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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. Read more
The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. You will enhance your ability to facilitate and lead the development of expert knowledge within your specific area of higher education including academic practice.

In an increasingly global world the study of higher education is no longer limited to local, regional or national contexts. Universities influence and are influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological change and ongoing sophistication of higher education national and international characteristics. The study pathway therefore aims to enhance practice, research and policy of higher education within these fluid contexts. The course contributes to the personal development of those concerned with the study of higher education both formally and informally in a wide range of institutional settings and locations. Coursework encourages you to bring together your personal understanding of issues relating to specific aspects of higher education with the established and current body of professional and academic research literature relevant to your professional or personal aims. Underpinned by the development of advanced, specialist research skills, the course allows you to progressively broaden the knowledge and understanding of your chosen aspects of higher education. It emphasises the synthesis of theory and practice, including academic practice, and the importance of both structure and agency when understanding interactions within higher education institutions.

Careers

The MA graduates from a wide range of backgrounds, including tutors, lecturers and academics from different disciplines and educational contexts will benefit from the provision of specialist knowledge and research methods training. The course actively seeks to support the professional development, employability and career progression of managers, administrators and academic-related, professional staff (e.g. learning technologists, academic developers). The offering of a range of specialised research skills is tailored to enhance the expertise of these professionals as well as those aspiring to progress to higher levels of management in the areas of higher education policy, widening participation and access in higher education institutions. Invited lecturers from external higher education and policy institutions will highlight possible pathways for future employment within specialist organisations or universities in a number of countries. The design of authentic course assessment tasks underlines the importance of developing specialised research and professional skills applicable in the workplace. Equally, the research skills element of the course will equip participants with necessary skills for progression to doctoral or independent research.

Module list

• National and International Perspectives on Higher Education Policy

This module examines policy and policy-making as distinct processes of implementation and change. Students will consider the approaches of different countries to important debates in the field including the purpose and nature of universities, funding, internationalisation, access and widening participation, management, quality, and regulation processes. Utilising policy analysis methods as well as key concepts and theoretical frameworks students will critically examine comparative evidence to enhance their knowledge and understanding of higher education principles, processes and practices drawing on individual national case studies. The module covers the following broad areas of higher education policy, policy-making and change:

• Access, recruitment and widening participation
• Quality assurance and regimes of (de)regulation in higher education
• Management and change at institutional, national and international level
• Tiers of higher education provision, rankings and their implications for governments and universities.
• Higher education financing and shifting patterns of funding.
• Internationalisation, global competition and cross-border flow of students and researchers.

• Universities as Contemporary Learning and Teaching Environments

This module examines the historical development of research in teaching-learning with a view to identify key contributions that influenced how we conceptualise teaching-learning in the university sector. Several theoretical traditions are presented (e.g. communities of practice, student approaches to learning, actor network theory) and emphasis is placed on the role of assessment and feedback as well as the wide-scale implementation of technological media in higher education and their impact on new modalities of learning. Students will be offered the means to enhance their critical understanding and use of relevant theory by supporting critical and systematic reflection on the changing nature of teaching-learning in higher education, on the changing management landscape, and on the relationships between them in national and international contexts.

• Special Research Methods in Higher Education

This module provides an overview of the methods and methodologies applied to research in higher education. In doing so, it provides links between higher education and educational and social research in general without losing its particular focus and applicability on higher education settings. The meanings and associations between methods are discussed and their position in wider epistemological paradigms is considered. Students will be given an overview of the development of these methods and methodologies in higher education and will develop applied research skills on methods relevant to their practice or interests. Conclusions will be drawn on the methodological opportunities and challenges of the presented research methods and their supplementary to wider educational and social research will be critically examined.

• Educational and Social Research Methods

This module provides you with the opportunity to consider the aims and intentions of educational research, critique published journal articles, and examine the role of evidence from research as a basis for improving education and social care. You will gain grounding in educational research issues, methods and strategies together with knowledge of how to match intended outcomes with specific educational questions and methods of investigation.

• Postgraduate Major Study

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of their Master's Major project and involves a dissertation of 14,000 words or the equivalent. The Major Project enables students to demonstrate the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and / or research understanding. It will involve the ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice. The project enables students to expand or redefine existing knowledge, to develop new approaches to changing workplace situations and / or to contribute to the development of best practice. It asks the student to communicate these processes in a clear and elegant fashion and to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. Students' research topics must be negotiated with their appointed supervisor. An application for ethical approval and ethics discussion paper must then be submitted. The project may take the form of a written dissertation, a formal presentation and full research paper, an exhibition, a performance, an artefact or the development of software, or other written, aural or visual material. The project may be formed from a combination of these modes but will normally include a written component.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a number of ways, from systematic literature reviews to reflective accounts on your professional practice, to ensure you're learning effectively. Other forms of assessment may include presentations, critical analyses of existing research, producing a dissemination poster and a research project. Each module comprises of one summative assessment and one core formative assessment. The assessment of the modules places emphasis on authenticity of the assessment tasks. Assessment are designed to strengthen your ability to conduct research in higher education settings.

