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Our Graduate Diploma in Economics and its new pathway, the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics, fill a critical gap in the market for postgraduate training in economics. Read more
Our Graduate Diploma in Economics and its new pathway, the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics, fill a critical gap in the market for postgraduate training in economics. If you have an undergraduate degree in another subject area - however distant from economics - but wish to switch to economics, the Graduate Diploma in Economics and the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics are specifically designed to allow you to do just that, without spending 3 or 4 years studying for a second undergraduate degree. They provide rigorous and intensive training, spread over 1 or 2 years, after which you will be able to compete on equal terms with students graduating with undergraduate degrees in economics.

Many of our students require a level of economic knowledge in their jobs that is usually acquired at an undergraduate level; many of them work for City institutions, the Bank of England, government departments and economic regulators. This Graduate Diploma provides them with a sound knowledge of the core analytical tools of economics, coupled with some training in econometrics - the statistical side of the discipline.

The Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics is designed for students who wish to go on to Master's-level study, with the ultimate ambition of becoming a professional economist, whether in the private or public sector, or an academic economist (which requires further study to PhD level). Many students go on to MSc and MPhil/PhD programmes at Birkbeck and other top UK universities.

Uniquely, this programme provides training specifically designed for such students. All modules on the programme are designed carefully around targeted, accelerated learning, in contrast to conversion courses in other universities that simply offer modules that are already part of other undergraduate programmes.

This programme is also available for distance-learners, as a purely online course. For both face-to-face and online students, all lectures are made available on video, and all course materials are also available online.

You will not need any prior training in the subject. The programme will give you a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas and methods of modern economics, and you will learn to apply economic reasoning to practical problems. Crucially, you will also develop the necessary mathematical and statistical tool-kit for studying economics. A background in a mathematical discipline is an advantage, but not essential; pre-sessional courses beginning in September provide an accelerated revision of core mathematics skills, starting at roughly GCSE level, but progressing very rapidly to more advanced techniques.

All students will be admitted to the Graduate Diploma in Economics in the first instance, but you will be offered the opportunity to transfer to the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics. This includes an additional module that introduces you to more technical material and bridges the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate study in economics.

The 1-year programme is taught exclusively in the evenings and is, thus, open to students in full-time employment, but the programme proceeds at an intense pace and the workload is very heavy, so this option is usually only pursued by students with a strongly quantitative background. The more common route is to take the programme over 2 years, with the first year focused primarily on quantitative training. All students have the option of being considered for the intensive 1-year route, though, based on their performance in the mid-term tests in week 6 of the first term of the programme.

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The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. Read more
The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. It will provide an excellent foundation for undertaking postgraduate research at doctoral level, but will also benefit the professional development of musicians intending to pursue careers in teaching, arts administration, broadcasting, and other domains.

Students on the Taught MA programme join a vibrant international postgraduate community and study with scholars, composers, and performers who have achieved international recognition in their fields. The Music Department has been ranked in the top three music departments nationally in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and the Complete University Guide 2016.

The MA Music programme will normally facilitate study of the following areas of specialism:
-Musicology
-Ethnomusicology
-Composition (acoustic and electro-acoustic)
-Performance

In addition, other options typically available have included:
-British Music
-Indian Music
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-World Music Analysis
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis
-Choral conducting (with special focus on Anglican church music)

Programme structure

Students will choose modules from sections A, B, C, and D below:

A. Major project, weighted at 60 credits (a dissertation, a public recital, or a portfolio of compositions/orchestrations and arrangements – depending on your chosen area of specialism)

B. A 30-credit module linked to your chosen area of specialism

C. Two compulsory core 30-credit modules embedding research training and engaging with major intellectual issues attendant on all subject areas

D. An additional 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B, subject to approval of the Board of Studies in Music.

