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Masters Degrees (University Of Kent)

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This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of contemporary European theatre. It is associated with the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN), the renowned Kent-based research centre dedicated to the study of non-English continental European theatre. Read more
This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of contemporary European theatre. It is associated with the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN), the renowned Kent-based research centre dedicated to the study of non-English continental European theatre.

On this programme you will study one term in Canterbury and another term in Paris.

The notion of ‘dramaturgy’, this unique concept and practice characteristic of European theatre work, serves as our central lens from which we explore creative practices and processes in contemporary European theatre, theatre systems, performance aesthetics, and their histories. You become familiar with current conceptual and theoretical paradigms of European theatre, from mise en scène to the postdramatic theatre and the links of European theatre with European philosophy from Plato to Alain Badiou. You also receive a thorough grounding in research methodologies.

You have the opportunity to work alongside the ETRN’s leading researchers, such as Patrice Pavis, Hans-Thies Lehmann, Paul Allain, Peter M Boenisch, and others, and to hear about their current, ongoing research. We make full use of Canterbury’s geographical location between London and the Continent, offering theatre visits and excursions, and also making use of the University’s campuses in Paris and Brussels.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The modules in Paris are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. These are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources, especially of the vibrant theatre scene, and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Possible modules may include:

European Theatre and Dramaturgy (compulsory)
Mise en Scène: Aesthetics and Dramaturgies of European Theatre (Paris compulsory)
Theatre Practises: Paris Casebook (option)
Other options include: Creative Producing and Dramaturgy, Theatre Criticism, Theories of Art in Modern French thought, a language module, and modules from the University of Kent at Paris programme.
Teaching and Assessment
Assessment is through a variety of written work and verbal presentations. This includes academic essays, in-class research presentations, contributions to workshops, portfolios of critical writing, and performance analysis. It also includes an assessed project proposal towards a prospective PhD project which could be your starting point for applying for doctorate scholarship.

The final dissertation requires you to research an individual project in depth, and to present its findings in writing and in a conference-style presentation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

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Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. They are also responsible for ensuring that treatment planning and delivery is achieved with absolute precision.

In the treatment of cancer, accuracy is paramount and a variety of highly specialised equipment is available within Radiotherapy Departments to achieve this. Computerised Tomography (CT) simulators employ the latest technology to localise tumours.

Technological advances

Technological advances in linear accelerator design ensure that treatment conforms to patients needs with pinpoint accuracy. Treatment units housing radioactive sources also play a useful role in patient management, as do 3D planning systems.

London South Bank University has invested heavily to ensure that students have access to the best learning tools and staff. There are two dedicated fully equipped skill labs that enable Dosimetry (Radiotherapy treatment planning) and a state of the art virtual environment of a radiotherapy treatment room (VERT).

Communication and care

Alongside the technology, the importance of high standards of communication and care of cancer patients cannot be overestimated. Cancer patients are treated by a multidisciplinary team in which the therapeutic radiographer plays a major role in reducing the sense of vulnerability and promoting patients autonomy.

As a graduate, you'll be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Radiographer .

PgDip programme

The PgDip programme is an accelerated programme over two years, for graduate students who already have a Level 6 qualification. Building on graduate skills you'll develop an enquiring, reflective, critical and innovative approach to Therapeutic Radiography within the context of the rapid changes occurring in the health service.

Top-up to MSc

By adding the research element of a dissertation (an extended and independent piece of written research), you'll be able to graduate with a Masters-level qualification.

Modules

On this programme we'll develop you as confident and competent practitioner who practices autonomously, compassionately, skilfully and safely. The programme comprises of five compulsory modules instilling a range of academic knowledge from health sciences to profession specific radiotherapy and oncology practice. And, add a dissertation for the award of a Masters.

Year 1

Radiation science and technology
Applied biological sciences
Radiotherapy theory and practice 1

Year 2

Patient care and resource management in radiotherapy
Radiotherapy theory and practice 2
Dissertation (MSc only)

Teaching and learning

Academic theoretical knowledge is gained through taught session led by lecturers and experts in the field, supported by blended learning and self-study activities.

Practical skills are normally developed through practical skills based sessions using VERT and dosimetry software, problem-based approaches and clinical placement.

Types of learning activities include:

• Lectures
• Seminars
• Enquiry-based learning
• Tutorials
• Formative assessments
• E discussions
• Observation and demonstration of practices within clinical placements.

Placements

Clinical placements are an essential element of the course. You will spend 50% of your time involved in academic study and 50% in clinical practice within a broad variety of healthcare settings. A clinical practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge and experience required to become a competent radiographer. Although sometimes initially challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be a radiographer.

