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Masters Degrees (Upper Second Class Honours)

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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. Read more
This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. At the same time, it enables students to become professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (with JNC recognition) for practice in the UK. Learning on the programme incorporates reflective professional approaches to informal education which enable the development of young people and communities. These are integrated together with wider critical learning on shaping the wider social, political and organisational context in which such practice takes place. The programme combines academic study on taught modules, two periods of fieldwork practice and students conducting their own choice of research with support from experienced researchers. The fieldwork practice placements enable students to develop their practice within local agencies (e.g. local charities and non-governmental organisations) with supported from experienced supervisors. Find out more about the programme from staff and students by watching our short videos.

Course structure

Core modules:
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 1 (15 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 2 (30 credits)

Students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, fieldwork reports, self-assessment, oral presentation and a 10,000 word research report. There are no examinations. To gain a Durham University MA, you must gain 180 credits at Masters level (pass mark 50%)..

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars, fieldwork practice and study visits.

Within an ethos of informal education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes, which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community and youth work and reflect the diverse range of community and youth settings within which practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion, drawn from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area. Two assessed periods of fieldwork practice offer opportunities for learning in practice settings related to community and youth work.

The MA Community and Youth Work provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to professional roles and responsibilities in practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this.

Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations, and assessed fieldwork practice. There is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives that students are encouraged to attend, such as extra-curricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to the professional discipline.

Other admission requirements

Applicants with substantial professional experience may be admitted by concession without an upper second class honours degree, providing that they have demonstrated an ability to undertake Masters level work. All applicants for this programme have to pass an informal interview, which can be conducted either in person in Durham or via telephone/webcam. This will also give applicants an opportunity to find out more about the programme from a member of the teaching team and have any questions answered. If potential applicants have any queries about the entry criteria or programme before making an application, we are happy to respond to informal queries at any stage and to discuss the programme with you.

Admission is subject to satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure check being undertaken upon an offer of a place being made, to assess whether applicants have any previous convictions that prevent them from working with vulnerable people. The cost of a DBS check is currently £44.

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This programme is based in the Department of Social Policy and offers the following benefits. To study the interrelations between population, development and health. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme is based in the Department of Social Policy and offers the following benefits:
To study the interrelations between population, development and health.
The chance to develop methodological skills used in population studies.
The chance to examine health and population interactions and policy implications in considerable depth.
Teaching by specialists who are at the forefront of their disciplines.
Students normally need at least an upper second class honours degree or its equivalent. No particular academic background is required.

Graduate destinations

Students graduating from this programme can expect to work in national and international institutions dealing with health and population issues, such as WHO, UNFPA, UNDP, IOM, as well as central and local national governments. A large number of our students have been employed in the health sector of their respective countries. Considerable interest has been shown in our students from the non-governmental sector as well as the private one. Additionally, many of our students go on to do a PhD in population health or a related discipline.

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The MA Photography course focuses on the fields of international photojournalism, documentary and travel photography, and is designed in particular for postgraduate students who wish to develop their knowledge and skills to pursue a career in these areas. Read more
The MA Photography course focuses on the fields of international photojournalism, documentary and travel photography, and is designed in particular for postgraduate students who wish to develop their knowledge and skills to pursue a career in these areas.
You will explore issues of photographic culture, image economies and visual representation, and develop an understanding of how the practice of making photographic images is affected by these issues in terms of both your approach to the subject and the style of your photographs. You will apply your learning through a series of practical assignments.

The course is designed to be accessible to professional photographers and photo educators studying part-time as well as those wishing to study full-time and complete in a single year.

What will you study?

In term one you will consider a range of practical and ethical issues that have an impact on the practice of photography by researching four research questions. You will explore these issues through readings, lectures, discussions and practical assignments.

In the first half of term two, you will plan for two picture stories, one travelogue and one issue based, which you will then go on to shoot in the second half of the term. This work will be based on a further four research questions. At the end of term two, you will edit and discuss your projects with professionals, peers and tutors leading to preparations for continuing one of the two projects into term three.

In your final term you will have 10 weeks to expand your work in progress into a substantial body of work with ‘The Book’ module in which you will have the opportunity to develop a photographic book on a personally researched theme. You will negotiate a learning contract with your tutor from which the final project will be assessed.

The type of issues you will study include image libraries and the commercialisation of the photo market, the changing nature of picture news gathering and photojournalism, issues of ethics and social responsibility in photography and the importance of meaning and context in photo images. The insight you gain from this study will inform your approach to taking photographs.

