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The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30. 1. 27 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French. Read more

M.A. Program in French

The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30.

M.A. without Thesis

1. 27 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French.
2. French 548 (3), a Graduating Essay written in French. The length of the graduating essay should be approximately 40 pages, including the bibliography. It may be based on a paper submitted for a graduate course, but thoroughly revised and expanded.
3. A one-hour oral examination, normally conducted in the target language, based on the graduating essay and the student's overall graduate program.
4. Regular attendance in the French Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. with Thesis

1. 24 credits of course work in FREN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in literature or linguistics given in French.
2. French 599 (6) a Master’s Thesis written in either French or English. The length of the M.A. thesis should be approximately 80 pages including the bibliography.
3. A one-and-a-half hour oral thesis defence normally conducted in the target language.
4. Regular attendance in the French Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. candidates in French who are interested primarily in Linguistics may write a thesis on an aspect of French Linguistics and will be permitted, after consultation with the Graduate Advisor, to supplement the Linguistics courses offered in the Department itself by taking courses elsewhere at UBC (in the Department of Linguistics or the Faculty of Education, for example), or at other universities under the Western Deans' Agreement.
Only a concentration in linguistics is possible, however, and students specializing in this area will be required to take some courses in French Literature to complete their Master’s program.

Time for Completion of Program

The maximum time permitted for the completion of a Master’s Program is five years. In certain circumstances, it is possible to complete the M.A. in a twelve-month period. The maximum period of financial support for full-time study in the M.A. program is two years. The program is available to students on either a full-time or a part-time basis. There is no formal residence requirement.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: French
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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The graduate program in Hispanic Studies offers opportunities for advanced study in the literatures of Spain and Spanish America, leading to the Ph.D and to the M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The graduate program in Hispanic Studies offers opportunities for advanced study in the literatures of Spain and Spanish America, leading to the Ph.D and to the M.A. (with or without thesis).

The UBC Library has extensive holdings in all areas of Hispanic studies, with particularly strong holdings in periodicals and Latin-American studies, in both Spanish and Portuguese. The Department has a reading room for graduate students, containing basic texts, scholarly collections, and reference works.

The program makes available a list of courses to be offered as early as possible, usually in February of the preceding academic year.

The M.A. program provides for two options. The minimum credit requirement for either option is 30.

M.A. without Thesis
1. 27 credits of course work in SPAN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in Spanish.
2. Spanish 548 (3), a Graduating Essay written in Spanish. The length of the graduating essay should be approximately 40 pages, including the bibliography. It may be based on a paper submitted for a graduate course, but thoroughly revised and expanded.
3. A one-hour oral examination, normally conducted in the target language, based on the graduating essay and the student’s overall graduate program.
4. Regular attendance in the Hispanic Studies Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

M.A. with Thesis
1. 24 credits of course work in SPAN numbered above 500, up to 6 of which may be drawn from 400-level undergraduate courses in Spanish.
2. Spanish 549 (6), a Master’s Thesis written in Spanish, English or French. The length of the M.A. thesis should be approximately 80 pages including the bibliography.
3. A one-and-a-half hour oral thesis defence normally conducted in the target language.
4. Regular attendance in the Hispanic Studies Research Seminar is mandatory and active participation and debate are expected.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Hispanic Studies
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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The Special Education area concerns the habilitation and education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, physical disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, and students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Read more

Program Overview

The Special Education area concerns the habilitation and education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, physical disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, and students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program also includes a focus on gifted and talented students. The master's programs focus on both research and practice. The M.A. is a research degree, appropriate preparation for doctoral studies, and incorporates a research thesis. The M. Ed. provides advanced professional preparation in areas of Special Education. Topics addressed in the master's programs include cognitive, language, and social development; learning and instructional design; and cultural and individual differences in relation to exceptional students.

UBC does not offer an undergraduate degree in special education.

The undergraduate courses in special education are open to students enrolled in the regular B.Ed. program or in one of the following post-B.Ed. special education programs: (1) Master of Education (M.Ed), (2) Master of Arts (M.A.), and (3) Diploma in Special Education. Most undergraduate courses are also available to Unclassified students.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Special Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

Special Education

The Special Education program at UBC concerns the education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, developmental disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, gifts and talents, and those who are deaf or hard of hearing. Faculty are committed to promoting practices that facilitate inclusion, empowerment, and self-determination of individuals with disabilities and other special needs in home, school, and community settings.

