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Masters Degrees (University Of Leeds)

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This programme is studied entirely in China. It is jointly delivered by the University of Leeds and Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, and allows experienced Chinese TESOL professionals to gain a deeper understanding of how languages are learned and the strategies used to teach them. Read more

This programme is studied entirely in China. It is jointly delivered by the University of Leeds and Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, and allows experienced Chinese TESOL professionals to gain a deeper understanding of how languages are learned and the strategies used to teach them.

You will explore current insights, issues and problems withinTESOL, and assesses the theoretical frameworks for the language learning,teaching and testing processes. You will have the opportunity to appraise the proceduresand outcomes of different approaches to pedagogy and evaluation in TESOL, andthe ability to explore how such issues and frameworks relate to your ownprofessional environment.

You’ll study four core modules exploring current theories of language acquisition, the complex context in which any language learning takes place, different approaches to and strategies for TESOL, and current theories around language assessment.

You’ll be taught at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies by tutors from both universities and be registered as a full-time student at Leeds, giving you access to all of our online library resources as well as those available at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies.

Research and professional insight

The Language Education team in the School of Education is nationally and internationally recognised for its range of teaching, research, knowledge transfer and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics.

The Language Education team in the School of Education is one of the largest such teams in the UK. Members have experience of teaching, teacher education and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics in many contexts in the UK and around the world, and are nationally and internationally recognised as researchers.

This programme is not suitable for those without professional TESOL experience.

Course content

This programme is jointly delivered and has been designed by academic staff from both the University of Leeds and Guangdong University of Foreign Studies.

All teaching and learning is influenced by the context in which it occurs. The programme begins by considering the components of an educational context, from visible features of the classroom to the less visible but influential educational norms that affect teacher and learner roles and behaviours.

You then explore current theoretical models of language acquisition, and consider the ways in which people learn, or acquire a second language. The course continues by deepening your understanding of learning and teaching integrated skills in TESOL, focusing explicitly on oral and written language processing and their implications for different teaching and learning activities. You’ll use this knowledge to design, adapt and evaluate language learning tasks, and to think carefully about methods of assessment that will be appropriate for your working context

At every stage of the course, you’ll develop your research skills and think about the relationship between research and TESOL practice. You’ll demonstrate this awareness when you complete your critical study: an intensive, small-scale, research project related to your own interests in TESOL education.

In March of the year after you successfully complete the programme, you’ll receive a MA TESOL degree from the University of Leeds at a graduation ceremony in Guangzhou.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Approaches and Contexts in TESOL 30 credits
  • Introduction to Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Teaching Oral and Written Skills for TESOL 30 credits
  • Language Testing 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This course is all taught face-to-face at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies with two modules each taught by tutors from each university. You’ll experience a range of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, discussions, small group tasks and presentations, and extra study support will be available online through the University of Leeds’ Virtual Learning Environment. Independent study is also an important part of this programme.

Assessment

All modules are assessed by written assignments of up to 6000 words, and you’ll be encouraged to write on topics that are directly relevant to your own professional context. Your critical study is around 12,000 words. All your assignments will be submitted online through the University of Leeds’ Virtual Learning Environment.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a range of knowledge and skills from this programme that could make a big difference your career prospects.

Many of our graduates go back to their previous work contexts, where they often become candidates for promotion thanks to their greater expertise. Others find new jobs in different institutions or other parts of the country. Some have even progressed to PhD level study at institutions in China, Hong Kong and the UK.



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Our MSc Enterprise and Entrepreneurship develops your enterprise skills and gives you an insight into how you can create economic and social value through entrepreneurial activity. Read more

Our MSc Enterprise and Entrepreneurship develops your enterprise skills and gives you an insight into how you can create economic and social value through entrepreneurial activity. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge to develop and manage your own business and identify new products, processes and markets to exploit opportunities in innovative ways.

Delivered and supported by award-winning academics and successful entrepreneurs, this practical course develops your understanding of enterprise and entrepreneurship on a global scale. You’ll develop your skills through practical activities such as creating a ‘pop-up’ business, acting as a consultant to an existing organisation and exploring your own entrepreneurial potential.

Key modules focus on creating, developing and managing ventures, including social and family organisations. Our action-based teaching techniques stimulate and enhance your skills, allowing you to experience genuine business challenges faced by enterprise both locally and globally.

The course offers flexible study options and you can choose to follow either our full-time or part-time course.

Academic excellence

The Centre for Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Studies is the focal point for enterprise education on campus at the University of Leeds. It provides exceptional research-based enterprise teaching and practical support.

The Centre can help you locate enterprise opportunities and get involved in entrepreneurial activities outside of your studies, such as joining a student enterprise group, starting a business, taking on a social project or entering a national competition.

You will also benefit from the centre’s network of Enterprise Ambassadors. These successful entrepreneurs provide real-world projects as part of the programme, which helps you to understand how to apply your enterprise education in practice.

The University of Leeds is recognised as a leading entrepreneurial University in the UK. We have won the title Entrepreneurial University of the Year (Times Higher Education Awards 2015), received The Duke of York Award for University Entrepreneurship (Lloyds Bank National Business Awards 2015) and Kairen Skelley, Head of Spark, the University's business start-up service, has been named Higher Education Enterprise Champion (National Enterprise Educator Awards 2015).

Course content

Introductory modules explore the concepts of enterprise and entrepreneurship and their role in society. You’ll examine how enterprise is seen around the world, and how different geographical and economic contexts create challenges for new ventures.

You’ll consider contemporary issues and debates during guest lectures with successful entrepreneurs, hearing first-hand about their experience of the latest topics. You’ll also develop your understanding of research methods in business and enterprise studies.

The course has a practical focus and you will work on a range of projects that allow you to gain real experience – you’ll create a new venture and work in a team to deliver a consultancy project for an entrepreneurial business.

In the final semester, you’ll complete a dissertation project on a research question of your choice - this can be used to explore your own ideas for a business venture or social enterprise, or look at how best to support or grow an existing firm.

You’ll also have a choice of optional modules in key areas of management and international business, including cross-cultural management, supply chain management and the emerging markets.