Clinical settings

At LSBU you will experience a variety of clinical settings such as NHS Trusts and the independent sector.

Placements for Therapeutic Radiography include:

• Brighton and Sussex University Hospital: Sussex Cancer Centre
• Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust: Kent Oncology Centre
• Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
• Royal Surrey Hospital
• Queens Hospital, Romford.

Structure of placements

Placements are spread over two years.

The first clinical placement; approximately seven weeks after the start of the course, gives a real taster of the role of the radiotherapy radiographer in the radiotherapy treatment process. It gives you an opportunity to confirm correct choice of career early within the course. Thereafter clinical placements follow the same pattern throughout the course.

Support from a mentor

An identified Link Lecturer and Personal Tutor from the University will be the person you can contact during working day hours whilst on placement with any concerns or questions you are unable to solve otherwise. As there is a close relationship between LSBU and the clinical placement; the Link Lecturer will pay regular scheduled visits to the different sites to meet up with students.

Professional links

The programme is validated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers.

Radiotherapy as a career

On successful completion of the course you'll be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a therapeutic radiographer.

From helping plan and administering treatment, to explaining it to patients and assessing their responses, therapeutic radiographers are involved in every stage of the treatment process.

Therapeutic radiographers work closely with professionals from other disciplines, are involved in the care and support of the cancer patient and their families through all parts of the patient pathway from the initial referral through to treatment review and follow-up stages. They are predominantly responsible for treatment for the accurate localisation, planning and delivery of ionising radiation.

Therapeutic radiographers need excellent interpersonal skills and emotional resilience as they deal with patients and their families at very difficult and emotional times. Making patients feel comfortable and guiding them through the process can be as important as the technical skills required for this role.

Career progression

Through the acquisition of a wide range of transferable skills such as psychosocial, organisational, management, technical and scientific skills, individuals are well prepared to work in any situation that best suits their individual expertise and interest.Working as a consultant practitioner is one common career path as well as management, research, clinical work and teaching.

After qualification, clinically experienced therapeutic radiographers may gain additional specialist skills and expertise through the postgraduate, post-registration and continuing professional development frameworks.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This is an interdisciplinary programme for professionals who want to develop and enhance their practice at postgraduate level. Read more
This is an interdisciplinary programme for professionals who want to develop and enhance their practice at postgraduate level. It is a workbased learning programme designed for participants from a variety of professional settings including the private, public and third sector, for example, health and social care; education; local government; public services; human resources; administrative services; cultural industries or the arts.

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/224/professional-practice#!overview

Course detail

The programme offers you the opportunity to explore your profession further, consider the challenges associated with your professional practice and develop your generic knowledge and skills in the workplace; while being able to focus on a specific area of practice relevant to you and your work. In particular, you develop strategic skills, knowledge of leadership styles and approaches, and critical analysis in the context of multi-agency working and research-based practice.

Purpose

You explore your profession further and consider the professional challenges associated within your specific area of practice, with modules that have been designed to help you review and analyse the current debates relevant to the professional context in which you are working.

Format and assessment

This flexible programme allows you to follow one of our specific accredited pathways or select modules of personal and professional interest from across the University, enabling you to review and analyse the current debates relating to key issues relevant to the professional context in which you are working.

Core modules:
• Learning and Development in Organisations
• Inter-professional Working
• Evidence Based Practice
• Research Skills
• Dissertation

Optional modules:

Students are able to select optional modules from the Centre for Professional Practice module catalogue or the wider University of Kent catalogue.

Assessments can be through:

- Oral presentations
- Written assignments
- Work-based projects
- Portfolio assessments
- Reflecting learning submissions
- Action Learning Sets

In Stage 3 you complete a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words

Careers

A postgraduate degree in professional practice is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as head teachers, head of human resources and organisation development, college and university administration managers. Most recent graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as Great Ormond Street Hospital, Kent Fire and Rescue Service, Kent, Surrey and Sussex Community Rehabilitation Company (KSS CRC), Rochester Grammar School, Chatham Grammar School for Boys and the University of Kent.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The MA in the Contemporary is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. Read more
The MA in the Contemporary is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. This new programme is a unique collaboration between the University of Kent and the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London which allows students to choose from a range of modules, each focusing on different aspects of contemporary culture. Jointly taught by academics and practitioners in the School of English and the School of Arts at the University of Kent and the ICA, the programme allows students to enrich their academic knowledge with a practical internship at the ICA.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/209/the-contemporary

Course detail

The MA in the Contemporary will provide students with a deep understanding of the relationship between disciplines in the arts and an appreciation of the way in which interdisciplinary thinking makes it possible to grasp and respond to key issues in contemporary culture. This pioneering educational opportunity will equip students with the skills, knowledge and professional experience to progress into areas such as artistic practice, related higher postgraduate research, arts management and policy and a variety of other careers within the arts.

