• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
"universal" AND "design"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Universal Design)

We have 22 Masters Degrees (Universal Design)

  • "universal" AND "design" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
Order by 
The certificate in Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technologies provides professionals, parents, and other community members instruction and training in assessment, pedagogy, and technology that support students that relay on UDL and AT for learning. Read more
The certificate in Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technologies provides professionals, parents, and other community members instruction and training in assessment, pedagogy, and technology that support students that relay on UDL and AT for learning. The UDL/AT graduate certificate is based on the following assumptions:

-With UDL and/or AT support, students of all abilities can reach their potential
-Practitioners who use UDL and/or AT must understand concepts, how to assess, and implement best practices
-Multidisciplinary teams must collaborate to support student who utilize AT must collaborate
-Knowledge in UDL/AT requires course work, guided observation, and supervised practicum

Highlights

-West Chester University's long standing quality and expertise in the field of special education
-Interdisciplinary program includes Special Education, Secondary and Professional Education, and Communicative Disorders
-Courses may be applied to PA teaching certification and/or to M.Ed. in Special Education (online and/or face-to-face format)
-Cohort model designed to increase student-to-student collaboration and provide social support for online learners
-Field placements arranged in student's community

Read less
Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we. But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we. Read more
Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we.

But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we.

Then join us in this innovative new postgraduate programme from Schumacher College in collaboration with the School of Architecture, Design and Environment at Plymouth University, the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, the Dartington Hall Trust and surrounding communities.

Ecological Design Thinking

Never has there been a more important time for a new approach for engaging with the challenging situations we face from the local to the global levels. In a rapidly changing dynamic situation, solutions rarely remain optimal for very long and continuous active participation is a necessary ingredient for success. Growing resilience in individuals and communities is the way to keep going despite the continuous change around us.

Our programme in Ecological Design Thinking embraces and explores this complex world of interactions with lively engagement and an optimistic approach. It offers powerful, practical and ecology-centred skills and knowledge to apply to a diverse range of practices from design, education and business to the more specific roles of leadership, management and consultancy.

The Ecological Design Thinking programme is trans-disciplinary, insightful and universal in its application; pragmatic and integrative in its operation. It brings together theoretical and practical discourses on ecologically inspired design, with methods of design thinking that are merged with the latest developments in anthropology, psychology and socio- political economics. It aims to create a novel ground for change makers at the forefront of our transition to sustainable societies.

Ecologically inspired design includes the study of ecological worldviews, systems dynamics and applied complexity theory alongside the philosophies and practices of permaculture and biomimetic design.

Design thinking is a well-established participatory technique grounded in the empathic understanding of the feelings, experiences and emotions of others. It engages people in lively conversations, visually stimulated interactions and playful prototyping. It frames problems as opportunities, forms insights and generates creative and collaborative solutions in complex situations.

The Ecological Design thinking programme aims to provide a nourishing environment for participants by incorporating short-courses led by internationally recognised thinkers, place-making projects in collaboration with the Dartington Hall Trust, the home of Schumacher College, and short placements offered by external partner organisations.

This programme is the fourth radical postgraduate programme developed at Schumacher College and contributes to and enhance the College’s ongoing collaborative inquiry into sustainable living – a live and networked inquiry of practice underway around the world by the College’s 20,000 alumni and others.

Who is this course for?

We would be delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to develop your understanding of a practice that is of great importance to all of our futures. We encourage applications from community practitioners and activists as well as planners, educators, architects, politicians and policy makers. You do not necessarily need a first degree in design to apply for this course. You only need to be enthusiastic, resilient and committed.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-design new approaches to the way we live that are socially just and ecologically sustainable. We are looking for those prepared to take risks and stand on the cutting-edge of new practices in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in a diverse mix of cultural experience and age that allows for rich peer- to- peer learning.

You Will Learn

The foundation of an ecological worldview through subjects such as ecology, deep ecology, systems thinking, complexity science and Gaia theory.
Living systems principles through the philosophy and practice of permaculture design, biophilia and biomimicry.
Creative and process-focused problem solving techniques by applying the methods and principles of design thinking
A multi-perspective appreciation of ethical issues and their implications for the future consequences of redesigning existing systems and creating new ones.
To apply ecological design thinking knowledge and skills to the design of social systems as a part of an emerging new economics
Personal and group enquiry practices to raise awareness of the interdependent relationship between the individual, society and nature and between theory and practice

Co-creative participatory practices and theoretical principles for new approaches to the ecological design process that include a range of stakeholders in the full lifecycle of projects, and you will apply these both in the studio, on the Dartington Hall Estate and in short placements on live projects