If you study part-time, you’ll study one day per week over 24 months and take only the compulsory modules, plus a dedicated module in applied enterprise. The part-time option enables existing entrepreneurs to continue to develop their own enterprise, whilst professionals and budding entrepreneurs can work alongside their studies.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll take seven compulsory modules including your dissertation.

  • Global Perspectives on Enterprise 15 credits
  • Enterprise and Society 15 credits
  • Contemporary Challenges in Enterprise 15 credits
  • Research Methods and Enterprise Project 30 credits
  • Enterprise Dissertation 30 credits
  • Enterprise Awareness 15 credits
  • New Venture Creation 15 credits

Optional modules

You'll also choose three optional modules.

  • Marketing for Management 15 credits
  • Globalization of Innovation 15 credits
  • Strategic Management 15 credits
  • Operations and Supply Chain Management 15 credits
  • Cross Cultural Management 15 credits
  • The Emerging Markets 15 credits
  • Small Business Growth 15 credits
  • Financial Reporting and Analysis 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Enterprise MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Enterprise MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of different teaching methods such as lectures, seminars, tutorials, work-based learning, fieldwork and workshops. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your skills and prepare for taught sessions and assessments.

The Enterprise Project module is one example of how practical learning and teaching is embedded in the programme. This gives students the chance to work closely with an entrepreneur and undertake a strategic developmental role within their business. For example, recent student Ratawan Tanadumrongsak completed a group project for Twinkl Ltd, an online business supplying education resources worldwide. You can read a case study about this project here.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

Start your own business

If you’re interested in developing and running your own business in the UK, you can get support from Spark, the University of Leeds business start-up service for students and graduates provided by the Careers Centre. The initiative offers a range of practical advice and resources to support the development of your business ideas, as well as opportunities to apply for funding.

Links with industry

Students have the opportunity to develop leadership skills as part of our Leaders in Residence initiative, which gives management students the opportunity to engage with senior figures from the world of business. This is a rare opportunity where successful and established business people will help you connect the theory of your course to real world practice, and offer their advice for career success.



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Study part-time at the UK’s leading university for Enterprise to develop the confidence and networks you need to successfully build a business, and your own career. Read more

Study part-time at the UK’s leading university for Enterprise to develop the confidence and networks you need to successfully build a business, and your own career.

This course is ideal if you have ambitions to start your own business, are working in an existing organisation or already run your own company. You'll learn to identify new products, processes and markets, and adopt innovative techniques to exploit opportunities.

The course is supported by award-winning academics and an influential network of highly skilled entrepreneurs, giving you access to their expertise and experience as well as providing valuable connections for the future. They help to deepen your understanding of the challenges faced by people in enterprise.

We aim to equip you with a practical toolkit to support the knowledge you will gain, providing immediate relevance and the tools to launch your career or business. You will develop the skills to identify promising opportunities that are right for you, and to create a business that will exploit these opportunities.

You’ll work on a range of projects to gain practical experience and connect with successful entrepreneurs, including creating your own pop-up business, as well as visits to small businesses to explore their approaches to growth. Then we use theory to deepen your understanding and to shed light on complex issues and challenges faced by enterprising people.

Part-time delivery enables you to work while you learn and leaves you with time for other commitments.

Academic and entrepreneurial excellence

The University of Leeds offers a diverse learning environment for people from a range of backgrounds who have a keen desire to learn and practice enterprise.

The Centre for Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Studies is the focal point for enterprise education on campus at the University of Leeds. It provides exceptional research-based enterprise teaching and practical support.

The Centre can help you locate enterprise opportunities and get involved in entrepreneurial activities outside of your studies, such as joining a student enterprise group, starting a business, taking on a social project or entering a national competition.

You will also benefit from our excellent connections with business, locally, regionally and nationally. The Centre’s network of Enterprise Ambassadors provide real-world projects and deliver workshops as part of the programme. They come from a wide range of business sectors, helping you to understand how to apply your enterprise education in practice.

The University of Leeds is recognised as a leading entrepreneurial University in the UK. We have won the title Entrepreneurial University of the Year (Times Higher Education Awards 2015), received The Duke of York Award for University Entrepreneurship (Lloyds Bank National Business Awards 2015) and The Guardian University Award for Entrepreneurship (2016). Kairen Skelley, Head of Spark, the University's business start-up service, has also been named Higher Education Enterprise Champion (National Enterprise Educator Awards 2015).

Course content

In year one you’ll explore successful enterprise and entrepreneurship and their role in society worldwide. You’ll explore how enterprise is seen around the world, and how different geographical and economic contexts create challenges for new ventures.

You’ll consider contemporary challenges and debates during guest lectures with successful entrepreneurs, hearing first-hand about their experience of the latest topics. You’ll also have the opportunity to apply what you have learned to your own business idea or an existing business, whilst drawing on their expertise.

In year two, you’ll take an in-depth look at social enterprises and alternative business models, including how best to grow an existing small business.

You’ll also work alongside our full-time students on a consultancy project for a local small-medium enterprise, building relationships with the founders and staff (you can read a student case study about a recent project). Some examples of recent projects include: ‘helping an ethical gifts retailer turn their sales performance around’; ‘undertaking a market and brand analysis for a luxury camping business’ and ‘researching the Jordanian and Indian market for a healthcare software company’.

You’ll be introduced to research methods, developing understanding of how to gain important market insights and analyse the viability of a business idea.

In the final semester of year two, you’ll complete the Enterprise Dissertation, an individual project that can be used to explore opportunities for your own business venture, develop a plan for growth in an existing business you are connected to, or to research in-depth an area of interest.

Part-time study

This part-time course enables existing entrepreneurs to continue to develop their business, whilst professionals and budding entrepreneurs can work alongside their studies. Combining work and study can often be to your advantage, since the experiences gained in your professional life will add depth and relevance.

You’ll study over two years, attending classes for one day per week from late September to early May with one-month breaks at Christmas and Easter. In year one, you'll also study for five days across June and early September. In year two, you’ll attend meetings with your dissertation supervisor from April to September. You can expect to attend for approximately 27 days in year one and 17 days in year two (plus dissertation meetings).

