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Masters Degrees (User-Centred Design)

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As a Data Visualisation Designer you can contribute innovative solutions with the potential to transform societal challenges, by designing the human interface to increasingly complex problems. Read more

Why take this course?

As a Data Visualisation Designer you can contribute innovative solutions with the potential to transform societal challenges, by designing the human interface to increasingly complex problems.

On this course, you will learn how to create rich and meaningful stories with data. We will study digital content in any mode, whether it is in alphanumeric form, binary, vector, pixel, video, or others. The designer provides an important interface, that allows us to explore data and generates meaningful communication. This communication is predominantly visual, but with developments in Wearables and the Internet of Things, is also becoming increasingly physical, affective, networked and interactive. Data Visualisation Design spans traditional graphic and information design, interaction design, information architecture, computational design, design thinking and user-centred and user experience design.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Learn the theory and practice of data visualisation, data, interface/interaction design and user experience, and apply this to your own design
Critically question the role of data related to the social, political, economic and cultural through contextual research
Explore live data sets from real world scenarios, such as industry or charities like the digital humanitarian network
Develop independent research and project ideas to create innovative, forward thinking design solutions and experiences for a digital and data driven world

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will prepare you to work in the design disciplines of the creative industries, with a focus on data visualisation, information design, computational design, digital content, interactivity and user experience. Data Visualisation designers are in demand in sectors including business, research, health, education, government/public service, the arts.

The skills gained on this course can also be applied to employment in UI (user interface) design, or focus on interaction as a UX (User experience) designer. The critical and contextual outlook allows you to position yourself as a strategist and operate in a consultative manner. The research aspect of the course would also suit a career in compulsory, further and higher education.

Careers include:

Data Visualisation Design
Information Design
Digital Graphic Design
UI (user interface) / UX (user experience) design
Interaction design

Module Details

The course is offered over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time).

You will study five units, one of which is shared with other MA courses in the School of Art and Design. There will be preparatory units delivering a grounding in practical skills, theoretical context and academic research (competencies and skills). You will also study units that allow more thematic engagement with interactive and data driven design in terms of theory such as critical design, affordances, experience and complexity. It will also provide a unit oriented towards employability, and incorporate live briefs and group work. These units work to catalyse your own ideas and research direction for the Major Project unit.

Core units currently comprise:

A Question of Research
Fundamentals of Data and Interaction Design
Digital Futures – Themes and Issues in Practice
Design Solutions for Enterprise, Society and Culture
Major Project

Programme Details

The teaching combines interactive lectures and group seminar discussions with support through one-to-one tutorials. You also receive feedback on your work through friendly but critical peer review in group sessions with other students, members of faculty and other experts as appropriate. One of the units includes working as a team. Your project work emphasises self-initiated learning which gives you the freedom to explore the specialist area of your interest, while being helpfully guided by your supervisor. The curriculum is very closely related to the research areas in the department, so the staff have cutting edge knowledge of the field and its potential for innovation.

Your learning is mostly assessed through the submission of practical course work, such as digital prototypes, and the documentation of the learning journey in sketchbooks, diaries, blogs or journals.

This will be documenting contextual research as well as stages in practical experimentation and annotation of reflection. There are some written elements to be submitted as well, mostly accompanying proposals/reports to contextualise your practice. The assessment also includes individual and group presentations, this mode is also used to give you formative feedback on your work throughout.

Here's how we assess your work:

Digital artefacts / prototypes
Learning journals
Proposals
Reports
Oral presentation

Student Destinations

This course is an opportunity to focus your creative design practice on the interactive, data driven, user centred and culturally contextualised. It also enhances your design career by upgrading your skills and widening your knowledge and thinking in the digital arena, allowing you to stay one step ahead of the rest. The independent research aspect of the course prepares you for further education in terms of a research degree and employment in R&D and/or education.

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This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career. Read more
This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career.

Who is it for?

This course is for people who share our ethos of wanting to design technology that meets user needs - interactive systems that are useful, easy-to-use and engaging. It is for people who get frustrated when they interact with unnecessarily complicated Websites, mobile apps or other interactive systems and think 'I want to be able to improve this.' It is for people that want to design technology based on an understanding of users' needs and to ensure that the products they and others design meet those needs. We welcome students who share this user-centred ethos.

Objectives

This course will equip you with the latest academic research, theories and techniques in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), User Experience (UX), usability and Interaction Design and encourages you to think about design in new ways - recognising that there are many 'right' ways to design interactive systems.

You will gain a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge, along with the necessary skills and experience to create engaging user experiences. You will study modules that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process; from understanding user needs, to designing interactive systems that meet those needs, to evaluating the usability of those (and existing systems) through user research.