Your Faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly, supportive and experienced staff. With over 150 research students across our three doctoral programmes (PhD; DProf and EdD), we provide the multi-disciplinary perspective and potential for academic debate that reflects our position as a leader in practitioner-focused and practice-led research studies.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, social services, local and regional authorities, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

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Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Read more
Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

Overview

Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Our course will provide you with a wide range of experiences and prepare you to deliver high quality care with confidence. All of our pre-registration nursing courses are developed by nurses for nurses and will support you to work with health care teams to meet the needs of vulnerable adults requiring health care across a variety of settings. Learning and working at Masters level will support you to shape and improve your future profession and the health care experiences of patients in your care.

Adult nurses have a unique role within the healthcare setting. Making a positive change or improving the quality of people’s lives is a central tenet of this role. This may involve enabling people to improve, maintain, or recover their health, and to achieve the best possible quality of life, whatever the circumstances.

We are committed to the principles and values of the NHS Constitution (DH, 2013) and our Adult Nursing course promotes the behaviours and values that patients and staff believe to be at the heart of our NHS. These include respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, improving lives, working together for patients and the understanding that everyone counts.

The course places equal value on clinical practice and theory. It will take you from university lectures to clinical placement settings, from young to mature adults. You may well find yourself at a GP surgery, working with mulita-skilled teams in patients’ own homes or in the middle of a variety of hospital settings, from accident & emergency through to medical or surgical areas or providing compassionate care for patients with life limiting illnesses.

We’ll support you all the way. You’ll soon discover that our faculty is a stimulating place to learn, with modern facilities and registered, practising tutors who’ll make sure you’re being taught the latest techniques. We’re passionate about healthcare and dedicated to delivering the values set out by the NHS Constitution.

You’ll have the chance to share experiences and knowledge with other health care disciplines and to see how the professions work together.

Teaching on campus takes place between 9am and 7pm, Monday to Friday. On placement, you’ll be allocated to a mentor who will support your development and you’ll be expected to work the same shifts as the health care team and your mentor. Each week you will work 37.5 hours. This will include early, late and night shifts, as well as working weekends and bank holidays. Each year, five weeks’ of annual leave is built into the course at set points to support you in balancing your course and relaxation time.

Each of the two years is divided in three 30-credit modules. Each module will start with theory, followed by a hospital or community placement. A series of short Medicines Calculations modules are also embedded through the course.

Placements last around 5 weeks and will include both acute and community settings. Placement opportunities include: Older Person’s Care, Dementia Care, District Nursing, Surgical Setting, Acute Care Nursing and many more. Your final placement will be 12 weeks in length and you will also undertake additional placements each year which will enable you to explore other areas.

You’ll be linked to one of our NHS healthcare trust partners for your placements in hospitals or community settings.

If you study in Cambridge or Peterborough, you’ll do your placement in or around Cambridge, Huntingdon or Peterborough. You’ll get plenty of support from experienced mentors.

Our state of the art skills laboratories provide an ideal environment in which to learn a suite of practical skills in the safety of the university. This ensures that you gain understanding about the underpinning evidence that supports these skills, preparing you for the delivery of these skills in the practice setting.

In year 2 of the course you may choose the option to undertake an overseas placement and gain insight into another health care system.

Careers

All pre-registration nursing courses delivered by Anglia Ruskin University are approved by the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). On successful completion of the MSc Nursing course, you’ll be eligible to apply for registration with the NMC and join a profession with a wide range of opportunity. You may choose to become a community professional, such as a practice nurse, or to work as a staff nurse within a hospital. With experience you could become a nursing specialist or nurse consultant. You may enjoy managing a health care team or leading a specialist team in, for example, the community setting. Nurses also undertake roles in research and education.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules -

- Evidence Based Knowledge and Skills for Nursing:
This first module aims to prepare students for the knowledge and skills required to deliver fundamental and safe care. A series of key strands which underpin nursing practice will be commenced in this module including: patient safety; human anatomy and physiology; health promotion and the recognition of the nurse’s role in public health; mental health and common mental health problems; leadership skills and the use of research evidence that underpins care provision. Communication and interpersonal skills will also be considered including principles of de-escalation and the importance of sound interpersonal and professional skills in practice.