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • Global Perspectives on Enterprise 15 credits
  • Contemporary Challenges in Enterprise 15 credits
  • Enterprise Awareness 15 credits
  • Applied Enterprise 30 credits
  • New Venture Creation 15 credits

Year 2 Compulsory modules

  • Enterprise and Society 15 credits
  • Research Methods and Enterprise Project 30 credits
  • Enterprise Dissertation 30 credits
  • Small Business Growth 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Enterprise MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of different teaching methods such as lectures, small group seminars, personal tutorials, consultancy fieldwork, market research fieldwork, and company visits. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your skills and prepare for taught sessions and assessments.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.




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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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Businesses are increasingly collecting large amounts of information about their customers and activities. This ‘big data’ is big news with the media, businesses and government as they consider how to use this mass of information in a meaningful way. Read more

Businesses are increasingly collecting large amounts of information about their customers and activities. This ‘big data’ is big news with the media, businesses and government as they consider how to use this mass of information in a meaningful way.

Analysts use their expertise to make sense of this information and interpret it, enabling evidence-based business decisions. As a result, they’re in high demand with employers in every sector.

This programme gives you an insight into business analytics and explores how organisations can exploit the big data revolution. You’ll develop decision-oriented, quantitative analytical skills in a management context, and learn to sift intelligence from the growing volume and variety of data collected on many aspects of life.

Combining theoretical concepts with practical application, you’ll develop a unique mix of quantitative and behavioural skills relevant to data analyses, effective decision-making and management.

Academic excellence

You’ll be taught by internationally recognised academics and business practitioners from our Centre for Decision Research, who are actively engaged in the latest research, advising businesses, governments and international bodies. They share this expertise and knowledge with you in the classroom.

With the Leeds Institute for Data Analytics on campus, the University of Leeds has a growing wealth of expertise and resources in data sciences.

Course content

This programme will build your knowledge and understanding of how business analytics can provide evidence to support management decision-making. You’ll learn how to use different evidence-based approaches to make effective decisions, developing your skills in quantitative analysis.

You’ll consider advanced techniques such as forecasting and have the opportunity to apply your decision-making skills to real-life business and management scenarios. With the support of leading researchers in this constantly shifting landscape, you’ll also gain an understanding of research methods.

A range of optional modules allows you to gain specialist knowledge that suits your interests or career plans.

The course culminates in a 12,000 word dissertation or project, enabling you to apply your learning to a topic of your choice. This is an opportunity to explore the very latest insights with the support of an academic who shares your passion and interest.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll take eight compulsory modules including your dissertation.

  • Effective Decision Making 15 credits
  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Advanced Management Decision Making 15 credits
  • Business Analytics and Decision Science 15 credits
  • Forecasting and Advanced Business Analytics 15 credits
  • Evidence Based Consultancy 15 credits
  • Research Methods 15 credits
  • Quantitative Analysis 15 credits

Optional modules

You'll also choose another three optional modules.

  • Behavioural Finance 15 credits
  • Risk Perception and Communication 15 credits
  • Managing Global Logistics and Supply Chains 15 credits
  • Operations and Supply Chain Management 15 credits
  • Managing and Designing Value Chain Networks 15 credits
  • Information Tools for Organisations 15 credits
  • Challenges in Information Management 15 credits
  • Designing Information Systems 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Business Analytics and Decision Sciences MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods to help you make the most of your studies. These will include lectures, seminars, workshops, online learning, computer classes and tutorials.

Independent study is also vital for this course allowing you to prepare for taught classes and sharpen your own research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

Graduates of the MSc Business Analytics and Decision Sciences can expect to have the quantitative skills to analyse complex business information, and use the resulting intelligence to inform business decisions.

You will be ideally placed to pursue a career in analytics and decision making, general and specialist management roles in a range of industries, or as business or market analysts.

Employers in both private and public sectors are actively seeking graduates with these skills, and trends show that the career opportunities are fast increasing. The role of the data scientist was described as the 'Sexiest Job of the 21st Century' by the Harvard Business Review.

Demand for experts in business analytics is growing rapidly and the University of Leeds is at the forefront of developments in this area.

Read more about Business Analytics at Leeds.

Links with industry

Students have the opportunity to develop leadership skills as part of our Leaders in Residence initiative which gives management students the opportunity to engage with senior figures from the world of business. This is a rare opportunity where successful and established business people will help you connect the theory of your course to real world practice, and offer their advice for career success.

You will be able to connect with leaders from a range of firms including major manufacturers and retailers, charity chief executives, entrepreneurs and directors of companies large and small, through structured meetings and events. This typically includes workshops, social events, guest lectures and professional skills development.

Careers support

We help you to achieve your career ambitions by providing professional development support as part of the course. You benefit from our professional development tutor, who will work with you to develop the important professional skills that employers value.

Read more about our careers and professional development support.

The Careers Centre also provides a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate.



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The Leeds Executive MBA will inspire and challenge you to achieve your full potential. Read more

The Leeds Executive MBA will inspire and challenge you to achieve your full potential. The skills and knowledge you gain, coupled with the experience of working alongside a diverse range of personalities and professional backgrounds, shapes your own management perspective and learning, benefitting both you and your business.

A set of core modules will give you a foundation in aspects of business such as human resource management, corporate finance and international business. You’ll also choose from optional modules to suit your own interests and career plans such as ethics, sustainability or global marketing. Once you’ve gained these new skills you’ll test them in a safe environment through live challenges setting up new ventures, taking on consultancy work and even experiencing the boardroom.

Taught by experienced practitioners and world-leading researchers in intensive teaching blocks, this programme will stretch your abilities and challenge how you think and act in business.

Academic excellence

You’ll benefit from the expertise and support of several major research centres. The School boasts the UK’s premier research centre in international business, the Centre for International Business at the University of Leeds (CIBUL) led by Professor Peter Buckley OBE and our Global and Strategic Marketing Research Centre is led by one of the UK’s foremost professors of marketing, Professor Costas Katsikeas.

Given Leeds’ position as a financial services hub, it’s not surprising that our academics working through our International Institute for Banking and Financial Services, and the Credit Management Research Centre, are among the most respected in the UK. As organisations and the nature of work change in an ultracompetitive marketplace, specialists from our Centre for Employment Relations, Innovation and Change work with employers and staff to develop effective working practices.

The Centre for Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Studies at the University of Leeds is the focal point for enterprise research on campus and supports business start-ups through SPARK.