Special Features

An interdisciplinary programme integrating design methods with those of ecology and the social sciences.
An integrative design programme rooted in deep ecological understanding and practice and informed by cutting edge thinking in new economic approaches and social dynamics.
A balanced distribution of time and resources on skill-based and cognitive-based knowledge and between practice and theory.
Access to some of the world’s leading thinkers and practitioners in design, Gaia theory, complexity, climate science, systems thinking, new economics and social change.
Short courses led by internationally recognised thinkers and researchers.
Short practical placements with a range of partner organisations operating at the leading edge of social innovation.
An immersive, integrative and transformational teaching and learning approach rooted in the principles established by Schumacher College and Dartington Hall, and engaged in a living and working community on and around the Dartington Estate in Devon.

Where you will go?

Ecological Design Thinking can be applied to a wide range of contexts, from the personal to the societal. This programme aims to create a new generation of designers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, educators, researchers, consultants and activists. Graduates will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transformation of society.

Read less
The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. Read more
The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. It provides a scientific and practical foundation and gives an overview of latest developments in Advanced Modelling, Computational Design and Robotic Construction.

Digital technologies have altered the field of architecture and the architectural profession significantly – from design to production. In this context, the course combines the professional quality of an architectural qualification with the theory and practice behind the latest digital developments in the field.

You'll use computer-aided methods for design and study the construction and fabrication process in-depth. As part of the School of the Built Environment and Architecture, you'll work in a transdisciplinary environment where knowledge is shared. Architecture students are also able to work in our Architecture Design Studio, a dedicated studio space with views across the London landscape.

You'll be able to exploit LSBU's extensive industry connections during the course and your dissertation will be closely linked to practice. You'll be encouraged to work together with partners; an engineering company or another academic School within LSBU.

Visit the Digital Architecture and Robotics lab (DARLAB) website, where you can find more information about the facilities and the latest projects taking place

http://www.dar-lab.net/

Modules

Integrative technologies and robotic manufacturing
Advanced digital design techniques
Design project material behaviour
Design project adaptive systems and structures
Technology for building systems
Design research architectural project
Dissertation

Modules will be assessed by a mix of coursework and examinations.

Teaching and learning

The academic team are qualified experts from all over the world, with experience in working with avant-garde technologies to gain the best results in architecture and design. In addition, all are actively involved in research and consultancy, which enables staff to draw on the latest industry developments in both lectures and practical work. You'll enjoy guest lectures from world experts.

The course makes extensive use of DARLAB (Digital Architectural Robotics lab), a research platform in architectural education that advances experimentation and cross-discipline collaboration among professors, students and industry partners to expand the boundaries of architectural practice. The modules' contents are oriented toward integrated learning assignments. The course is delivered through lectures, seminars, projects and internships.

You'll be supported throughout your final project by your tutors and will have access to a range of e-learning materials.

Currently 50% of our full-time student cohort is from overseas. This allows our students to network across America, India, the Middle-East, Australia and Europe.

Placements

Staff use their professional connections to help students find work experience and job opportunities on graduation. All students will be involved in the construction of a large-scale pavilion in central London.

Professional links

The Digital Architecture and Robotics laboratory (DARLAB) partners with industry to provide solutions to their business problems and challenges that they currently face or expect to arise in the near future. We offer businesses a number of avenues for accessing our research expertise. We also undertake research projects for small and big businesses alike at competitive rates and where speed and confidentially are key requirements.

Partners Include:

• Hiteco: designers and manufacturers of high-tech machine components for machining wood, light alloys, plastic and composite materials.
• QDesign: a team of experts in engineering sciences. Their solutions offer a wide range of robotics plants applications and continuous software development.
• SCM Group: company world leader in the production of woodworking machinery and systems.
• CIMsystem: a leading provider of CAD/CAM technology and technological solutions with a worldwide technical and sales partner network.
• HAL: a Grasshopper plugin for industrial robots programming supporting ABB, KUKA and Universal Robots machines. Allows to simulate, program, control and monitor robotic cells.
• KUKA: pioneer in robotics and automation technology, one of the leading manufacturers of robotic systems worldwide.

Employability

The Master's program opens up various possibilities for professional development. You could go on to work in the area of architecture, building construction, engineering, interior or product design. You could also work as a specialist or consultant in the field of computational design and robotic construction.

The course could also lead on to a PhD or employment in engineering research.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Read less
This programme aims to develop a specialist approach to graphic design and visualisation through combining traditional and contemporary approaches in the field. Read more
This programme aims to develop a specialist approach to graphic design and visualisation through combining traditional and contemporary approaches in the field.

