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Our Graduate Diploma in Economics and its new pathway, the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics, fill a critical gap in the market for postgraduate training in economics. Read more
Our Graduate Diploma in Economics and its new pathway, the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics, fill a critical gap in the market for postgraduate training in economics. If you have an undergraduate degree in another subject area - however distant from economics - but wish to switch to economics, the Graduate Diploma in Economics and the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics are specifically designed to allow you to do just that, without spending 3 or 4 years studying for a second undergraduate degree. They provide rigorous and intensive training, spread over 1 or 2 years, after which you will be able to compete on equal terms with students graduating with undergraduate degrees in economics.

Many of our students require a level of economic knowledge in their jobs that is usually acquired at an undergraduate level; many of them work for City institutions, the Bank of England, government departments and economic regulators. This Graduate Diploma provides them with a sound knowledge of the core analytical tools of economics, coupled with some training in econometrics - the statistical side of the discipline.

The Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics is designed for students who wish to go on to Master's-level study, with the ultimate ambition of becoming a professional economist, whether in the private or public sector, or an academic economist (which requires further study to PhD level). Many students go on to MSc and MPhil/PhD programmes at Birkbeck and other top UK universities.

Uniquely, this programme provides training specifically designed for such students. All modules on the programme are designed carefully around targeted, accelerated learning, in contrast to conversion courses in other universities that simply offer modules that are already part of other undergraduate programmes.

This programme is also available for distance-learners, as a purely online course. For both face-to-face and online students, all lectures are made available on video, and all course materials are also available online.

You will not need any prior training in the subject. The programme will give you a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas and methods of modern economics, and you will learn to apply economic reasoning to practical problems. Crucially, you will also develop the necessary mathematical and statistical tool-kit for studying economics. A background in a mathematical discipline is an advantage, but not essential; pre-sessional courses beginning in September provide an accelerated revision of core mathematics skills, starting at roughly GCSE level, but progressing very rapidly to more advanced techniques.

All students will be admitted to the Graduate Diploma in Economics in the first instance, but you will be offered the opportunity to transfer to the Graduate Diploma in Quantitative Economics. This includes an additional module that introduces you to more technical material and bridges the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate study in economics.

The 1-year programme is taught exclusively in the evenings and is, thus, open to students in full-time employment, but the programme proceeds at an intense pace and the workload is very heavy, so this option is usually only pursued by students with a strongly quantitative background. The more common route is to take the programme over 2 years, with the first year focused primarily on quantitative training. All students have the option of being considered for the intensive 1-year route, though, based on their performance in the mid-term tests in week 6 of the first term of the programme.

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The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. Read more
The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. It will provide an excellent foundation for undertaking postgraduate research at doctoral level, but will also benefit the professional development of musicians intending to pursue careers in teaching, arts administration, broadcasting, and other domains.

Students on the Taught MA programme join a vibrant international postgraduate community and study with scholars, composers, and performers who have achieved international recognition in their fields. The Music Department has been ranked in the top three music departments nationally in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and the Complete University Guide 2016.

The MA Music programme will normally facilitate study of the following areas of specialism:
-Musicology
-Ethnomusicology
-Composition (acoustic and electro-acoustic)
-Performance

In addition, other options typically available have included:
-British Music
-Indian Music
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-World Music Analysis
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis
-Choral conducting (with special focus on Anglican church music)

Programme structure

Students will choose modules from sections A, B, C, and D below:

A. Major project, weighted at 60 credits (a dissertation, a public recital, or a portfolio of compositions/orchestrations and arrangements – depending on your chosen area of specialism)

B. A 30-credit module linked to your chosen area of specialism

C. Two compulsory core 30-credit modules embedding research training and engaging with major intellectual issues attendant on all subject areas

D. An additional 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B, subject to approval of the Board of Studies in Music.

Example: MA with specialism in Musicology

A. A 12,000-word dissertation on a musicological topic weighted at 60 credits

B. 30-credit module ‘Contemporary Musicology’

C. Compulsory core 30-credit modules, ‘Core Research Seminars’ and ‘Research Methods and Resources’

D. 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Core Research Seminars

And The following specialism-specific modules will be offered every year:
-Contemporary Musicology
-Ethnomusicology in Practice and Theory
-Compositional Techniques
-Music Performance

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:
-British Music
-Music Analysis
-Practice and Theory of Choral Conducting
-Advanced Organ Studies
-Electronic Music
-Orchestration and Arranging
-Indian Music
-World Music Analysis
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of seminars, practical sessions and one to one supervision. Seminars provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues, and to present their own original work, informed by the knowledge that they have gained through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical sessions in areas such as studio or field recording techniques help to prepare students for their own independent work.

