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The MPhil in Modern South Asian Studies is a postgraduate course with a substantial research component. Read more
The MPhil in Modern South Asian Studies is a postgraduate course with a substantial research component. It is designed both for students who want to enhance their understanding of the social, cultural, political and economic history and present condition of South Asia and for those who want to go on to further primary research. It provides intensive research and language training for those who wish to go on to prepare a doctoral dissertation, but it is also a freestanding postgraduate degree course in its own right.

The MPhil is associated for examination purposes with the Faculty of Human, Social and Political Sciences. But teaching and learning for the course takes place in the Centre of South Asian Studies and the various humanities and social science faculties and departments. The course covers South Asia from the early modern period to the present. The areas studied cover the modern states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal.

The MPhil aims to introduce students to the latest research topics, methods and debates in South Asian studies at an advanced level. It provides training in the use of printed, manuscript and other sources relevant to South Asian studies. It provides essential language training in Hindi and Urdu. It offers training in the advanced use of library and archival facilities and the appropriate use of electronic databases for the location, identification and evaluation of source materials. It provides a structured introduction to key debates in South Asian history, development economics, politics and sociology through a variety of intensive courses. Finally, it offers close supervision in undertaking an original research project.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsasmpmsa

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

1. a deeper understanding of their chosen area of South Asian studies and the critical debates within it
2. a conceptual and technical understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies
3. the technical skills necessary to pursue primary research in their chosen area.
4. the ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field
5. an understanding of and proficiency in a modern South Asian language.

Skills and other attributes

By the end of the course, the students should have acquired:

1. the skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse the primary source material relevant to the student's area of interest
2. the skills necessary critically to evaluate their own and others' work
3. the ability to formulate a research proposal using the appropriate primary materials and to place this within its relevant academic context, to locate and assimilate relevant secondary source material and to discuss pertinent interpretative debates
4. the ability to reach an independent judgement, based on their own research
5. a facility in communicating the results of their ideas, research and its conclusion in a written form as a work of historical scholarship, and as an oral contribution in a research colloquium.

Format

Assessed coursework will consist of the core course (Introduction to Modern South Asia), taken by all students, and one option selected by each student from the range offered as part of the MPhil. The core course will centre around 14 twice-weekly classes in the Michaelmas Term, at which participation is mandatory. 8 option course classes will be held throughout the Lent Term. In addition the language element of the course will run throughout the year with weekly classes in either Hindi or Urdu. There will also be a strong element of research training to include preparing for fieldwork, interviewing techniques and the use of archival material.

Core and option essays, the book review and dissertation will all be double marked and mark sheets containing feedback will be given to students. Students meet regularly with their Supervisors, the Course Convenor and others teaching on the course who are happy to provide comments on students' progress. It is usual to hold a session in the late Lent Term or early Easter Term to provide the chance for students to present their planned dissertation research to the rest of the group and receive their feedback. Course Convenor holds an 'office hour' weekly during term.

Assessment

- Thesis between 15,000 and 20,000 words in length.
- Book Review: 2,000 words.
- Core course essay: 3,000 words.
- Option course essay: 5,000 words.
- Three hour written language examination in either Hindi or Urdu.
- One hour language oral examination in either Hindi or Urdu.

Continuing

The MPhil is a freestanding degree, but it is expected that many candidates, because of the significant research-training component of the course, will proceed thereafter to pursue the PhD. The course offers a thorough preparation for doctoral research, through the historiographical and conceptual emphasis of the taught component, through the specialist options, and through the dissertation. All MPhil students who wish to continue to a PhD will be encouraged to discuss their progress with their supervisor. Marks of 67 and above are strong marks to support the case for continuation to the PhD in, for example, the Faculty of History. However, this requirement varies from Faculty to Faculty.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The two-year MA Intensive South Asian Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Intensive South Asian Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, of which a course at an appropriate level in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali or Urdu and the course ‘The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia’ are core. In addition to the two core courses, students must choose courses to the value of 90 credits from the list of options advertised for the MA South Asian Area Studies. The disciplines available include Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study attached to a university or research institute in India, Pakistan or Nepal (the location depending on their choice of language), where they will further develop their language proficiency and conduct research for an extended dissertation. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. No prior knowledge of a South Asian language is required but applicants should provide evidence of their language-learning ability. The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students with existing language skills.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/ma-intensive-south-asian-studies/

Structure

Students take The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia - 15PSAC314 and a course in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali or Urdu in their first year, plus courses to the value of two full units (90 credits) from the list given below. These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

Students spend the first half of their second year studying at one of our partner institutions in South Asia, before returning to work on their 20,000-word dissertation.