It will provide the student with opportunities to develop a personalised visual language through visual thinking, expressed in physical and virtual means combining traditional and contemporary media. Theory and practice are intertwined and students express their ideas through the production of written assignments and the production of artefacts, both aligned with their specialist area of interest.

The programme comprises six modules offering a range of learning experiences and staff access that allows for: project proposal development; situating practice in a wider context; research methodologies; experimentation with materials, processes and techniques; developing entrepreneurial skills; all realised through a final project phase.

The combination of directed study, technical support and independent learning enables the culmination of all this to be tailored towards supporting future career aspirations.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/graphic-design/

Careers and further study

The universal demand for graphical knowledge and increasing emphasis on visualising complexity across diverse fields provides a vast range of career choices for graduates. Depending on individual aspirations, students evolve their practical, historical and theoretical interests for a career in industry or academic research through PhD study.

Why choose Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough?

The School of Arts, English and Drama is renowned as one of the world’s top places for studying the visual, literary and performing arts, offering outstanding opportunities across its wide remit. Each course is designed to inspire talented individuals with the drive and determination to succeed.

We provide many exciting ways to enhance skills, including research-led teaching by recognised international scholars, access to multi-million pound facilities, contact with prominent industry links, and superb entrepreneurial support.

A unique range of post-graduate taught programmes and research opportunities encompass art, design, history, theory, performance, postmedieval literature, linguistics studies.

We offer a unique range of postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities which encompasses art, design, theory, performance by practice, post-medieval literature, creative writing, linguistics and theatre

- Facilities
Our students have full access to our state-of-the-art facilities, which offer a tantalising number of creative possibilities. They provide industry standard outputs, and you will receive an unparalleled level of professional training in using them.

- Career Prospects
Over 92% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Our students develop excellent transferable skills because of the range of topics studied on our courses and the diversity of teaching and learning methods we use.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/graphic-design/

Read less
What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?. This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture. Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a . Read more

What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?

This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a research-by-designand design-by-research perspective. Students are educated and trained in a multicultural and international context. The programme combines an academic approach with creative- experimental approach. It is characterised by a fully-integrated design methodology, providing students with solid skills in the contemporary discipline of architectural design and research.

The Master of Architecture programme is organised at both of the faculty's campuses in Brussels and Ghent, though each campus offers a different orientation:

  • Campus Brussels - Architecture: Urban Projects, Urban Cultures
  • Campus Ghent - Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis. The programme consists out of a minimum of four semesters.

International

The Faculty of Architecture takes its international dimension as the basis for its own quality assessment. It positions itself squarely within the international field of qualitative academic education. The faculty's international activities are extensive and diversified: student mobility and staff exchange on a European and intercontinental level, internationally oriented programmes for incoming students, international workshops and competitions, international research projects, international internships, development cooperation, etc.

The faculty continues to build on its tradition of academic integration of teaching and research to maintain and enhance its standard of quality and international standing.

The faculty works hard to consolidate and enrich its network of cooperative associations with professionals and universities all over the world and strives to leverage this international network for students' benefit. Its international dimension is a strong catalyst for creativity and an added value to students' future professional career.

Objectives 

"The intended academic quality, is the core of the program (architecture, urban planning), i.e. academically based 'professionalism'.

The broadening of the profile focuses on basic disciplines (architecture and urban planning), however without compromising the appropriate focus on the professional profile of the architect (in multiple forms).

In the profile of master, one should obtain extreme concentration and specificity (however, no specialisation).

On the one hand, the master focuses on the content and area-specific level of the bachelor phase, and on the other hand on the acquirement of access to the professional or doctoral field (advanced masters, PhD,...).

The core competences of the master are:

  • the intellectual development and broadening of the competences acquired in the bachelor;
  • a research attitude (for solutions)
  • the specific, disciplinary knowledge (architecture, urban planning)
  • the interdisciplinary skills (also as to recognize the limits of the own scientific discipline).

The master program should guarantee the acquirement of scientific depth. The offered frontier disciplines focus on the current state of research and development within the competence field. The technical qualification to be acquired, focuses on the high quality problem solving of complex tasks.

Curriculum framework campus Ghent: Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

At our campus in Ghent, the International Master of Science in Architecture is concerned with the current theory and practice of architecture and sustainability.

The Brundtland report (United Nations, 1987) defines sustainable development as 'development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. The United Nations in 2005 referred to the 'interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars' of sustainable development as economic development, social development and environmental protection.

Translating these three pillars for sustainable architecture, they would entail: providing access to high quality and healthy living and working environments for all, finding ways to create socially sustainable environments at different scales and a wise use of natural resources. Technical considerations, together with more conceptual or strategic issues, are dealt with in this two-year program about architecture and sustainability.