You will study the work of contemporary practitioners in these areas of photography and the relationship between their work and the markets they supply.

In addition, you will develop an appreciation of the practical requirements of planning, research and preparation for photography assignments.

Entry to the course is based on the assumption that you are a technically proficient photographer. It is important to note that it is your responsibility to ensure that you have the technical skills to complete the practical work.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor. This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. Read more
The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor.

Who is it for?

This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. There is a rich blend of students on the course with a variety of backgrounds and interests.

There are students from a number of jurisdictions many of whom will have experience of working in practice. Most students will have a upper second class honours degree or have performed well on the Graduate Diploma in Law. A high standard of work is therefore expected and achieved.

Objectives

This postgraduate Legal Practice Course is a practical course which will give you a strong foundation for a future career in the law. This is reflected in the skills based, transactional nature of the course.

You will work on a series of client files which will be similar to the cases dealt with in a solicitor’s office. The law school’s experienced staff will guide you through the different tasks that would have to be undertaken to advance the client’s case. Your approach to the course will therefore be very different to the one experienced in an academic law course. You will have to apply knowledge in a way that best serves the client’s interests.

The course is very interactive. You will learn by performing tasks relating to the case studies that you are given. These include drafting legal documents, preparing letters of advice or delivering a submission at court. At the end of the course you will therefore be well prepared for your career in the law.

Academic facilities

The course is delivered at the Gray’s Inn Place campus in the heart of legal London. The campus has a specific professional programmes library and all the classrooms have been designed to meet the requirements of the professional law courses.

There is a dedicated LPC suite of classrooms which also includes lockers and a resources room specifically for LPC students. The building which houses the LPC suite also has 10 video rooms where students can practice performances in the oral skills.

Placements

There are no placements as part of the course. However, students will be able to take advantage of the many pro bono opportunities that the law school offers. These include advice clinics, court based projects and schemes which offer the opportunity to work abroad. The City Law School also has links with a wide variety of organisations who can offer opportunities to volunteer with them.

The law school is often approached by firms offering internships to students.

Teaching and learning

One of the strong features of the LPC at City is the level of support students receive. All of the tutors on the course are solicitors, some of whom have worked as partners in their previous firms. They are supported by occasional sessions delivered by practitioners or visiting academics who are experts in their particular fields.

The course is structured in a way that allows you to gain maximum benefit from the experience that tutors have. Students therefore get a high level of face to face contact time with tutors.

This is reinforced by the size of the groups. For the workshops students will be in a group which has a maximum of 16 students. This group will then split into two for the skills sessions which have a maximum of eight students. This allows more time for students to get guidance from tutors.

These smaller sessions are underpinned by the large groups. All students will attend these sessions which give an overview of the area being studied.

Assessment

The assessment regime for the course has to meet the SRA’s requirements. This means that the Core Practice Areas, Electives and Professional Conduct and Regulation (including Solicitors Accounts) are assessed by means of a written examination.

The Course Skills are assessed in the context of the Core Practice Areas and Wills in a manner that is appropriate to the individual skill. For example, you will have to conduct a filmed interview with an actor as your client, make a filmed court submission, draft a legal document or prepare a letter of advice for a client.

Our assessments are open book and therefore test your application of the law rather than your memory.

Modules

The course begins with a two week Foundation when you will have classes every day. This will introduce you the Course Skills and the more practical approach that we take to studying the law. The course is then divided into two stages.

In stage one you will study the core modules. During this stage you will attend four days a week. You will normally have three one and half hour sessions a day amounting to 16 – 18 hours a week.

In stage two, you will study three elective modules. Your timetable will depend on the electives that you choose. You will have around 13.5 – 15 hours of classes a week during this stage.

Stage one - in Stage one you have to complete nine compulsory modules as follows:
-Core Practice Areas
-Course Skills
-Professional Conduct and Regulation
-Wills and the Administration of Estates

Stage two - during Stage two of the course you will study your electives. In order to complete the LPC you must pass three electives. You can take your electives at more than one provider and you can take your electives at providers other than City. You should, however, be aware that it might be more expensive for you to do this. You will choose your electives in November/December after having received guidance from the tutors about your choice. You will have to opt for either a commercial or general practice route although the bulk of the electives are open to all students. All students can choose from the following electives:
-Advanced civil litigation (10 credits)
-Commercial dispute resolution
-Commercial law (10 credits)
-Employment law (10 credits)
-Media law (10 credits)

If you take the commercial route you can also opt for Equity Finance and Mergers and Acquisitions. You will not be able to choose options on the general practice route. On the general practice route you can opt for Family or Private Client but will not be able to take options from the commercial route.