MA Intensive South Asian Studies - Programme Specification 2014-2015 (pdf; 393kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/courses/file97965.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

- Dissertation

A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from South Asia, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The South Asia collection consists of approximately 88,000 volumes in English and other European languages and about 70,000 volumes in South Asian languages.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more
Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Course description

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our student
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan. Read more
Do you want to enhance your understanding of the cultural, political and economic history of Pakistan? The MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan provides a comprehensive and critical approach to Pakistan: its complex and vibrant culture, politics, economics, law, religious history and current trends. SOAS hosts one of the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff who specialise on Pakistan related topics. You will have an opportunity to interact and work closely with them. The Programme of Study will introduce you to the latest research topics, methods and debates in the field. It will prepare you to critically assess the diverse complexities of one of the most reported on countries in the world.

Optional language training is available for those who aspire to a research degree.

The degree is enhanced by the activities of a Research Centre dedicated to the Study of Pakistan. The Centre is part of the wider South Asian research cluster at SOAS.

- Centre for the Study of Pakistan:
Students are encouraged to join in the activities of the vibrant centre (http://www.soas.ac.uk/csp/), which runs fortnightly seminars and workshops, and an Annual Lecture.

- MUSA:
The Centre for Pakistan supports MUSA, recently launched, a postgraduate research forum for the study of Muslim South Asia.

- Internships:
Several summer internships are currently available to run alongside the MA degree. Please contact the convenors or the SOAS careers office for details.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/

Structure

The programme will consist of three course units (1 core + 2 options) and a dissertation.

The core course (Imagining Pakistan) will introduce the main topics, approaches and possible lines of enquiry for a cultural history of Pakistan from 1947 to the present.

Students will choose two courses from a list of options that includes courses on modern Muslim thinkers and Contemporary Islamism in South Asia, Law and Society in South Asia, Urdu language, and Urdu literature in Pakistan.

Students will also write a 10,000 dissertation on the Study of Contemporary Pakistan, applying and developing the knowledge acquired in the core courses to an independent topic of research.

MA in the Study of Contemporary Pakistan - Programme Specifications 2013/14 (msword; 88kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/ma-in-the-study-of-contemporary-pakistan/file85899.doc

Employment

The MA prepares students for a wide range of career destinations. Graduates will benefit from interdisciplinary cultural and linguistic training that is widely sought after in the business and public sector. It is suited for those seeking employment as management consultants, policy advisers in Government and the Civil Service, Think Tanks, Charities, NGOs, as well as journalism and media related openings, more broadly in the culture industry, or for those who aspire to a Research degree.

- Standard Chartered - International Bank
- Bestway – Food Wholesaler
- Gallager Heath - Insurance Broker
- Citizen’s Foundation – Education Support in Pakistan Charity

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers a critical, cutting edge study of present day India. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach and provides analytical training. Read more
The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers a critical, cutting edge study of present day India. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach and provides analytical training.

Students have the opportunity to choose to study contemporary India topics, issues and challenges in the following subjects: anthropology, cinema, culture, development studies, history, law, literature, politics, study of religions and languages.

The MSc Contemporary India Studies programme:

- introduces students to recent topics, methods and debates in the study of India
- prepares students at an advanced level to pursue research interests
- allows students to opt in for language training in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali, Panjabi and Urdu

The MSc Contemporary India Studies is based in the South Asia Institute which has an active schedule of events and seminars throughout the year and attracts renowned speakers and scholars not only from India but also internationally.

Internship opportunity

The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers students the opportunity to go on a 2-4 week work placement to India during the course of their studies, with placements provided through SOAS’ vibrant alumni network and the Careers Office.

Opportunities for placements fall within three broad areas: NGOs and development; business and economics; and media and journalism. They are arranged through the Careers Office and administered by the South Asia Institute.

The MSc Contemporary India Studies is designed to appeal to those interested in understanding current events and developments in India and who want to gain a deeper understanding for academic or commercial purposes such as business, industry, government departments or NGOs.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/msc-contemporary-india-studies/

Structure

Students take the core module Contemporary India: Issues, Methods and Approaches plus two taught option modules (2 units) from the list below (a maximum of 1.0 unit may be a language course).