Mission

Our mission is to collaboratively engage a range of diversity, expertise, and research endeavors to promote or enhance the learning and well-being of individuals with exceptionalities in home, school, and community settings.

Top 5 Reasons to Apply

1. Only university in the country to offer graduate coursework in special education across all areas of exceptionality.

2. Opportunities for practical experiences with a variety of district and community partnerships:
- American Printing House for the Blind
- Autism Community Training
- BC Children’s Hospital/Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children
- Blind Beginnings
- Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults
- Pacific Autism Family Centre
- Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired
- Provincial Services for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing
- School Districts in the Lower Mainland and rural areas of BC
- Special Education Technology-BC
- Well-Being Program for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf-blind
- Western Institute for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

3. We offer opportunities for research and funding through faculty partnerships.

4. We offer opportunities to change practice for the better through Special Education faculty initiatives.

5. Outstanding support through a world-class faculty and staff to guide you on your academic journey!

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The Special Education area concerns the habilitation and education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, physical disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, and students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Read more

Program Overview

The Special Education area concerns the habilitation and education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, physical disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, and students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program also includes a focus on gifted and talented students. The master's programs focus on both research and practice. The M.A. is a research degree, appropriate preparation for doctoral studies, and incorporates a research thesis. The M. Ed. provides advanced professional preparation in areas of Special Education. Topics addressed in the master's programs include cognitive, language, and social development; learning and instructional design; and cultural and individual differences in relation to exceptional students.

UBC does not offer an undergraduate degree in special education.

The undergraduate courses in special education are open to students enrolled in the regular B.Ed. program or in one of the following post-B.Ed. special education programs: (1) Master of Education (M.Ed), (2) Master of Arts (M.A.), and (3) Diploma in Special Education. Most undergraduate courses are also available to Unclassified students.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Special Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

Special Education

The Special Education program at UBC concerns the education of students with exceptionalities, such as students with visual impairments, developmental disabilities, emotional or behavioural disorders, learning disabilities, gifts and talents, and those who are deaf or hard of hearing. Faculty are committed to promoting practices that facilitate inclusion, empowerment, and self-determination of individuals with disabilities and other special needs in home, school, and community settings.

Mission

Our mission is to collaboratively engage a range of diversity, expertise, and research endeavors to promote or enhance the learning and well-being of individuals with exceptionalities in home, school, and community settings.

Top 5 Reasons to Apply

1. Only university in the country to offer graduate coursework in special education across all areas of exceptionality.

2. Opportunities for practical experiences with a variety of district and community partnerships:
- American Printing House for the Blind
- Autism Community Training
- BC Children’s Hospital/Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children
- Blind Beginnings
- Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults
- Pacific Autism Family Centre
- Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired
- Provincial Services for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing
- School Districts in the Lower Mainland and rural areas of BC
- Special Education Technology-BC
- Well-Being Program for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf-blind
- Western Institute for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

3. We offer opportunities for research and funding through faculty partnerships.

4. We offer opportunities to change practice for the better through Special Education faculty initiatives.

5. Outstanding support through a world-class faculty and staff to guide you on your academic journey!

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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. Read more
The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

- With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines as chemistry, physics, and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.

- The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.

- The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

Plan of study

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for the completion of the program. This includes five required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

The program has an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the core. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program enhances a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

- Electives

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.

- Thesis/Project

Students may choose to complete a thesis or a project as the conclusion to their program. Students who pursue the thesis option take two graduate electives, complete nine semester credit hours of research, and produce a thesis paper. The project option includes four graduate electives and a 3 credit hour project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in materials science and engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, or a related field from an accredited college or university,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Written English (TWE). A minimum TOEFL score of 575 (paper-based) or 88-89 (Internet-based) is required. A 4.0 is required on the TWE. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. In addition, upon arrival at RIT, international students are required to take the English language exams, administered by the English Language Center. Individuals scoring below an established minimum will be referred to the center for further evaluation and assistance. These students are required to follow the center’s recommendations regarding language course work. It is important to note that this additional course work may require additional time and financial resources to complete the degree requirements. Successful completion of this course work is a requirement for the program.