Placements

You will have the option to undertake a six month UX internship, after the taught part of the course has finished.

All internships are paid and provide valuable work experience, enhancing employability. As an internship student you can apply the HCI/UX knowledge and skills you have developed on the course in real-world projects and build a UX work portfolio. This supports you in standing out in the job market. You will also get the opportunity to conduct your independent research project on a topic of interest to both you and the internship company. This helps ensure the practical importance of the research.

Previous internships include positions at:
-London UX agencies (e.g Webcredible, Foolproof, Bunnyfoot)
-The BBC
-The Telegraph
-Nature.com

Academic facilities

You will benefit from the use of the City Interaction Lab - a combined commercial and research lab, where we have undertaken UX consultancy for prestigious companies including Virgin Atlantic. The lab is fitted with the latest technologies including a usability testing suite, mobile testing station, eye-tracker, interactive tabletop, brain interaction technology, 3D printer and more. We employ student consultants on some projects, providing the opportunity to work on real client projects.

Teaching and learning

The course is delivered by distinguished academics from City University London's Centre for HCI Design, who all have a passion for user-centred design. Industry professionals also participate in teaching and learning - by giving guest lectures, running practitioner tutorials and even by providing feedback on students' design outputs and input into module content, ensuring that students learn the knowledge and skills most valued by industry.

Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. It is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Examinations (which focus on applying HCI theory in realistic situations).
-Coursework (which range from written reports and essays, to posters, presentations and design documentation - e.g. wireframe prototypes). A range of both group and individual courseworks are set during the course. Group courseworks are often centred around realistic design projects.
-Independent research project (dissertation). The independent project allows students to conduct original research on an HCI topic of their choice.
-Each of these account for around one-third of the total course assessment. However, the exact balance varies according to the chosen elective module.

Modules

You will study seven core modules and one elective module that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process. Modules are delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. These include sessions delivered by guest lecturers from industry. Full-time students spend eight hours/week in lectures and four hours/week in seminars/tutorials. Part-time students spend half this time in classes. Overall workload is around 36 hours/week for full-time and 18 hours/week for part-time students.

You will also undertake an independent Research Project, for which our module on Research Methods and Professional Issues will prepare you.

A series of optional, but recommended, practitioner tutorials supplement the taught modules. These include talks, workshops and field trips. Previous tutorials have featured HCI/UX practitioners from prestigious companies including Foolproof, Futureheads and eBay.

Taught Core Modules
-Interaction design (15 credits)
-Creativity in design (15 credits)
-Information architecture (15 credits)
.-Evaluating interactive systems (15 credits)
-Inclusive design (15 credits)
-Cognition and technologies (15 credits)
-Research, methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Taught Elective modules
-Web applications development (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Telemedicine (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course empowers students to succeed in a variety of User Experience (UX) roles in leading digital agencies, business consultancies, IT companies and commercial/government organisations.

Roles include:
-UX Designer/Consultant
-User Researcher
-Information Architect
-Accessibility Specialist.

There is an increasing need for specialists with a deep knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction design. As the industry continues to expand, there is no better time to become a Master in this field. The course is also an excellent starting point for those wanting to pursue a PhD in HCI.

Our course is highly respected by industry, with exceptional employability; Over 90% of students are employed within six months of graduating (City Graduate Destinations), in prestigious companies including Samsung, Tesco, Thomson Reuters and Google.

The median annual salary for our recent graduates is £34,000 per year (City Graduate Destinations).

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This innovative programme is a collaboration between the schools of Architecture and Engineering. Leading UK industry is relying on Virtual Engineering to drive competitiveness in an increasingly tough global market. Read more
This innovative programme is a collaboration between the schools of Architecture and Engineering. Leading UK industry is relying on Virtual Engineering to drive competitiveness in an increasingly tough global market. The dramatic change in practices within organisations to be digitally driven in the future requires a wider approach to design and fresh business models. To capitalise on this, it is critical for future and existing Designers and Managers to have the skills this programme provides.

This programme brings together the best of design teaching from different professions; from Industrial and Product Design, Architecture, alongside facilities at the technological forefront of digital design including Virtual Engineering, Virtual Reality and Rapid Prototyping.

It links the knowledge and experience held by industry partners with the University’s research strengths.

This unique programme pioneers a collaborative transdisciplinary approach between Architecture and Industrial Design disciplines sharing a design ethos and methodology; exploring the similarities and differences in a collaborative studio environment.

With a history of new product development initiatives dating back to the 1990s, and drawing on its substantial developments in Virtual Engineering, the School is well placed to harness knowledge, expertise and networks that have been developed within the University over recent years.

This programme draws on the knowledge, expertise and networks that have been developed within the University as part of the Virtual Engineering Centre (VEC).