Career prospects

This course is designed to prepare you for life as a trainee solicitor.

Many applicants will not have a training contract when they start the course. The law school offers the bespoke Training Contract Advisory Service (TCAS). This is run by members of the team who were partners in their firms and so know what employers are looking for.

TCAS offers assistance with CV’s, covering letters, selection days and other matters relating to a search for a traineeship. In particular, students can arrange a mock interview with a member of the team. The support offered has allowed graduates to go into a wide variety of firms. These include commercial and high street firms both within and outside London.

We do retain links with our alumni some of whom assist us with the course in a variety of ways. In particular, we have a mentor scheme which involves previous students and members of the profession more generally. The mentors are able to give you guidance on your career.

Some graduates will also go on to further study or use the skills and knowledge acquired in areas outside of the law.

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We have set no deadline for applying, as we will operate a rolling admissions policy, which means that we will close to new applications when the programme is full. Read more
We have set no deadline for applying, as we will operate a rolling admissions policy, which means that we will close to new applications when the programme is full. We therefore strongly recommend that you apply as soon as possible. We reserve the right to interview either in person or via Skype applicants with a non-law degree background but with relevant professional experience directly related to this programme.
Law graduates
A degree in law, or a degree with substantial law content, normally of at least upper second class honours (or equivalent).

Overview
One year full-time evening intensive block period teaching (starting in September annually)
The LLM in International Shipping Law (Piraeus, Greece) is a new programme created by Queen Mary University of London, following the success of the London-based LLM in International Shipping Law. This programme will be taught by Centre for Commercial Law Studies academic staff at the Hellenic Management Centre (HMC) in Piraeus, Greece. It is aimed at lawyers and professionals with relevant work experience and is taught in two intensive blocks, so that you can fit it in with your other commitments.

The Hellenic Management Centre is committed to professional education and development within the shipping industry and is also the Official Educational Provider of the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers (ICS) in Greece.

This LLM programme is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers.

Structure

The LLM in International Shipping Law (Piraeus, Greece) programme consists of six taught half modules (assessed by exams or written essays), taught in six intensive teaching blocks over the two academic semesters.

Classes are provisionally scheduled to be held from 17-21.00 on Thursday, Friday and Monday and from 10-17.00 on Saturday and Sunday.

You will also be assessed on a 15,000 word dissertation, following the London LLM curriculum.

Modules

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.
Note: All modules listed below are compulsory for the LLM in International Shipping Law (Piraeus, Greece).

◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM301 / QLLG003 Maritime Arbitration (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM303 / QLLG002 Wet Shipping Law: Collisions and Other Incidents at Sea (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)

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This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide training in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. Read more

MSc

This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide training in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. This reflects one of our key institutional roles in leading the debates in political economy and pluralistic economics. It also places applied focus on policy engagements and their theory foundations, drawing on our strengths and expertise in those areas.

This programme will equip you with the specialist knowledge required by international employers in both the business and public sectors; as well as providing rigorous foundations for those who wish to go on to research in economics at the PhD level.

This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide trainnig in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. This reflects one of our key institutional roles in leading the debates in political economy and pluralistic economics. It also places applied focus on policy engagements and their theory foundations, drawing on our strenghts and expertise in those areas.

This programme will equip you with the specialist knowledge required by international employers in both the business and public sectors; as well as providing rigorous foundations for those who wish to go on to do research in economics at the PhD level.

Graduate Diploma

This one-year diploma is administered by the Department of Economics and provides students with a solid understanding of the main topics in economics. It is a programme largely at an undergraduate level, designed both as an entry qualification for postgraduate study and as a bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate work.

The programme is suitable as a standalone qualification for those wishing to change their career path or develop within their present profession. Alternatively, the Diploma acts as a conversion course for students without previous economics training who wish to take an MSc programme in Economics.