You’ll also come across plenty of opportunities to build your professional network, and your project work will bring you into contact with some of our many industrial partners. We have extensive relationships with Marks & Spencer, IBM, Yorkshire Bank, Asda-Walmart, Lloyds Banking Group, KPMG, Accenture and the NHS, as well as small and medium-sized enterprises, charities and social enterprises.

Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA), the international impartial authority on postgraduate business education, representing the global standard for all MBA, DBA and MBM programmes. Membership allows graduates to network with each other and access job vacancies, careers support, CPD events and more. Find out more about AMBA accreditation.

Course content

The course begins with an online pre-induction programme and the on-site induction takes place in October. This is an opportunity to meet the MBA team, academic staff and brush up on study skills. During the induction you are introduced to the Leading Change module, which runs alongside your core and option modules throughout the programme.

To complement and enhance your studies you will undertake three live challenges that allow you to test your new skills and knowledge in a safe environment. You’ll develop a business plan for a new business, take on consultancy work for an external organisation and simulate a board room situation.

The course culminates with either your MBA Project, where you’ll undertake independent research – you could even focus on a topic of direct relevance to your own organisation - or your choice of two optional modules. You also have the opportunity to take part in an optional international study tour.

Course structure

Year 1

Compulsory modules

  • Accounting and Finance 15 credits
  • Operations and Information Management 15 credits
  • Management in Action 30 credits
  • Marketing 15 credits
  • Strategic Management 15 credits

Year 2

In Year Two you’ll take four compulsory modules, as well as studying 30 credits of optional modules.

Compulsory modules

  • People and Behaviour in Organizations 15 credits
  • Economics of Strategy 15 credits
  • International Business Management 15 credits
  • Strategic HRM & Talent Management 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Management of Projects 15 credits
  • Creating Value Through Innovation 15 credits
  • Management Consulting 15 credits
  • Management Decision Making 15 credits
  • Systems Thinking and Consulting Practice 15 credits
  • Business Project 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Executive MBA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

The Leeds Executive MBA is flexible enough so you can fit it in around your work, whilst giving you time away from the office to fully focus on your studies. It’s delivered in intensive three day blocks Thursday to Saturday, every six weeks with a few modules delivered over four days, Thursday to Sunday. Most teaching takes place at our executive conference facility, Weetwood Hall.

Assessment

The majority of assessment is by work-based assignments, allowing you to develop a more strategic understanding of your organisation by focusing your work on a specific management problem or issue.

Study tours

MBA students have the opportunity to take part in a one or two-week international study tour.

Typically we try and offer a variety of trips in any year to a European and/or American University. You’ll have the chance to visit local companies and partner business schools, enjoy business seminars and networking opportunities with local students, businesses and leaders and still have time to explore the culture, history and sights of the region.

Career opportunities

If you are looking to develop yourself and your career then the Executive MBA is the ideal choice in helping you achieve these goals. It will provide the opportunity for you to:

  • Start your own business or grow your existing one
  • Progress into a more senior position within your current organisation, or change career
  • Learn how to constructively and critically analyse your organisation and yourself
  • Gain knowledge and learn new skills, which will enable you to make improvements with real impact.


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An MBA challenges how you think and act in business. Employers want more from their managers than knowledge and strategic thinking – they also seek leadership skills, commitment and creativity. Read more

An MBA challenges how you think and act in business. Employers want more from their managers than knowledge and strategic thinking – they also seek leadership skills, commitment and creativity. The Leeds MBA equips you to meet these challenges.

This top global MBA programme (Financial Times Top 100 Global MBA Ranking, 2016) integrates business and management theory with practice, but also emphasises your personal and professional development. You’ll study the foundations of business such as marketing, accounting, finance, operations and human resource management.

Importantly, you’ll also gain key qualities expected of leaders including commercial awareness, interpersonal skills, a genuine understanding of the fundamental business functions and a critical and questioning outlook.

You’ll apply what you’ve learned to examine significant business issues in a set of live challenges working with a range of external organisations. You’ll gain an international outlook and build valuable connections, helping you become a global leader.

Academic excellence, professional focus

You’ll benefit from the expertise and support of several major research centres. The Business School boasts the UK’s premier research centre in international business, the Centre for International Business at the University of Leeds (CIBUL) led by Professor Peter Buckley OBE and our Global and Strategic Marketing Research Centre (GLOSMARC) is led by one of the UK’s foremost professors of marketing, Professor Constantine Katsikeas.

Given Leeds’ position as a financial services hub, it’s not surprising that our academics working through our Institute for Banking and Investment, and the Credit Management Research Centre, are among the most respected in the UK. As organisations and the nature of work change in an ultracompetitive marketplace, specialists from our Centre for Employment Relations, Innovation and Change work with employers and staff to develop effective working practices.

If you’re thinking of starting your own business, you’ll also benefit from the support of Spark – our specialist team will be there to support and encourage you in turning your business idea into a reality.

You’ll also come across plenty of opportunities to build your professional network, and your project work will bring you into contact with some of our many industry partners. We have extensive relationships with Marks & Spencer, IBM, Yorkshire Bank, Asda-Walmart, Lloyds Banking Group, KPMG, Accenture and the NHS, as well as small and medium-sized enterprises, charities and social enterprises.

Accreditation

The Leeds MBA is accredited by the Association of MBAs.

Course content

Through a variety of taught modules, you’ll gain an understanding of the key components of business management – marketing, accounting, finance, operations and human resource management. Alongside these subjects we explore how to manage and lead people in organisations. You’ll also have the option to take part in one of our international study tours.

You’ll build and apply your skills as you complete live challenges in two of your modules. One of these exciting projects allows you to generate ideas for new commercial opportunities and turn them into viable business plans, either for an existing organisation or in a start-up. The other gives you the chance to provide consultancy support to an external business, social enterprise or voluntary sector organisation.

The course culminates in your MBA Project, giving you the opportunity to turn your knowledge into practice that relates to your own ambitions. Your project can be desk-based if you want to research a topic in-depth, or you can work on a live management issue with an external organization to develop links with employers and industry. If you’re planning to start your own company, you could even put together a comprehensive business plan.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Management Decision Making 15 credits
  • International Business Management 15 credits
  • Strategic and Entrepreneurial Management 15 credits
  • Economics of Strategy 15 credits
  • Global Marketing Management 15 credits
  • People and Behaviour in Organizations 15 credits
  • Global Operations and Information Management 15 credits
  • Leading in Practice 15 credits
  • Strategic HRM and Talent Management 15 credits
  • Accounting and Finance 15 credits
  • Project/Dissertation 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Full Time MBA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials, online learning, computer simulations and more.