The VEC is a University of Liverpool, School of Engineering led centre of expertise in best practice for demonstration, innovation and integration of virtual design and engineering technologies across High Value Manufacturing sectors.

The VEC comprises a multi-disciplinary team of engineers, computer scientists and industry experts, underpinned by extensive access to a wide range of academic expertise from across a wide range of disciplines. The VEC delivers technology development and the latest research, training and knowledge transfer around the application and adoption of advanced modelling, simulation and 3D immersive visualisation in support of product design and manufacturing innovation.

Visiting lecturers from leading design practices and industry will contribute to the programme as guest lecturers, with current research, and demonstrating real-life case studies.

This programme offers a semester at our campus in China, Xi’an Jiaotong- Liverpool University.


Programme Structure

Semester 1

Presenting Design Research (15 credits)
Design Project 1 (30 credits)
Managing New Product Development (15 credits)
Digital Design and Simulation Technologies (15 credits)
User-centred Research and Design (15 credits)
Design Appreciation 1 (15 credits)

Semester 2

Research Methodology (15 credits)
Design Project 2 (15 credits)
Innovation and Entrepreneurship (15 credits)
Group New Product Development Project (15 credits)
Design Appreciation 2 (15 credits)

Semester 3

Thesis (Dissertation, Design by Research or Design) (60 credits)

Careers

The industry need for digitally enabled Architects, Designers and Engineers promises a number of exciting career paths for students. The multi-disciplinary focus of this programme will develop careers in creative and manufacturing industries spanning architecture, product design and development, and urban design.

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Designing at the forefront of communication technology. The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. Read more
Designing at the forefront of communication technology.

Overview

The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. These advances have created a demand for graduates who understand social and participatory design principles and have the skills to design new interactive technologies.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies provides an innovative mix of social and technical skills. You will gain an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that affect the use of interactive technologies, examining how technology is perceived and employed by the user, and you will develop the skills to design and create usable and accessible devices and applications.

Course content

Understand social media and interactive technologies through the key roles they play in society. Explore topics in human-computer interaction, user-centred design, social and cultural theory and human psychology and learn to apply them to the practical problems of designing interactive pages, devices and systems.

Modules for this social media degree are taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Computer Science.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies includes eight core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology
-Research Methods for Interactive Technologies
-User-centred Design for Interactive Technologies

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff with the relevant experience for your topic. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Examples of previous projects include:
-Accessibility of iPhone/iPad apps
-Democracy and participation in York City
-The use of social networking sites by the older generation
-Social robotics and companionship
-Living with the h-index?
-Investigating immersion in games with inattentional blindness
-Immersion and cognitive effort when playing videogames
-Immersion in audio-only games

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge needed to play a leading role in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. This social media degree also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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This MSc programme is centred on furthering the understanding of architecture and urban design in the development of building cities and the social groups that inhabit them. Read more
This MSc programme is centred on furthering the understanding of architecture and urban design in the development of building cities and the social groups that inhabit them. It offers an increase of specialism to those interested in the research and design of the built environment intending to take either an academic pathway or a specific direction within their current professional practice.

Degree information

The programme addresses the study of architecture and cities using the theoretical and analytical framework of space syntax as well as wider theoretical and analytical approaches. Students learn to specialise in one of several streams related to contemporary world challenges: architecture and computing, sustainable urbanism, social inclusion and exclusion, informal settlements, spatial cognition, the physical and immaterial dimensions of social networks and design innovation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Design as a Knowledge-Based Process
-Buildings, Organisations and Networks
-Space Syntax Methodology and Analytical Design
-Spatial Cultures
-Architectural Phenomena
-Spatial Justice

Optional modules
-Analytical Design Research Project
-E-Merging Design and Analysis

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation related to the main themes of the programme, typically involving a directed research project on a building or urban site.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through seminars, lectures, design studios, hands-on computer workshops, a variety of field trips in and around London and an international trip (optional). Assessment is through essays, written and take-home examinations, oral presentations, project reviews, debates, group and individual projects, classroom exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
The E-merging analysis and design studio (optional module) is usually accompanied by an international trip not exceeding £ 750 per person, based on standard costs as specified by the School.

Careers

Graduates of the programme go on to many different career routes: some have progressed to PhD degrees and have obtained academic positions in top universities worldwide, others have found teaching positions on architectural programmes; some go into policy-making activities; and many have ploughed their knowledge back into furthering their architectural/design careers. In the past few years an increasing number of graduates have obtained jobs at Space Syntax Limited.

First destinations of recent graduates include: CABE, Foster and Partners, Aecom, Arup, Qatar Foundation, Cube Design, Portland Design Associates, Levitt Bernstein, Paul Drew Design, Manu Chugh Architects, Buro Happold and Space Lab, as well as various academic or research positions at prestigious international universities or research centres.