Candidates not meeting the general requirements may petition for admission to the program. In such cases, it may be suggested that the necessary background courses be taken at the undergraduate level. However, undergraduate credits that make up deficiencies may not be counted toward the master’s degree.

Any student who wishes to study at the graduate level must first be admitted to the program. However, an applicant may be permitted to take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student if they meet the general requirements mentioned above.

Additional information

- Part-time study

The program offers courses in the late afternoon and evenings to encourage practicing scientists and engineers to pursue the degree program without interrupting their employment. (This may not apply to courses offered off campus at selected industrial sites.) Students employed full time are normally limited to a maximum of two courses, or 6 semester credit hours, each semester. A student who wishes to register for more than 6 semester credit hours must obtain the permission of his or her adviser.

- Maximum limit on time

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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The Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies offers master’s degrees comprised of elements from other RRU programs, enabling us to provide an education shaped by your unique aspirations. Read more
The Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies offers master’s degrees comprised of elements from other RRU programs, enabling us to provide an education shaped by your unique aspirations. Students benefit greatly from an individualized education that offers programs pursuant to their unique interests and schedules, while employers are attracted to candidates capable of meeting the specific demands of the professional world. That’s how everyone wins. That’s why Royal Roads graduate students are always in demand.

Our System

This graduate degree program is offered in 2 formats: online or a blended delivery that combines online coursework with one on-campus residency. And since we’re committed to providing individualized education, all of our students work closely with our program head to develop individual academic plans tailored to their specific needs. Drawing from two or more areas of study, this unique system enables Royal Roads graduate students to pursue an interdisciplinary course of study that combines personal passion and professional interest.

*This is not an independent studies or cohort model program. Courses are not self-paced and their start and end dates can vary.

Our Students

Royal Roads University draws more than just master’s students seeking an active role in the design of their educational experience. It also attracts driven, focused individuals who want more from their careers and who share a common desire to apply their education meaningfully throughout their organizations and communities. Most of our graduate students are already working professionals. That’s why we’re committed to providing a program that integrates professional experience with a practical education.

Commitment

Requiring 2 to 2.5 years of study, this degree program provides flexible scheduling options that combine online MA degree learning with one optional short term on-campus residency.

*Each online course can require up to 20 hours of study per week. Working professionals are encouraged to take this into consideration when developing a program of study in the MA in Interdisciplinary Studies program.

Delivery Model

This unique program allows each student to work directly with faculty to create an individualized schedule of study that draws together courses of personal and professional interest from other masters and graduate certificate programs at Royal Roads University. Students select no more than 50 per cent of their courses from any one program to assure interdisciplinary breadth of study. Individuals may do one on-campus residency in another masters program, or they may complete their degree completely online.

Online Courses
Online courses are not independent studies courses; they have deadlines for assignments and, more importantly, require posting deadlines to foster the fruitful exchange of ideas that make virtual communities thrive. In building your schedule of study, working professionals should consider taking no more than one online course at a time as each course can require up to 20 hours of work per week.

On-Campus Residencies
Students who elect to do a residency work on two or three courses simultaneously in a blended model of delivery. Residencies begin with a pre-residency online, followed by two to three weeks of intensive on-campus coursework and subsequently, several weeks of post-residency work. While the MA in Interdisciplinary Studies program recommends a residency in another masters program during the course of studies, residency options demand unimpeded time on-campus.

The MA in Interdisciplinary Studies program is driven by a student’s interdisciplinary research and career interests. A prospective student’s application needs to provide a rationale for the proposed combination of courses and academic fields of study.

Whereas most graduate interdisciplinary degrees draw from traditional, single disciplines (e.g., sociology, psychology, ecology, etc.), Royal Roads’ MA in Interdisciplinary Studies program offers a unique take on interdisciplinarity. This program draws not from single disciplines but from multidisciplinary academic program areas (e.g., humanitarian studies, environmental education and communication, leadership, etc.); in addition, the program focuses on applied research instrumental to working professionals’ career goals.