Central in the program of the International Master of Science in Architecture is a critical reflection about architecture and its social, cultural or environmental role for society.

Based on a highly interdisciplinary learning process of integrated research and 'research by design', students are expected to determine a theoretical stance on current issues with particular emphasis on how aspects of sustainability, universal design, urban ecology and energy-efficient technologies may contribute to the development of more sustainable human settlements.

Apart from the theoretical courses, the program includes 3 design studios (during one semester) and 1 final master dissertation studio (during one year). Each semester, there is a focus on a specific attitude, related to the main theme of the programme. All studios are organised through a pool of studio groups (Academic Design Offices and Design Studios) where the teaching staff provides a series of specific themes, methods and intervention areas for the students to develop an architectural project:

Themes sem 1

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail

Themes sem 2 (specific focus on the city of Ghent)

  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration
  • urban emergent processes

Themes sem 3

  • architectural materiality and detail

Themes sem 4

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration

Career perspectives

Graduates are trained to lead multidisciplinary teams of engineers, interior architects, landscape architects and artists. In addition to working as independent (self-employed) architects, our graduates also work as professionals in government agencies and international design firms. Some graduates go on to roles as researchers serving local or international governance bodies, NGO's or other institutes.



Read less
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Read more
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Recent technological advances provide continuing opportunities for creative application. Its unique properties of transparency and interaction with light gives MA Glass students the opportunity to explore new possibilities and build specialist knowledge as a material for the future.

Course Overview

The MA Glass programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork.

In this century, glass as a material offers a unique place in design and architecture and there are very few institutions that offer the opportunity to explore this material, with particular reference to its applications in architecture. Swansea glass department has a long established reputation for glass and strong industrial links help underpin the educational experience for students. The history of the department enables a broad spectrum of approaches that draw on the historical, cultural and technological uses of this material. Glass in its many forms; mosaic, glaze, enamel and window façade covers a broad association of surfaces, which offers for the maker a rich and varied pallet. This is a hands-on course!

The main strands of the programme are: design and philosophy, material innovation and glass design. These themes are considered in the context of glass for the environment, to fulfill the need to develop innovative, sustainable and possibly universal solutions for a variety of architectural, public and private spaces.

The programme prides itself in newly equipped workshops that provide excellent specialist facilities including sandblasters, acid etching bay, cold working machinery, screen printing facilities for glass and an extensive range of glass and ceramic kilns for casting and decorative processing. Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school such as wood, metal, ceramics, 3D printing and water jet and laser cutting.

The teaching team consists of highly experienced glass artists and designers who are either engaged in professional practice or are research active, supported by industrially trained technical staff. This ensures that the course delivers a qualification and experience that is highly relevant to the changing needs of the industry and wider architectural glass community.

The department works closely with the Architectural Glass Centre, which often supports and advises the students on live commissions and commercial work. We also work with the CIRIC research centre within the faculty, with 2 members of this research centre specialising in glass. This provides research opportunities and access to high technology resources giving the students opportunities to link with creative industries infrastructure in the region as a potential starting point for future employment.

With an eighty year history the glass department benefits from strong support from Alumni and the local glass community as well as networks and connections from world-renowned glass artists.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers within the Architectural Glass Industry, Glass Studios, teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Many have continued to practice as designers and artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

Possible career pathways have included:
-Establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker
-Setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others
-Employed in specialist glass studios
-Engaging in freelance work on architectural and interiors projects
-Designing for industry or working in the glass industry
-Working on private and public commissions
-Working on art projects and community projects
-Other opportunities include arts administration, curating, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial
-Continuation of studies to postgraduate level on our MA programme
-Further academic research leading to MPhil, or PhD is available

Read less
Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Read more
Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry.

Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends.

This course is aimed at recent graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise.

Why choose this course?

The design of our programmes is informed by state-of-the-art research being undertaken in the department.
- You will be given the opportunity to undertake an intensive course on compiler construction from one of Europe’s leading authorities in the field.
- Professional experts contribute to the range of subjects on offer.
- You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement
- You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community.
- The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

The MSc in Software Engineering is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computer Science has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computer Science with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to update their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

You can also do a Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc)
-Formal Software Engineering (optional)
-Network Principles (optional)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Paradigms of Programming (optional)
-Compiler Construction (optional)
-Machine Learning (optional)
-Operating Systems Development (optional)
-Secure Programming (optional).
-Low Level Tools and Techniques (optional)
-Systems Administration (optional)
-IT Systems Management and Governance (optional)
-Multiservice Networks (optional)

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Teaching and learning

Lectures provide a theoretical basis, while the practical sessions are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. Coursework and projects form the basis for continuous assessment. These methods have been developed to provide the varied experience that our students require, including the opportunity to discuss your work directly with the lecturers.

Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. There are also visiting lecturers from research organisations and industry.

Assessment methods include examination and coursework, reflecting the development of academic content from the more practical aspects to the more conceptual.

Specialist facilities

Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables you to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances you understanding of theoretical concepts. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Our server and security laboratories provide a safe environment for you to experiment with range of complex systems and software.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of this course are employed across a whole range of careers from development roles in small software houses, to the activities of IT departments in large, multinational corporations, to more specialist roles for providers of IT and telecommunications services. These include technical roles, including software design and development, specialist product support, and infrastructure and security management roles.

Read less
Mechanical engineering plays a role in nearly everything made by humans. From design to fabrication to final applications, mechanical engineers touch everything. Read more
Mechanical engineering plays a role in nearly everything made by humans. From design to fabrication to final applications, mechanical engineers touch everything.

Our program balances theory, design and laboratory experience in the areas of thermal fluids, mechanics, dynamic systems, design and materials. We aim to help students develop into leaders in the field. Students are eligible to specialize in any one of the following areas of emphasis:
- mechanics and design (with emphasis on solid mechanics/stress analysis, vibrations and simulation/control)
- materials (with emphasis on nanotechnology, microstructure/property relationships, thin films and materials processing)
- thermofluids (with emphasis on heat transfer, microfluidics and environmental/biological transport phenomena)

The master of science (MS) program provides a balance of advanced theory and practical knowledge necessary for either practice within the profession or advancement to a doctoral program.

The master of engineering (MEng) program prepares students for careers in professional practice through a flexible course selection and requires no thesis or project.

The PhD program prepares students for basic and applied research in mechanical engineering through multidisciplinary research areas reflective of the interests of ME faculty.

Recent doctoral graduate placements include: Caterpillar Inc., Universal Instruments, Corning Inc., General Electric Research, Apple, Electrolux.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

Read less
Develop your career as a highly efficient and effective project leader with our 100% online Masters in Project Management. Internationally recognised and Association for Project Manager (APM) accredited, our distance learning course is relevant to project management positions in any industry. Read more

Course Overview

Develop your career as a highly efficient and effective project leader with our 100% online Masters in Project Management. Internationally recognised and Association for Project Manager (APM) accredited, our distance learning course is relevant to project management positions in any industry.

Our MSc Project Management takes a universal approach to project management and is specifically designed to develop a deep knowledge and understanding of the role of PM, the broad range of management processes and practices involved in managing projects and the skills to apply your expertise across in a range of sectors.

This course addresses project management from a management perspective. Uniquely our online MSc Project Management recognises that management is an individual and personal activity; every manager manages in their own way. Consequently we encourage and enable you to develop your own individual, unique approach to managing projects, based on good management and specialist project management skills.

As well as developing your own unique management style, you will learn how to lead and manage projects and project teams effectively, as well as mastering a range of specialist project management principles, systems and techniques.

Project Managers are highly sought after in many industries and organisations, both nationally and internationally. We’ll provide you with the supported learning you need to develop the knowledge, transferable skills and confidence to access these exciting career opportunities.

Modules

Management Theory

This module is designed to focus on building your knowledge of management as well as your own unique approach to management. You will learn about the key principles and practices of management, including organisational structures and leadership. You will also explore the principles and practice of marketing and organisational success.

Management Practice

Organisational performance is largely dependent on the performance of people, which in turn is determined by the quality and effectiveness of their management, therefore it is crucial that managers are able to effectively manage people. You will learn about people management, HR policy and practices, and how managing performance, motivation empowerment and the development of commitment.

Project Management Systems

You will develop a thorough understanding of the process of project management, together with the diverse range of resources and activities that the project manager must plan, co-ordinate and control to achieve a successful project. The Module establishes the framework for the management of projects through a comprehensive understanding of the role and functions of project management throughout the project life-cycle from inception through all its stages to completion and use.

Project Management Context

This module will give you a sound understanding of the context for project management and how projects relate to organisations and the larger organisational environment. You will explore contemporary project management by looking at examples from a wide range of organisations and industries.

Project Management Techniques

You will develop a systematic understanding of a number of key tools and techniques used in the management of projects, enabling you to critically evaluate project needs and to select and apply appropriate techniques for your project. With the demand for continuous improvement, production systems such as lean and agile will be explored as well as other performance improvement tools and techniques, including risk and risk management, to identify and manage risk throughout the project life cycle.