Employability
This programme enhances students' intellectual and design abilities in the field of urban/architectural theory, architectural/urban morphology and the social aspects of the urban environment. Graduates of this programme can be involved in both professional and academic activities. Graduates who choose to go into practice will have a leading edge in evidence-informed and research-based design. Those who choose an academic path will have the advanced knowledge and skills required for high-level academic positions.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The course provides a unique approach to the study of architecture and cities world-wide equipping students with exceptional theoretical and analytical skills. It is located in UCL Bartlett one of the UK's largest multidisciplinary built environment faculty, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

The programme is unique in the world in integrating architecture and urbanism, and adopting a user-centred approach. Students receive advanced and exceptional training in theories, data analysis and their creative integration with design thinking.

The degree draws on the rich design industries in London including Space Syntax Ltd and provides networking opportunities to help advance students in their academic and professionals both during and after the programme.

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About the course. -Access to world-class collections and archives. -Learn to apply a user-centred approach to support design decisions and generate new design opportunities. Read more
About the course:
-Access to world-class collections and archives
-Learn to apply a user-centred approach to support design decisions and generate new design opportunities
-Practice within a research-intensive environment, where equal emphasis is placed on design theory and practice
-Develop effective communication and visual systems
-Produce functional, aesthetic and highly crafted complex documents, interfaces and interaction environments

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Information design: practice (design projects)
-Information design: core (seminars and essays)
-Dissertation

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates have an excellent employment record. Many take up positions in type design studios, with publishers and general design studios, and wayfinding and information design studios. Others develop their own businesses, or take up managerial roles in creative firms. Employers include Apple, Monotype, Microsoft Typography, Victoria & Albert Museum, Oxford University Press, Financial Times and Nokia.

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- 21st Century Innovation. There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Read more

Overview

- 21st Century Innovation
There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Companies large and small also recognise the essential need for early-stage innovation research that uncovers crucial understanding of user needs, socio-cultural trends and insights, which lead to exciting and differentiating new innovation concepts.

“There is political agreement in Europe that to ensure competitiveness, prosperity and wellbeing, … the progressive shift in emphasis of European innovation policy from exclusive reliance on ‘technology push’ to more demand- and user-driven innovation must continue.”

(Design as a driver of user-centred innovation EU Commission, April 2009)

- For all Innovation Leaders
This MSc offers the opportunity to become a leader in Design Innovation for your organisation. The MSc in Design Innovation gives a practical education and experience in the key themes that drive 21st century innovation, such as innovation strategy and deep understanding of human needs, behaviours and socio-cultural trends. You will learn the methods to research, acquire, analyse and present this understanding as well as the techniques and skills to synthesise actionable innovation concepts.

Course Structure

The programme is delivered by assignments, lectures, workshops and dissertation. A large portion of the learning is experiential through case research, workshop discussion, fieldwork and individual or group assignments. A substantial field project is carried out in the third semester, with a written dissertation on completion. All modules and dissertation are 100% continuously assessed, with no end of semester written examinations.

- Modules
The programme is delivered over 12 months (full-time) or 24 months (part-time). It is structured in a modular format to facilitate part-time study over 2 years while staying in employment. Also, modules may be studied individually with individual certification and for accrual of credits towards a Diploma or Masters award.
Taught modules are delivered in semesters 1 & 2 (Autumn and Spring).
Dissertation project, including field research, is carried out in semester 3 (Summer).

Career Options

This MSc programme is ideal for anyone aspiring to be an effective radical innovator. In particular, it directly prepares graduates for the roles of innovation leadership, innovation management, product management, strategic marketing, market research, design strategy and new product or service development in a wide variety of sectors such as technology, pharmaceutical, agri-food, design, manufacturing, service industries and all areas of the public service.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50K Full-time

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
- 21st Century Innovation. There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Read more

Overview

- 21st Century Innovation
There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Companies large and small also recognise the essential need for early-stage innovation research that uncovers crucial understanding of user needs, socio-cultural trends and insights, which lead to exciting and differentiating new innovation concepts.

“There is political agreement in Europe that to ensure competitiveness, prosperity and wellbeing, … the progressive shift in emphasis of European innovation policy from exclusive reliance on ‘technology push’ to more demand- and user-driven innovation must continue.”

(Design as a driver of user-centred innovation EU Commission, April 2009)

- For all Innovation Leaders
This MSc offers the opportunity to become a leader in Design Innovation for your organisation. The MSc in Design Innovation gives a practical education and experience in the key themes that drive 21st century innovation, such as innovation strategy and deep understanding of human needs, behaviours and socio-cultural trends. You will learn the methods to research, acquire, analyse and present this understanding as well as the techniques and skills to synthesise actionable innovation concepts.