Individualized Schedule of Study

There are three paths through the MA in Interdisciplinary Studies degree:
Coursework - A student completes 36 credit hours of on campus or online courses
-6 credits in two required courses in interdisciplinary theory and methods
-30 credits accumulated by completing courses in MA or graduate certificate programs

Major Project - A student completes 36 credit hours of on campus or online courses
-6 credits in two required courses in interdisciplinary theory and methods
-18 credits accumulated by completing courses in MA or graduate certificate programs
-12 credits dedicated to a major project usually aligned with a student’s professional field

Thesis - A student completes 36 credit hours of on campus or online courses
-6 credits of required courses in interdisciplinary theory and methods
-18 credits accumulated by completing courses in MA or graduate certificate programs
-12 credits dedicated to a master’s thesis

Where needed, a student may take advantage of a directed study course to further familiarity with scholarship in a particular area of study.

Prospective students must contact the College of Interdisciplinary Studies to discuss development of their unique program schedules.

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- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance.

- graduate students from other disciplinary backgrounds wishing to further their understanding of global economic policy issues and debates through systematic academic study.

- economics graduate students wishing to specialize in global economic policy and governance.

Prior knowledge of economics is not a requirement.

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is the most recent addition to the Department of Economics’ portfolio of masters programme. The programme builds on the department’s unique combination of expertise – in policy analysis, regional economics and critical theoretical perspectives – to provide students with an in-depth understanding of core policy debates in the area of global economic governance. Specifically, the programme focuses on:

- global economic governance: It offers in-depth specialisation in this area of wider global governance.

- economic policy: It provides high-level training in the understanding and critical evaluation of economic policy issues, design and solutions, their foundation in the evolution of economic theory and methods, as well as critical discussion of the application of policy design to real-world problems, such as issues of implementation and monitoring.

- regional specificities within the global economy: It provides a differentiated analysis of problems of global economic governance from a range of regional perspectives, in advanced as well as developing country regions.

The programme is taught through two dedicated core courses (Global Economic Governance I: Global Economic Policy Debates and Analysis and Global Economic Governance II: Institutional and Governance Debates on Economic Development and Growth). In addition, students can choose from a wide range of optional courses and will write a 10.000 word dissertation.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/

Structure

The MSc in Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new masters programme designed for professionals and postgraduate students, with or without a prior background in economics, who wish to gain a focused and in-depth understanding of contemporary economic governance and policy debates.

The MSc is taught through two dedicated core courses. The first, Global Economic Governance 1 deals with issues of Global Economic Policy. This covers international trade and investment relationships between countries, trade and industrial policies, global capital markets, the international monetary and financial system, multinationals, global production networks and labour in the global economy. The second core paper, Global Economic Governance 2 deals with issues of institutions and governance. This includes issues of governance reforms for developing countries, the theory of institutional economics informing these debates, the policy and theoretical debates around property rights reforms, anti-corruption, industrial policy, rents and rent seeking, democratization and related governance issues. In addition, students will choose one, two or three optional courses, depending on the weight of the courses (see the list below), from across a range of SOAS departments plus a 10,000 word dissertation.

Students can, but do not have to, choose a course structure that, in addition to the programme’s focus on policy analysis and training, provides research method training.

- Optional Courses

MSc GEGP students can choose either one (1 unit) course or two (0.5 unit) courses or three (0.33 unit courses) to make up a total of 1 unit from the following list of courses by department. The availability of open option courses in other FL&SS departments from the below list is conditional on the approval of individual course convenors as well as the usual restrictions with regard to pre-requisites, timetable compatibilities and availability of individual courses in any one academic year. Students should note that some courses are capped in terms of student numbers, and that students from home departments will be given priority in case the relevant caps are reached. All law courses are open only for students with an LLB or who take the Law pre-sessional course offered by the School of Law at SOAS.

- Economics Department

MSc GEGP students will be eligible to take any of the post-graduate courses offered in the Economics Department, pending permission by the course convenors on the basis of the students’ prior academic qualifications in economics. Economics options with CATS 22.5 (0.5 unit) modules will be made available subject to approval.