Example: MA with specialism in Musicology

A. A 12,000-word dissertation on a musicological topic weighted at 60 credits

B. 30-credit module ‘Contemporary Musicology’

C. Compulsory core 30-credit modules, ‘Core Research Seminars’ and ‘Research Methods and Resources’

D. 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Core Research Seminars

And The following specialism-specific modules will be offered every year:
-Contemporary Musicology
-Ethnomusicology in Practice and Theory
-Compositional Techniques
-Music Performance

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:
-British Music
-Music Analysis
-Practice and Theory of Choral Conducting
-Advanced Organ Studies
-Electronic Music
-Orchestration and Arranging
-Indian Music
-World Music Analysis
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of seminars, practical sessions and one to one supervision. Seminars provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues, and to present their own original work, informed by the knowledge that they have gained through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical sessions in areas such as studio or field recording techniques help to prepare students for their own independent work.

All students must undertake an independent project (dissertation,composition portfolio, or performance), which is developed with the help of one-to-one expert supervision. Finally, optional modules can be drawn from the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes of Music or of other departments –these free-choice modules may involve other forms of staff-student contact, depending on the subject area. The Department actively promotes interdisciplinary approaches to the study of music and students are encouraged to engage with other disciplines in the humanities and sciences.

The contact hours experienced by each individual student will vary considerably, given a high degree of flexibility in the programme. Students will typically attend between 2 and 4 hours of seminars per week in term time, as well as additional practical sessions as appropriate. Individual supervision of dissertations, performance projects and composition portfolios amounts to an average of 6 hours spread over over the second and third terms.

Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to attend research seminars, both student-led and those involving staff or guest academic speakers (typically 1-2 hrs each week). They must also undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and assessments, to broaden their subject knowledge and to prepare their dissertations or portfolios. Students are encouraged, as an integral part of their studies, to take advantage of other opportunities including participating in performance opportunities (including staff-led ensembles) and attending research and composition seminars, some of which are organised in conjunction with university research institutes.

There is a busy programme of musical performance, both within and outside the music department, which complements students’ academic programme by providing opportunities both to listen to and to perform a wide variety of music. The many musical ensembles to which students can contribute includes both independent societies (including orchestras, choirs, opera and musical theatre as well as a Javanese gamelan) and department-run ensembles such as the New Music Ensemble and Korean percussion group.

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Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas. Read more
[[About the program
The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science is designed to provide students with an integrated, comprehensive, and complete education in the discipline of psychology. Students undertake advanced training in a range of methodological (research methods, psychometrics, statistics) and applied areas, and develop competence in conducting research. All applied material is based on the scientist-practitioner model, and evidence-based approaches to psychological intervention are stressed.

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science provides students with advanced education and training in the core psychology graduate attributes, including but not limited to the following:
- Advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in some of the core research areas of the discipline
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation and interpretation of some of the most widely used cognitive and personality assessments
- Knowledge of the theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidenced based approached to psychological intervention
- Explaining how the science and practice of psychology is influenced by social, historical, professional and cultural contexts

The Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science prepares graduates for a career in psychology. On completion of this course, graduates may apply for provisional registration as a psychologist providing they enrol in further postgraduate studies or undertake two years’ supervised training.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

- Professional recognition
This program has been granted accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).

Further study
- Master of Psychology (Clinical)
- Master of Psychology (Forensic)

Professional outcomes

Under supervision, graduates can pursue careers in the professional practice of psychology including clinical, forensic or organisational psychology, counselling, health and community psychology, research, and other specialist areas.

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

Thesis overview

The most challenging aspect of 4th year studies is the research thesis. The thesis component is designed for students to demonstrate their ability to conceive, conduct, and report on, high level, original research. The research thesis is carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff, and is assessed against a number of criteria. Briefly, these criteria relate to the student’s command of the area under investigation, from the conceptualisation of the problem, through the development of an appropriate strategy to investigate the problem, to clear interpretation and reporting on the outcomes of the research. The research thesis consists of two subjects.
- PSYC71-400 Diploma Thesis 1: Research Seminar and Ethics
- PSYC72-420 Diploma Thesis 2

The thesis subjects are to be completed in two consecutive semesters, regardless of full- or part-time enrolment status.

- Fourth Year Orientation Session
Students are expected to attend the fourth-year orientation session held during Bond Orientation Week, which is the week before classes start. During this session students are given full details of the requirements for their fourth year of studies in psychology.