All students must undertake an independent project (dissertation,composition portfolio, or performance), which is developed with the help of one-to-one expert supervision. Finally, optional modules can be drawn from the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes of Music or of other departments –these free-choice modules may involve other forms of staff-student contact, depending on the subject area. The Department actively promotes interdisciplinary approaches to the study of music and students are encouraged to engage with other disciplines in the humanities and sciences.

The contact hours experienced by each individual student will vary considerably, given a high degree of flexibility in the programme. Students will typically attend between 2 and 4 hours of seminars per week in term time, as well as additional practical sessions as appropriate. Individual supervision of dissertations, performance projects and composition portfolios amounts to an average of 6 hours spread over over the second and third terms.

Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to attend research seminars, both student-led and those involving staff or guest academic speakers (typically 1-2 hrs each week). They must also undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and assessments, to broaden their subject knowledge and to prepare their dissertations or portfolios. Students are encouraged, as an integral part of their studies, to take advantage of other opportunities including participating in performance opportunities (including staff-led ensembles) and attending research and composition seminars, some of which are organised in conjunction with university research institutes.

There is a busy programme of musical performance, both within and outside the music department, which complements students’ academic programme by providing opportunities both to listen to and to perform a wide variety of music. The many musical ensembles to which students can contribute includes both independent societies (including orchestras, choirs, opera and musical theatre as well as a Javanese gamelan) and department-run ensembles such as the New Music Ensemble and Korean percussion group.

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In this program you will. - Learn anatomy through dissection. - Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching. - Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging. Read more

Programme description

In this program you will:
- Learn anatomy through dissection
- Gain knowledge and experience of anatomical teaching
- Take additional modules on neuroanatomy, embryology, anatomy law and ethics and medical imaging.
- Contribute to world leading anatomical and/or biomedical research

Our programme aims to improve your theoretical and practical knowledge of human anatomy through an intensive on-campus dissection course, as well as the development and learning of theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This programme has two main strands. One is the in-depth study of the anatomy of the human body. Anatomical knowledge will be learned to a level to teach undergraduate and postgraduate students and professions allied to medicine. This strand will involve the dissection of a body in groups of three to five students over two semesters. This part of the course is largely self-directed, with regular “surgeries” when teaching staff are present to answer questions and help students with the dissections.

The other is anatomy pedagogy, covering the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Next to theoretical lectures and workshops the first semester will focus on observing the teaching of anatomy to medical undergraduate students. The second semester will focus on being involved in preparing and carrying out teaching sessions to both small and large groups of students. The learned theoretical material, the observations and practical experiences will be compiled in an end-of year teaching portfolio. The experience that you will gain can be used towards an application as associate fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Complementing these strands will be a lecture-based embryology course providing you with an understanding of normal human development and how normal development can go wrong, manifested in commonly observed congenital abnormalities. You will also study neuroanatomy, the health and safety of embalming procedures and handling bodies, the legal and historical aspects of anatomy in Scotland and the UK, an introduction to the ethics of using bodies in medical education and explore clinical techniques used to image the body.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of six courses plus a summer dissertation project. The courses "Teaching Anatomy" and "Basic Human Anatomy 1 & 2" make up the majority of the degree with 40 credits each. The other courses are 10 credit courses that are spread out over two semesters as follows (10 credits equal 100 hours of work):

Semester one:

- Basic Human Anatomy 1: Gross anatomy of the Limbs and Thorax (20 credits)
- Anatomy Law and Ethics: Divided into 3 parts: Health & Safety of anatomy and body handling, the legislation that governs the activities of anatomy departments both in Scotland and throughout the UK, and the ethics of using human material for the teaching of anatomy (10 credits)

Semester two:

- Basic Human Anatomy 2: Gross anatomy of the Abdomen, Pelvis, Head & Neck (20 credits)
- Neuroanatomy: Gross Anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory and motor pathways, cranial nerves, spinal cord, spinal nerves and autonomic nervous system (10 credits)

Semesters one and two:

- Teaching Anatomy: Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students (40 credits).
- Embryology: From ovulation of the egg to fetal development of all body systems (10 credits)
- Medical Imaging and Anatomy: explore anatomy using images produced by clinical tools such as X-ray, CT and MRI. (10 credits)

Summer period:

- Dissertation Project: 10,000 word dissertation and oral presentation (60 credits)

Teaching is by lectures, seminars and tutorials. Courses are assessed by either, or a combination of, oral examinations, essays, multiple choice question exams, extended matching question exams, presentations and practical anatomy exams.