Programme Specification

MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy programme specification (pdf; 392kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/file97019.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.
Access to other London Universities will be provided, where relevant to specific courses.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Courses are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and an essay or project-based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge

- Students will learn about core policy debates on global economic governance.
- Students will study the current institutional and organisational architecture of global economic policy-making and governance.
- Students will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of differing economic theories and methods, and of how these relate to economic policy debates and designs in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will study regionally specific economic policy challenges in the context of the evolution of the global economy, and will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of different regional perspectives on global economic governance.
- Students will be trained in the understanding and use of economic policy tools and design, as well as issues of policy implementation and monitoring.
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will acquire sound knowledge of statistical research techniques and economic research methods.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to develop intellectual initiative and to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on current research in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will acquire the ability to discriminate between competing economic theories and methods underlying the design of global economic policies, and to critically appraise the policy implications of these differing approaches.
- Students will learn to apply theoretical, empirical and technical knowledge about core features of current global economic governance to practical policy analysis through coursework and the dissertation.
- Students will have an opportunity to translate a complex understanding of issues in global economic governance into reform proposals, and to learn how to present these in an articulate, informed and coherent manner.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Students will learn how to gather, organise and employ data, information and evidence for economic policy analysis and design in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will gain the ability to critically assess economic policy tools and to design economic policy proposals in a case study context.
- Students will learn how to identify core problems in economic policy design, implementation and monitoring
- Students will acquire the ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely to present core analyses and policy messages or suggestions in clear language (written and verbal).
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will learn how to apply one or more research methods systematically to a chosen topic or project.

Transferable skills:

- Students will be able to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on information received.
- Students will learn how to present ideas coherently and concisely, in writing and orally, extracting key elements from complex information.
- Students will be given the opportunity to engage with independent research on well defined tasks or topics.
- Students will learn how to identify policy problems and design solutions, selecting and applying competing theories and methods appropriately.
- Students will gain an understanding of how to gather, organise and deploy data and evidence to form a balanced judgement and to develop and support critical argument and policy recommendations. S
- Students will have an opportunity to present written and oral materials clearly and effectively and to engage constructively with feedback.

Employment

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new programme, starting in 2016/17.

Students enrolling in this programme will return to or pursue careers in a wide range of positions in public, private and non-governmental project management and policy advice, for which a thorough understanding of on-going issues in global economic governance is essential.

This includes, for example, government officials from developing and advanced countries whose remit requires a wider understanding of global economic governance issues; employees of international organisations whose remits are not primarily concerned with economic policy-making, but increasingly require a thorough understanding of global economic governance issue to co-ordinate their approaches with those of other national and international organizations; private sector managers and consultants requiring a systematic understanding of current economic crises and imbalances in the world economy as well as regulatory approaches to this; employees of NGOs working in areas affected by current global economic crises and imbalances and policy responses to these; graduate students wishing to build a career in any of the above, and economics graduates with a special interest in global economic policy debates and design.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. Read more
The MASt in Physics is a taught masters level course in which candidates coming from outside Cambridge work alongside students taking the final year of the integrated Undergraduate + Masters course in Physics. It is designed to act as a top-up course for students who already hold a 3-year undergraduate degree in physics (or an equivalent subject with similar physics content) and who are likely to wish to subsequently pursue research in physics, either within the department or elsewhere.

The course aims to bring students close to the boundaries of current research, and is thus somewhat linked to the expertise from within the specific research groups in the Department of Physics. Candidates make a series of choices as the year proceeds which allow them to select a bias towards particular broad areas of physics such as condensed matter physics, particle physics, astrophysics, biophysics, or semiconductor physics. The emphasis can range over the spectrum from strongly experimental to highly theoretical physics, and a range of specialist options may be chosen.

All students also undertake a substantial research project, which is expected to take up one third of their time for the year. Details of the current Part III physics course can be found at http://www.phy.cam.ac.uk/students/teaching/current-courses/III_overview . Please note that the courses available to students do change from year to year (especially the Minor Topic courses taken in the Lent Term) and so this year's course listing should only be used as a guide to what courses might be available in future.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphasphy

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- reinforced their broad understanding of physics across the core areas studied in the Cambridge bachelors physics programme.
- developed their knowledge in specialised areas of physics bringing them close to the boundaries of current research.
- developed an understanding of the techniques and literature associated with the project area they have focussed on.
- demonstrated the application of knowledge in a research context and become familiar with the methods of research and enquiry used the further that knowledge.
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of knowledge.
- demonstrated some level of self-direction and originality in tackling and solving research problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and execution of research.