The programme is offered on a full-time basis, over a period of nine months commencing in early September with a three weeks long pre-sessional. Subsequently, students take four courses: Microeconomic Analysis, Macroeconomic Analysis, Quantitative Techniques in Economics OR Econometrics, and EITHER Issues in Economic Development OR International Economics OR Banking and Finance. Assessment is in the form of written examinations and course work. Completion of the Graduate Diploma at an acceptable level allows students to take one of the MScs in Economics in the following year.

The Graduate Diploma may also be taken on a part-time basis over two years. Students undertaking the programme on that basis must take Microeconomic Analysis and Quantitative Techniques in Economics OR Econometrics in the first year, and take Macroeconomic Analysis and EITHER Issues in Economic Development OR International Economics OR Banking and Finance in the second year. The pre-sessional in September requires full-time attendance.

The entry requirements are normally a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Other relevant experience, including good qualifications in a less relevant subject area may be considered. Applicants can apply using the postgraduate online application form. online application form (http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/dipecon/

Pre-sessional (Preliminary Economic Analysis)

The aim of Preliminary Economic Analysis is to provide a condensed introduction to the fundamental concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. It is designed to give students a rigorous, systematic and comprehensive overview of basic microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. Through the introduction and analysis of theoretical concepts, ideas and techniques, it provides the necessary background for students to successfully complete the Diploma courses Microeconomic Analysis and Macroeconomic Analysis. Please go to Preliminary Economic Analysis for further detail (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/153400091.html).

Programme Specification

Graduate Diploma Programme specification (pdf; 151kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/dipecon/file76402.pdf)

Full Time Study

All students are required to take and pass the following four courses which are taught in a combination of lectures and small class tutorials:

1. Microeconomic Analysis (Diploma) (153400131)
2. Macroeconomic Analysis (Diploma) (153400132)
3. ONE of the following optional modules:

Quantitative Techniques (153400116)
OR
Econometrics (153400103)

4. ONE of the following optional modules:
Issues in Development Economics (Diploma) (153400118)
OR
International Economics (Diploma) (153400117)
OR
Banking and Finance (Diploma) (153400122)

Part Time Study

The Graduate Diploma may also be taken on a part-time basis over two years. Students undertaking the programme of that basis must take Microeconomic Analysis and Quantitative Techniques in Economics or Econometrics in the first year, and take Macroeconomic Analysis and EITHER Issues in Economic Development OR International Economics OR Banking and Finance in the second year.

Microeconomic Analysis, Macroeconomic Analysis, Issues in Economic Development, International Economics and Banking and Finance are assessed by written examination (80%) and assessed coursework (20%). Quantitative Techniques and Econometrics are assessed by written examination (100%). Three-hour written examinations are held in May/June. There is no assessment for Preliminary Economic Analysis.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/dipecon/

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The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, including a team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts. In addition, students take a text-reading seminar, allowing them to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies, or an approved language-based course. Further courses can be selected from available disciplines including Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. Applicants should have at least intermediate-level proficiency in modern Chinese (HSK Level 4). The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students’ existing language skills. Alternative elements are available for applicants not in need of further Chinese language training, such as native speakers of Chinese.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/ma-advanced-chinese-studies/

Structure

In the first year at SOAS students on the programme take the team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 and two taught courses (2 Units) from the list given below. In addition, students take a Reading Seminar in Chinese Studies - 15PCIC003 (1 Unit) or an approved language-based course (1 Unit).

In their second year, students will undertake a Period of Postgraduate Study in China (15PCIC004) at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London (Extended Dissertation in Chinese Studies 15PCIC999).

These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

MA Advanced Chinese Studies - Programme Specification 2014/15 (pdf; 207kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/courses/file93666.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Lectures and Seminars
Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

Dissertation
A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from China, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Read more
The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

The course

The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

Pharmacy technicians or other pharmacy staff may study the taught modules at a lower academic level which would incorporate appropriate SQP qualifications and lead to a University College Diploma.

The full programme would typically be delivered on a part-time basis and studied over three academic years, with students completing the ‘taught’ modules to achieve a PgD or UCD within the first two years and those continuing to MSc completing the Masters Dissertation within an individually negotiated timescale over a one to two year period.

How will it benefit me?

Completion of this award will be representative of an individual’s commitment and on-going industrial Continuous Professional Development (CPD) as required by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Successful candidates will gain accreditation from a leading academic provider in the sector but also an award which has the potential to add gravitas and improve the perceived status of those who undertake it, while providing them the opportunity to further develop their higher level discipline specific skills.