You have the option to finish after the second semester graduating with a Diploma in Human Anatomy, or to gain your masters by completing a summer dissertation project that can be either library-, practical- or laboratory-based.

More information on anatomy at the University can be found on our website: http://www.ed.ac.uk/biomedical-sciences/anatomy

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you gain a highly regarded qualification in anatomy and the teaching of anatomy. It will provide you with a set of major transferable skills such as dissecting experience, teaching experience, expertise in health and safety and anatomy law and ethics.

This programme can therefore open up possibilities in for example anatomy teaching, anatomy laboratories, further studies in medical and biomedical sciences, further research leading to a PhD, and many more increasing your long-term career prospects.

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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Northumbria’s GDL is taught using a practical, student-focused approach providing a solid grounding in the major areas of law. It covers the foundations of legal knowledge which are taught by means of lectures, group sessions and seminars. Read more

About this course

Northumbria’s GDL is taught using a practical, student-focused approach providing a solid grounding in the major areas of law. It covers the foundations of legal knowledge which are taught by means of lectures, group sessions and seminars. Students are provided with comprehensive study materials, textbooks and step-by-step workbooks to support their studies.

At the beginning of the programme students are required to study the English Legal System by means of a pre-attendance package and induction programme.

In addition, students must study the following seven subjects, which are stipulated by the professional bodies as being the foundations of legal knowledge:
- Contract Law
- Criminal Law
- Equity and Trusts
- European Union Law
- Property Law
- Public Law
- Law of Tort

All students are required to undertake research into a further area of law. Past options have included Company Law, Commercial Law, Employment Law, Family Law, Evidence and Legal History among others. Students receive initial guidance on the subject and advice on how to conduct legal research.

Successful GDL students who continue to study at Northumbria are guaranteed a place on the LPC and are entitled to a substantial discount off LPC or BPTC fees.

Please note that although an undergraduate qualification is required for access to the Graduate Law Degree (GDL), the programme is an undergraduate award and adheres to the University’s undergraduate regulations and procedures. Students who apply for the GDL are not eligible for the postgraduate scholarship scheme but on completion of this programme those who progress to the LPC or BPTC at Northumbria will qualify for the scholarship at that stage.

See the website https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/graduate-diploma-in-law-common-professional-examination-gdlcpe-ft-dtfcpe6/

Please note that students with exemptions who pass the outstanding subjects will pass the programme, but will not generally be awarded the Diploma.

Who would this Course suit?

This course would suit a student with a non-law undergraduate degree who would like to go on to study either the Legal Practice Course with a view to becoming a solicitor, or the Bar Professional Training Course with a view to becoming a barrister.

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Geared both to philosophy graduates, to consolidate and expand their philosophical grounding; and equally to conversion students, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques from across the philosophical spectrum, while also bringing them up to a high level in selected specialist areas. Read more
Geared both to philosophy graduates, to consolidate and expand their philosophical grounding; and equally to conversion students, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques from across the philosophical spectrum, while also bringing them up to a high level in selected specialist areas.

Key benefits

- Offers a wide selection of optional topics, both current and historical, covering the entire philosophical spectrum from aesthetics to logic and everything in between.

- Open both to Philosophy graduates and to those converting into Philosophy from other subjects at undergraduate level, with pathways appropriate to their different needs.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/philosophy-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students must earn a total of 180 credits. 60 of these will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 words, to be completed over the Summer at the end of the course. (A student who satisfactorily completes the course up to the point of the dissertation may exit the programme without completing one, and will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Philosophy on the basis of their 120 credits).

The initial 120 credits will be earned through optional modules. Most of these are confined to either the first or the second semester, and are worth 20 credits; General Philosophy is the exception, and spans both semesters, and is worth 40. Students who do not have an undergraduate background in philosophy are normally expected to take the 40 credit General Philosophy module. This module introduces basic philosophical methods, techniques and terminology, and acquaints you with some of the most important and influential writings on the subject.