Important notes for students

Upon completion of 4th year training (e.g., the Graduate Diploma or the Honours program) many students apply for provisional registration as a psychologist. Provisional registration permits the professional practice of psychology and can be achieved either through a Board approved Supervised Practice Program (two years of supervised practice), or through Postgraduate studies in Psychology. Students who intend to apply for provisional registration following their 4th Year studies should be aware of the registration requirements as administered by the Psychology Board of Australia under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009. Information on Psychology Board of Australia registration requirements can be obtained from http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au

Students who obtain their undergraduate qualifications outside of an ‘approved qualification’ in Australia must have them assessed as being equivalent to an accredited three year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, prior to being granted provisional registration. Undergraduate transcripts of students wishing to undertake their 4th year studies at Bond from non-Australian institutions are carefully checked by the 4th Year Coordinator to determine equivalence with an APAC accredited 3-year sequence of study in Australia. Transcripts are checked to ensure that subject matter undertaken in the undergraduate sequence matches core areas within the discipline (e.g., perception, memory, learning, motivation and emotion, psychobiology, personality, emotion, developmental psychology, social psychology, and abnormal psychology), and includes statistics and research methods. When assessing suitability for entry into 4th year programs, Bond University makes every effort to ensure that core topics covered in undergraduate degrees obtained outside of Australia are equivalent to those required in an accredited three-year sequence of study in psychology in Australia, however we do not guarantee the equivalence of these degrees.

Students who obtained their three year undergraduate qualifications outside of Australia should be aware that successful completion of the 4th year program might not be sufficient for registration as a psychologist and/or the membership requirements of the Australian Psychological Society (APS). Equivalency assessments may be required by the Psychology Board of Australia. For more information on equivalency assessments please visit http://www.psychology.org.au

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/graduate-diploma-psychological-science

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In this program you will. Learn anatomy through dissection. Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching. Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging. Read more

In this program you will:

  • Learn anatomy through dissection
  • Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching
  • Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging.
  • Contribute to world leading anatomical and/or biomedical research

Our programme aims to improve your theoretical and practical knowledge of human anatomy through an intensive on-campus dissection course, as well as the development and learning of theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This programme has two main strands. One is the in-depth study of the anatomy of the human body. Anatomical knowledge will be learned to a level to teach undergraduate and postgraduate students and professions allied to medicine. This strand will involve the dissection of a body in groups of three to five students over two semesters. This part of the course is largely self-directed, with regular “surgeries” when teaching staff are present to answer questions and help students with the dissections.

The other is anatomy pedagogy, covering the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Next to theoretical lectures and workshops the first semester will focus on observing the teaching of anatomy to medical undergraduate students. The second semester will focus on being involved in preparing and carrying out teaching sessions to both small and large groups of students. The learned theoretical material, the observations and practical experiences will be compiled in an end-of year teaching portfolio. The experience that you will gain can be used towards an application as associate fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Complementing these strands will be a lecture-based embryology course providing you with an understanding of normal human development and how normal development can go wrong, manifested in commonly observed congenital abnormalities. You will also study neuroanatomy, the health and safety of embalming procedures and handling bodies, the legal and historical aspects of anatomy in Scotland and the UK, an introduction to the ethics of using bodies in medical education and explore clinical techniques used to image the body.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of six courses plus a summer dissertation project. The courses "Teaching Anatomy" and "Basic Human Anatomy 1 & 2" make up the majority of the degree with 40 credits each. The other courses are 10 credit courses that are spread out over two semesters as follows (10 credits equal 100 hours of work):

Semester one:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 1: Gross anatomy of the Limbs and Thorax (20 credits)
  • Anatomy Law and Ethics: Divided into 3 parts: Health & Safety of anatomy and body handling, the legislation that governs the activities of anatomy departments both in Scotland and throughout the UK, and the ethics of using human material for the teaching of anatomy (10 credits)

Semester two:

  • Basic Human Anatomy 2: Gross anatomy of the Abdomen, Pelvis, Head & Neck (20 credits)
  • Neuroanatomy: Gross Anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory and motor pathways, cranial nerves, spinal cord, spinal nerves and autonomic nervous system (10 credits)