Format

The course begins with taught courses offered in seven core areas: these "Major Topics" are lectured in the Michaelmas Term and cover substantial areas of physics. Students may choose to attend three or more of these for examination in the Lent term. In the Lent term, students take three or more shorter more specialised "Minor Topic" courses (from about twelve) for examination in the Easter Term. Substitutes for Major and Minor Topic courses are available from a small subset of courses taught by or shared with other departments. Throughout the year students also work on a research project that contributes to roughly a third of their mark and at the end of the year sit a three hour unseen paper on General Physics.

Depending on the lecturer for each course, students may be expected to submit work (i.e. problem sets) in advance of the small group sessions for scrutiny and/or present their work to those attending the sessions.

Assessment

The research project will be assessed on the basis of scrutiny of the student's project laboratory notebook and project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with the project supervisor and another member of staff.

It is not usual for submitted work to be returned with detailed annotations. Rather, feedback will be predominantly oral, but lecturers are expected to submit a short written supervision report at the end of each term for each of their students.

Feedback on the research project will be be primarily oral, during the student/supervisor sessions, though a short written supervision report at the end of the Lent term will be provided by each supervisor

Candidates will normally take:

- A two hour unseen examination on three or more of the Major Topic courses. These will be taken at the start of the Lent Term.
- A one and a half hour unseen examination on three or more of the Minor Topic courses. These will normally be taken at the start of the Easter term.
- One three hour unseen General Physics Paper, taken towards the end of the Easter term.
- A number of additional unseen examination papers, if the candidate has chosen to take any of the interdisciplinary courses, Part III Mathematics courses, or other shared courses in lieu of any of the Major or Minor Topic papers.

Candidates who have chosen to substitute a Minor Topic paper with an additional External Project, will be assessed on that work via scrutiny of the student's project report (typically 20-30 pages) and a short (approx 30 minute) oral examination with two members of staff.

Candidates who have taken the Entrepreneurship course, in lieu of a Minor Topic, will be assessed on the basis of the course assignments set by the course co-ordinator.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Education and Training previously Post-Compulsory Education) is the professional qualification for those who wish to teach in the post-compulsory sector, which includes further education colleges and adult education. Read more
This Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Education and Training previously Post-Compulsory Education) is the professional qualification for those who wish to teach in the post-compulsory sector, which includes further education colleges and adult education. This course leads to QTLS, now equivalent to QTS.

The full-time course is designed for students who wish to enter the profession and can only be studied at our Harcourt Hill Campus.

The part-time course is designed for those already employed as teachers and trainers in the education and training sector - this might be in further education, higher education, the health service, adult and community education, the prison service, the armed forces or private training providers. The part-time course can only be studied at one of our partner colleges:
- City of Oxford College
- Reading College
- Swindon College

Leads towards the status of Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-education-post-compulsory/

Why choose this course?

- The major part of the course is based on skills development, with exploration of theories covering learning and teaching, assessment and human interaction.

- The emphasis of the course is on the development of skills related to teaching groups and individuals. This includes planning, delivering, and assessing groups, and participation in course teams in terms of working with colleagues and peers. A critical analysis of the wider context is expected.

- You will develop your skills as a reflective practitioner in all your teaching / training roles and be supported through a process of individual learning planning.

- Currently there are teacher shortages in construction, maths and numeracy, information technology, and health and social care - but students from other disciplines are welcome.

- The courses and students at further education (FE) colleges are diverse and the key requirements for teachers are enthusiasm, and the ability and motivation to teach and assess across a wide range of courses.

- Graduate students on both part-time and full-time courses may elect to study at master's level for part of the course, this gives an exemption of three modules from an MA in Education. This will lead to the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Education.

Professional accreditation

QTLS is equivalent to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)

This course in detail

You will develop your skills as a reflective practitioner in all your teaching / training roles and be supported through a process of individual learning planning.