Entry requirements

The programmes are offered at different levels of study, therefore for each award there is a different entry requirement:

UCDip (level 5)

Candidates should have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, or equivalent. These should normally include English, Mathematics and a Science or their equivalent. Candidates should also be able to provide evidence of a sufficient standard of core educational skills to benefit from, and succeed in higher education and substantial industrial and professional experience and responsibility or an NVQ at level FE2,3 or 4 as appropriate.

For candidates with no higher education qualifications, such experience should normally be of 5 years or more.

PgC / PgD / MSc

For admission to the University College PgC/PgD/MSc Veterinary Pharmacy candidates would be expected to have obtained a minimum of an upper second class degree in Pharmacy or a related animal science subject.

Applications may also be considered from candidates with a lower second class honours degree, Foundation Degree or good HND (together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years) or a Graduate Diploma/Graduate Certificate or equivalent. For all applicants, evidence of previous qualifications is required. However, all are judged on their individual merits. Non-graduates with significant work experience are also invited to apply. Where a candidate's honours degree (or equivalent) was not assessed in English, their English language skill will, typically, be evaluated by interview and/or via an approved English Language test.

Further information and applications

For course structure information select the 'Course structure' tab, or download our Course Information PDF.

Due to this being a part time course only, Harper Adams are unable to accept International Students who will require a Tier 4 Visa. If you require more information on this please visit the UK Borders Agency website.

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​The programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and is accredited by the British Dietetic Association. Read more

Course Overview

​The programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and is accredited by the British Dietetic Association. It enables nutrition graduates to study dietetics so that they can apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian at Postgraduate Diploma or MSc level.

The Postgraduate Diploma programme is closely aligned to the BSc (Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics programme and contains three compulsory placements in NHS Dietetics Departments in Wales.

Students exiting with the Postgraduate Diploma can return to undertake the dissertation on a part-time basis to gain the MSc Dietetics.

Applications for September 2016 entry open October 2015. Deadline for applications: 15th January 2016.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Dietetics---MSc-PgD-.aspx

Entry Requirements​

Applicants should have an honours degree (1st class or 2:1) in human nutrition, or a degree that includes nutrition in the awards title, with sufficient emphasis on physiology and biochemistry (50 credits in total required, with at least 20 credits in human physiology and 20 credits in human biochemistry).

It is also preferable for candidates to have 10 credits in sociology and 10 credits in psychology, however this can be taken alongside other modules on the programme if successful.

Students should have completed their degree not more than five years before their proposed entry to this Masters.
Applicants who have a first or upper second-class honours degree in nutrition, which does not contain either sufficient biochemistry or physiology (but not both), can undertake further relevant modules at undergraduate level, prior to applying for the programme.

Applicants who do not have a degree award in nutrition (1st or 2:1) but meet the requirements for biochemistry and physiology, will need to undertake a further relevant taught course of study to at least to postgraduate diploma level prior to applying for the course.

Applicants who speak English as a second language must have adequate command of English, with an IELTS score of 7, with at least 6.5 in all elements.

​Course Content​​

During the programme students are educated to be responsive practitioners, able to adapt to the changing needs of society. The course is designed to produce critically thinking and reflective professionals who have comprehensive theoretical knowledge, along with a spirit of enquiry and an analytical and creative approach to problem solving.

The programme has two main parts; the Postgraduate Diploma and MSc.

Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics:
This part contains the taught academic element, which is closely aligned to the BSc (Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics programme and three periods of practical training. On completion students can graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics, which leads to eligibility to apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian.

MSc:
Students can undertake the dissertation to obtain MSc Dietetics, which can be achieved straight after the Postgraduate Diploma element. On completion students can be awarded MSc Dietetics, which also leads to eligibility to apply to the HCPC to register as a Dietitian. Alternatively the dissertation can be taken after being awarded the Postgraduate Diploma, within 5 years of initial enrolment; this can be taken on a part-time basis.

The taught academic part of the course contains six modules at Level 7 (Masters). In addition, students study professional body modules (level 5) in order to fulfil the requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council and the British Dietetic Association curriculum guidelines.

Learning & Teaching​

​The taught element of the programme involve lectures, tutorials and practical work. Tutorials are mainly case study based where students apply the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures to problem solve case scenarios. Practical sessions are either food based, involve giving presentations or practice in consultation skills. The practicals take place in the specialist food facilities and the clinical simulation suite.

It is expected that students undertake independent reading and self-study; this is aided by the use of Moodle, the Virtual Learning Environment in use at the University.