Your interactions with other students are also a key element of your learning experience, and you could meet prominent external speakers and professionals through events such as our prestigious Corporate Wisdom Lecture Series.

Independent study is also vital, allowing you to sharpen your research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. They include formal exams, group projects, essays and written assignments, group and individual presentations.

Study tours

MBA students have the opportunity to take part in a one or two-week international study tour.

Typically we try to offer a variety of trips. You’ll have the chance to visit local companies and partner business schools, enjoy business seminars and networking opportunities with local students, businesses and leaders and still have time to explore the culture, history and sights of the region.

Please note these trips are optional and are not covered bythe basic programme fees.

Read more about MBA study tours

Career opportunities.

You are an individual with your own career aspirations and goals – so we take a person-centred approach. Our professional development programme is tailored to help you compete effectively in the global marketplace. We will support you in developing your career plans by providing high-quality careers information, advice and coaching that realistically meets your needs and the market’s requirements.

You'll also interact with experts, gain knowledge in global developments and enhance your leadership and transferable skills. Some professional development activities are embedded in the core programme, others are delivered virtually, run as a workshop, seminar or through one-to-one coaching. Ultimately we want to equip you with the skills you need to manage your career for life.

Read more about Career Development in The Leeds MBA.



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At the end of the course, students taking the course will be expected to have. You will have the opportunity to engage with a range of learning approaches during the course of your study. Read more

At the end of the course, students taking the course will be expected to have:

You will have the opportunity to engage with a range of learning approaches during the course of your study.

You will take part in lectures, workshops and seminars. Some of these will be more traditional whereas others will require you to undertake research before coming together to discuss project and programme issues with a range of students and academic staff.

You will have seminars from industry practitioners and have the opportunity to discuss your projects with them to gain real world insight into the problems you are trying to solve.

You will have the opportunity to work in a range of study facilities to develop practical skills and understand the link between the theory and practical implementation of projects and programmes, with a deep understanding of benefits and risks. Throughout the weekly class sessions and through use of the on-line support material, you will obtain skills required to successfully implement and manage a range of diverse projects and programmes with confidence.

Often working on assessment and project briefs you will develop solutions to meet real world problems/requirements in project and programme management and be able to present these to your peers, practitioners and third parties in order to obtain balanced and current feedback.

What happens on the course?

  1. Financial Management of Projects
  2. Project Management
  3. Programme Management
  4. Leading Transformation and Change
  5. Legal Obligations
  6. Research Methods and Professional Skills
  7. Dissertation

Why Wolverhampton?

This course will appeal to anyone who is looking to advance in Programme and Project Management. The topics are practical, with an emphasis on the application of the knowledge gained and applied to many learning situations, including the use of case studies, live round-table debate, team-working exercises, applied coursework, blended learning environments, and independent study. Students are encouraged to gain knowledge in their field through extensive reading, and to apply this research in a more formal way. The completion of a dissertation demonstrates the range of academic and professional skills gained at the University of Wolverhampton. Students will have support within classroom time and dedicated workshops, small working groups, and personal tutors to develop the student to help gain a higher level of achievement.

You will also have the benefit of relevant experience of staff in disciplines. Issaka Ndekugri is a world class expert on the managerial, administrative and legal aspects of decision-making in the procurement of infrastructure and other engineered assets and related professional services. With advanced degrees in Engineering, Management and Law from world class universities and relevant industry experience, he is the rare type of well rounded professional hybrid able to communicate with a wide range of functional managers/directors in organisations on a highly informed basis. His experience has been built on direct employment in roles involving the negotiation and administration of large infrastructure projects and employment as an academic and consulting with industry on best practice in the procurement of products, works and services. He has undergone world class training in negotiation (in the Harvard Business School), membership and chairing of dispute boards on major international infrastructure projects (by the international Dispute Resolution Board Foundation based in Seattle) and mediation (by CEDR, the London-based international Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution).

Career highlights: Member of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s College of Experts; Peer Review Editor for Construction Law Journal; Member of Editorial Boards of: the International Journal of Law in the Built Environment; the Institution of Civil Engineer’s Journal of Management, Procurement and Law; Founder of FIDIC-NET, the international network of experts in the international procurement of infrastructure; Published 100+ papers/articles and textbook entitled The JCT Building Contract: Law and Administration, which won Gold award of the Chartered Institute of Building’s International Literary Award Scheme; £ 1.3+ million of grants from: former DTI, European Social Fund, Learning Skills Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, City University of Hong Kong, Society of Construction Law, Worshipful Company of Arbitrators’ First Charitable Trust; External examiner to: University of Central Lancashire, University of Manchester, Salford University, Loughborough University, Leeds Metropolitan University, United Nations’ Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand; Supervision of 8 successful PhD candidates

He is currently Professor of Construction and Engineering Law in the University of Wolverhampton and Director of the University’s Construction Law Postgraduate Programme.

We are currently developing the Springfield Campus which will be Europe’s largest construction centre of excellence. Join us as the exciting development takes shape and from 2019/20 students in the School of Architecture and the Built environment will be taught from the new campus.

Career path

Graduates of this course will gain knowledge to equip them for employment in a range of managerial positions including: Programme Manager, Project Manager, Change Manager, Risk Manager and Benefits Realisation Manager, Project Planner.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you, the student, will be able to:

1. apply project management systems, tools, and methodologies in a wide range of contexts involving extensive supply chains and gain maximum benefits realisation;

2. work effectively within different types of team environments and manage and lead such teams in compliance with employment law;

3. exercise leadership in the administration of project contracts to achieve budgetary, schedule, benefits and quality targets with appropriate dispute avoidance/resolution strategies;

4. analyse risks and uncertainty affecting complex projects and programmes to arrive at sound decisions and judgements in the absence of complete data and communicate conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences;

5. demonstrate understanding of the operation of major projects and programmes as temporary organisations and behaviour within such organisations and related competence in the design and implementation of organisation structures, strategies, systems and procedures for complex programmes not only across business sectors but also in the public sector

6. demonstrate competence to develop new knowledge and problem-solving competence through research



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The study of the history of art at Leeds has an international reputation for its innovative, rigorous, diverse and critically engaged approaches. Read more

The study of the history of art at Leeds has an international reputation for its innovative, rigorous, diverse and critically engaged approaches. Previously called MA History of Art, the name has been changed for 2018 to highlight the established strengths of this course with its emphasis on social and political approaches to art history.