- Promoting Professional Practice in Nursing:
In this module students will be supported to understand the significance of prioritising patients as central to the role of the nurse and a key component of the NMC Code (2015). Person-centred care will be addressed through the exploration of patient autonomy and patients' rights. The concepts of advocacy, raising concerns and candour will provide students with an understanding of the legal and ethical parameters that support the delivery of safe care. The module builds on knowledge of bioscience and clinical skills to further enhance delivery of safe fundamental care. Introductions to leadership, management and team working will be provided.

- Nursing Adults with Challenging Health Needs:
This module addresses the complexities of long term conditions and palliative care for adult patients. Preventing the development of long term conditions and life-threatening disease, promoting health and wellbeing and supporting adults with long term conditions to live well independently are key aspects of the nurse’s role. Effective integrated care is critical to the patient experience and students will explore the impact of national drivers from a theoretical and practice based perspective, with a focus on the use and effectiveness of care pathways. This module provides the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical skills and ethical and legal issues to meet the challenges faced by those affected by long term and life limiting conditions.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 1

Year two, core modules -

- Ensuring the Safety of Patients Experiencing Acute Illness:
Patients become acutely unwell in clinical or home settings. This module will provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience to recognise, communicate and respond competently when a patient’s clinical condition indicates that they are becoming acutely unwell. Students will explore how psychological well-being can impact on recovery and the importance of patient focused care and empowerment. Alongside theory input students will participate in clinical scenarios around deteriorating patients (e.g. acute respiratory failure, acute coronary syndrome, and sepsis). Computer-controlled mannequins and simulation skills environments will be utilised to develop students’ skills in recognising and responding to patient deterioration.

- Decision Making, Leadership and Management in Nursing:
This theory/practice module enables students to enhance their leadership, peer coaching and decision making skills. The module aims to develop a varied and flexible repertoire of skills to be able to work effectively within multi-disciplinary teams, in the often challenging environments encountered in modern clinical practice. The module promotes students’ growth and expertise in professional knowledge and judgment, focusing on self-awareness and personal development. Development of key management skills of leadership, assertiveness, delegation and coaching will be provided as well as tools for resilience to withstand the stresses and pressures of practice.

- Major Project - MSc Nursing Adult:
This theory/practice module comprises a major project that is situated in and developed from the care setting. During the final practice placement, students will be expected to negotiate an area for service improvement to enhance the patient experience. This module will consolidate the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in clinical management and leadership and seeks to complement these with insight to mechanisms for improving the quality of healthcare. Understanding and applying concepts of quality assurance, clinical governance, standard setting and the role of audit in maintaining standards will be key drivers.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 2
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 3

Assessment -

To make sure you’re developing the skills and knowledge needed for professional practice, we use a range of assessment methods. These include essays, presentations, written exams, and multi-choice questions. We know feedback is essential for your progress and our lecturers take pride in giving you clear guidance on how to improve your expertise. Assessment also takes place in the practice setting and your mentor will support your development and undertake your assessment in each of your placements.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Cambridge - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

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Overview. Are you looking for a highly challenging two-year Research Master's programme in Philosophy? Come to Radboud University!. Read more

Overview

Are you looking for a highly challenging two-year Research Master's programme in Philosophy? Come to Radboud University!

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy

What makes this programme special?

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- An offering of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, History of Philosophy, and Philosophy of Religion.

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

Specialisations of the Master's in Philosophy

The Faculty of Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies at Radboud University offers the entire range of philosophical disciplines. However, students enrolling in the Research Master's programme are expected to choose one of the following specialisations:

- Metaphysics and Epistemology

In Metaphysics and Epistemology you focus on the development of the hermeneutic tradition – key figures being Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.

- Philosophical Anthropology

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et. al.). Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).

- Philosophical Ethics

In Philosophical Ethics you investigate the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). This section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

- Social and Political Philosophy

In Social and Political Philosophy you study ‘the political’ as an essential but conflict-ridden aspect of the human condition, and politics as a way of coping with this. Spinoza, Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Zizek and Foucault are central figures in this specialisation.

- Philosophy of Language and Logic

Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are being interpreted.

- Philosophy of Mind

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.

- History of Philosophy

In History of Philosophy you explore the development of natural philosophy and metaphysics from the late Middle Ages to early modern and modern times, investigating, in particular the evolution of the sciences of psychology and physics from philosophy.