Students will be able to choose from a wide variety of modules in the areas of Contemporary Literature, Creative Writing, Film, Drama and History and Philosophy of Art. Students will also be invited to attend an induction at the ICA at the start of their studies to introduce them to the facilities and will be encouraged to make use of the ICA’s programme of seminars and events.

The Contemporary MA is also available with a term in Paris: https://www-test.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/766/the-contemporary-paris

Format and assessment

Besides engaging with ICA curators through the core module in Reading the Contemporary, students will also participate in three research trips in the autumn, spring and summer terms, led by ICA curators and responding to contemporary artistic developments, media and platforms.

Each student will be invited to undertake an internship at the ICA (for a maximum of 2 days a week over a month) between February and June (Tue-Fri). Each group of students will work in the ICA studio, supervised by the Associate Curator of Education, and will have access to the ICA programme and ICA archive where necessary. The experiences and research undertaken will feed into their final project whilst gaining vocational experience at the ICA.

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. The MA in Music at the University of Kent gives you the opportunity to develop an area of specialism alongside rigorous training in key professional and academic skills. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

The MA in Music at the University of Kent gives you the opportunity to develop an area of specialism alongside rigorous training in key professional and academic skills. In studying for the MA you will choose one of three pathways:

- Research (Musicology or Ethnomusicology)
- Composition
- Performance,

which allow you to undertake two large-scale projects (Specialist Project and Dissertation). Regular one-to-one tutorials and work in small seminar groups enable you to gain confidence and expertise in both theoretical and practical work. Option modules support the development of your specialism. Studies in areas such as composition techniques, musicology and ensemble performance provide an important grounding in relevant fields of inquiry and creative practice.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/354/music-research-composition-or-performance#!structure

Course detail

Our students explore both the creative and technical aspects of music and its related technologies and also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with practitioners from other arts subjects. You take common modules in research methods and postgraduate study skills, while giving you the opportunity to foster your subject skills in specialist modules. Work is developed through individual enquiry as well as sharing and critiquing ideas through group seminars, designed to provide a forum for debate as well as practical instruction.

Our specialist facilities include a large recording studio, a Foley recording space, surround-sound studio and post-production rooms. All have been designed to the highest standard in order to provide an excellent environment for postgraduate work. We have an array of loudspeakers for electroacoustic performance, live sound and collaborative arts projects. Students are encouraged to participate in these music concerts and interdisciplinary events, becoming part of the exciting artistic environment here at the University of Kent.

Purpose

The programme aims to:

- enable students to develop an advanced understanding of music theory and practice taking into account developments in scholarship over the past few decades. In achieving this aim, students will focus upon theoretical and/or practice-based research methods and, in all cases, will engage a range of current research practices that address music critically.

- provide opportunities for students to develop their work through individual enquiry and through sharing and critiquing ideas

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

- Specialist Project (60 credits)
- Advanced Audio Skills (30 credits)
- Critical and Historical Perspectives on Music (30 credits)
- Composition Techniques (30 credits)
- Collaborative Project (30 credits)
- Popular and World Music (30 credits)
- Interdisciplinary Project (30 credits)
- Technology in Performance (30 credits)
MU622 - Ensemble Performance (30 credits)
MU898 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment is by a range of coursework, including individual projects, skills-based tasks, seminar presentations and written work.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the area of music and audio arts is a valuable and flexible qualification, which can lead to career opportunities within the creative industries, music recording and production, audio software development, sound for film, composition and academic careers.

These possibilities are augmented by work in video games, the Internet, live sound for theatres and festivals, audio installations for museums, sonic arts and computer music. Postgraduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Research Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film and is suitable both for graduates in the subject and those new to it.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/19/film-paris

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campus-based film culture. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

Modules available on this programme may include:
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity (Paris) (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

During the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available, making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in film

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- allow you to spend your first term in Canterbury, studying modules in film, and to spend your second term in Paris developing your interest in cinema within the context of city often seen to be central to the aesthetic developments of filmmaking and critical approaches central to the history of the discipline

- consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of film

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to French cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study in Paris

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location. Read more
This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location.