Cost and Financial Management

You will gain an in-depth understanding of the financial, commercial and cost aspects of projects and project management. You’ll explore the business and commercial environment in which projects exist, and critically evaluate the factors that influence the strategic and financial rationale for projects. You will learn how the business case for projects is developed, established and evaluated, together with the processes involved, supported by an understanding of financial and accounting protocols and practices.

Project Planning and Control

You’ll develop a systematic understanding of the principles, practices and systems used to plan and control projects. You’ll develop a critical insight into integrated planning and programming software and information systems and the potential of Project Management Information Systems [PMIS] to provide effective management of all aspects of a project, especially resources, time and cost.

Research Design and Methods

This module is designed to equip you with an in-depth understanding of the theories and methods of research and research design. You’ll develop a theoretical and practical foundation from which to develop your Masters Level Major Project/Dissertation.

Major Project/Dissertation

This Module provides the opportunity for you to undertake a significant piece of independent research using appropriate, recognised methods. You will identify and pursue a topic relevant to project management that is of interest and in which you wish to develop a significant level of expertise. You’ll develop and refine the theme for the project together with your course tutor, who will support you during the research and writing process. It’s your opportunity to put your newly acquired skills and knowledge into practice and to showcase them to current and prospective employers.

Assessment

Assessment will be in the form of written assignments for each of the modules together with your major project/dissertation.

Read less
If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Read more
If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Our course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering.

The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself.

Why choose this course?

This programme is rooted in real-world and industry-relevant experiences. Lecturing staff have extensive experience in research and university teaching, as well as a wide range of previous industrial and commercial backgrounds. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement.

You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Computing is accredited as partially meeting the requirements for CITP and have been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computing has a modular course unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computing with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a Master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Computing Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Object-Oriented Programming (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Structured Data (compulsory for MSc)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Computer Systems and Networks (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc)
-Cyber security and the web (Compulsory for MSc)

As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here.

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Careers and professional development

Our MSc students come from all over the world and graduate to follow careers in technical, business-related and creative roles, for example as developers, engineers, IT managers or web developers. Whatever their interest, our graduates tell us that the relevance of our courses and the skills they've learnt enable them to achieve their goals and build their careers.

Read less
Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again. Read more
Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again.

Who is it for?

The International Politics and Human Rights programme is for students who want to explore international politics and human rights more widely and then drill down to specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to create your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t. These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Do human rights offer universal protections, or do they provide ideological cover for neo-imperialist powers?
-Can human rights provide protection to individuals in a way that supersedes the nation-state, or do they serve the interests of powerful states?
-Should human rights be concerned with the minimalist needs of security and subsistence, or should they aspire to grander visions of global justice?

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We unpick the ideas that structure the way we understand the world, so we can identify how those understandings shape global events. We then focus on how the way we view things may, in itself, be ethically problematic.

International Politics and Human Rights is an evolving subject so you explore unique specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

Placements

You have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams.Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The first core module Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics l is taught in the first term and Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics, is taught in the second term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

You take two 30-credit core modules, one in each term, totalling 60 credits. You will then take elective modules totalling 60 credits, which include 15 and 30 credit options, and complete your 60 credit dissertation in the third term as a student on the full-time programme (with submission in September of that year). You must also attend the dissertation workshops that are offered by the department, as it is a compulsory and important part of the MA programme.

Core modules
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics IPM117 (30 credits)
-International Politics dissertation IPM111 (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding Security in the 21st Century (15 credits)
-International Organisations in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-Development and International Politics (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Global Capitalism: Past, Present and Future (30 credits)
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
-Global Governance (15 credits)
-International Politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-making (30 credits)
-US Foreign Policy (15 credits)
-Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
-Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
-Global Political Economy: Contemporary Approaches (30 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Department of Sociology:
-Developments in Communication Policy (30 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication (30 credits)
-Criminal Minds (15 credits)
-Crime News (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice (30 credits)
-Human Rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International Criminal Law: Crimes & Institutions (30 credits)
-Law and War (30 credits)
-Minorities and Indigenous People in International Law (30 credits)
-International Law & The Use of Force (30 credits)

*MA International Politics and Human Rights students have access to additional LLM options with The City Law School.

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2016 70% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-UNESCO
-Amnesty International
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-US Embassy
-International Crisis Groupp
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-European External Action Service

From human rights organisations to NGOs and government agencies, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

Read less
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

Read less
In the wake of the 'global' economic crisis, this innovative new masters programme offers students the chance to explore alternative future possibilities for international development in theory and practice. Read more

Overview

In the wake of the 'global' economic crisis, this innovative new masters programme offers students the chance to explore alternative future possibilities for international development in theory and practice. Combining cutting-edge thinking on development, economic geography, political economy, labour studies and social change, this exciting programme explores the multiple connections (and disconnections) between countries of the Global North and Global South.