At the cutting edge of the discipline, the MA in the Social History of Art builds on a unique legacy of dynamic and challenging scholarship, and continues to test the parameters of the discipline and shape wider debates in the field.

Around a shared commitment to understanding art as central to the production and reproduction of the social worlds we inhabit, our key research strengths lie in feminist, gender and Jewish studies, on questions of materialism and materiality, the postcolonial and the ‘non-Western’, as well as in provocations of those fields of art history considered more ‘established’, from Medieval and Renaissance up to the contemporary.

We combine an exceptional range of optional modules, core modules on methodology and advanced research skills, and self-directed research leading to a dissertation on a topic of your own choice.

Specialist facilities

The School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies offers a modern and well-equipped learning environment, complete with professionally laid out studios and versatile exhibition spaces in a beautiful listed building, fully redesigned and refurbished, at the heart of the University campus.

The University incorporates world-class library resources and collections, the Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, Treasures of the Brotherton, the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, ULITA – an Archive of International Textiles and the [email protected] performance venue.

The world class Brotherton Library holds a wide variety of archive and early printed material in its Special Collections which are available for use in your independent research. Our other library resources are also excellent, and the University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them.

Course content

Across both semesters, you’ll take core modules. These will enable you to develop practical skills for advanced-level research, and to engage critically with key debates in art history from the foundations of the discipline up to contemporary approaches.

Alongside this, you’ll work in depth on specialist topics, with choices from an array of optional modules covering a considerable chronological and geographic range with diverse critical and methodological approaches.

The development of your research skills and specialist knowledge will ultimately be focused in the writing of your dissertation – an independent and self-devised research project, which you will undertake with the guidance of your supervisor.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • MA History of Art Core Course 30 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 1 5 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 2 5 credits
  • Art History Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Reading Sexual Difference 30 credits
  • The Margins of Medieval Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Movies, Migrants and Diasporas 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • Intersecting Practices: Questioning the Intersection of Contemporary Art and Heritage 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Unmaking Things: Materials and Ideas in the European Renaissance 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social History of Art MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social History of Art MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods including lectures, online learning, seminars and tutorials. However, independent study is crucial to the programme ― it allows you to prepare for classes and assessments, build on your skills and form your own ideas and research questions.

Assessment

Our taught modules are generally assessed through essays, which you will submit at the end of the semester in which you take each module.

Career opportunities

This programme will develop your visual, critical and cultural awareness and expand your subject knowledge in history of art. In addition, it will equip you with sophisticated research, analytical, critical and communication skills that will put you in a good position to succeed in a variety of careers.

Our graduates have pursued careers as curators and education staff in museums and galleries and worked for national heritage organisations, as well as in journalism, publishing, arts marketing, public relations, university administration and teaching. Others have transferred the skills they gained into fields like the insurance industry, independent style editing and freelance writing on fashion, arts and culture.

Many of our graduates have also continued with their research at PhD level and secured external funding to support them – including AHRC scholarships. A large proportion of our former research students are now developing academic careers in the UK, Europe, Asia, USA and Canada.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. Read more

This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. You’ll directly address the complex nature of the politics and international relations of the Middle East to gain an oversight of internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations.

Covering a range of approaches from Politics, Comparative Politics and International Relations, it addresses the security, economic, identity and political dynamics of the region. The programme will be of interest to you if you’re wishing to study these issues in more depth and to make comparisons across the region.

You’ll benefit from our specific expertise and research interests in a diverse range of areas relating to the Middle East - with particular focus on security issues, regional relations and the interest of the outside powers in the Middle East, as well as our in-depth research and experience in specific sub-regional areas.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. They boast specialisms in a range of areas: the politics of Islamism; the Persian Gulf; the Israel-Palestine conflict; the international organisations of the Middle East; democratisation in the region and issues of terrorism and insurgency. Teaching on the programme draws upon a network of Middle East specialists based at the University. They come from a range of disciplines and participate in the Middle East Research Group (MERG).

Our rich research culture within the School of Politics and International Studies is specifically focused on the Middle East. It also draws on other regions and cross-cutting themes such as the prevalence of authoritarianism and the problems of democratisation, meaning that there is a combination of focus on the Middle East which is also influenced by wider insights and research focus.

Course content

The compulsory modules will give you the opportunity to:

  • gain an advanced understanding of the issues of security, economy and society across the Middle East
  • undertake a comprehensive analysis of the ever-changing dynamics of this complex region
  • examine the pressing contemporary issues facing the Middle East
  • gain an insight into the internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations
  • study in-depth the ongoing peace negotiations in Israel-Palestine.

You’ll also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

Each semester you will take 60 credits amounting to 120 credits across the whole year. In semester one you will study Contemporary Politics of the Middle East and in semester two you will study The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict, along with your chosen optional modules.

If you’re a part-time student, you’ll take one compulsory module and study some optional modules in your first year. You’ll then take the second compulsory module, the dissertation module and other optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Debating the Middle East: Islam, Politics and Culture 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Nuclear Non-Proliferation and WMD 15 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • Hezbollah: From Islamic Resistance to Government 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Theoretical Approaches in International Relations 30 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Relations and Politics of the Middle East MA Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You’ll also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment consists of a mixture of essays, exams and group presentations. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

The programme is both academically cutting-edge and policy relevant at a time when the Middle East is undergoing radical change. It will produce graduates who are able to fill the growing need for experts on the region in a variety of industries from oil and investment to security and services. The Middle East is a growing market for many firms who all want to understand the risks and opportunities of working in the region better.

There is a growing market from employers for graduates with expertise in Middle Eastern politics, including NGOs and international institutions; ministries of foreign affairs, trade and defence; as well as consultancy and risk-management/analysis firms engaged in the region.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in. Read more

This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in.

