).
- This is an excellent preparation for post-graduate life due to the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis: a publishable article and a PhD research proposal.
- Students have a high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad.
- There is an international climate: more than half of the teaching staff and Research Master’s students are from outside the Netherlands.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers investigate varied aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills; the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually, and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme is designed for people aiming to do research in the field. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. The majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that over 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our research in this field

All of the research related to this specialisation is embedded in the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science. This internationally renowned centre is dedicated to the study of the historical interrelation of philosophy and the sciences. Many of the researchers affiliated with the centre investigate the evolution of natural philosophy since Aristotle and the development of the different natural scientific disciplines (such as physics, chemistry or psychology) since the seventeenth century. Although the centre is best known for its expertise in the ancient, medieval and early modern periods, the researchers also cover the entire period from the Aristotelian corpus up to contemporary philosophy.

The focus on natural philosophy is due to the consideration that, at least up to the eighteenth century, factors such as time, space, the motion of stars, and the nature of the human soul were all integral parts of (natural) philosophy. Nijmegen's Center for the History of Philosophy and Science is the only research centre in the world dedicated to the investigation of this historical development.

Thesis subjects in History of Philosophy

The centre is active in organising public lectures, seminars and colloquia, which students are very welcome to attend. Although many research Master’s students choose a topic related to the research activities of the Centre, this is not mandatory. Recent Master’s theses (publishable articles) were about the following themes:
- The use of history in utopian tales
- The Vatican censorship of Paracelsus
- Thought experiments in Locke and Leibniz
- The theme of flight in Plato and Philo of Alexandria
- Bergson’s method of intuition
- Chiffons of Clairvaux on the will
- Perceptual experience in Merleau-Ponty
- Agamben’s reading of Hegel

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

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(subject to approval). Kent’s new MA in European Culture makes it possible to study the history, literature, and political philosophies of the continent while based in Paris, Europe’s cultural capital. Read more
(subject to approval)

Kent’s new MA in European Culture makes it possible to study the history, literature, and political philosophies of the continent while based in Paris, Europe’s cultural capital.

Europe is at the heart of many contemporary political debates, and is a geographically, linguistically and culturally diverse continent with a rich history. From the French Revolution to the European Union, Europe has long been a placeholder for any number of utopian, internationalist aspirations. To trace the history of the cultural constructions of Europe is to hold a mirror up to its changing intellectual faces.

The programme is offered by the Department of Modern Languages and benefits from staff expertise in a variety of disciplines across the School of European Culture and Languages (https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html). Based at Kent’s Paris centre at Reid Hall, where authors and philosophers such as Barthes, Beauvoir and Derrida have lectured, and in the heart of historic Montparnasse, where Picasso and Modigliani had their studios, the MA offers you the chance to immerse yourself fully in European culture in order to enhance your linguistic skills and cultural understanding.

The programme consists of one core module, ‘The Idea of Europe’, and three further taught modules, followed by a final dissertation. All modules are taught in English.

This is an ideal programme for anyone with an interest in the rapidly changing political history of Europe, in its diverse literature, or in the experience and independence gained from living and studying overseas for an extended period of time. Additionally, you will benefit from enhanced linguistic skills from your time spent living in Paris while studying at Kent's Paris centre, as well as gain confidence and independence from living overseas.

Course structure

You take one core module, ‘The Idea of Europe’ which will equip you with the methodological and historical framework for the MA as a whole. You then take three further taught modules offered at the University of Kent’s Paris centre before undertaking a final dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.


- Centre for Modern European Literature

Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

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