- Philosophy of Religion

In Philosophy of Religion you focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, and also exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into one of three groups:

1. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating.

2. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools.

3. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education.

Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

The reputation of Radboud University – and of the Philosophy Faculty in particular – will serve you well whichever career path you choose.

NVAO: quality Research Master Philosophy above average

At the end of April the Accreditation Organisation of the Netherlands and Flanders NVAO has renewed the accreditation of the Research Master Philosophy. The NVAO evaluates the Research Master Philosophy as 'good'. The verdict shows that the NVAO finds the Master's programme systematically above average quality.

Faculty scholarships for excellent international students

The Faculty offers scholarships for excellent students from abroad wishing to start the Research Master’s programme in Philosophy every year. Each scholarship amounts to €10,000 for the first year of the Research Master’s programme, and in case of good study results can be renewed for the second, final year.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Language and Logic (Research). Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are interpreted. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Language and Logic (Research)

Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are interpreted.

The programme "Philosophy of Language and Logic" focuses on the development of analytical philosophy from Frege onwards and the rise of modern semantics in the last decades of the 20th century. Its main research interests are the context-dependent interpretation and its relation to formal semantics and pragmatics, and philosophy of mind. Typical themes that are addressed are context-dependence and presupposition, dynamic theories of meaning, discourse and discourse structure, the analysis of propositional attitudes and their relation to mental states, and the relation between interpretation and psychological processes.

Current research is connected with two NWO-funded projects that are being carried out within this section, namely "Information Integration in Discourse" and "Reasoning and the Brain" (in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam and the F.C. Donders Centre). Furthermore, together with the department of linguistics, this section organises the interdisciplinary "Semantics Colloquium".

The members of the section work together with several philosophical and semantic centres in the Netherlands, Germany, France and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/logic

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).

The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).

On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:

- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >233 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated

An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicants must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually, and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate, they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/logic

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research). Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research)

Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves: What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?

Traditionally, philosophy of mind is part of the analytical method in philosophy. Recently, however, a more phenomenological approach to typical questions in the philosophy of mind has provided a refreshing new look on old topics. Additionally, the advance of cognitive neuroscience is providing a new method to address old questions. Philosophy of Mind and Cognition in Nijmegen combines traditional analytical theorizing with insights from phenomenology and the empirical sciences.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.

The research carried out in this section (‘cognitiefilosofie') covers a number of traditional topics: mental causation, perception of, for example, colour, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, theories of mind, mental content and the nature of folk-psychology.

These subjects are specifically addressed against the backdrop of the idea that cognition is essentially embodied. This is the basic premise of the 'embodied embedded cognition paradigm', the 'enactive' approach to cognition and specific body-based forms of neurophenomenology.

Three smaller research projects take place within this section: (1) 'The Bisected Mind', the idea that folk psychology can be regarded as an interpretation of body-based behavioural tendencies and tries to reconcile indeterminacy of mental state attribution with mental realism (Slors). (2) 'Phenomenal Consciousness and Mental Causation', which addresses the problem of the causal efficacy of phenomenal states as well as the possibility of a science of consciousness (van de Laar). (3) 'Colour Perception', which aims to reconcile different theories on the nature of colour and colour perception by developing the idea that the concept of colour is multi-layered, instead of monolithic (van Leeuwen).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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Taught at our Centre for Victorian Studies, this lively course offers you the opportunity to study nineteenth-century literature and art history in the midst of the outstanding Victorian architecture of our Egham campus. Read more
Taught at our Centre for Victorian Studies, this lively course offers you the opportunity to study nineteenth-century literature and art history in the midst of the outstanding Victorian architecture of our Egham campus.

A central element of the course is the study of Victorian London; you will explore a variety of texts from a range of perspectives, from Dickens to the phenomenon of the department store; from the painters of fashionable life to the panic surrounding the Whitechapel murders.

You will also complete three other courses covering specialist areas of this rich period of literature and art ,and towards the end of the course you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in a subject of your choice when completing the dissertation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/mavictorianliterature,artandculture.aspx

Why choose this course?

- All members of staff are actively engaged in major research projects and in the most recent RAE (2008), 90% of the work submitted by the Department was judged to be of international standard with 30% assessed as world-leading (4*). The Department’s major research strengths span the Renaissance, the nineteenth century and the twentieth century and contemporary critical theory.

- This is a lively interdisciplinary course with an excellent track record, taught by dedicated staff internationally renowned for their expertise in the field.

- You will be supported in work in the disciplines of either art history, literature, or cultural history regardless of the subject of your first degree.