At the heart of this alternative development agenda, students are encouraged to challenge the common use of Western historical experiences and categories as the universal templates against which the rest of the world is measured and found lacking. Instead, students will reconsider the diversity of populations, economies, urban centres, and governance practices in the Global South on their own terms - and in so doing, step outside the conventional lenses of mainstream development theory and the international policies they inform.

Global Development Futures is delivered through intensive small group teaching and close engagement with leading academics in the School of Geography's world-leading Economy, Development and Social Justice research theme.

This MRes is a pre-doctoral training programme taught in conjunction with the London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership (LISS DTP) and is an approved pathway for ESRC 1+3 PhD studentship funding and ideal for those seeking to work in a research-related role. The new MRes programmes from 2017 will be the same structure as the MA/MSc equivalent, but will include two compulsory modules: ‘Introduction to Social Science Research 1: Epistemology, Research design, and Qualitative methods’ and ‘Introduction to Social Science Research 2: Quantitative Methods and Data’. Please check the website at time of application for the latest module structure.

Why study at QMUL Geography?

- Research excellence: Joining the School of Geography places you alongside academics that are actively developing and challenging contemporary thinking in this field. Almost 80 per cent of the School’s research outputs (books and articles) are rated as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*) placing it 5th in the UK for this measure (REF2014)
- Employability: Students completing this programme will be well-placed to enter governmental, non-governmental organisations, civil society, and academic research roles.
- Field-based research: Students receive tailored research supervision and training suitable to their individual research interests. They are also given the opportunity to participate in an optional seven-day field trip to Mumbai, India, to further develop field research skills.
-Twilight teaching: Some optional modules will include evening classes (5-7pm) and intensive teaching periods will condense required attendance. Small group teaching will provide students the unique opportunity to work closely with leading academics in this field of study.
-Capital location: We're a School that cares about the world beyond the university, working with a range of community groups, artists, cultural and heritage institutions and policy makers, particularly here in east London. Our passion is to demonstrate through research and teaching the intellectual and political significance of geographical research and understanding. We encourage our students to become part of this vibrant intellectual culture.

Read less
Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these. Read more

Overview

Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these.

Women and children, both in the UK and around the world, face inequality on a daily basis. These inequalities come from lack of access to healthcare, education, employment opportunities, technological advances, legal support, and social, cultural and political opposition (Marmot, 2010). The World Health Organisation has recognised this and explicitly targeted women and children in three of its Millennium Development Goals; to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health, alongside wider goals to improve universal access to education and to eradicate poverty that also disproportionately affect women (WHO, 2015).

This course focuses on the health of women and children. During their ‘core’ modules, students will be encourage to explore individual health issues, as well as exploring the global legislation that impacts on women’s and children’s health, and understanding how they can implement and influence policy change. The option modules will allow the student to tailor their learning to their individual practice; whether caring for the critically unwell women, doing a physical assessment of a new-born infant (NIPE), understanding the global impact of responsive parenting or as an effective leader or manager of a service.

References

Marmot, M., 2010. Fair society, healthy lives. The Marmot Review. London: University College London.

World Health Organisation, 2015. Millennium Development Goals http://www.who.int/topics/millennium_development_goals/about/en/

Careers

This course will utilise a global public health perspective and is aimed at all practitioners who work with women and children, so will appeal to students both in the UK and internationally. It will offer an inter-professional learning opportunity to a range of professionals including Midwives, Children’s Nurses, Health Visitors, Hospital and Community nurses, Family Support Workers, but is also suitable for those who work with women and children in the voluntary sector or education. The course will be taught by a range of experienced lecturers from a variety of clinical backgrounds. Please be aware that this course is aimed at practitioners working in some capacity with women’s and children’s health and does not lead to a registerable qualification with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK.

Modules & assessment

Core modules -

- Global Challenges to Women and Children's Health:
This module is designed for an inter-professional audience, and has a global public health focus, considering issues affecting women and children around the world. It is designed to provide insight and exploration of the major public health issues affecting the health of women and children. Each of the main areas explored will include an overview of the illness/problem as well as consideration of the social, cultural and political context and influence upon it and evaluation of how this leads to inequality and may reduce life chances.

- Research Proposal - Women's and Children's Health:
This module provides a critical overview of research philosophy and the major methodological and design approaches to research in order to equip you to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of published research, whether in your specialist area or in the health, welfare and social care field.

- Political Power and Policy Drivers affecting Women and Children's Health:
As part of everyday inter-professional practice, practitioners working with women and children are affected by policy drivers in a number of ways, however, differences may be apparent in how these are translated to healthcare and how they are embedded into practice. Implementing new policy requires practitioners to use their, power, influence and interpersonal skills. The module will enable the student to critically evaluate their own knowledge and skills which underpin their current practice.