In addition students undertake 3 periods of practical training in NHS Dietetics departments in Wales. Full preparation is given prior to the placements and students are supported and visited during the placements by Dietetic Academic staff.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who offers pastoral support and guides the student through personal development planning.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by examination and/or assignment. All the modules are externally assessed. The clinical training placements have to be successfully completed to proceed and graduate.

Employability & Careers​

Dietitians normally begin their career in the National Health Service where they progress to the main clinical grades. The opportunity exists for specialisation in various aspects of dietetics by means of post-registration education. In addition there are opportunities for dietitians to be involved in health education/promotion, education, research and journalism.

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

This new course has resulted from an initiative by the professional body for physics, the Institute of Physics, in response to current and future needs for specialist physics teachers in secondary schools who may wish to offer mathematics as a second subject. The PGCE is a full time, one year, postgraduate course, carrying 60 Masters Level credits.

Potential students will be graduates of physics or engineering who may be recent graduates or ‘career changers’ of different ages. The normal entry requirement is a bachelor’s degree from a recognised University, at upper second-class honours or above and one where physics topics form at least 50% of the degree content.

Aims

This qualification aims to produce reflective, confident and competent teachers of physics and mathematics who are able to be effective at planning, teaching and assessing these subjects in secondary schools and contribute to the whole school community. The course will equip you with the knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to teach physics with mathematics such that you are able to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people;
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status;
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people;
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners;
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area;
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the science (Physics) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school;
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression;
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses;
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum;
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils;
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in physics;
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons;
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning;
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area;
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning;
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times;
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher. Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory. Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors who are experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Masters level – plus extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/423902/PGCert-Secondary-Education-with-QTS.pdf

For more information on the courses Special Features and Teaching and Assessment, please follow this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-secondary-education-physics-with-mathematics

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Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. Read more

About the course

Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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Offered in collaboration with Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), this new programme offers an unparalleled opportunity to study the social, political, cultural and economic development of the modern city from historical perspectives and through comparative experience of two of the great urban laboratories of the Western world, Paris and London. Read more
Offered in collaboration with Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), this new programme offers an unparalleled opportunity to study the social, political, cultural and economic development of the modern city from historical perspectives and through comparative experience of two of the great urban laboratories of the Western world, Paris and London. You can choose a full year in Paris or the split-site option in Paris and London.

In this interdisciplinary programme, taught in English, you will explore the development of urban topography and planning through site visits and analysis, using a primarily bifocal approach to the growth of city living and management, and how that has shaped the fabric of the world.

With faculty expertise drawn from ULIP and three Schools in QMUL’s Faculty of the Humanities and Social Science, as well as its split-site delivery, the programme enables students to develop both their empirical understanding of and their methodological approaches to what distinguishes and what connects these two cities, while expanding these comparative insights towards a broader engagement with urban history and culture, and the challenges cities face today.

Programme structure:

The programme consists of four modules plus a dissertation and an assessed research methodology component. Two core modules are delivered in the autumn term in Paris at ULIP, and two optional modules taken from a range offered in Paris at ULIP and in London at Queen Mary University of London in the second term. You can choose, therefore, between a split-site programme in Paris and London or a full year in Paris.

The programme is delivered via small-group seminars where you will be encouraged to discuss key issues and participate through seminar presentations. The programme will also be supported by a hands-on approach, including site visits and workshops. Sessions are led by members of faculty from ULIP, and the Schools of History, Geography and English and Drama from QMUL in weekly seminars led by staff members with original research qualifications and interests in the area.

Entry requirements:

Students should have an upper second-class honours degree in a relevant Humanities-related subject. A recognised equivalent from an accredited overseas institution is also accepted.

If English is not your first language, satisfactory evidence of your English language proficiency must be provided. IELTS 7.0 (minimum writing 6.5) is the minimum level for entry to the course.

The degree is taught entirely in English and there is no French language requirement.


If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at or call us at the following number +33 1 44 11 73 83.

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The MA Medical Ethics & Law programme at King's College London examines in depth the ethical and legal questions raised by medical practice and science. Read more
The MA Medical Ethics & Law programme at King's College London examines in depth the ethical and legal questions raised by medical practice and science. The programme was founded in 1978, and is an important part of the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, the first of its kind in the UK.