In addition, students write a 10,000-word dissertation on Contemporary India. The dissertation will include the option of undertaking a 2-4 week internship during the summer months either arranged by students to be approved by the course director or through the Careers Office who have a database of organisations offering internship positions in India as well as the UK in terms of diaspora activities.

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars
Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

- Dissertation

A 10,000-word dissertation will be written on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MSc Contemporary India Studies and the candidate's supervisor.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree brings together European and international partners to provide an integrated study programme engaging with theoretical, empirical and applied approaches to security, intelligence and strategy. Read more
This Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree brings together European and international partners to provide an integrated study programme engaging with theoretical, empirical and applied approaches to security, intelligence and strategy. Studying across Europe you will be able to participate in an optional work-based placement with a practitioner organisation.

● The University of Glasgow is the leading partner in the consortium of universities that have developed this joint masters programme. Other degree awarding partners include Charles University Prague (Czech Republic) and Dublin City University (Ireland).

● Specialist master classes and webinars (online seminars) will be provided by practitioners and visiting academics.


● The programme will address a wide range of challenging intellectual questions, as well as the policy and ethical dilemmas that arise when state and non-state actors seek to resolve threats ranging from traditional interstate conflict to diverse contemporary issues such as terrorism, organised crime, and insecurity and vulnerability associated with technological and cyberspace advancements.

● You will also gain experience of the methods and products (linked to intelligence gathering and analysis, diplomacy and strategic communications) used by states, as well as the international political and economic/business communities to advance their security.

Programme Structure

The programme is structured around a series of mobility periods across two years where you study at the three programme universities for 1 academic semester each. During year 1 you will undertake a series of core courses reflecting the main themes of the programme and research methods training.

In year 2 you will choose a specialist concentration containing a range of optional courses. Also included is a 4th flexible mobility period, during which independent study (dissertation) and an optional work-based learning placement with a relevant non-academic practitioner partner are undertaken.

The periods of mobility are designed to enable you to engage with a variety of perspectives on the three core themes of the programme and promote valuable knowledge and practical skills based outcomes that will feed into future career opportunities.

Year 1

• University of Glasgow (September - December)
• European and international security strategies
• International security & strategic thought
• Intelligence analysis & policy making
• Language option: Arabic, Chinese, Russia, German, French OR Spanish.

Dublin City University (January - May)

• International security
• Intelligence & security analysis: theory & practice
• Political terrorism OR Peace-keeping & peace-making interventions.

Various locations (June - August; optional)

Research period to work on dissertation and engage with placement partner
Summer School (provided by OTH Regensburg), includes training on situational awareness, presentation and communication, analytics and intercultural awareness

[[Year 2 ]]

Charles University Prague (September - February)
You must choose one specialist themed concentration and complete a minimum of four courses (including the core). You may choice a fifth course from any of the options offered to make up the required number of credits. (Additional courses may be added to concentrations and all courses are subject to availability)

Concentration A - Strategic Studies
Concentration B - Regional Security
Concentration C - Security & Technology
Concentration D - Conflict Studies

Independent Study Portfolio (March - August)

During this flexible mobility period you will return to the university location of your primary supervisor. This will be your official academic home for this period. During this period all students have to complete their independent study portfolio which includes a dissertation. Depending on your research topic you may be able to spend some time during this mobility period in a fourth location at one of our associate partners. Some students will also have the opportunity to undertake a 6-8 week work-based placement linked to their dissertation topic. These are offered by our associate non-academic partners and are available on a competitive basis.

A range of formative and extra-curricular features are embedded within this programme. These include

• Language learning opportunities (e.g. German, Czech, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, Urdu, Arabic),
• Study Tour opportunities (e.g. Brussels/Paris/London, Washington) to visit key institutions and organisations working in the security sector such as NATO, European External Action Service.
• Policy development exercises, situational workshops and crisis management training events
• A project based Summer School
• Opportunities to attend security focused conferences
• Specialist guest lectures and seminars
• Membership of the University of Glasgow's Global Security Network and the opportunity to work closely with staff from Charles

University’s Deutsch Security Square.
Students (funded and fee-paying) should be aware that the programme involves a minimum of 2 flights once you have arrived at Glasgow.

Airfares are not included

with tuition fees. Possible flights include:

Glasgow to Dublin
• Dublin to Prague OR via optional summer school in Regensburg
• Prague to Dublin OR Glasgow (if not based in Czech Republic for your dissertation period)
• Work-placement students will have additional travel to factor into account

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The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

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