Semesters one and two:

  • Teaching Anatomy: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students (40 credits).
  • Embryology: From ovulation of the egg to fetal development of all body systems (10 credits)
  • Medical Imaging and Anatomy: explore anatomy using images produced by clinical tools such as X-ray, CT and MRI. (10 credits)

Summer period:

  • Dissertation Project: 10,000 word dissertation and oral presentation (60 credits)

Teaching is by lectures, seminars and tutorials. Courses are assessed by either, or a combination of, oral examinations, essays, multiple choice question exams, extended matching question exams, presentations and practical anatomy exams.

You have the option to finish after the second semester graduating with a Diploma in Human Anatomy, or to gain your masters by completing a summer dissertation project that can be either library-, practical- or laboratory-based.

More information on anatomy at the University can be found on our website:

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you gain a highly regarded qualification in anatomy and the teaching of anatomy. It will provide you with a set of major transferable skills such as dissecting experience, teaching experience, expertise in health and safety and anatomy law and ethics.

This programme can therefore open up possibilities in for example anatomy teaching, anatomy laboratories, further studies in medical and biomedical sciences, further research leading to a PhD, and many more increasing your long-term career prospects.



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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Northumbria’s GDL is taught using a practical, student-focused approach providing a solid grounding in the major areas of law. It covers the foundations of legal knowledge which are taught by means of lectures, group sessions and seminars. Read more

About this course

Northumbria’s GDL is taught using a practical, student-focused approach providing a solid grounding in the major areas of law. It covers the foundations of legal knowledge which are taught by means of lectures, group sessions and seminars. Students are provided with comprehensive study materials, textbooks and step-by-step workbooks to support their studies.

At the beginning of the programme students are required to study the English Legal System by means of a pre-attendance package and induction programme.

In addition, students must study the following seven subjects, which are stipulated by the professional bodies as being the foundations of legal knowledge:
- Contract Law
- Criminal Law
- Equity and Trusts
- European Union Law
- Property Law
- Public Law
- Law of Tort

All students are required to undertake research into a further area of law. Past options have included Company Law, Commercial Law, Employment Law, Family Law, Evidence and Legal History among others. Students receive initial guidance on the subject and advice on how to conduct legal research.

Successful GDL students who continue to study at Northumbria are guaranteed a place on the LPC and are entitled to a substantial discount off LPC or BPTC fees.

Please note that although an undergraduate qualification is required for access to the Graduate Law Degree (GDL), the programme is an undergraduate award and adheres to the University’s undergraduate regulations and procedures. Students who apply for the GDL are not eligible for the postgraduate scholarship scheme but on completion of this programme those who progress to the LPC or BPTC at Northumbria will qualify for the scholarship at that stage.

See the website https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/graduate-diploma-in-law-common-professional-examination-gdlcpe-ft-dtfcpe6/

Please note that students with exemptions who pass the outstanding subjects will pass the programme, but will not generally be awarded the Diploma.

Who would this Course suit?

This course would suit a student with a non-law undergraduate degree who would like to go on to study either the Legal Practice Course with a view to becoming a solicitor, or the Bar Professional Training Course with a view to becoming a barrister.

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Geared both to philosophy graduates, to consolidate and expand their philosophical grounding; and equally to conversion students, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques from across the philosophical spectrum, while also bringing them up to a high level in selected specialist areas. Read more
Geared both to philosophy graduates, to consolidate and expand their philosophical grounding; and equally to conversion students, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques from across the philosophical spectrum, while also bringing them up to a high level in selected specialist areas.

Key benefits

- Offers a wide selection of optional topics, both current and historical, covering the entire philosophical spectrum from aesthetics to logic and everything in between.

- Open both to Philosophy graduates and to those converting into Philosophy from other subjects at undergraduate level, with pathways appropriate to their different needs.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/philosophy-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students must earn a total of 180 credits. 60 of these will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 words, to be completed over the Summer at the end of the course. (A student who satisfactorily completes the course up to the point of the dissertation may exit the programme without completing one, and will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Philosophy on the basis of their 120 credits).