After a term at our Canterbury campus, you move to Kent’s Paris centre to study modules with a specific focus on this city, allowing you to benefit from the experience of living and studying in another European culture. All classes in Paris are taught in English. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Comparative Literature involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing students to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices. The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian, as well as from colleagues in the School of English.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

This programme is for those wanting to pursue detailed literary and cultural studies and also wishing to benefit from the experience of living and studying overseas.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. The spring term modules are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. These modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term. Read more
The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages and the Department of Comparative Literature and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar. After a term at our Canterbury campus, you study at Kent’s Paris School of Arts and Culture to study modules with a particular focus on the city, gaining the experience of living within another European culture.

After you have taken four modules across the autumn and spring terms, you undertake a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. The French and Comparative Literature MA can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material, and those with the desire to live in Paris in an active and extended engagement with the culture.

In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where your studies are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take two modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year.

The modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in the city. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
FR998 - French Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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Our Master of Philosophy (MPhil) with possibility to transfer to our Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) involves the systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge in your chosen academic disciplinary field or area of professional practice in business or economics. Read more

Our Master of Philosophy (MPhil) with possibility to transfer to our Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) involves the systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge in your chosen academic disciplinary field or area of professional practice in business or economics.

Degree aims 

This degree aims to:

  • Provide you with the general ability to conceptualise, design and realise a project for the generation of new knowledge, and a deep understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry
  • Allow the creation of new knowledge, through original research and advanced scholarship, to extend the forefront of that disciplinary field or area of practice.

Course structure

You will learn to conceptualise, design and realise a project for the generation of new knowledge. Our degree will give you deep understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry. 

Unlike taught programmes (such as Bachelor's and Master's programmes), this degree provides a more critical and rigorous exploration of your particular subject area. It places much more emphasis on original research and the contribution to knowledge. 

You will attend taught courses in your first and second year to lay the foundation from which you will develop advanced research skills including the gathering, analysis and presentation of quantitative and qualitative data.

Supervisors

At the heart of this MPhil/PhD is the collaboration between you and your research supervisor. Our supervisors, your first point of contact in the faculty, are experts in your chosen area and will guide you through the process of: 

  • Defining the aims of your research project, and its expected deliverables
  • Outlining a suitable plan of work, monitoring its realisation, and helping you to keep your commitment to it
  • Guiding you to obtaining ethical approval to realise your research, if your study requires it
  • Identifying any further taught courses and training events (in addition to mandatory ones) to be attended in support of your research project.

Research

You are encouraged to contact us to discuss your research interests and you will graduate with a degree title that reflects your area of specialism. Your award will be based on the completion of a thesis.

We have expertise and can supervise research students primarily in the areas of human resource management, organisational behaviour, accounting and finance, financial services, critical and social research in accounting, public administration, public policy, political economy, applied economics, social and economic network analysis, international business, strategic management, supply chain management, knowledge management, IT strategies, entrepreneurship and innovation, marketing, tourism, and cultural, art and heritage industries. 

Research is seen as an essential activity for the Business School as a foundation for excellence in teaching, and as a basis to provide contract research and consultancy services to business and the wider community, both nationally and locally (especially within south-east London and Kent). 

Attendance

The normal route accepted by the University is to register first as MPhil student, and transfer to PhD after demonstrating sufficient progress in your research (usually after about 12-18 months from start). 

Attendance for MPhil is 18-36 months full-time and 30-48 months part-time; PhD is 36-60 months full-time and 48-72 months part-time.

For further information, guidance on how to apply and an application form, please visit http://www.greenwich.ac.uk/research/study.

Employability

We have developed strong relations with many academic institutions, research centres, and companies in the financial centres in London, including in the City, Canary Wharf, and Fenchurch Street. This offers you networking, mentoring and internship opportunities, making it a perfect location to develop your career. 

You can also reach out to top employers through our dedicated Business School Employability Office (BSEO). Our team focuses on developing your employment skills through CV support, interview skills workshops and guidance through mentors to progress in the industry. This includes the opportunity to network with employers and recruiters at career fairs. The BSEO team was shortlisted for the Times Higher Education Leadership and Management Awards; which shows their dedication to actively support career development.

Helping graduates into careers is a very important part of our mission as a university. Job prospects for Greenwich graduates have been improving rapidly, with 93 per cent of 2014/15 Greenwich graduates looking for work were already in jobs or further study by January 2016 (according to latest national figures).

Ranking

Greenwich is one of the top two most globally diverse universities in the UK, US, Australia and New Zealand, by Hotcourses Diversity Index.

We have also been named as one of the "most international" universities on the planet by Times Higher Education magazine.

Assessment

You will be assessed through submission of a thesis and an oral examination. You will also have to pass three mandatory courses in year one, one optional course in year two and shorter preparatory training courses.