- In addition to the academic component of the course, you will be offered the unique opportunity to undertake an optional internship of 4-6 weeks in the summer, in a leading library, museum, publisher or other setting.

- You will be invited to participate in the regular research seminars and graduate reading groups organised under the auspices of the Centre for Victorian Studies as a route to preparing for PhD research.

- Our excellent library resources span the full range of English studies and you will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House as well as the British Library and the many specialist libraries located in central London.

Department research and industry highlights

- The course director, Ruth Livesey acts as an editor of the leading research journal in the field, the Journal of Victorian Culture, and is in addition, a board member and an advisor to Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies and 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century.

- Dr Anne Varty’s most recent monograph, Children and Theatre in Victorian Britain (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007) was shortlisted for the best book award 2007 by the Society for Theatre Research and highly commended in the George Freedley Memorial Prize 2009, US Theater Library.

- Dr Sophie Gilmartin has received fellowships and awards from the Leverhulme Trust, the AHRC and the National Maritime Museum for her current project Letters from the Sea.

Course content and structure

You will take five core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
Victorian London
You will be introduced to the theories and methods of a variety of humanities disciplines through the medium of an in-depth study of the literature, history, geography, and visual culture of nineteenth-century London. It invites students to reflect critically on their own approaches to the material studied through an engagement with both primary materials and a variety of recent secondary material.

The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Contexts, Theories, Readers
You will be equipped with a systematic understanding of the scope and range of the nineteenth-century novel in the context of Victorian publishing, reading and critical practices.

Aestheticism and Decadence in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture
You will be provided with an advanced understanding of the complex field of aestheticism in nineteenth-century literature and culture, with particular attention to concepts of decadence and the relationship between the written word and the visual arts.

The Pre-Raphaelite Revolution
You will examine the most important artistic development ever in the history of British painting; the founding of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848, and the subsequent evolution of a new pictorial language, notable for its hard-edged drawing, brilliant colour, hallucinatory detail, and intensity of feeling.

Methods and Materials of Research
You will develop skills in researching and writing critical essays and dissertations, including use of footnotes, bibliography and using criticism. You will also be provided with an introduction to information technology, essay formatting, and advanced information retrieval, with special emphasis on journals and individual masters specific websites.

Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of original written work, of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, to be submitted in the first week of September. The topic of the dissertation will be agreed between yourself and your supervisor. You may also be required to complete an unassessed research proposal and bibliography during the summer term.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- developed a critical understanding of Victorian culture by focusing on the developing cultural representations and presences of London in the nineteenth century

- an advanced grounding in the theory and practice of cultural studies

- evaluated relevant critical, theoretical and contextual research at the forefront of the field

- completed independent literary research at an advanced level using traditional and electronic resources

- confidence in deploying the appropriate critical and technological skills as required the field.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by essays and the dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs and in prominent positions outside academia. In the field of twentieth-century literature our postgraduates have recently secured positions at Queen Mary, University of London, the Universities of Wales, Nottingham, Lancaster, Newbold College and elsewhere; and have published academic books with Cambridge University Press, Palgrave, Berg and other publishers, as well as popular books on gay studies, music and other topics. The English Department also prepares postgraduates for successful careers in a variety of other areas, such as teaching, writing and journalism, curating, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Master's specialisation Philosophical Ethics (Research). This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy. Read more

Master's specialisation Philosophical Ethics (Research)

This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy.

There is no philosophical discipline that is more deeply rooted in the current and controversial socio-cultural debates than practical philosophy and more specifically than philosophical ethics. The rejuvenation of the philosophical tradition, when it comes to contemporary issues, is never more necessary or more exciting than in this field of philosophy. The hermeneutical perspective – which is so characteristics of philosophical ethics at Radboud University – combines the precise interpretation of influential texts with a focus on culture philosophical approaches, phenomenological analysis and ethical applications. A unique addition in the ethical discussion is the attention for ethical issues, especially in literary sources.

Key authors for this specialisation are, in chronological order, Aristoteles, Thomas van Aquino, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher, Heidegger, Gadamer, Levinas, Ricoeur, Habermas, Taylor and Toulmin.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophical Ethics, you investigate the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). This section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

The department of ethics participates both in the research programme 'The project of a hermeneutic philosophy' as well as in the research programme ‘Ethos, Polis, Religion' (research programme in practical philosophy).

This section of the faculty investigates the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). For its ethical research it cooperates closely with the Centre for Ethics of Radboud University (in Dutch). The section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).

The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).