Course Structure

The programme is delivered by assignments, lectures, workshops and dissertation. A large portion of the learning is experiential through case research, workshop discussion, fieldwork and individual or group assignments. A substantial field project is carried out in the third semester, with a written dissertation on completion. All modules and dissertation are 100% continuously assessed, with no end of semester written examinations.

- Modules

The programme is delivered over 24 months part-time. It is structured in a modular format to facilitate part-time study over 2 years while staying in employment. Also, modules may be studied individually with individual certification and for accrual of credits towards a Diploma or Masters award.
Taught modules are delivered in semesters 1 & 2 (Autumn and Spring).
Dissertation project, including field research, is carried out in semester 3 (Summer).

Career Options

This MSc programme is ideal for anyone aspiring to be an effective radical innovator. In particular, it directly prepares graduates for the roles of innovation leadership, innovation management, product management, strategic marketing, market research, design strategy and new product or service development in a wide variety of sectors such as technology, pharmaceutical, agri-food, design, manufacturing, service industries and all areas of the public service.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH51K

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This interdisciplinary programme introduces health informatics in the context of international health systems and global health challenges, supported by specialist courses covering areas such as public health informatics, telehealthcare and mHealth. Read more

Programme description

This interdisciplinary programme introduces health informatics in the context of international health systems and global health challenges, supported by specialist courses covering areas such as public health informatics, telehealthcare and mHealth.

The term eHealth describes a diverse field concerned with the application of ICT to support the organisation and delivery of healthcare services and to enable citizens to manage their own health and wellness.

eHealth has become a priority area for the international healthcare sector and is attracting considerable global investment. This interdisciplinary programme introduces eHealth in the context of international health systems and global health challenges, supported by specialist courses covering areas such as public health informatics, telehealthcare and mHealth.

It is aimed at a wide audience, including health professionals, policymakers, NGOs, researchers, eHealth vendors and ICT practitioners. The programme is unique in addressing the topic from a truly international perspective, including a consideration of low and medium income economies.

Online learning

Our online learning environment is fully interactive and enables you to communicate with classmates and tutors from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Courses include:

Introduction to Global eHealth
Introduction to Health Informatics
The Ethics and Governance of eHealth
Telemedicine and Telehealth
The Business of eHealth
mHealth in High and Low Resource Settings
Global Health Challenges
User-centred Design
Public Health Informatics
Project Management

In the final phase of the programme students are be assessed on the basis of a structured research dissertation, based on a piece of original empirical research using a range of methods suited to the technology context and questions under investigation.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, or are unsure if online postgraduate study is for you, we offer online credit-bearing courses. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Learning outcomes

The programme is focused on eHealth applications, delivery, research and policy and does not provide training in technical aspects of software design.

Career opportunities

Academic and commercial research in eHealth
eHealth industry - design, development
Aid agencies/NGOs - eHealth deployments and evaluation
Governments and health providers - eHealth policy and management
International Agencies - eHealth policy, analysis, delivery

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Great design ideas can change the world. With human and user-centred design at the heart of this internationally regarded Masters programme, you’ll develop research and practice-based design solutions to respond to a demanding industry and rapidly changing society. Read more
Great design ideas can change the world. With human and user-centred design at the heart of this internationally regarded Masters programme, you’ll develop research and practice-based design solutions to respond to a demanding industry and rapidly changing society.

Whether your background is in design or in another discipline, you’ll develop, test and evaluate innovative design solutions in real-life scenarios. You’ll gain first-hand experience of current needs and trends across a range of sectors, and focus on a large-scale design project within one of the specialisms offered (see the ‘Specialisms’ tab).

Taught by diverse staff with internationally recognised profiles in research and practice, you’ll build an interdisciplinary approach to design in a stimulating environment, while being exposed to and involved in cutting-edge research. You’ll gain practical and research skills to prepare you for a wide range of careers.

Specialist facilities

We have plenty of facilities to help you make the most of your time at Leeds. We have an impressive range of resources that you can use to develop your projects.

At the top of our research facilities we have the world’s most sophisticated mobile eye-tracking glasses, which are used to understand how users interact with design. Other excellent research facilities are our EEG equipment (electroencephalography) to understand how users interact with the world, and our colour analysis/prediction lab.

We also house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history. ULITA, an archive of international textiles, is also housed on campus and collects, preserves and documents textiles and related areas from around the world. You can make appointments to view items, but it also has an online catalogue where you can explore the major collections.