- Postgraduate Major Project:
The Major Project, which is central to the Masters award, enables students to demonstrate their ability to synthesise learning from previous modules and use this learning as the basis for planning, conducting and writing up a research or work-based project. This project provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate: the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism; depth of knowledge which may involve working at current limits of theoretical and/or research understanding; critical understanding of research methods and its relationship to knowledge; awareness of and ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice; the ability to draw meaningful and justifiable conclusions from information which may be complex or contradictory; the capability to expand or redefine existing knowledge to develop new approaches to changing situations and contribute to the development to best practice; the ability to communicate these processes in a clear and sophisticated fashion; the capability to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. In the course of your studies with us you may generate intellectual property which is defined as an idea, invention or creation which can be protected by law from being copied by someone else. By registering with us on your course you automatically assign any such intellectual property to us unless we agree with the organisation covering the cost of your course that this is retained by them. In consideration of you making this assignment you will be entitled to benefit from a share in any income generated in accordance with our Revenue Sharing Policy in operation at that time. Details of our Intellectual Property Policy and Guidelines can be found on My.Anglia under Research, Development and Commercial Services or by contacting this Office for a hard copy.

Optional modules -

- Applied Leadership & Management:
This module provides an innovative exploration of leadership and management in healthcare, and examines their impact on organisations including wider considerations in the external environment. This module will enable students to assess and analyse the roles that leaders and managers play in a range of organizational contexts; and to apply the principles and techniques of leadership and management in a range of contexts.

- Care of the Critically Unwell Woman:
This module will enable you to develop in-depth knowledge and skills when caring for the critically unwell woman, during the child bearing continuum. Work-based learning is incorporated into the module in order to recognise and value your professional expertise. While practicing midwifery in an area where women with high dependency needs will be cared for, you will also spend clinical time developing your skills in the high dependency or intensive care unit.

- Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE):
This module will focus on the specialist knowledge and the clinical skills that are required to enable you to competently undertake a thorough Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE) in clinical practice. You will utilise in-depth knowledge and understanding that you have gained to enable you to recognise the deviations from the normal to initiate appropriate care and referral. Critical reflection and completion of the practice documents will allow you to further identify your learning needs and develop your scope of professional practice.

- Global Impact of Responsive Parenting:
This module is designed to examine the positive health impact responsive parenting has on the mother and infant dyad, the wider family, society and the Globe. Historical child rearing styles will be reviewed and debated to highlight their negative effects on child development and on society. The module will explore the current understanding of neurophysiology of infant brain development and how parenting interactions can affect this process. The module will conclude with positive practical steps for health professionals to encourage responsive parenting with the parents they work with every day.

Assessment -

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your learning in a variety of ways during this course. Assessment will vary between modules, but includes patchwork text, reflective essays, action plans, reports, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), essays, ‘journal style’ articles (to prepare you to publish your work) and a major project on a subject of your choice.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

Distance learning - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/distance-learning

Read less
This new programme addresses how states and societies respond to global challenges of social, demographic and economic change, and of poverty, migration and globalisation. Read more

This new programme addresses how states and societies respond to global challenges of social, demographic and economic change, and of poverty, migration and globalisation. It is underpinned by the LSE approach to social and public policy that is explicitly international, interdisciplinary and applied. 

Meeting human needs and increasing well-being are universal policy goals but are addressed differently around the world, with different roles for governments, NGOs, families, and markets. Our ISPP programme incorporates this international and comparative perspective to policy design and evaluation. Looking at low-, middle-, and high-income countries, you will gain the skills to identify key social challenges and to analyse the social and public policies used to address them.

You can choose to take the MSc International Social and Public Policy without a specialism, with unrestricted option courses, or you can take particular optional courses to provide you with a specialism. You can decide to specialise either when you apply or early in the first term. Specialism options include:

  • MSc International Social and Public Policy (Development)
  • MSc International Social and Public Policy (Non-Governmental Organisations)
  • MSc International Social and Public Policy (Migration)

These programmes equip you for a career in social and public policy in government, NGOs, international organisations, private sector providers, or in academia.

Graduate Destinations

Students who have graduated from programmes similar to this have gone on to work for:

  • different UN agencies including UNDP, UNICEF and UNHCR
  • a variety of small and large NGOs including Oxfam, Médecins Sans Frontières, International Red Cross and One World
  • action international or intergovernmental organisations such as the World Economic Forum, European Commission and World Bank
  • consulting companies
  • government ministries.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X