The initial 120 credits will be earned through optional modules. Most of these are confined to either the first or the second semester, and are worth 20 credits; General Philosophy is the exception, and spans both semesters, and is worth 40. Students who do not have an undergraduate background in philosophy are normally expected to take the 40 credit General Philosophy module. This module introduces basic philosophical methods, techniques and terminology, and acquaints you with some of the most important and influential writings on the subject.

- Course purpose -

This programme is suited both to students with an undergraduate philosophy degree and to those converting into philosophy from another subject at undergraduate level. For philosophy graduates, it will consolidate and augment their existing knowledge, and provide a firm foundation for subsequent independent research. For conversion students, there is a General Philosophy module which is designed specifically to introduce them to key texts, concepts and arguments from right across the philosophical spectrum: by means of this module, in conjunction with their own choices of optional subjects, such students will also be prepared for further research in philosophy.

- Course format and assessment -

Mostly taught through lectures and seminars; assessed through coursework and/or examinations plus a 12,000 word dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Usually to further research; also to teaching, management, the financial or the public sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Read more
The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Comprised of a broad curriculum that balances both academic and production experiences, the MA program constitutes a period of study and practice en route to professional work, teaching or further advanced degrees.The program includes a carefully planned combination of theory and practice; however, with attentive counseling, students determine a sub-specialization in history, criticism or some aspect of performance, technology, or design.

At Binghamton University, students practice theatre in excellent facilities and receive individual guidance in small classes and through close advising. Qualified MA degree candidates may have the opportunity to teach a section of an undergraduate course, undertake assistantships in technical theatre or departmental administration, mount productions in the studio theaters, or act, direct, design or write as part of the department's theatre and dance season.

Graduate Degrees Offered

MA in Theatre. Concentrations, though not required, are available in the following:
- Directing
- Performance
- Technical Production/Design
- Theory and Criticism

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended. Undergraduate major in theatre is not required; however, students lacking a suitable background in theatre studies are required to satisfactorily complete certain undergraduate courses beyond those required for the graduate degree.
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- If available, the following may be submitted to supply the Graduate Committee with supplementary information. All supplementary application materials must be e-mailed to .
----Writing sample (one paper from an upper-division undergraduate course of no more than 20 pages)
----Samples of theatrical work (a portfolio in electronic or DVD form) of tech/design and/or performance work

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form (PDF)
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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Please note due to the great demand for our programmes early applications are assessed when received and dealt with promptly. Therefore it is advisable to make early applications for an early response. Read more
Please note due to the great demand for our programmes early applications are assessed when received and dealt with promptly. Therefore it is advisable to make early applications for an early response. If you do not yet have your final degree results this will not hinder your application as we are happy to issue conditional offer letters in such circumstances.

This exciting new full-time programme has been designed to provide an opportunity for quantity surveying graduates to become educated in specialised areas of their profession that are not generally covered in great detail in their undergraduate degrees.It has been developed in response to considerable demand for an additional qualification and specialisation in the discipline. The primary emphasis of the programme is on developing the knowledge and skills of construction cost management of building services installations and civil engineering works.The programme is presented within the School of Real Estate and Construction Economics in the Faculty of the Built Environment in DIT. The total intake of students each year will be approx. 20-25 students. Because of the applied nature of the programme, it is expected that, initially at least, the students will come with undergraduate qualifications in quantity surveying, construction economics, construction economics & management, or equivalent.The content of the programme, delivered over 1½ years (3 Semesters) full-time includes subjects pertinent to the practice of quantity surveyors and construction economics professionals, but of a more specialised nature than those normally covered in their undergraduate degrees. The programme’s focus is strongly oriented towards the development of the underlying knowledge and the skills involved in construction cost management, especially of the building services and civil engineering work. This programme should be of particular interest to international students who want to study on a full-time basis in Ireland.

Career Opportunities

The programme aims to provide graduates with knowledge and skills in more specialised areas of quantity surveying/construction cost management, additional to those normally covered in undergraduate degrees.