The courses and students at further education (FE) colleges are diverse and the key requirements for teachers are enthusiasm, and the ability and motivation to teach and assess across a wide range of courses.

You will cover the following aspects of teaching and learning in the post-compulsory sector:
- assessing learners' needs
- planning and preparing teaching and learning programmes for groups and individuals
- developing and using a range of teaching and learning techniques
- managing the learning process
- providing learners with support
- assessing the outcomes of learning and learners' achievements
- reflecting on and evaluating your own performance, and planning for future practice
- working within a professional value base and conforming to agreed codes of professional practice.

Students on the full-time course will undertake teaching practice in a post-16 institution. All students will be observed teaching in their setting or institution.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, course content may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

All tutors demonstrate good practice in delivery and assessment tasks and are role models for participants. Sessions will include lectures, group work, role plays, case studies, syndicate groups and one-to-one tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is by a variety of methods, including presentations, assignments, practical projects and group work.

Several different people will observe you in your professional context. You will be required to present individually to your peer group, work collaboratively with your peers and participate in group presentations. Other methods used are:
- completing a portfolio of evidence
-a case study
- analysis of audio and video recordings
- reports and essays.

Careers

We have strong links with local partner colleges offering excellent employment prospects for students.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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The hospitality and tourism management program prepares students to step into numerous mid-level hospitality and tourism management and government policy positions. Read more

Program overview

The hospitality and tourism management program prepares students to step into numerous mid-level hospitality and tourism management and government policy positions. The program is focused on hospitality business planning, branding, economic management, and development of quality processes to deliver exceptional leadership within many service and corporate settings and at post-secondary academic institutions.

Plan of study

The program introduces major concepts associated with all aspects of hospitality, tourism, and business management, whether they are applied specifically to the hospitality-tourism industry or the wider service industry. Among the general concepts investigated are hospitality business development and marketing quality. Electives allow in depth study in specialized areas of hospitality manangement, such as resorts and attractions, travel and tourism, conventions and events, technology, and human resource development.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in hospitality and tourism management and elective courses chosen by the student to meet career interests and objectives. Students complete a graduate project or a comprehensive exam. A thesis option is available with approval. Course offerings generally are scheduled for evenings or via online learning to facilitate part-time students.

Core courses

Core courses explore essential hospitality and tourism business issues such as teamwork, strategic organizational change, financial and service performance metrics, development and marketing of resorts and attractions, and branding. Each course not only introduces the service philosophy but also examines the real differences in hospitality-service management outcomes necessitated by the adoption of a new service paradigm.

Electives

Elective courses provide students with an opportunity to individualize their graduate program in line with their career and professional interests. With the approval of the department chair, students are allowed to take a selection of elective courses from outside the program. Courses may be taken from the service leadership and innovation program, the human resource development program, and Saunders College of Business. Students are cautioned to observe course prerequisites in their selections.

Of the six credit hours of electives, students are relatively free to select courses they feel best meet their needs. All elective courses must be graduate-level. If previous course work exists, students may request a transfer of credits. A limited number of credit hours may be taken as independent study or practicum courses.

Project/Capstone/Thesis options

Students must successfully complete a graduate project or comprehensive exam as a culminating experience allowing for demonstration of competencies in theory and applications for the discipline. Students work with the program adviser and/or program faculty to determine a topic for the graduate project and must arrange a faculty mentor for the project. The comprehensive exam option is open to all students. Students may request the thesis option, but must be approved and have secured a faculty mentor.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected capstone/exam/thesis option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules: https://www.rit.edu/programs/hospitality-and-tourism-management-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Submit a current resume.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 80 (Internet-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. All international students will take the Michigan Test of English Proficiency upon arrival. A prescribed program in English and a reduced program course load may be required.

After a review by the program chair, applicants whose prior undergraduate work has been in areas other than hospitality or tourism may be required to complete additional courses. Students may choose elective courses with the approval of the program.

Additional information

Part time study:
The program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis. The length of time required to earn the degree varies according to the student’s undergraduate preparation and the number of graduate courses taken per semester.