Professional recognition

This degree is accredited by the European Doctoral Programmes Association in Management and Business Administration, a prestigious body that aims to help its members increase the quality of their PhD programmes.

Careers

You can have a career in research, whether in academia or in the research and development departments of businesses or government bodies.



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The PG Certificate/Diploma programme aims to provide general-level pharmacists, registered with the GPhC and working within the NHS, with the core skills and competencies required to provide holistic pharmaceutical care in the practice setting. Read more
The PG Certificate/Diploma programme aims to provide general-level pharmacists, registered with the GPhC and working within the NHS, with the core skills and competencies required to provide holistic pharmaceutical care in the practice setting.

The programme aligns with a nationally agreed pharmacy practitioner development strategy and is the result of a unique collaboration of higher education institutions across London and the south and east of England.

The programme develops the practitioner student's underpinning knowledge and skills in clinical pharmacy practice and medicines management.

The programme works on a philosophy of student-centred workplace learning, supported by workbooks and learning sets facilitated by experienced pharmacy practitioners. The practitioner students are expected to take responsibility for managing their learning and achieving the course objectives in support of their CPD.

Completing the practice elements of the PG Certificate/Diploma programme leads to an academic award and the award of a Statement of Completion of General Pharmacist Training from an accredited training centre. In the MSc programme, you will complete a research project, supported by academics with expertise in practice research. You will gain expertise in research techniques, you will be supported to write a protocol and complete either an NHS or University Ethics application and to collect and analyse your data.

The aims of the PG Certificate and PG Diploma are:

- To enable you to apply appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to carry out effectively the role of the general pharmacist practitioner within your pharmacy practice base and wider healthcare teams

- To enable you to carry out effective consultations with patients respecting their diverse needs and with regard to confidentiality and consent

- To enable you to identify, prioritise and resolve complex pharmaceutical care issues

- To enable you to apply knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology and the clinical use of drugs and therapeutic guidelines to the treatment of common disease states

- To enable you to access, gather, interpret, critically evaluate and summarise medicines information

- To enable you to monitor the quality of services provided, identify, prioritise and resolve significant medicines management issues and monitor and evaluate outcomes

- To enable you to establish population health needs and apply specialist pharmaceutical knowledge to public health issues.

The aims of the MSc are:

- To investigate a topic in depth
- To evaluate current practice or a new service
- To publish research and advance knowledge in pharmacy practice
- To develop skills you require for the RPS Advanced Pharmacy Framework
- To inspire you and others in your workplace to carry out much needed practice research
- To support your future career and to help you explore new career paths.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/pha/gpp

Pharmacy

We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes and courses for pharmacists and other health-care professionals. Our Medway School of Pharmacy is a unique collaboration between the Universities of Greenwich and Kent. We have designed innovative patient focused programmes to address the needs of healthcare professionals. A significant investment in facilities and equipment has allowed us to embark on our objective of establishing an internationally recognised research reputation based on multidisciplinary team work.

What you'll study

- Practitioner development and establishing your professional and clinical practice (PG Cert) (60 credits)

- Module A: Developing self, others and your operational management skills (PG Dip) (30 credits)

- Module B: Ensuring patient safety and a quality service (PG Dip) (30 Credits)

- Research project consisting of thesis, poster presentation and personal reflections (MSc) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through objective structured clinical examination, multiple-choice questions, assignments, a literature review, an audit, a change management project and a competency-based portfolio review.

Professional recognition

Completion of the practice elements of the course leads to the award of the Certificate of Completion of General Pharmacist Training from an accredited training centre.

Career options

This programme provides progression for pharmacists towards advanced practitioner status.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Music is a vital and dynamic aspect of a school curriculum and is an important human practice throughout the world. The PGCE Secondary (Music) course prepares students to teach this challenging and fulfilling subject in a way which reflects the essence of music itself, i.e. Read more
Music is a vital and dynamic aspect of a school curriculum and is an important human practice throughout the world. The PGCE Secondary (Music) course prepares students to teach this challenging and fulfilling subject in a way which reflects the essence of music itself, i.e. a unique practical and creative discipline in which we can understand and express our ideas.

The course allows student teachers to develop their musicianship in the context of the classroom and thus empower young people to use music as part of their lives.