On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:

- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated

An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicant must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including he ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics



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Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research). Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research)

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium). The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasizes the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, with the potential for a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Clearly, this approach has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of the relation between normality and pathology. This avenue is currently being pursued at the CPPA in an endeavour to explore philosophical psychopathology and its consequences, both as a contribution to Freudian metapsychology and as a critique of it.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills; namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium), respectively. The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasises the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, harbouring the possibility of a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Master's specialisation in History of Philosophy (Research). Read more

Master's specialisation in History of Philosophy (Research)

This course involves exploring the development of philosophy from Antiquity to early modern and modern times, with a particular emphasis on the genesis of modern scientific disciplines such as psychology, physics or chemistry, out of the traditional body of Aristotelian natural philosophy.

There is no other academic discipline in which the past is so important as in philosophy: today's philosophers are still engaging with the pioneers of the field: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Wittgenstein. For this reason, the philosophy curriculum at Radboud University consists of a number of historical courses. The specialisation History of Philosophy covers the entire history of philosophy from the Presocratic philosophers up to today, divided into four periods: ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary.

Key authors for this specialisation are, in alphabetical order, Aristotle, Descartes, Epicurus, Galileo, German idealists, Hegel, Hobbes, Hume, Leibniz, Lucretius, Merleau-Ponty, Plato, Pomponazzi, Sartre, and Thomas Aquinas.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

Why study History of Philosophy at Radboud University?

- We offer a large choice of research courses in the history of philosophy.

- Our programme emphasises the importance of developing and using research skills.

- You will have a personal supervisor who will guide you during the entire programme.

- As a Research Master’s student, you’ll be affiliated with the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science, which has received top rankings in the field in past national evaluations (2006 and 2013).

- This is an excellent preparation for post-graduate life due to the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis: a publishable article and a PhD research proposal.

- Students have a high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad.

- There is an international climate: more than half of the teaching staff and Research Master’s students are from outside the Netherlands.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers investigate varied aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills; the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually, and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme is designed for people aiming to do research in the field. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. The majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that over 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our research in this field

All of the research related to this specialisation is embedded in the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science. This internationally renowned centre is dedicated to the study of the historical interrelation of philosophy and the sciences. Many of the researchers affiliated with the centre investigate the evolution of natural philosophy since Aristotle and the development of the different natural scientific disciplines (such as physics, chemistry or psychology) since the seventeenth century. Although the centre is best known for its expertise in the ancient, medieval and early modern periods, the researchers also cover the entire period from the Aristotelian corpus up to contemporary philosophy.

The focus on natural philosophy is due to the consideration that, at least up to the eighteenth century, factors such as time, space, the motion of stars, and the nature of the human soul were all integral parts of (natural) philosophy. Nijmegen's Center for the History of Philosophy and Science is the only research centre in the world dedicated to the investigation of this historical development.

Thesis subjects in History of Philosophy

The centre is active in organising public lectures, seminars and colloquia, which students are very welcome to attend. Although many research Master’s students choose a topic related to the research activities of the Centre, this is not mandatory. Recent Master’s theses (publishable articles) were about the following themes:

- The use of history in utopian tales

- The Vatican censorship of Paracelsus

- Thought experiments in Locke and Leibniz

- The theme of flight in Plato and Philo of Alexandria

- Bergson’s method of intuition

- Chiffons of Clairvaux on the will

- Perceptual experience in Merleau-Ponty

- Agamben’s reading of Hegel

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with Classical Chinese Confucian texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history of and developments in translation and commentary.

Confucian Classics Studies (SICH7013) will explore some of the main texts of Confucianism, and interpretations of the philosophy and the cultural impact of these texts, including The Book of I Ching, The Book of History and Three Annals of Spring and Autumn.

Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius. Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the Exoteric traditions of the Han version of the Songs, the Sayings of Confucius and his disciples, the Six Secret Strategic Teachings, An Essay on Government by Liu Yi, Yangzi Book on Government and On the Important List of Government.

Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on key Confucian texts from the Compilation including, for example, Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals and The Book of Discussion on Legalism.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables students to engage in a detailed study of the reception of Confucianism in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows students to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7013 Confucian Classical Studies
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Confucian Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Confucian Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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This MSc develops the knowledge and analytical skills needed for a successful career in banking, finance and related areas. It is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, including students with no previous training in economics or accountancy. Read more

Introduction

This MSc develops the knowledge and analytical skills needed for a successful career in banking, finance and related areas. It is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, including students with no previous training in economics or accountancy.
The course is taught by Economics and Accounting & Finance in the Stirling Management School.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Siobhán Lucey

Course objectives

The overall objective of the course is to impart the knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in banking and finance, or a related field. Developments in banking and finance are occurring rapidly, and with growing complexity. So people working in this area must be able to understand and analyse current developments, and also be able to anticipate future developments. The course is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds, and does not require any previous training in economics or accountancy.