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The MBA program at Alliant School of Management provides advanced business, management and analytical skills, and extensive practical experience in applying these skills, particularly in multicultural contexts. Read more
The MBA program at Alliant School of Management provides advanced business, management and analytical skills, and extensive practical experience in applying these skills, particularly in multicultural contexts. The MBA degree is designed to offer flexibility to students who have completed prior business courses. The program follows a cohort model, with all students taking the core curriculum courses as a cohort at the beginning of the program, followed by concentration tracks during their remaining program of study.

The MBA program is offered on-ground in San Diego, San Francisco, as well as in a fully online format.

ASM Business Administration Undergraduate students can accelerate their MBA using our Direct Pathway program.

Core Courses

All students take eight core courses and four concentration courses. Our core courses develop your managerial knowledge, analytical capacities, and cultural exposure:

International Marketing Management
Organizational Behavior and Global Leadership
Strategic Management
Statistical Analysis and Modeling for Business
Financial Management
Technology for Managerial Decision Making
Operations Management and Logistics
Management In the New Age (Capstone)

For Non Business Majors

Students who do not have an undergraduate business major are required to take 2 additional courses before starting their MBA curriculum of 12 courses. The total number of courses for non business majors is 14. The 2 additional courses are noted below.

Foundation Courses (2 courses - 6 units)

Financial and Managerial Accounting
International Economics and Trade

Concentration Options (4 courses - 12 units)

Customize your online MBA with one of over twenty concentration options. Our concentration programs increase your marketability with focused content in traditional, emerging, and interdisciplinary areas of study.

Concentration options include:

NGO Management
Entrepreneurship
Health Care Management
Human Resource Management
Information and Technology Management
Pharmaceutical Industry Management

The Alliant School of Management MBA Advantage

- A distinguished history in international management education
- World class faculty
- 45,000+ successful alumni in over 100 countries
- Industry Connections and Networking Opportunities
- Professional development opportunities: internships, community service learning, personal branding workshops
- Financial aid to qualified students
- Scholarship opportunities
- Flexible course formats for working professionals
-WASC-accredited University
SAP ERP software training

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The MBA program at Alliant School of Management provides advanced business, management and analytical skills, and extensive practical experience in applying these skills, particularly in multicultural contexts. Read more
The MBA program at Alliant School of Management provides advanced business, management and analytical skills, and extensive practical experience in applying these skills, particularly in multicultural contexts. The MBA degree is designed to offer flexibility to students who have completed prior business courses. The program follows a cohort model, with all students taking the core curriculum courses as a cohort at the beginning of the program, followed by concentration tracks during their remaining program of study.

The MBA program is offered on-ground in San Diego, San Francisco, as well as in a fully online format.

ASM Business Administration Undergraduate students can accelerate their MBA using our Direct Pathway program.

Core Courses

All students take eight core courses and four concentration courses. Our core courses develop your managerial knowledge, analytical capacities, and cultural exposure:

International Marketing Management
Organizational Behavior and Global Leadership
Strategic Management
Statistical Analysis and Modeling for Business
Financial Management
Technology for Managerial Decision Making
Operations Management and Logistics
Management In the New Age (Capstone)

For Non Business Majors

Students who do not have an undergraduate business major are required to take 2 additional courses before starting their MBA curriculum of 12 courses. The total number of courses for non business majors is 14. The 2 additional courses are noted below.

Foundation Courses (2 courses - 6 units)

Financial and Managerial Accounting
International Economics and Trade

Concentration Options (4 courses - 12 units)

Customize your online MBA with one of over twenty concentration options. Our concentration programs increase your marketability with focused content in traditional, emerging, and interdisciplinary areas of study.

Concentration options include:

NGO Management
Entrepreneurship
Health Care Management
Human Resource Management
Information and Technology Management
Pharmaceutical Industry Management

The Alliant School of Management MBA Advantage

- A distinguished history in international management education
- World class faculty
- 45,000+ successful alumni in over 100 countries
- Industry Connections and Networking Opportunities
- Professional development opportunities: internships, community service learning, personal branding workshops
- Financial aid to qualified students
- Scholarship opportunities
- Flexible course formats for working professionals
-WASC-accredited University
SAP ERP software training

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