You can exit the PGCE courses with one of two awards. The Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) is awarded to those students who gain less than 40 Level 7credits, but who pass all modules, gaining 100 or 120 Level 6 credits. If you achieve 40 or 60 Level 7 credits and pass all the modules, you will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE). All students completing a PGCE will also be recommended for QTS.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/pgce-secondary-music.aspx

Course detail

The aims of the course are:
• to challenge assumptions about the nature of music and music education;
• to analyse the various theories and practices of music education through active learning;
• to place listening, composing and performing, in a wide range of styles and genres, at the centre of the student teacher’s learning experience;
• to experience working alongside teachers in music departments;
• to give access to the latest teaching and learning resources;
• to develop the student teacher as a reflective and enthusiastic practitioner;
• to develop skills which complement the student teacher’s existing expertise;
• to help student teachers develop a well principled philosophy of music education which they are able to use in the profession as the basis of their practice.

The course is organised in partnership with schools in Kent and beyond. We use the expertise of teachers in partnership schools and tutors in university sessions to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding required for teaching music to young people, across the full secondary age and ability range.

Suitability

The course is for people who want to become qualified teachers.

Content

All PGCE courses cover three main areas: Curriculum Studies, Professional Studies and Enhanced Studies. However, all learning on the course is designed to complement professional practice and the academic study will be informed by and inform practice.

PGCE students will be placed in two schools for a mixture of blocked time and serial (e.g. one day a week) time adding up to meet the current Government requirement for a minimum 120 days in school.

• Professional Studies
Professional Studies sessions aim to inform you about aspects of professional practice which are central to your work, whatever your subject, including how do we learn, how do we include all children, how is teaching a professional activity, how can education be organised and how can learning be assessed.

• Curriculum Studies
This module involves work in studying key concepts that underpin the various curricula and syllabi for your subject. The sessions allow discussion of different pedagogies and allow reflection on differing school approaches to the subject.

• Enhanced Studies
The module enables you to choose an area of personal interest to you to study this in more depth through a research project based in a school.

Format

Across the PGCE year there is an equivalent of 12 weeks of taught input which take place at university on the Canterbury Campus. The teaching on these days will be a mixture of seminar and workshop activity. There will also be a small number of lecture inputs.

Across the PGCE year there is the equivalent of 24 weeks spent in school. Student teachers will learn in a variety of ways in school, including from experienced mentors, through observing others and through experience. There is also a degree of individual support for learning offered in this course provided by mentors in school and the university tutors.

Tutors and mentors who lead the learning on this course are all qualified teachers.

Assessment

You will be assessed in two main ways­ via academic assignments and assessment of your teaching.

You will submit academic assignments for 20 credits in each curriculum, professional and enhanced studies modules. Each submission will include a written element, but you may also be assessed via presentations or practical performances as relevant to their chosen subject options.

What can I do next?

Upon successful completion of the programme students can teach in schools as qualified teachers.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Our Orthodontics MSc is a full time three-year programme of academic, practical and clinical teaching in orthodontics. Read more

Our Orthodontics MSc is a full time three-year programme of academic, practical and clinical teaching in orthodontics. The programme covers all aspects of modern orthodontics, including normal development and growth of the craniofacial region, development of the dentition, orthodontic tooth movement, treatment planning, management of malocclusion, contemporary appliance systems and treatment mechanics.

Key benefits

  • Exposure to a wide variety of orthodontic appliances and techniques
  • Rotations to peripheral hospital orthodontic departments in SE England
  • Dedicated postgraduate dental centre at Guy’s Hospital
  • Internationally competitive research opportunities

Description

The Orthodontics MSc programme is based at King’s College London Dental Institute with clinical treatment clinics at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which collectively with King’s College London form King’s Health Partners. Orthodontic trainees also rotate out to undertake patient treatment sessions at a number of peripheral hospital units within South East England.

The programme is based on the UK General Dental Council Orthodontic curriculum and is delivered through lectures, practical and technical teaching elements, clinical seminars, tutorials, self-directed learning, supervised clinical treatment of patients and attendance on diagnostic and multidisciplinary outpatient clinics.

Academic and clinical teaching is supported by a local virtual learning environment and also through access to the British Orthodontic Society national on-line learning programme. Assessment is through written, oral and practical examinations, clinical work-based assessments, case presentations, patient logbooks and the submission of a research dissertation.

Students undertake a dedicated research project as part of their course and the Dental Institute at King’s provides an environment enriched with internationally recognized academics to facilitate this. In recent years, students have undertaken projects incorporating many different subject areas including clinical orthodontics, craniofacial biology, dental materials science, clinical psychology and dental public health.

Students are encouraged to register and undertake a King’s Graduate Certificate in Academic Practice to further develop their educational skills. The programme complies with the principles of Erasmus and supports the European Union directives on specialisation in orthodontics.