You’ll explore the themes, concepts and debates in the study of the history of science through core modules. These will also allow you to develop your historical research skills, using our excellent library resources to work with primary and secondary sources. But you’ll also choose from a range of optional modules that allow you to specialise in topics areas that suit your interests, from birth, death and illness in the Middle Ages to modern science communication.

Guided by leading researchers and supported by our Centre of History and Philosophy of Science, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to a wide range of activities. You could even gain research experience by getting involved in the development of our Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

We have world-class research resources to support your studies. The Brotherton Library houses extensive manuscript, archive and printed material in its Special Collections, including Newton’s Principia, a first edition of his Opticks and thousands of books and journals on topics from the 16th century onwards on topics such as astronomy, botany, medicine, physiology, chemistry, inventions and alchemy. You’ll also have access to the collections of artefacts across campus that we have brought together through the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

The Centre also hosts a number of research seminars given by visiting speakers, staff members and doctoral students and which all postgraduate students are encouraged to attend. There are also regular reading groups on a wide range of topics and the seminar series of other centres within the School are also available.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module introducing you to different approaches and debates in history of science, technology and medicine, as well as how they have been used over time to help us understand scientific developments. You’ll build on this in the following semester with a second core module that will give you a foundation in historical skills and research methods, equipping you to work critically and sensitively with primary and secondary sources.

You’ll have the chance to demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve gained in your dissertation, which you’ll submit by the end of the year. This is an independently researched piece of work on a topic of your choice within the history of science, technology and medicine – and you can choose to take an extended dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth.

Throughout the year you’ll be able to choose from a range of optional modules, allowing you to develop your knowledge by specialising in a topic of your choice such as science and religion historically considered, or science in the museum. You’ll take one optional module if you take the extended dissertation, or two if you do the standard dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll take three compulsory modules, though you can choose whether to take a standard (60 credits) or extended (90 credits) dissertation. You’ll then choose one or two optional modules.

  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • Current Approaches in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The European Enlightenment 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules combine seminars and tutorials, where you will discuss issues and concepts stemming from your reading with a small group of students and your tutor. You’ll also benefit from one-to-one supervision while you complete your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We assess your progress using a combination of exams and coursework, giving you the freedom to research and write on topic areas that suit your interests within each module you study.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a range of in-depth subject knowledge throughout this programme, as well as a set of high-level transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication that are very attractive to employers.

As a result, you’ll be equipped for a wide range of careers. Some of these will make direct use of your subject knowledge, such as museum work or public engagement with science, while your skills will enable you to succeed in fields such as business and finance, publishing, IT and teaching.

Graduates of our School also regularly go onto careers in journalism, the media, social work, human resources, PR, recruitment and the charity sector. Many also continue with their studies at PhD level and pursue careers in academia.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds. Read more

The opportunity to study Criminal Justice and Criminal Law at an advanced level is a particular strength of the LLM at the University of Leeds.

This programme will enable you to develop a sophisticated knowledge of current issues in criminal justice, criminology and criminal law in the UK, Europe and across the globe. It combines cutting-edge compulsory modules with a wide range of optional modules allowing you to tailor your degree to your own particular interests.

Throughout the course we’ll encourage you to:

  • examine critical issues in criminal law
  • explore the complex and dynamic nature of the criminal justice process
  • understand the mechanics of the research process
  • consider the rights of individuals within criminal justice processes.

This programme is offered within the dynamic Centre for Criminal Justice Studies (CCJS), an internationally-recognised research centre that provides an active and multi-disciplinary environment, whose members are committed to high-quality teaching in criminal justice, criminology and criminal law. The CCJS also excels in the production of research that is empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated and policy relevant. Research is interdisciplinary and often international in its reach. The University of Leeds recognises CCJS as one of its key 'peaks of research excellence'.

CCJS academics have conducted research for a range of external funding bodies including the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the Nuffield Foundation, the Home Office, the Youth Justice Board, the Leverhulme Trust, the European Commission, the National Probation Service and others. Since 2001, CCJS members have been awarded research grants totalling over £10 million. Such projects sustain the established profile of the Centre as a pre-eminent research unit and ensure that our teaching is at the cutting edge of contemporary academic and policy debates.

The CCJS has an Advisory Board with more than twenty members who hold senior positions within local criminal justice and partner organisations, including the police, the judiciary, the probation service, prisons and the courts. Our strong links with the local criminal justice community bring valuable benefits for our students.

Course content

Compulsory modules studied throughout the year will introduce you to fundamental principles, theories, concepts and approaches in the fields of criminal law and criminal justice. You’ll also explore and examine the intricate and complex relationships and dynamics between criminological theory, research and practice, and the impact of criminal justice processes on individuals and social groups, often in the wider context of social and political change.

These modules will also enable you to hone your critical and analytical abilities and your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll be able to demonstrate in your dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programmes, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

Our optional modules will give you the opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in topics that interest you. An indicative list of optional modules is provided below.

If you are a part-time student, you’ll take four compulsory modules in your first year. You’ll then take the compulsory dissertation module and your chosen one or two optional modules in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Criminal Justice Processes 30 credits
  • Contemporary Criminological Theory and Approaches 30 credits
  • Dissertation Criminal Law/Criminal Justice 60 credits
  • Central Issues in Criminal Law 15 credits
  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Policing 1: The Nature of Contemporary Policing 15 credits
  • Policing 2: Accountability of Policing 15 credits
  • Security and Justice 30 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Cyberlaw: Regulation of Cyberspace 15 credits
  • Globalisation and Crime 15 credits
  • International Human Rights 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Advanced Racism and Ethnicity Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Criminal Justice and Criminal Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Criminal Justice and Criminal Law LLM Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our compulsory and optional modules are taught through a range of weekly seminars, lectures and workshops.

You’ll need to prepare for your seminars and lectures, undertaking any exercises that might be prescribed in advance. Independent study is integral to this programme – not just to prepare for classes but to develop research abilities and other critical skills.

The LLM Degrees Director will be your personal supervisor and will support you throughout the programme.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a variety of methods but for most modules you’ll be required to write an essay of up to 4,500 words at the end of each module. You’ll also be expected to write a final dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme is particularly suited to those who wish to pursue a career in public service, the private sector, the voluntary sector, or any other arena where success is built upon higher-level skills and advanced knowledge of criminal justice, criminology and criminal law issues.