The specific objectives of the course are:
- to provide knowledge and understanding of the nature of financial systems, and the particular roles of banks and the central bank
- to develop the capacity to appraise and compile economic and financial reports
- to understand those aspects of economics that are most relevant for a career in banking and finance
- to develop an appreciation of the international dimension of financial systems
- to develop the ability to apply appropriate risk management techniques
- to develop the capacity to understand, assess and comment on company accounts
- to develop the facility to use spreadsheets and econometric techniques to analyse corporate performance, and to identify trends in financial markets
- to develop the ability to appraise investment projects with capital budgeting techniques
- to develop an understanding of the key financial decisions made by corporations, and their use of the equity and bond markets to raise finance
- to provide knowledge and understanding of different types of banking and financial systems, including those in emerging countries and countries in transition
- to provide an understanding of the theory, methodology and techniques of research in banking and finance, and also of the potential limitations of this research

Learning outcomes:
The general learning outcomes in terms of knowledge and understanding that apply to the course as a whole are:
- a systematic understanding of knowledge in banking and finance
- a critical awareness of current problems and new insights in banking and finance
- a practical understanding of the techniques of enquiry and research used in banking and finance, and of how they are used to - create and interpret knowledge
- a conceptual understanding for evaluating current research and scholarship in banking and finance
- a conceptual understanding for evaluating methodologies and (where appropriate in a dissertation) for formulating hypotheses

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Modules are taught by a combination of lectures and small group teaching, in the form of seminars, workshops or computing labs. Assessment in most modules includes coursework, often a mid-semester test, and an end-of-semester examination. Resit examinations are available.
Successful completion of the taught element of the course leads to the award of the Diploma or allows you to continue for the award of the MSc by completing dissertation based on an original research question agreed by yourself and your supervisor. The project should reflect your own understanding and knowledge of selected topics learnt during taught modules.

Career opportunities

There is an excellent employment record among graduates, many of whom now work in financial institutions in the UK and abroad.
MSc Banking & Finance graduates are currently working around the world in countries such as Kenya, Indonesia, China, India, Norway, Ghana, Turkey, Greece and Malta. They are actively contributing to the performance of the following organisations: Alpha Bank, Ministry of Finance, Greece, Citibank, Santander, Ernst & Young, HSBC, Jones, Lang LaSalle, Grant Thornton UK LLP, Bank of China, Vodaphone, CITIC Trust, Emporiki Asset Management.

Graduates entering into employment in the past three years are currently working as:
- Associate, David Griscti & Associates (Malta)
- Banker, Bank of China
- Client Services Officer, JPMC (Vietnam)
- Audit Associate, Grant Thornton UK LLP

Alumni of the MSc Banking & Finance degree who graduated between five and ten years ago have since advanced into some of the following positions:
- Finance Manager, ActivTrades PLC (UK)
- Senior Auditor, Ernst & Young (Malta)
- Relationship Manager, Alpha Bank (Greece)
- Audit Officer, Banking Bureau (Taiwan)
- Business Development Manager, Jones Lang LaSalle (India)
- Debt Management Advisor, HSBC (UK)

Some of our more established alumni are currently leading and shaping the strategy of global financial organisations – here is an example of how a few former Banking & Finance students have advanced in their careers:
- Head of Banking Trends, Egnatia Bank (Greece)
- Principal Finance Officer, Teachers Service Commission (Kenya)
- Management Associate, Citibank (UK)
- Credit Partner, Santander Corporate Banking (UK)
- Head BPA Region, Novartis (Switzerland)
- Anti-Evasion Tax Force Officer, Ministry of Finance (Greece)

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Top Rankings for Marketing. The University of Stirling Management School’s Marketing Division ranks among the top in the country. Read more

Introduction

Top Rankings for Marketing
The University of Stirling Management School’s Marketing Division ranks among the top in the country. We are positioned 2nd in Scotland and among the top 20 in the UK. Complete University Guide 2016.
Marketing is about creating, communicating and delivering exchanges of value between an organisation and its customers that satisfy the customer, the organisation and society at large. The MSc Marketing course offers students from a wide variety of educational and cultural backgrounds the opportunity to understand and combine academic concepts and practice-related marketing issues. This unique combination of academic and practice allows for students to be well-positioned for future success in the field of marketing.
As part of the highly flexible method of learning, the following degree pathways are offered, all of which provide a route to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate qualification. All students will register for the MSc course in Marketing in the first instance and be given the opportunity to change degree pathway at the end of the first semester.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time
- Duration: 12 months
- Start date: Mid-September
- Course Director: Dr Keri Davies