You’ll also be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so that you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There is also a computer-aided design (CAD) suite with access to the latest design software, and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing, screen printing, 3D printing, and laser cutting.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll study a set of compulsory modules that will allow you to develop a range of research, conceptual and practical design skills and tools to lay the foundations for the rest of the programme. You’ll have the chance to learn through case studies, practical exercises and work on briefs encompassing all specialisms offered.

In Semester 2 you’ll have a choice of optional modules that focus on current trends in design practice and research. These optional modules will give you the opportunity to work on live projects from industry and/or live research projects being conducted in the School of Design. You’ll work on group and/or individual projects to explore more specific and advanced skills and tools in your areas of interest.

In Semester 2 you’ll also choose and develop a specialist project in which the tools and skills learnt in Semester 1 are applied. Projects can be developed in a wide range of topics that suit your interests and career ambitions. These include: Branding Design, Digital and Interactive Design, Information Design, Instructional Design, Graphic and Visual Communication Design, Service Design, and Typographic Design.

In Semester 3 you can choose one of two pathways: 1) Continue with your specialist design project, develop it at a professional level and apply it in a real-life context (with suitable users) for evaluation; 2) Produce an independent research dissertation based around a relevant field or topic within the specialisms offered.

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Human Interface Technology aims to improve interactive technology to meet users’ needs. It is useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, rehabilitation, education and training, entertainment and business. Read more

Overview

Human Interface Technology aims to improve interactive technology to meet users’ needs. It is useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, rehabilitation, education and training, entertainment and business. Study in the field incorporates a diverse range of topic areas including user-centred design, the development of new interface devices and technologies (hardware and software), evaluating these technologies within the application context, and studying the broader impact on human behaviour and society.
The master’s consists of 30 points of course work and a thesis to be completed full-time over one year. Graduates will have knowledge of key interface design principles, the ability to describe and evaluate interface hardware and software, and research and development skills.

Qualification structure and duration

The programme of study consists of a thesis and two courses:

HITD690 Thesis in Human Interface Technology
HITD602 Design and Evaluation
HITD603 Prototyping and Projects

The master’s consists of a course and a thesis to be completed full-time over one year.

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The course has a very distinct ethos based around the theme of environmentally sensitive building design. The aim is to provide you with skills and understanding that would enable you to take a leading professional and specialist role. Read more
The course has a very distinct ethos based around the theme of environmentally sensitive building design. The aim is to provide you with skills and understanding that would enable you to take a leading professional and specialist role. It is also driven by the following key underlying themes that apply across all our architecture courses:

• Critical regionalism;

• Sustainability;

• User Centred Design; and

• Professional Development

Environmental issues rank at the very highest levels in the concerns of the general public and are particularly affected by the impact of the design and construction industry. The scale of influence ranges from building to urban dimensions. These are global problems requiring global and interconnected solutions and the course is designed to address issues from a world perspective. Issues are considered for different climate types and locations, giving a strong international dimension as well as providing opportunities to develop solutions that address local circumstances. The course is designed to give you the chance to acquire a mixture of skills and knowledge that would support roles as integrated and important members of design and construction teams. The course also provides opportunities to understand the specific needs of progression onto research degrees in the subject area.

Buildings consume vast amounts of natural resources during their construction and subsequent operation, accounting for around a third of the total energy used globally, and demand exploitation of natural resources to supply the materials. In use, building emissions add to global warming, damage the environment and create waste disposal problems. Buildings can also cause ill health and discomfort for their occupants due to poor air quality and inadequate internal conditions. This course considers the full range of issues associated with sustainable architecture including:

• Energy You will have the opportunity to understand human comfort and energy use and to examine critically the links between energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide. This includes an exploration of energy assessment methods for both domestic and non-domestic buildings in a variety of cultural and climatic contexts.

• Materials and resources You will have the opportunity to be able to examine the relationships between resource use and the design of building fabric, and both passive and active mechanisms for human control of the environment and environmental services.

• Global environment The course is suitable for students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and from different climatic regions. You will have the opportunity to consider the differences and similarities of built environments around the globe and to seek innovative approaches to the development of appropriate architecture in widely different contexts.

• Health and well being Central to the course ethos is the notion of user-centred design. All design aims to improve life. But in complex scenarios of construction the user, as the primary beneficiary of architecture, can become overlooked. The course aims to ask you to question the needs of the user and examine human comfort in relation to the quality of the built environment.

In all of these aspects you are asked to develop your own perspective and attitude, as part of your own continuing professional development. A key aspect of the course is that we ask you to become pro-active researchers in a complex field, making connections between a huge range of information and responding innovatively and with enterprise. At the heart of the student experience lie the shared experience of personal growth and development and the acquisition of knowledge, skills and understanding pertinent to the individual in developing their own careers in the field.