Recent graduates have gone on to do a PhD and work in academia and in research outside academia both in the UK and overseas. Other alumni hold senior positions in criminal justice organisations including police and probation services, the prison service, and youth justice services, as well as in the private and voluntary sector, both in the UK and abroad. Some graduates have been awarded promotions following successful completion of the programme.



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The Clinical Embryology MSc is an internationally recognised qualification that provides academic and professional development for clinical scientists and clinicians working in the field. Read more

The Clinical Embryology MSc is an internationally recognised qualification that provides academic and professional development for clinical scientists and clinicians working in the field. It is delivered by distance learning, allowing you to remain in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide a high standard of education in clinical embryology and to provide enhanced academic and professional development for clinical scientists and clinicians working in the field through provision of a recognised qualification which will contribute to uniformity of knowledge in the theory and practice of clinical embryology.

It was the first web-based MSc programme in clinical embryology, established in 2000. Since then nearly 300 students, from around 40 countries, have attended. The programme was developed by the Division of Reproduction and Early Development in association with the Leeds Centre for Reproductive Medicine (LCRM) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

More information

The programme leader is John Huntriss. Course lecturers include staff from the University of Leeds, Bourn Hall Clinic in Cambridge, Leeds Centre for Reproductive Medicine, University College London and the University of Sheffield.

You can also study this subject at Postgraduate Diploma level (distance learning).

Course content

Building on your existing knowledge and experience, the programme offers advanced learning in clinical embryology. It aims to help establish good practice in the field of assisted reproductive technologies.

Through a series of compulsory modules, you’ll develop your knowledge of both the theory and practice of clinical embryology.

For the research project, you’ll write a persuasive research proposal in a subject area relevant to clinical embryology. The subject is chosen by you and comprises an original area of investigation. This research module aims to give you useful experience of hypothesis-driven research, including: critical evaluation of published literature in the chosen field of study, collation and justification of the project itself, research methodology and resources needed, statistical methods, report writing and scientific presentation.

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • Fundamentals of Clinical Embryology 45 credits
  • IVF and Embryo Culture 35 credits

Year 2 Compulsory modules

  • Micromanipulation 15 credits
  • Cryobiology and Cryopreservation 15 credits
  • Ethics and Law for Embryologists 10 credits
  • Research Project in Clinical Embryology 60 credits

Learning and teaching

You’ll learn through a combination of:

  • “core” lectures and practical sessions at face-to-face workshops
  • self-directed learning, using web-based and printed resources and the University library.

There are three, compulsory, one-week, residential workshops in the UK over two years. In the first of these workshops you’ll be assigned a tutor and will meet the teaching staff and your fellow-students. You’ll take part in practical sessions, seminars and discussion groups and will attend lectures, sometimes by guest speakers. Formal examinations will also take place during the second and third residential workshops.

Contact with your tutors and fellow-students is through email and online discussion rooms.

Assessment

Student assessment will be split between assessed course work and formal examination.

For the MSc award you are also assessed on the research project proposal you submit as your dissertation.

Career opportunities

The programme allows students to gain a wide breadth of knowledge that can give them confidence in their subject and allow skills to be transferred to the workplace.

Enhancing mobility and success in the workplace are engrained in the course. The course intake comprises embryologists, clinicians, reproductive technicians and reproductive scientists, typically working full time. The programmes are designed to fit around these requirements. We aim to uphold the academic excellence and integrity that has made the University of Leeds postgraduate programmes in clinical embryology highly respected in the field, and recognised for their high standards.

The enhancement of academic understanding of clinical embryology gained through the programmes provides good prospects for promotion and mobility in the workplace and for application to other positions. This has allowed many former students to move on to more senior positions, including several laboratory directors. Some former students are now directing policy in the field of ART. Other students have gone on to open their own ART clinics and many have become research active. Students also get the opportunity to network with an international group of ART practitioners, which is important for exchanging ideas on clinical practice and for career networking.



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During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval. Read more

During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval.

You’ll develop your understanding of research methods, improving your skills in preparation for writing the dissertation as well as for a range of careers. You’ll also choose from optional modules within the Victorian pathway – and you can take a broader approach with modules from across the School of English. Taught by leading researchers in their fields, you’ll be able to focus on your interests and explore new texts and contexts.

You’ll benefit from studying in a major nineteenth-century cultural and industrial centre, with all of the archives, museums, galleries and architecture the region has to offer. The family home of the Brontës is a short trip away in Haworth, and the city’s galleries and libraries contain substantial material to support your research.

Our extensive library resources help to make the University of Leeds a stimulating environment for critical thinking. The world-class Brotherton Library contains a wealth of archival, manuscript, and printed material in its Special Collections, including the original manuscript of Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Sylvia’s Lovers (1864) and her only surviving manuscript diary. You’ll also find works, including much correspondence, by the Brontë family as well as extensive collections of letters to and from figures including Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, and Bram Stoker among others.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module which builds your knowledge of research methods in literary studies. You’ll also take the first of your three optional modules – at least one optional module must focus on the Victorian period, but you can choose up to two modules from across the range offered by the School of English if you want to expand your knowledge in different directions. You’ll take your two remaining optional modules in the following semester.

Throughout the programme you’ll gain specialist knowledge in areas that suit your interests as well as improving your skills in research and analysis. You’ll demonstrate these qualities when you submit your dissertation by the end of the programme in September – an independent research project on a Victorian literary topic of your choice.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Brontes 30 credits
  • Victorian New Media 30 credits
  • Apprentices to Life: The Nineteenth-Century Bildungsroman 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Victorian pathway) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Victorian pathway) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have two-hour weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. You’ll also benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with your dissertation supervisor.

However, independent study is a vital part of the degree as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

We use different assessment methods, but most of your modules will be assessed by a single 4,000 word essay, which you submit at the end of the semester. Your research project or dissertation is usually between 12,000 and 15,000 words. During the year you may also be expected to give presentations on your reading during seminars, or submit unassessed essays to get feedback on your work.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a wide range of advanced transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll be well equipped to pursue a career in a wide range of fields depending on your interests. These could include teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be in a good position to develop a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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