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This course engages with issues at the very forefront of modern food production. You‘ll explore the origins of biotechnology, the legislation and social issues related to biotechnology in food, the immune system and role of antibodies. Read more

This course engages with issues at the very forefront of modern food production. You‘ll explore the origins of biotechnology, the legislation and social issues related to biotechnology in food, the immune system and role of antibodies.

You’ll have chance to challenge the myths associated with food allergies and the risks, causes and solutions. You’ll learn the science behind every ingredient that goes into a product.

The core sciences of chemistry and biochemistry underpin the course, alongside the processing of food. You’ll also study some elements of microbiology and nutrition. You’ll learn to apply fundamental scientific concepts to understand and manipulate the complex characteristics of foods and to integrate this scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology.

The course is strongly linked to our research groups, meaning you’ll be taught by staff who are actively engaged in world-class research and cutting-edge professional practice.

Course content

Through this programme you'll develop the ability to critically assess the complex factors that influence the range, quality and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.

You'll apply scientific knowledge from your bachelor degree and extend it to areas outside your first degree discipline. You'll gain a broad knowledge of food science with the necessary related understanding of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and biology. You'll also learn to integrate your scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology and will develop your own interests and skills through specialised options and projects, influenced by current research thinking in the field.

The programme provides an understanding of the methodology of research investigations by experimental project, and helps you develop the personal skills you'll need to communicate effectively in future professional activities.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Food Biotechnology 10 credits
  • Impacts of Food Processing on Nutritional Quality 10 credits
  • GMOs, Antibodies and PCR 10 credits
  • Food and the Allergic Reaction 10 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Professional Development for Employment and Research 20 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Science (Food Biotechnology) MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. We make extensive use of IT, and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time to enhance and extend the material you’ll learn formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by a range of methods, including formal examination, in-class tests, laboratory practical reports, example sheets, problem solving, project work and verbal presentations.

The pass mark for each module is 50%. All marks from all modules (passed and failed) are included in the final classification mark, which must be at least a 50% average to pass.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups. Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch. Read more

This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch.

You’ll develop in-depth specialist knowledge of scientific techniques and practical skills in the assessment and control of food quality, food safety, product design and new product development. In addition to industrial monitoring of quality, you will also study industry standard techniques and international standards in quality and safety management, as well as the impact of EU law and legislation on food products.

Course content

Throughout the programme you will develop an understanding of the underpinning scientific techniques in chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and biology relevant in applications of food science and the food industry.

You’ll examine different aspects of the product development process from product conception through to product launch. Through the process you’ll apply principles of project management, industrial experimental design, quality design techniques and sensory science in developing new food products and production processes that integrate consumer needs and expectations ,while at the same time conforming to food legislation, food quality and safety requirements.

The study of the principles of quality assurance, management and improvement and its application through design, measurement and monitoring will also be examined, covering aspects such as quality auditing, quality control and HACCP, predictive modelling and experimental design.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Food Analysis 10 credits
  • Food Product Development 80 credits
  • Sensory Science 20 credits
  • Food Quality Assurance and Control 10 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Quality and Innovation MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. Extensive use is made of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time, to enhance and extend the material taught formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by course work and written exams which take place at the end of the semester in which the module is taught.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups.

Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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With the advancement of food technology, food manufacture has allowed for enhanced food quality, improved food safety and increasingly competitive options for consumers. Read more

With the advancement of food technology, food manufacture has allowed for enhanced food quality, improved food safety and increasingly competitive options for consumers. Developments in food production have also given way to consideration of the impact on food safety.

This Masters will provide you with a broad knowledge of food science focusing on chemistry and biochemistry, whilst giving you the necessary background understanding of physics, mathematics, and biology to excel in this field. You’ll develop the ability to apply fundamental scientific concepts to understand and manipulate the complex characteristics of foods. The programme will also allow you to challenge current issues in food production and issues arising from food safety.

Course content

Throughout the programme you’ll analyse and critically appraise complex factors, including sociological and ethical issues that influence the range, quality and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.

Through a combination of practical laboratory classes and lectures underpinning scientific theory and knowledge, you’ll gain the ability to integrate scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology.