Course purpose

The programme prepares you for the Membership in Orthodontics (MOrth) of one of the United Kingdom Royal Surgical Colleges, currently under conjoint status with the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. Passing the conjoint MSc examination will be complemented by a pass in the MOrth of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

Course format and assessment

The usual training period is a minimum of 4,500 hours over the degree (3 years) whole-time or agreed equivalent within the framework of a less than full-time training programme.

The programme content is apportioned approximately as:

  • 60% clinical
  • 25% academic
  • 15% research

This time allocation is flexible and will depend upon the capacity of the trainees to complete the curriculum to a competent level.

Methods of assessment

  • Science of Orthodontics (30 credits) - unseen written examination
  • Clinical Orthodontics (theory) (30 credits) - unseen written examination
  • Clinical Orthodontics (60 credits) – clinical examination (30%); practical examination (20%); oral examination (20%); assessed course work (cases and open problems) (30%)
  • Orthodontic Research (60 credits) - research project (60%); oral examination (40%)

Extra information

As we are seeking to identify your suitability for this clinical environment, we expect our interviewees to adopt the dress code required of clinical dental students at King's and/or Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Trust. Further information will be given should you choose to apply. Entry to the programme is strictly dependent upon occupational health clearance that you are able to conduct exposure prone procedures (EPPs) before you start clinical work.

This will assess your hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C antibody status, HIV and TB status following the completion of a health questionnaire and a further health check before or at enrolment. If offered a place on the course, overseas students are advised to be tested locally and send the results of these checks with the questionnaire, prior to a separate full test in the UK at the College's Occupational Health Department before term begins. All offers of a place on a programme are made subject to a satisfactory criminal conviction disclosure. If you are from overseas or have never lived in the UK before, you should contact the relevant authorities in your home country to arrange for the equivalent check to be conducted and/or a certificate of good conduct to be issued.

NHS Hospital Trusts

The clinical component of the course may include sessions at some of the following hospital trusts. This is a unique aspect of the training on this course and provides the students with the opportunity for a very wide-based clinical experience.

  • William Harvey Hospital, Ashford, Kent;
  • Kingston Hospital;
  • Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead;
  • Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton;
  • Queen Mary’s Hospital, Sidcup;
  • Medway Maritime Hospital;
  • St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust;
  • Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford;
  • Croydon University Hospital.


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Based in London, this groundbreaking Master’s programme offers students unique access to world-class scholars, thinkers and practitioners drawn from the world of sport and its academic study. Read more
Based in London, this groundbreaking Master’s programme offers students unique access to world-class scholars, thinkers and practitioners drawn from the world of sport and its academic study.

It is directed by Ed Smith, the commentator, historian of sport, and former cricketer for England, Middlesex and Kent.

The course enables the student to undertake research on a specific topic, agreed with the supervisor, in any aspect of the history of sport over the last two centuries. Assessment is by a dissertation, written under expert guidance over the course of the year.

A central feature of the programme is its series of ten evening seminars and post-seminar dinners in a London club, at which participants can engage in general discussion with guest speakers. These experts include:

• Mike Brearley OBE, former Captain of the England Cricket Team and former President of the MCC
• Dr Kasia Boddy, Lecturer at Cambridge University and author of Boxing: A Cultural History
• Mervyn King, Lord King of Lothbury KG, GBE, FBA, former Governor of the Bank of England and ex-Director, Aston Villa Football Club
• Professor Christopher Young, historian of sport, Cambridge University
• Simon Kuper, author and Financial Times columnist
• Matthew Syed, journalist, author and broadcaster

Sport’s place in modern life has never been more central, and the history of sport is a rapidly growing area of academic study. The course will touch on all major sports – in Britain, America and on the Continent. Some of the themes addressed by the lectures will be:

• Why was Britain so central to the development of modern sport?
• When and how did sport become politicised?
• How has sport influenced attitudes towards class, race, gender and sexuality?
• Sport’s role as an agent and beneficiary of globalisation.

The course will begin with two seminars about how to choose, research and write an academic dissertation, held at the University’s London offices, 51 Gower Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 6HJ. These will be followed by ten guest lectures and dinners, held at the splendid Caledonian Club (Halkin Street, London SW1X 7DR), a few moments from Hyde Park Corner in central London.

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Brussels is the centre of European decision making. It is estimated that 60% of national legislation of EU member states originates, in some form, in Brussels. Read more
Brussels is the centre of European decision making. It is estimated that 60% of national legislation of EU member states originates, in some form, in Brussels. Anyone wanting to enter a career in civil service, either at the EU level or in a national government in Europe, must gain a strategic understanding of the scope, content, decision-cycle and implementation of policy in Europe.