- Course purpose -

This programme is suited both to students with an undergraduate philosophy degree and to those converting into philosophy from another subject at undergraduate level. For philosophy graduates, it will consolidate and augment their existing knowledge, and provide a firm foundation for subsequent independent research. For conversion students, there is a General Philosophy module which is designed specifically to introduce them to key texts, concepts and arguments from right across the philosophical spectrum: by means of this module, in conjunction with their own choices of optional subjects, such students will also be prepared for further research in philosophy.

- Course format and assessment -

Mostly taught through lectures and seminars; assessed through coursework and/or examinations plus a 12,000 word dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Usually to further research; also to teaching, management, the financial or the public sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Read more
The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Comprised of a broad curriculum that balances both academic and production experiences, the MA program constitutes a period of study and practice en route to professional work, teaching or further advanced degrees.The program includes a carefully planned combination of theory and practice; however, with attentive counseling, students determine a sub-specialization in history, criticism or some aspect of performance, technology, or design.

At Binghamton University, students practice theatre in excellent facilities and receive individual guidance in small classes and through close advising. Qualified MA degree candidates may have the opportunity to teach a section of an undergraduate course, undertake assistantships in technical theatre or departmental administration, mount productions in the studio theaters, or act, direct, design or write as part of the department's theatre and dance season.

Graduate Degrees Offered

MA in Theatre. Concentrations, though not required, are available in the following:
- Directing
- Performance
- Technical Production/Design
- Theory and Criticism

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended. Undergraduate major in theatre is not required; however, students lacking a suitable background in theatre studies are required to satisfactorily complete certain undergraduate courses beyond those required for the graduate degree.
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- If available, the following may be submitted to supply the Graduate Committee with supplementary information. All supplementary application materials must be e-mailed to .
----Writing sample (one paper from an upper-division undergraduate course of no more than 20 pages)
----Samples of theatrical work (a portfolio in electronic or DVD form) of tech/design and/or performance work

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form (PDF)
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by. Read more
An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by:

--offering students an anticipated edge in the professional job market;

--enhancing applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset;

--providing necessary postgraduate experience for students who intend to continue their study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;

--providing a year of literary study for those who wish to take a career break.

Intended to meet the needs of students who have a passion for English literature and wish to extend their undergraduate study by engaging in further fast-track study leading to a Master’s qualification, our MA is designed as a one-year full-time programme. (In some years a part-time route may be available-please check our website for details).

The MA timetable has been designed to enable concentration of seminars within two days (Monday and Tuesday) to offer flexibility with students’ other commitments.

Our MA offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. Students, therefore, enrol on one of three pathways.

MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
The MA in English Literature pathway enables students to select from a range of modules and work in a variety of areas either not covered in their undergraduate choices, or which they desire more deeply to examine. Contributing tutors are acknowledged experts in their specialisms.

MA IN ENGLISH: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The MA in English: Children's Literature focuses on key areas within children’s literature and draws on the department’s long-established reputation in this field. Our 1981 introduction of an undergraduate module in Children’s Literature made us one of the earliest English departments, nationally or internationally, to offer modules in this rapidly expanding and popular field of study.

MA IN ENGLISH: LITERATURES VICTORIAN AND MODERN
The MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern attends to specific genres, types, and sub-periods of literature within the consistently popular Victorian and Modern periods. It differs from period-based MAs in other institutions by offering modules in specific literary types rather than generalist or panoramic treatments of period.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
All MA students complete “Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research” 1 and 2, four option modules, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation. Taught modules run for one term each. The dissertation is completed during Term 3 and the summer.

MANDATORY ELEMENTS:

MLS4ISM1: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 1

MLS4ISM2: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 2

MLS4DIS: Dissertation

OPTION MODULES:

MLS4CMCL: Classics of Modern Children’s Literature *#

MLS4NCCL: Nineteenth-century Children’s Literature *#

MLS4VCF: Victorian Crime Fiction #

MLS4LFS: Literature of the Fin de Siècle #

MLS4LWTC: Literature and War in the Twentieth Century #

MLS4LYAF: Young Adult Fiction *#

PATHWAY REQUIREMENTS
Students taking the MA in English Literature pathway can choose any four options and may write their dissertation on an approved topic in any area of English literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Children's Literature pathway must take at least two of the modules marked * over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in children’s literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern pathway must take at least two of the modules marked # over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in Victorian and/or Modern literatures.

Please see our website for further details. The Programme Convenor welcomes enquiries about any aspect of the programme.