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You will take eight Assessed Modules plus an Individual Project carried out in the department. Six of the modules cover core Software Engineering methods, practices and tools, and are compulsory. Read more
You will take eight Assessed Modules plus an Individual Project carried out in the department. Six of the modules cover core Software Engineering methods, practices and tools, and are compulsory. For the remaining two modules, you will be able to choose from Natural Language Processing, Topics in Privacy & Security, Evolutionary Computation, Concurrent & Real-Time Programming, and Functional Programming Technology.

Software Engineering has become a crucial discipline in the functioning of the modern world. Information systems, communications, transport, manufacturing and services all require well-engineered and reliable software. The focus of our MSc in Software Engineering is automated and large-scale software engineering, so the course will equip you to deal with the types of systems widely found in industry.

The MSc is a full-time, one-year course for those with some experience or background in Software Engineering. You will learn up-to-date theory and practice in the core areas of Software Engineering, and the main methods and tools used in industry. The course also covers model-driven engineering, service-oriented architectures, software architectures and user-centred design. You will gain a thorough understanding of techniques and practices of software management, including measurement and testing. This in-depth understanding of the role of software in commercial organisations will enable you to develop and maintain large-scale software systems.

You will gain a thorough understanding of techniques and practices of software management, including measurement and testing. These techniques will allow you to understand the role of software in commercial organisations and you will be able to develop and maintain these large scale systems.

Course Aims
When you graduate, you will be able to apply advanced Software Engineering techniques to analyse systems and design solutions, particularly in a commercial context. You will have experience of using state-of-the-art Software Engineering tool suites (e.g., Eclipse and Epsilon). You will also understand the human factors in Software Engineering, and will be able to design systems taking into account the needs of users.

Your individual project gives you the chance to specialise in a specific area of Software Engineering, as you will undertake independent research and apply your results to develop a real solution – an application, tool or technique.

On graduation, you will be equipped to design and maintain large systems in a wide range of industries, or to pursue an academic research career in Software Engineering.

Learning Outcomes
A thorough grounding and practical experience in the use of state-of-the-art techniques for developing software-based systems.
An in-depth understanding of the principles underpinning these techniques, so as to make sound judgements throughout the systems and software engineering life cycle.

Project

Team Project
You are taught a broad range of project management skills, which you will directly apply to a medium-sized software project that is conducted in small student teams.

Individual Project
The course concludes with your individual project. You may choose a topic among the many offered by the academic staff, or you may propose your own topic. Some recent topics were:
-Air Traffic Control application using PostgreSQL
-Automated Development of Graphical Editors built atop Graphiti
-Multi-Agent Reinforcement Learning: Conquest of Mars
-Natural Disaster Planning - A System of Systems Analysis
-Reinforcement Learning for Mobile Cognitive Radio Agents
-Simulation-based Hazard Analysis for Autonomous Robots
-Study of Business Processes in a Complex Enterprise System
-Using heuristics for Monte Carlo Tree Search

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Our postgraduate taught courses are specifically designed to meet the needs of industry, and the thorough grounding we provide, alongside the skills you learn from undertaking a Masters degree, will stand you in good stead in the workplace.

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With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry. Read more
With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry.

Who is it for?

The course is for motivated students who enjoy working within high-pressure environments often to tight deadlines. You will need a good undergraduate degree as well as the tenacity and patience to understand business systems and the ability to adapt to constant change.

Objectives

There is a common misconception in building business systems: that users know their requirements. Often they don’t. This postgraduate Business Systems Analysis programme has been designed to address this problem.

The MSc in Business Systems Analysis and Design is not about developing algorithms and coding. We work with technology but we are not technicians because we know that to become an IT consultant or business analyst, you need to understand the disparate areas that make up the discipline. This is a Masters degree where you will design a business system; in order to do this you will unpick the information infrastructure to find out if the system works.

Analysing a business system is a process that demands constant re-evaluation. By investigating system requirements, considering how information flows through it, and exploring the pitfalls that emerge within user hierarchies, at City we examine the business system as a whole. This approach is essential to respond to rapid business change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-What is the right system to address the problem?
-Does the system meet the needs of the business now and will it be able to adapt in the future?
-How is information flowing within the system?
-How will users interact with the system throughout the project life cycle?

Placements

As a student on this programme you can undertake an internship in the July to December period, for up to six months. You can work under a client’s direction for all or part of this time. Many students use the internship as an opportunity to carry out a specific project which forms the context for their final dissertation.

One current student is working within a user experience design company to investigate how scents affect the emotional perception of digital fruit images displayed on a desktop service.