In a quickly changing world, the European Union is a key actor. As the largest economy, it is the first trading partner for many countries around the world. But by developing its own foreign and defence policy, it equally seeks to become a crucial diplomatic player.

This MA programme responds to an increasing need to study the EU’s external relations at an advanced level. The EU is studied in its different dimensions, such as foreign policy, security and external relations law, but also from an outsider’s perspective in a context of global change and regional instability.

The programme draws heavily on the presence of the EU and other institutions in the proximity of the Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) and builds on the tradition of inviting high-level diplomats to share their views with students. Key modules are taught by leading experts in the field from both the Brussels and Canterbury campuses of the University of Kent.

By taking an interdisciplinary and critical look at the EU’s international role, this MA programme prepares students well for careers in diplomacy, research and employment in diverse organisations that deal with the external dimension of the EU.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/767/eu-external-relations

Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time (standard version); 18 months full-time, three years part-time (extended version)

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS. Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in EU External Relations allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying EU External Relations in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'EU External Relations with Human Rights Law'.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a research-active teaching environment which ensures a good grounding in the study of social science in general, in public policy and its formulation, and in European public policy in particular

- offer a critical perspective of the interplay between international relations, European politics, and European integration, as they relate to the inputs, processes, systems and policy outcomes at the European level

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of European public policy in particular

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of the major theoretical approaches to policymaking and policy analysis, the historical development of the contemporary European policy landscape, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field

- ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for the advanced assessment of contemporary problems in European politics, society, and economy, and their solutions

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills)

- produce the policy-relevant knowledge, as well as analytical and research skills, which are valued in employment contexts linked to EU- and national policymaking.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject. Read more
The programme offers a thorough grounding in postgraduate-level film. We will be pleased to consider applications from applicants with either a background in Film or a related humanities subject.

It is taught by experts in Film and seeks to engage you with the key elements that make up the diverse nature of film and moving images.

The Film MA can also be studied between Canterbury and Paris, with the first term at our Canterbury campus and the spring term at our centre in Paris. It is also available in Paris only where you spend the entire year in the French capital.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

About the Department of Film

The Film Department at the University of Kent is known for its excellence in research and teaching. It was ranked second in the UK for research power in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). One of the largest European centres for the study of film, it has an established reputation going back 35 years. Approaching film as a dynamic part of our cultural experience, we encourage thinking about film as it emerges at the intersections of art, document and entertainment. Through theory and practice, individual research, student-led seminars and visiting speakers, we promote an environment in which postgraduate students are able to engage with the continuing vibrancy of cinema.

Studying film as a postgraduate at the University of Kent will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise, library facilities and a campusbased film culture. We currently offer expertise in North American, European and Latin American cinemas. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives, as well as with digital media and practice by research.

In 2014, the University opened a new 62-seat cinema named after the pioneering female film director Ida Lupino, which students can enjoy as part of their experience during their studies. The Lupino has state-of-the-art digital projection and sound, and has been created to provide an intimate atmosphere for film viewing.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FI811 - Conceptualising Film (30 credits)
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History (30 credits)
FI815 - Film and Modernity (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- develop your understanding and skills to a notably higher level of sophistication and achievement (appropriate to an Master’s level award) than would be expected at degree level, such that you leave the programme with a substantial analytic and critical understanding of film and film studies

- develop your understanding and skills to the level necessary for entry into a research programme in Film Studies

- develop your ability to think independently, argue with clarity and force, to discern areas of research interest within the field and be able to frame viable research questions

- provoke reflection on areas of critical and theoretical approaches to cinema and its context

- nurture the intellectual skills cited above in the context of written work (essays and dissertations) as well as in the context of interpersonal interaction (seminars, research papers, supervision)

- attract outstanding students irrespective of race, background, gender, and physical disability, from both within the UK and from overseas

- develop existing and new areas of teaching in response to the advance of research and scholarship within the subject, as well as new developments in filmmaking practice.

Research areas

Research in both theory and practice is currently centred in five broad areas:

- national cinemas – form and history: North American, European, Latin American
- the moving image in a digital context
- documentary film
- film aesthetics
- avant-garde and experimental cinema.

Centre for the Interdisciplinary Study of Film and the Moving Image
The Centre draws together scholars from across the University who use film and the moving image as an integral part of their research. We are open to ideas that extend the reach of the Centre and seek to support projects that promote collaboration between individuals and other research centres. Our aim is to produce a more proactive engagement with other disciplines, to open new lines of communication and to produce innovative knowledge formations through the activity of pioneering research projects.

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to film journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work at Universal Pictures, the London Film Festival and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, as well as in film production, as editorial assistants and as web designers.


Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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