This is a time of great interest in medical ethics and law. Huge questions are raised by advances in fields such as genetics and assisted reproduction. In a changing moral climate, debates about conflicts between mother and fetus, or about physician-assisted suicide, are very much alive. There are challenging questions about psychiatry, about the allocation of scarce medical resources, about the boundaries of the market in medicine, and about the law and ethics of medical research. The programme aims to study the methods of reasoning and analysis in ethics and law, and to examine selected areas of health care and medical pratice from these perspectives. It also seeks to further the understanding of those whose work brings them into contact with medical ethics and law and those who wish to embark on further study and research.

Key benefits

- In-depth philosophical analysis and the most up-to-date legal scholarship applied to a very wide range of medical issues.

- The programmme discusses controversial issues such as euthanasia and abortion with a balanced approach.

- Supported by the UK's first centre of Medical Law and Ethics and its distinguished team of academic staff members, teaching is conducted in small seminar groups of less than 30 to encourage active student participation.

- Applicants with a particular focus on medical law may want to consider the Medical Law pathway as part of the MA Medical Ethics & Law programme.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-ethics-and-law-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Study in depth the ethical and legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources.

- Course purpose -

For medical/legal professionals, graduates of a relevant discipline, those going on to research and for anyone wanting to think about and discuss some of the hardest human decisions. To study the methods of reasoning and analysis in ethics and law; to examine selected areas of health care and medical practice from a further perspective of medical ethics and law; to assist those involved in teaching or intending to teach in these areas.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year and to write the examinations for each module in January or May of that year. Coursework will be required for some modules and Dissertations are due by late August the same year. Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with Dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Enhancement of existing career; more specialised area of law; personal development. Many alumni go on to work in policy-related positions including positions at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the Human Tissue Authority, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the Department of Health. We also have a number of alumni who have worked or are working in the BMA Ethics Department, for the GMC, Progress Educational Trust, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the King's Fund, and medical defence societies. A number of alumni are teaching ethics and/or law in medical schools. Students who go on to doctoral-level study also find academic positions in law schools and research centres.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. Read more
The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. The degree is designed to benefit academics, teachers of Islam in other institutions, translators of Islamic material into English in research centres, government departments and da'wa centres. It provides excellent research training and is a useful qualification for those who wish to progress to higher postgraduate degrees.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/

Structure

Students take three taught units (one major, two minor) and write a 10,000 word dissertation.

Two courses, including the major, must be taken from Group A. The third unit can be from Group A or B. Normally no more than two translation items may be taken.

English language requirements - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/international/englishrequirements/

MA Islamic Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 28kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/file80798.pdf

Employment

As a postgraduate student specialising in Islamic Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Study in depth the legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources. Read more
Study in depth the legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources.

Key benefits

- The most up-to-date legal scholarship applied to a very wide range of medical issues.

- The programmme discusses controversial issues such as euthanasia and abortion with a balanced approach.

- Supported by theUK's first Centre of Medical Law and Ethics and its distinguished team of academic staff members, teaching is conducted in small seminar groups of less than 30 to encourage active student participation.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-law-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Examines in depth the legal questions raised by medical practice and science. The Medical Law pathway forms a part of the MA Medical Law & Ethics programme, which was founded in 1978, and is an important part of the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, the first of its kind in the UK.

This is a time of great interest in medical ethics and law. Huge questions are raised by advances in fields such as genetics and assisted reproduction. In a changing moral climate, debates about conflicts between mother and fetus, or about physician-assisted suicide, are very much alive. There are challenging questions about psychiatry, about the allocation of scarce medical resources, about the boundaries of the market in medicine, and about the law and ethics of medical research.

- Course purpose -

For medical/legal professionals, graduates of a relevant discipline, those going on to research and for anyone wanting to think about and discuss some of the hardest human decisions. To study the methods of reasoning and analysis in law and to examine selected areas of health care and medical practice from a further perspective of medical law.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year and to write the examinations for each module in January or May of that year. Coursework will be required for some modules and Dissertations are due by late August the same year. Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with Dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Enhancement of existing career; more specialised area of law; personal development. Many alumni go on to work in policy-related positions including positions at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the Human Tissue Authority, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the Department of Health. We also have a number of alumni who have worked or are working in the BMA Ethics Department, for the GMC, Progress Educational Trust, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the King's Fund, and medical defence societies. A number of alumni are teaching ethics and/or law in medical schools. Students who go on to doctoral-level study also find academic positions in law schools and research centres.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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