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This certificate provides an access route to the Department of Planning's RTPI and RICS-accredited MSc in Spatial Planning for students who do not have the usual educational qualifications necessary for entry onto the course. Read more
This certificate provides an access route to the Department of Planning's RTPI and RICS-accredited MSc in Spatial Planning for students who do not have the usual educational qualifications necessary for entry onto the course.

It is a one-year part-time (one day per week) undergraduate-level course.

The overall aims and objectives of the course are to provide you with a general, yet critical, understanding of the planning process and some of the key issues and themes in contemporary spatial planning.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/certificate-in-spatial-planning-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes' Department of Planning performs a leading role in research and consultancy, with clients and projects covering subjects from local concerns to multinational organisations, government and industry.

- Our research feeds directly into the teaching of the Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies and the department's students have the opportunity to learn directly from the most current areas of practice.

- The Certificate in Spatial Planning studies is a part- time course and Oxford, with its excellent transport links to all regions of the UK, is a particularly convenient place to study for part-time students on day release from work.

Professional accreditation

The Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies provides an entry qualification for the MSc in Spatial Planning which is accredited by both the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This means that following graduation from the MSc in Spatial Planning and the RTPI and RICS Assessment of Profession Competence requirements, graduates can become full members of both professional bodies.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, and practical and project work.

Oxford Brookes' undergraduate courses are broken down into equal-sized units of study called modules, self-contained in teaching, learning and assessment.

The course is made up of four single-credit modules. Each requires about 150 hours of study over the 15 weeks - including around 36 hours of staff contact time. Formal teaching takes place over the first 12 weeks, with the last weeks available for examinations if these are part of the module assessment.

Approach to assessment

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations and practical exercises.

Past Performance

The Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies has been running since September 2005 and the vast majority of graduates have gone on to successfully complete the MSc in Spatial Planning. Their performance on the MSc has been at least as good as that of students who have come through a more traditional route to a masters-level course. Indeed many graduates of the Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies have gone on to be awarded a Distinction in the MSc in Spatial Planning.

Attendance pattern

You will two two modules per semester, each of which is taught on the same day so you need to be at Oxford Brookes one day per week. Currently teaching takes place on Thursdays.

How this course helps you develop

The Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies, as a stand alone qualification, can help to improve internal progression and promotion prospects within organisations.

Careers

The Certificate in Spatial Planning Studies provides an entry qualification for the MSc in Spatial Planning which is accredited by both the Royal Town Planning Institute and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. This dual accreditation makes MSc in Spatial Planning graduates attractive to both the public and private sectors of planning and related built environment employers.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

With more than 600 students engaging a wide range of research topics in our undergraduate, postgraduate and research degree programmes, including Masters by research, the department is widely recognised as a leading educator in environment, design and development subjects. With a complement of over 60 teaching, administrative, technical and research staff, the department performs a leading role in research and consultancy, with clients and projects covering subjects from local concerns to multi-national organisations, government and industry.

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This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students with no background in Philosophy to do advanced work in the subject and to obtain an Honours-level qualification in it. Read more
This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students with no background in Philosophy to do advanced work in the subject and to obtain an Honours-level qualification in it. The course is open to those who already have an upper second first degree, and it may be taken on either a full-time basis (9 months) or a part-time basis (18 months). The first part of the programme aims to provide students with a knowledge of important topics in Philosophy and also an opportunity to develop essential skills to engage critically with those topics. In this part of the programme, students take four to five undergraduate modules. The second part of the programme aims to give students experience in applying research skills to a well-defined problem under the guidance of an expert in the area. To achieve this aim, students will prepare a written project based on independent research that is supervised by a member of staff.

Taught modules

Students take 80 credits of undergraduate modules during the course (four to five taught modules). Of these, 20 credits must be chosen from the following undergraduate first year, first term modules: Reason and Argument A (20 credits); Reason and Argument B (10 credits); Introduction to Ancient Philosophy B (10 credits). The remaining 60 credits must be chosen from our 20 credit year three undergraduate modules.

Students may choose their modules from a list of no fewer than three modules per term. This list will be published in advance of the beginning of the programme of study. The modules available for the year 2016/17 can be accessed below:

The Postgraduate Research Skills Seminar

The Postgraduate Research Skills Seminar is taught over two terms and is designed to provide students with a grounding in the skills necessary to contribute to contemporary philosophical debates. Th