Accreditation

CIM Dual Award
The MSc Marketing course at Stirling was one of the first in the country to be accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM). Upon the successful completion of the MSc Marketing Course, two modules will be waived, meaning students need only complete the remaining two modules (versus completing all four required modules) in order to gain a Professional Diploma in Marketing. This exciting opportunity will provide you with the competitive edge you are looking for to embark on a successful career.

MSc Marketing with Brand Management

The MSc Marketing with Brand Management is a specialist, 12-month full-time taught postgraduate course. The course offers students the opportunity to hone skills necessary to plan, manage and evaluate brand projects. This course provides a stronger focus on the specifics of developing and using brands and branding in the marketing context. All students will register for the MSc Course in Marketing in the first instance and be given the opportunity to change degree pathway at the end of the first semester.
The course is modular, so the credits awarded at the end of each assessed module can be accumulated towards a postgraduate qualification. Students of Marketing with Brand Management study three core topics in the Autumn Semester before deciding on their final course of study. In the Spring Semester MSc Marketing with Brand Management students have to apply this knowledge through a project undertaken for an external company and through an appreciation of Contemporary Issues in Marketing. To specialise in Brand Management students must also complete the modules on Brand Marketing and Digital marketing and Advertising and undertake an individual dissertation or group research project in the field of Branding.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

The taught modules of the MSc course are delivered using a variety of methods, for example, lectures, tutorials, case studies, role playing, computer simulations, fieldwork exercises, site visits, guest speakers and company projects. Much of the assessment is continuous and may include research reports, essays, briefings, management reports, case analyses, debates, literature reviews, marketing communication plans, poster sessions and presentations. Assessed work is often conducted in groups, as developing teamwork and communication skills are seen as important.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.
The reputation of our research at Stirling Management School was recognised in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), where the School was placed in the UK's top 25 institutions for Business and Management, out of 101 business schools. In Scotland, the School was ranked in the top five. 64% of our research outputs were classified as world-leading and internationally excellent in terms of their originality, significance and rigour and we were ranked 14th in the UK in terms of research impact with over 60% of our research impact judged to have outstanding reach and wide-ranging impact on the policies of public, private and governmental organisations.
Members of our academic staff regularly publish in journals such as British Journal of Management, Journal of Marketing Management, European Journal of Marketing, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of Advertising, Industrial Marketing Management, Marketing Intelligence and Planning, and Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services. Our staff consistently serve as conference and track chairs at international marketing conferences and hold editorial posts across a wide-variety of academic journals. Notably, current members of staff regularly consult industry across a number of high-profile issues such as the recent horse meat scandal, the role of marketing towards children and the issues facing the high street retailers across the UK.

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Metaphysics and Epistemology. Metaphysics deals with basic philosophical questions such as. Read more

Metaphysics and Epistemology

Metaphysics deals with basic philosophical questions such as: What is being? What is truth? What is the essence of something? Is reality one or many? In Nijmegen, the Department of Metaphysics and Epistemology focuses mainly on the question of how these metaphysical questions are affected by hermeneutical philosophy as it has been developed in the 19th and 20th century. In particular, this impact is examined in discussion with the work of philosophers such as Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/metaphysics

Information for students

In Metaphysics and Epistemology you focus on the development of the hermeneutic tradition - key figures being Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.

This specialisation covers the classic metaphysical tradition from Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas to Hegel, but more particularly the hermeneutic philosophical tradition of the 19th and 20th centuries. The hermeneutic tradition is studied from a metaphysical and ontological point of view, with particular attention to hermeneutic philosophers of the 19th century (Schleiermacher, Dilthey) as well as to the 20th-century authors who continued this tradition in a phenomenological framework (Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida).

Research in this line mainly focuses on the meaning and status of being, truth and subjectivity in the hermeneutic tradition. Those authors in the continental tradition who were critical of these hermeneutic developments in philosophy are also included.

Current research projects are devoted to Ricoeur and Derrida on Metaphor and Truth and The Hermeneutics of Strangeness. Finally, the section has for some years been running a successful Heidegger seminar.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).

The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).

On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:

- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated

An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicant must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke their noses into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke their noses into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate. Read what our Master's students say about our programme

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/metaphysics



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