In the final months of your programme you’ll have the opportunity to focus your studies in areas of particular interest to you through your research project, which will be influenced by current research thinking in the field. The research project will also help you develop the personal skills you'll need to communicate effectively in future professional activities such as presentations.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Physical Aspects of Food 10 credits
  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Colloid and Dairy Science 10 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Food Analysis 10 credits
  • Professional Development for Employment and Research 20 credits
  • Food Quality Assurance and Control 10 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Science MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. Extensive use is made of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time, to enhance and extend the material taught formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by course work and written exams which take place at the end of the semester in which the module is taught.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups. Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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In recent years, there has been a growing world-wide concern about environmental water management issues, including concerns about coastal and estuarine water pollution, river flooding and urban drainage, wetland and mangrove management, and ecological aspects of lakes and reservoirs, to mention but a few. Read more
In recent years, there has been a growing world-wide concern about environmental water management issues, including concerns about coastal and estuarine water pollution, river flooding and urban drainage, wetland and mangrove management, and ecological aspects of lakes and reservoirs, to mention but a few. In addressing these and other environmental challenges, engineers and environmental managers are using sophisticated numerical models for predicting complex hydrodynamic, water quality and sediment transport processes. These models are increasingly complemented with decision support software systems and a wide range of related hydroinformatics software tools.

The MSc in Civil and Water Engineering will offer you the knowledge and expertise that you need for a career as a consulting water engineer within this specialist professional area of civil engineering. The course aims to complement a relevant undergraduate degree by introducing you to hydroinformatics, computational hydraulics and environmental hydraulics, including water quality indicators and sediment transport processes in coastal, estuarine and inland waters.

The MSc is aimed at graduates in Civil Engineering, Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences and Bio-Sciences. Good mathematical skills are an advantage. The degree programme is also aimed at engineers/scientists working in relevant areas wishing to upgrade or refresh their qualifications.

Distinctive features

• The School of Engineering received the highest rating in the UK for its research and its research impact in the Government’s latest Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014).

• The course lecturers have considerable experience of working on a wide range of practical environmental hydraulics project and their models have been mounted by over 35 companies for over 80 world-wide EIA projects and by over 45 universities in 17 countries.

• The MSc in Civil and Water Engineering is accredited by the ICE, IStructE, IHT and IHIE, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer under the provisions of UK-SPEC for intakes 2014-2018 inclusive, for candidates that have already acquired a CEng accredited BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree or an IEng accredited BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Structure

The MSc in Civil and Water Engineering is run by the School of Engineering and is designed to provide specialised, postgraduate training in environmental water engineering whilst having a measure of flexibility to permit some study of related subjects in Civil and Geoenvironmental Engineering.

The aim of the programme is to enhance your engineering skills and the completion of an extended project within one of the water engineering fields forms a major part of the programme. Thus, the MSc in Civil and Water Engineering aims to complement an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering, or similar, by introducing you to hydroinformatics, computational hydraulics and environmental hydraulics, including water quality indicator and sediment transport processes in coastal, estuarine and inland waters. You will have the opportunity to work with some of these models in an extended project. The degree programme is available on a one-year full-time basis or on a three-year part-time basis.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/civil-and-water-engineering-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/civil-and-water-engineering-msc-part-time

Teaching

A wide range of teaching styles will be used to deliver the diverse material forming the curriculum of the programme. You will attend lectures and participate in examples classes. You must complete 120 credits in Stage 1 in order to progress to the dissertation, for which you will be allocated a supervisor from among the teaching staff. Dissertation topics are normally chosen from a range of project titles proposed by academic staff, usually in areas of current research interest, although you will be encouraged to put forward your own project ideas.

Assessment

Assessment is conducted via coursework and examinations.

You will be required to undertake an individual research project in a specialist area of Water Engineering, leading to the preparation of a dissertation. Project work is undertaken under the direct supervision of a member of staff in one of the three participating departments.

Career prospects

The record of employment of graduates of the Cardiff University MSc in Civil and Water Engineering is excellent, with the majority of graduates joining engineering consultancies. A small number of graduates each year go on to further study, typically a PhD.

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