Academic facilities

As a student on the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course you will have access to dedicated labs and use specialist software such as SAP. At City we also have access to Microsoft Dynamics ERP software to support the enterprise information system module. Microsoft Dynamics is an industry-based CRM system. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We provide a diversity of teaching approaches so you get a diversity of learning experiences in the form of traditional lectures, live classroom demonstrations, tutorials, laboratories, and TV studio role-playing. We encourage you to engage with the material in an active way. As a postgraduate student, we expect you to take responsibility for your own learning and use non-timetabled hours for your own private study or group interactions.

You will be assessed in a variety of ways from coursework and laboratory work to presentations, examinations and a project dissertation. By successfully completing eight taught modules and the research project you will be awarded a Master of Science (MSc) degree. All modules in this course are supported by Moodle, City's online learning environment.

The course is available full time (12 months) and part time (up to 28 months - two days a week). The Department is aware that this involves considerable commitment from part-time students, and we try to be as flexible as we can so you can successfully combine your work and study.

By completing eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed the eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. If you successfully complete four modules (60 credits) you will be awarded a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

There are six core modules and four electives from which you can choose two topics. Practical work is emphasised throughout the degree programme to develop your understanding and skills, which is strengthened by interactive teamwork. The course has an excellent track record in producing employable hybrid IT/business professionals.

In the industry you need to communicate your expertise in lay terms. The modules give you experience in working on group projects so you can manage roles and responsibilities and build a set of professional values. The core content will also give you the ability to set strategies, manage information flows and deal with problems such as overload and risk.

The course develops:
-Skills in business awareness, design and consultancy to facilitate the alignment of IT systems and services to business objectives
-The specialist understanding of theoretical principles in business systems analysis and design.
-Technical skills, through practical laboratory work, so you can apply your knowledge of IT and how it affects business competitiveness.

The course will give you specialist knowledge ranging from business systems requirements analysis and design, software systems engineering, data modelling to business intelligence, project management and business engineering with ERP solutions.

Core modules
-Business engineering with ERP solutions INM342 (15 credits)
-Business intelligence & analytics INM451 (15 credits)
-Practical business systems consultancy INM353 (15 credits)
-Project management INM372 (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues INM373 (15 credits)
-Systems specification INM312 (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose from one module in the first term from the following:
-User-centred design INM355 (15 credits)
-Information and knowledge management INM351 (15 credits)

Choose from one module in the second term from the following:*
-Databases INM343 (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (IR) INM351 (15 credits)

*Note: Databases is compulsory for students who do not have prior knowledge at the discretion of the programme director.

Career prospects

As a City graduate you leave with front-line knowledge. With insight from major areas of research including software engineering, human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence, you will be able to assimilate your skills within the industry and offer a future-focused mindset.

From Unilever to HMV and from Accenture to ITN, City graduates are employed across sectors in consultancy companies, software houses, the public services, telecommunications, multinational manufacturers, and large retailers. The programme will help you build a strong peer network as well as a solid network of contacts for your continued career development.

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The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators. Read more
The MA Graphic Design course encourages designers to explore ways of developing understanding between co-communicators.

You will do this by systematically interrogating design practice, through using design methods to analyse and comprehend situations and behaviour and by generating alternative and novel visual solutions. Students apply to the course predominantly from graphic design courses but are welcomed from a variety of backgrounds (if they can show an aptitude for typography) where they may have studied photography, architecture, illustration, interaction design, three dimensional design, fine art, or, subjects such as journalism, philosophy, psychology, anthropology or sociology. Whatever your background, you will be required to reflect on your worldview; the underlying assumptions and understanding that guides and constrains your practice, and to use this reflection as a starting point from which to further develop. Your practice can take many forms: it can be self-expressive, or socially orientated; print, screen-based or three-dimensional. It can focus on an aspect of a well-defined area of design, such as branding, experimental typography, publishing, and user-centred design, or on something more unconventional defined as part of your study.

Depending on what kind of focus you identify you will select one of three different types of Professional Development Portfolio (PDP). These reflect either a business, academic or curatorial/editing focus and provide you with another way of tailoring your study to meet your aspirations.

Graphic designers often work in groups, sometimes comprising members from different disciplines. The MA Graphic Design course provides many opportunities to work in interdisciplinary ways as it sits alongside the courses of other disciplines. Many of the taught sessions such as the introduction to research methods and processes occur in these interdisciplinary groups. At other times however you will be developing your project with your supervisor and other students on your course. This will require you to develop a theoretical framework, methodology and research methods that support your research focus.

As a graphic designer you should anticipate the possible consequences of your design interventions, including the meanings constructed through your practice, in relation to ethical and sustainability issues as well as to other relevant contexts. Creative approaches are required that respond to complex situations in which many problems reside. Outcomes are not constrained by media or by limited interpretations of what it is to be a graphic designer.

Consequently, an outcome might involve the design of an experience or service, as much as it might concern more conventional forms of graphic production.

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